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Interview with Marion Hodgson [Undated]

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

My name is Hap Chandler, and I have the privilege to interview Marion Stegeman Hodgson. Marion, why don't you introduce yourself and tell us a little bit about ...

Marion Hodgson:

Well, I'm a native of Georgia, and I went to the University of Georgia, and my senior year was 1941, the year of Pearl Harbor. I think Roosevelt knew we were going to get in the war because he was trying to build up a big force of civilian pilots. And he introduced the civilian pilot training program. and University of Georgia had that to train pilots, and I was lucky enough to be one of the women selected at the only time they offered it to women, one woman for every ten men, five of us were selected to learn to fly on the CPT course. Five out of twenty who applied I believe it was. And, of course, we didn't know Pearl Harbor was going to happen, but we got our private licenses at the end of that course and got five hours college credit to boot. And then December 7th, along came Pearl Harbor, and by 1943, Uncle Sam was really desperate for pilots, and so desperate that they were scraping the bottom of the barrel and decided to use women for stateside duty and release the men to go overseas. So I was one of the ones that was selected by Jacquelyn Cochran to take training, air force training. I think about 2000 of us, I use rough numbers, I don't know the exact numbers, but about 2000 of us entered training for the WASPs, and it was a six-month program when I went through. And later it was increased to seven months.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

Where did you take your training?

Marion Hodgson:

At Sweetwater, Texas, out where the rattlesnake rattles and the buzzard builds its nests.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

It was kind of warm ...

Marion Hodgson:

It got pretty warm in the summertime, triple digits most of the time.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

What sort of uniforms did they ...

Marion Hodgson:

Had no uniform at all except what we call zoot suits when I first went to Sweetwater. Those were mechanics coveralls made for men, and they came in two sizes, 42 and 44, so we had to cinch the belt around us several times and roll up the pant legs. I didn't have to because I'm so tall but it was way too big. But the girls that had to roll up the pant legs and the sleeves had a hard time looking military because the crotch of the uniform was down around their knees. We were not a very spiffy looking group. We were issued two of those, and we got in the shower with a scrubbing brush and bar of soap and washed down one suit while the other one was dry enough to put on, and we would swap them back and forth that way. That's what we lived in for six months.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

No uniform?

Marion Hodgson:

No uniform at all. .. We went down to the dry goods store in Sweetwater and bought tan slacks and white shirts and tan overseas caps for our Sunday uniform, and that was as military as we could look. And of course shoes were rationed. You only got two pair of shoes a year, and you had to tear out a coupon out of your ration book to get that. And so our shoes were any size, color, or shape that we could get for one of our coupons, and they didn't last very long, and we marched in them, so we had to get them half-soled and make do with two pairs a year, which is not easy when you're drilling.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

Did you receive your wings in Sweetwater after six months?

Marion Hodgson:

Six months in my case.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

You were sent then where?

Marion Hodgson:

I was sent to the Ferry Command, the 51h Ferrying Group at Love Field in Dallas, Air Transport Command. And it was heaven after Sweetwater.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

What duties did you have?

Marion Hodgson:

In the Ferry Command, we would go to the factories and pick up new airplanes usually and ferry them to bases all around the country and lots of them were ferried to Fort Dix, New Jersey, or other points of embarkation where the planes were taken apart and put on ships and sent overseas and then put back together when they got overseas. But sometimes we ferried old airplanes from base to base, or just wherever we were needed. Of course the WASP did a lot more than just ferry planes, that just happened to be my job.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

You were in an organization referred to as the WASP, and the WASP means what?

Marion Hodgson:

Women Airforce Service Pilots.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

And of the 2000 of them who applied, how many completed training?

Marion Hodgson:

Well more than that applied, actually 25,000 people applied, but that's sort ofa misstatement because you had to be, had to have a private license, private pilot's license. By the time I came along, it had to be a lot more than that. In the beginning you had to have hundreds of hours to qualify for training, but by the time March 1943 came along, they reduced it down to a private pilot's license, and there were not 25,000 licensed pilots, women pilots, there were only about 3000, roughly 3000, a few more than that, women pilots. So 25,000 people applied but that didn't mean they were qualified to apply. But anyway, 2000 were accepted for training, and of that number, a little more than 1000 of us made it through, got our wings.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

Highly selective process?

