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Recorded Sound Section--Motion Picture, Broadcasting and Recorded Sound Division

INTRODUCTION

USING THE COLLECTIONS

SELECTED COLLECTIONS
Radio
Music Recordings
arrow graphicEarly Recording Stars
Miscellaneous Music Collections
Opera and Classical Music
Library of Congress Concerts
Drama and Literature Recordings
The Spoken Word

CONCLUSION

RECORDED SOUND EXTERNAL SITES

VISIT/CONTACT

Early Recording Stars
see caption below

Nora Bayes as Juliet. 1920. Prints and Photographs Division. LC-USZ62-126190 (b&w film copy neg.).

bibliographic record

The first woman to achieve widespread acclaim as a professional recording star was Ada Jones (1873-1922) [audio], who was called “the first lady of the phonograph.” With her clear, strong voice and excellent diction, Jones was one of the first women to successfully record on commercial cylinders and discs. Her repertoire included dialect sketches, conversational duets, and comic songs. She and two other great vaudeville and musical comedy performers, Blanche Ring (1871-1961) and Nora Bayes (1880-1928), though now generally forgotten, can be heard on these early commercial sound recordings.

Trumpet virtuoso Edna White (1892-1992) [picture], one of the few female instrumentalists in the early days of recording, is featured in a fascinating audio interview (RYA 0001) about her recording career with Thomas Edison. Eva Taylor (1896-1977), billed as “queen of the blues,” was another early Edison artist whose recordings are in the collection.

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