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Area Studies Collections

INTRODUCTION

USING AREA STUDIES COLLECTIONS

CASE STUDIES: AMERICAN JEWISH WOMEN AND LATINAS
American Jewish Women
Latinas
Using the Collections
Selected Collections
Audiotapes

Manuscripts

Film Materials

Copyright

Newspapers

Journals and Newsletters

arrow graphicMaps

Photographs

Folk Songs and Folklife

Cookbooks

Genealogical Research

CONCLUSION

AREA STUDIES EXTERNAL SITES

VISIT/CONTACT

Maps

A Latina presence can be found in many places where perhaps it might not be expected. Researchers with imagination and ingenuity are sometimes rewarded by finding Latinas on historical maps. An excellent guide to these maps is The Luso-Hispanic World in Maps: A Selective Guide to the Manuscript Maps to 1900 in the Collections of the Library of Congress, edited by John R. Hébert and Anthony P. Mullan (Washington: Library of Congress, 1999; Z6027.S72 L43 1999 GenColl; also available online). For example, in 1795-96, when Vicente Sebastián Pintado fashioned his official map of Spanish New Orleans and vicinity, a map in continuous use until at least 1873, he designated who owned property within the city limits and Bayou Saint John. On this map (Map of New Orleans and Vicinity, by Pintado and Carlos Trudeau, Havana, 1819 [1804]; G4014.N5 G46 1819 .P Vault G&M), Pintado noted a sizeable parcel belonging to “La Negra Rachon,” perhaps an Afro-Latina of means.

Sanborn Fire Insurance maps supply a wealth of historical detail about the locations of important structures within numerous U.S. towns and cities. If you look at the maps produced for New Mexico, you will discover that in 1886 the Sisters of Loredo in Santa Fe had a wooden convent and academy. By 1898 the convent had become known as the Loretto Convent and Academy and included a girls' dormitory. At the same time, Saint Vincent's Academy also had a girls' school dormitory. In Albuquerque, you can locate a Spanish Seventh Day Adventist Church made of concrete in 1950, as well as one wooden structure housing the Catholic Teachers College, and another used by the Saint Therese Roman Catholic Church and Sisters' Home. (See Land Use Maps in the Geography and Map section for further discussion of the Sanborn maps.)

The Geography and Map Division (see Geography & Maps) also houses more general maps, such as the United States Bureau of the Census map Spanish Origin Persons as a Percent of Total Population by Counties of the United States, 1970 (G3701.E1 1970 .U55) and American Geographic approved mapa del mexicano americano (G4051.S1 1976 .A5).


SAMPLE LCSH: Mexican Americans—West (U.S.)—Maps; West (U.S.)—History—Maps.

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