Marion Hodgson:

Yeah, it was.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

Of those, __ that rate was about fifty percent.

Marion Hodgson:

Not quite that high, more than one third washed out.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

Of course, in World WarII, that was the Air Corps' way of winnowing women's pilot training. I recall how disappointed some of my classmates were who were in navigation school and they washed out very quickly into the program.

Marion Hodgson:

Yeah, it was heartbreaking, you felt like your whole life was ruined.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

.... So you're in Love Field in Dallas.

Marion Hodgson:

I actually spent a lot of time in Wichita, Kansas on what they called detached orders, which means I would report back there after I delivered a plane instead of reporting back to Love Field because there were three aircraft factories it! Love Field. There was the Beechcraft Factory, Boeing factory, and the Cessna factory.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

You would pick up the aircraft off the assembly line and take them to the nearest field?

Marion Hodgson:

Right. The first twenty minutes or so of your flight was considered a check, I mean a test flight. Actually they had been test flown by the factory 'mt when we would pick them up, we would fly them the fITSt twenty or thirty minutes of our route was considered a test flight and if something didn't seem right or didn't sound right, we would turn around and take it back. But I never had to do that except in one case when an AT -6 caught on fire with me, but I was still on the ground at the North American factory in Dallas. And I couldn't put it out, we were told to jam the throttle forward and it would blow the flames out, but when I jammed the throttle forward, the flames just got higher, and by the time they were coming over to the cockpit, I was out of there. But two mechanics with fire extinguishers were standing nearby, and one of them hopped in the cockpit and between the two of them, with the fire extinguisher, they got the fire out. But I always felt like a coward getting out of the cockpit, but I felt that thing was about to blow.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

Better a live coward than a dead hero.

Marion Hodgson:

Thank goodness they're still alive too, or were when I saw them. COUNTER 085

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

Well, through most of '43 and then 1944 came along, I knew that you had an interest in a Marine pilot who was in the hospital, would you like to tell us a little bit about that?

Marion Hodgson:

Well he was a boy from my hometown, Athens, GA. Our families knew each other, and we knew each other, but he was eight years older, so there had never been any romance or anything. But I admired him, always had, he was a wonderful person. So when he crashed and burned and was not expected to live, I wrote to him everyday to keep his spirits up. And we wrote back and forth, he was in the hospital a year and a half and we wrote back and forth, and my-letters took him all the way through my training and my Ferry Command experience, and we sort offell in love through our letters. And course meanwhile I had managed to make a few illegal landings in Norfolk, Virginia, because he was in the, I mean in Richmond, VA, at the army airfield there, which was closed to Ferry traffic, but I'd take a chance and land there anyway and get on a ferry boat and go over to Norfolk where he was in the navy hospital. And we had our dates that way, illegally, so we just really had a very few dates before we decided to get married You moved fast in World War II, cause you didn't know if you were going to be alive the next month or not.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

That's right. He was a major at the time of the crash.

Marion Hodgson:

Right, he was later promoted to lieutenant colonel. But he was perfecting a night landing technique that he was going to take over into the Pacific. He was with the l,t marine night fighter group that went over to the Pacific, but he didn't make it because he crashed just before they were due to leave. But he was trying to perfect the night landing technique and as he was coming in to land with no lights, and simulating a night, the conditions that he would fmd in the south Pacific, a bomber took offright in his path, and the tower either didn't see it or didn't warn him or something, anyway they collided Fortunately nobody in the bomber was hurt, but he was critically injured and burned, horribly burned. But he had such a wonderful spirit about it all and stayed so upbeat with the whole thing that that was one thing that made me fall in love with him.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

He had his WASP flying into Richmond.

Marion Hodgson:

Not very often, I think I only got there twice.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

That must have been a real morale booster. And your friend in the WASP went on to some other airplanes.

Marion Hodgson:

Yeah, the WASP flew every fighter and every bomber in the air corps arsenal, course it was the army air corps, army air forces in those days. But we, thl::Y, the WAS',', not I, flew everything in the arsenal, all the bombers and all the fighter~, including the B-29. One of my roommates, not roommates, classmates, bought a P-38 at the end of the war.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

Did she fly it?

Marion Hodgson:

She flew it, but she couldn't afford to keep it. It was such a gas guzzler, and hangar space was so expensive, and maintenance and so on, and nobody had any money in those days. So she had to let it go, but think what that would be worth now.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

I recall I was in Mount Hope, Idaho. We were out on a gunnery mission which meant that somebody was towing a target and gunners would take potshots at them with .50 caliber ammunition. Well, it happened technically it was a B-26, which was a red hot airplane as you recall. Sometimes called the widow maker. And after the mission was over, the B-26 came and landed. And this little bitty girl, very attractive I might add, got out of the airplane, and all the four-engine bomber pilots, instead of whistling at her as they expected, they stood around, why do those girls get to fly those hot airplanes and we've got these four engine props to fly.

Marion Hodgson:

Tough luck guys.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

I understand that Colonel Paul Tibbetts trained some of your ...

Marion Hodgson:

Two of them.

Marion Hodgson:

Yeah, Paul Tibbetts trained two WASPs to fly the B-29, in two days. He checked them out in the B-29, and they went around the country to demonstrate how easy it was to fly because it had a horrible reputation of catching on fire ~n the take off, and the chief test pilot at Boeing had been killed in it. And the men were balking at flying it. So Paul Tibbetts, actually Hap Arnold, General Arnold was the one that had the idea, but he got Paul Tibbetts to execute it, to have the women demonstrate how easy it was to fly. And sure enough, that shamed the men back into the cockpit, they never had another man refuse to fly it.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

When you reflect back on those days, do you have an outstanding experience that comes to mind?

Marion Hodgson:

Well, not when I was flying it, but when I was on an airliner taking off over New York City, the airliners were mostly DC-3's in those days, as you know. And we were taking off from laGuardia field in New York City and lost both engines on the take off in the DC-3. That's the thing I remember most, that and the AT -6 that caught on fire with me. I guess you remember the excitement and not the long boring hours. But anyway, somehow the angels held us up and we got back in the field. We broke every rule in the book, you're never supposed to turn toward the dead engine, and one engine went out first and he turned towards that engine. The plane was full of ncthing b'Jt Ferry pilots, one other WASP and myself, and all the rest were men Ferry pilots. And everybody screamed when the pilot turned toward the dead engine, but he got away with it. And they say never tum back to the airport, and he turned back to the airport, and he got away with it and got us down. Just barely cleared the high-tension wires. We were low, of course, and then as we got to, almost to the ground, he let the wheels down and we didn't roll that far. He was 26 years old, I think, 24 or 26, the captain.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

On a page, some of our people go to high schools and colleges and talk about their war experiences, and one of the impressions that we get from children is they didn't realize how young we were in those days. MIl: I tell them I was not always an old lady.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

You lost some of your WASP friends. MIl: 38. 38 WASPs were killed.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

And they crashed __ . MIl: Right.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

Would you like to talk about some of these? MIl: Well, the sad part was that there was no provision to send the bodies home. And we had to take up a collection to send the bodies home to the families and sit up all night in the boxcar with the coffin. And it was awful cold in the winter, I didn't ever have to do it. But I was told how cold it was in the winter and how hot it was in the summer to have that duty. And then when the girls got home with the body of the deceased, there was no, they were not allowed to put a flag on the coffin, and were not allowed to put a gold star in the window because we were still civil service employees and not really part ofthe air force at that point. Now thirty years later, by an act of Congress, we were made retroactively members of the army air forces or the US air force is the way my honorable discharge reads. And so they corrected that thirty years later, but it didn't do us any good at the time. We didn't have any money to bury the dead, not to bury the dead but to get the body home.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

You were not accorded normal benefits.

Marion Hodgson:

No, we didn't have any insurance and of course we made less than the men, but this was in the forties and we really didn't expect to be treated equally. We just felt lucky to be there at all and to be given that chance to fly those big beautiful airplanes.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

Isn't it amazing how the country came together after Pearl Harbor?

Marion Hodgson:

Just amazing, and I've never seen it like that since. We were all pulling together, and everybody was patriotic, and gosh, if anybody hadn't been patriotic, I think they would have been lynched real quick. But it was amazing how the whole country pulled in the same direction and cooperated. Course we had been attacked and we knew what we were fighting for. So it was different, but I would love to see that same spirit of cooperation now. I don't think we'll ever see it again, the way things were going.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

We knew who the baC: guys were.

Marion Hodgson:

Yeah, it was clear cut.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

World War II was an unusual period in the history of this country. We were privileged to serve.

Marion Hodgson:

It really was a privilege. In fact I, I'm still so patriotic that I cry every time the flag goes by and when I pledge allegiance I get a lump in my throat, and now the Supreme Court is considering whether to take "under God" out of it. Boy howdy.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

It's a strange new world. On the other hand, women have been afforded opportunities that you never dreamed of.

Marion Hodgson:

True.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

In the forties. For instance, as an astronaut. An astronaut which folIows _

Marion Hodgson:

Is that right?

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

It's not unusual for women pilots to be flying any type of airplane, but their rank. What the problem is, when you sit in the left seat, you're the boss.

Marion Hodgson:

That do create a problem.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

So men on the crew have contentions with that

Marion Hodgson:

Like their mother speaking to them, they don't like it.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

Did you get back horne at all during this period?

Marion Hodgson:

I made some illegal landings in Athens. I remember one time my mother came rushing, I had calIed ahead and told her I was on my way from Atlanta, and so I could see her car coming out to Epps Field in Athens, and by the time I landed, she was already there, and before I could get the engine shut down, she started running straight toward the propelIer, scared me to death, I thought I was going to decapitate my own mother. But I got it shut down before she did, but it was nip and tuck there for a while. But yes, I landed, I wasn't supposed to land at Richmond and I did, and I didn't get caught thank goodness. And I wasn't supposed to land at Athens and I did and didn't get caught.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

Statute of limitations is up.

Marion Hodgson:

Right, I can say it now.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

I had the privilege of reading the book you put together in regards to your World War II experiences, and also ...

Marion Hodgson:

Ta-da.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

Yes. The title is Winning my Wings.

Marion Hodgson:

There it is.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

There it is. TelI us a little bit about it.

Marion Hodgson:

Well, it took me fifty years to write it for one thing. I started writing it when I first got out of the WASP, while everything was fresh in my mind., thank goodness, because I could never have written the flying scenes, I wouldn't have been able to remember all the details of the cockpit checks and things like that. Anyway, nobody was L'lterested in World War II things right after World War II. Everybody wanted to r<:tum to normal just as fast as possible and get back to normal living. So I tried writing short stories about this, I had some good luck selling short stories in those days. There was a good short story market, but not for World War II stories, so they didn't want that. And I tried writing it as a fictional book and had no luck with that. And they just weren't, the market wasn't right, but now all of the sudden, the market is right, and the market is hot. So I've had really good success with this, it went through two printings with the Naval Institute Press as the publisher. And now I'm selling it myself, and it's had some inquiries from HolIywood, which I'm excited about.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

They're making it into a movie?

Marion Hodgson:

I hope they do to, before I die.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

It's got allthe ...

Marion Hodgson:

Ingredients?

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

Ingredients, thank you. I've just thought of the lady's name that introduced the bill that gave veteran's benefits to the WASP. Her name was Boggs.

Marion Hodgson:

Boggs, Lindy Boggs.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

And her daughter is Cokie Roberts.

Marion Hodgson:

Right. Cokie Roberts quotes a lot of my book in her book, I mean a lot of my letters in her book.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

Dh, really.

Marion Hodgson:

Uhhuh.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

How interesting.

Marion Hodgson:

In fact, Cokie's book came out before mine did, so I had to tell my publisher that I had given my permission to use those letters, it didn't CTe<!te ar..y problem, just a little bit of overlap.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

I have not read Cokie Roberts' book.

Marion Hodgson:

It's good. I'll lend yo:!. my copy.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

Well as the story goes along, pilots starting to con:e b~ck from overseas, and they started to close flying schools, which meant that pilot flying instmctors as civilians were subject to the draft, and what did they do?

Marion Hodgson:

They didn't like that. And they didn't want!c get in the marching army. So they resented the fact that women had taken up the cockpits and they didn't have anywhere to go except to be drafted. So they started lobbying Congress to get us out of there, and they did.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

General Arnold, I understand fought it, he lost that particular battle ...

Marion Hodgson:

Won the war but lost the battle.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

So you left the WASP when?

Marion Hodgson:

In June of 1944.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

Then what happened?

Marion Hodgson:

I got married.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

Married your Marine.

Marion Hodgson:

Right.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

Who was in the states in where, Texas?

Marion Hodgson:

He was the executive officer at the Marine Corps air station outside of Fort Worth. We were stationed there for a year and then went out to Miramar, California, until V-J Day. But the WASP stayed on duty until December of ' 44. But since they didn't need us anymore, and they were raising such cain about us, I resigned in June of'44 so I could marry my, the love of my life.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

And did he get out of the Marine Corps?

Marion Hodgson:

He was retired physically. But he served, he actually got back on flight status but not to go overseas, I think they call it class 2 pilot or something like that. But he got back where he could fly again. He recovered really well and stayed on duty until V -J day and then they retired him because they knew he'd never be able to do combat with his burned legs, got a stiff ankle out of . the deal so he couldn't go back to flying for the airlines, which is what he had done before he went into the Marines. Well actually he went in the Marine Corps and then he got out and went flying for Eastern airlines and then Pearl Harbor came along and he was called back into the Marine Corps. He was in the reserves.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

Well he was a pilot early on.

Marion Hodgson:

Yeah, one of the early pilots.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

So now we're at V-J day, you're happily married, your husband is out of the Marine Corps, then what.

Marion Hodgson:

Then he went back to work for Eastern airlines but they told him he could never fly as captain and that if would be satisfied to remain a co-pilot, they'd take him back as a pilot, but to understand that with his stiff ankle, they didn't think he could handle the plane in an emergency. And so they gave him a job on the ground as an aircraft dispatcher. And he could hardly stand that with all his friends up in the sky. It was hard, and it was also shift work, which made it hard. But I could keep his schedule. I mean I might eat breakfast at midnight, but whatever his schedule was, I kept the same thing, until I got pregnant, and then I couldn't keep his schedule anymore, I had to keep the baby's schedule. So that was when he decided that it was time to change, and we got an opportunity to move to Texas and start an insurance company, life msurance company. And he took it, and so we lived there for more than fifty years, until he died.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

He finally became president of the company.

Marion Hodgson:

It was just a small company, but it did quite well.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

I believe you told me your first child was born in Piedmont Hospital here in Atlanta.

Marion Hodgson:

Right. We were living in Hapeville out near the airport because he was working at Eastern airlines, and he would go back and forth on his bicycle from Hapeville, he needed to keep exercising those legs that had been so badly burned. It was sort of like Vance [Lance Armstrong], what's his name.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

Did you do any flying, serious flying you know, after the WASPs.

Marion Hodgson:

I haven't flown for sixty years.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

Think you're ready to get back in the cockpit?

Marion Hodgson:

If this becomes a movie, and I get enough money, I'm buying me an airplane.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

Good for you, I'll go for a ride with you.

Marion Hodgson:

If you're brave enough.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

I had an experience over at Maxwell Field, Alabama, several years ago, over to the graduation of the Air Command and Staff College. A staff pilot, and I was with George Capers, a _ naval hero, and some of us, we all had on our little medals that you wear, and this cute little major came over, a pilot, and she said what are all these for. So I think I told her combat story or two, and she said, well, can I hug you. I said of course. I said, "What are you going to do when you get out of the Command Staff program?" Said, "I'm going to Travis Air Force base as the aircraft commander of a C-141." I was born about thirty years too soon, or I could have been the navigator. A whole different world out there.

Marion Hodgson:

It sure is.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

Well, you've written a book, and have two sons.

Marion Hodgson:

Two sons and a daughter.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

You have five grandchildren.

Marion Hodgson:

Six grandchildren and a great grandchild to be born next month.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

Fantastic. And you came all the way from Wichita Falls, Tex~-s, to talk today to a Silver Wings group and charmed them. You sold a few books, and the questions were right interesting.

Marion Hodgson:

They were.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

I've forgotten what they asked, do you remember any ql1estions. Did any of them particular excite you.

Marion Hodgson:

I was surprised nobody asked me what type planes I flew or, what was the other thing they always ask me, how many hours I had. Nobody there asked me either question, and I was surprised because that's usllally the first two questions that pilots ask me and I'm always embarrassed to answer because I didn't fly the big bombers or the fast fighters, I just ferried single and twin engine airplanes, but they were big enough and fast enough for me. I'm not sure my reflexes would have been fast enough to handle P-51 or-

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

You'd have been surprised I think. How many hours did you get.

Marion Hodgson:

About 500.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

About 500. You know that's the number I had when I left the Air Corps, of which 265 as I recall correctly were combat hours.

Marion Hodgson:

Wow. Your hours were a little bit harder to come by than mine were.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

Some of them were not fun and games, though. Tomorrow I'll be telling my story to the World War II Roundtable. Just as a matter of interest, Marion's father was a well-known figure at the University of Georgia, why don't you tell us a little bit about him.

Marion Hodgson:

Well, he was such a wonderful man. He was such a wonderful father and such a wonderful family man, wonderfhl husband, that I don't even thir.k about his career until somebody like you asks me. But he had coached everything, football, basketball, baseball, and track at the University of Georgia, and really put the school on the map as far as athletics were concerned. When he died, he was director of athletics and dean of men. He gave up the sports he coached one at a time. All I can remember him coaching in my childhood was the basketball team and the track team.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

[You saw football games.]

Marion Hodgson:

Yeah I was, the Georgia-Yale game. 15 to nothing when they dedicated the stadium.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

First game in Sanford Stadium.

Marion Hodgson:

First game in Sanford stadium, and Yale was expecting to clobber Georgia and instead they got clobbered.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

Sounds like it was Miami __ . That was a great team.

Marion Hodgson:

Catfish Smith. I had a big crush on Catfish Smith. He didn't know it, I was about 12 years old I guess.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

Athens is a wonderful place to grow up and a wonderful place to go to school.

Marion Hodgson:

Iagree.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

I'm sure that many people will share your opinion. You told me that when you went to Texas and they spoke of the university, you didn't know what they were talking about.

Marion Hodgson:

Well, 'the university' to me meant the University of Georgia, and that was a great shock when I heard Texans talking about 'the university' and they meant Texas.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

Down in Austin.

Marion Hodgson:

Right.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

Well, it was sixty years ago.

Marion Hodgson:

Let's see, got out in '44. How many years is that, it'll be sixty years next year.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

As soon as you get the movie rights sold for your book, you'll be back in the old airplane. A great grandma.

Marion Hodgson:

I don't think the movie rights per se wi!! get me there, but maybe the movie will.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

And you can take your grandchildren and grea~ grandchild.

Marion Hodgson:

Right.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

Marion, I thank you very much for ...

Marion Hodgson:

Well, you're very welcome.

F. C. "Hap" Chandler:

Thank you for coming to the History Center to share your experiences with World War II, and we hope you'll come back often.

Marion Hodgson:

Thank you.

 
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  The Library of Congress  >> American Folklife Center
  October 26, 2011
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