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Interview with Philip G. Adams [11/10/2012]

David Healey:

Good morning. It's November the 10th, 2012. My name is David Healey, and I'm conducting an oral history interview at Sunbelt Court Reporting in Houston, Texas; and the court reporter is Donna King, and our veteran this morning is Philip G. Adams, and he served in the United States Army from 1957 to 1959. Good morning, Mr. Adams.

Philip G. Adams:

Good morning.

David Healey:

Can you tell us some basic biographical information first? So what -- what day were you born?

Philip G. Adams:

I was born March the 21st in 1934 at Lubbock, Texas.

David Healey:

Okay. And did you grow up in Lubbock?

Philip G. Adams:

No. We -- at that time we lived in West Texas, near Plains, east of Plains, and then we moved to New Mexico; and I lived in New Mexico the rest of my life, until about 15 years ago, when I moved to Conroe.

David Healey:

How old were you when you moved to New Mexico?

Philip G. Adams:

Probably two. I'd just got my first haircut at Plains.

David Healey:

So --

Philip G. Adams:

About two.

David Healey:

So you lived in New Mexico -- what? About 75 years? Is that right?

Philip G. Adams:

No. It'd probably be about 45 or so --

David Healey:

Forty-five years.

Philip G. Adams:

-- before I moved to Texas.

David Healey:

Okay. And --

Philip G. Adams:

My people were all sharecroppers, and we lived on farms for the first four years of my life. And then we -- my dad also was a cement finisher. He also worked outside and did most of the farming at night. We didn't have a pickup. We just had a car to pull cotton to the gin in those West Texas sands. My mother would drive. My dad and I would get out and push. I was just two or three. I wasn't very big.

David Healey:

Boy, that's -- that's a load. Have that cotton packed in a big old trailer or something?

Philip G. Adams:

Yeah.

David Healey:

Man, that's tough.

Philip G. Adams:

I think it took about a year to pick all that cotton at night.

David Healey:

Wow. That's a -- that's a task.

Philip G. Adams:

We went to the gin. It just sucked my -- well, feet out from under me, and my little hat fell off, a little soogie, they called it; and I never saw it again. It just went up in the air --

David Healey:

Wow.

Philip G. Adams:

-- up the pipe.

David Healey:

Up the pipe. Man, you're lucky it didn't suck you up there, too, I guess. That's something else. Well, what did your -- what did your dad do when you moved to New Mexico?

Philip G. Adams:

Well, my father was always a cement finisher. He had started in the Southern California area and had worked in the Seattle area and then had worked for a good many years in the Minnesota area, throughout St. Paul, and then he worked pretty well all over Texas; and then we were just in New Mexico working, except in Texas. During World War II he had to leave Lovington, where we lived, and go to the shipyards in Houston to work during the war.

David Healey:

Oh, I see.

Philip G. Adams:

And he wasn't drafted because he had already served in World War I in -- in Germany; and he had a real eventful life there, wrecks and -- motorcycle driver and ambulance driver and --

David Healey:

Wow.

Philip G. Adams:

He was in the Air Force. They wanted him to be a parachutist, but he didn't think that was too fun.

David Healey:

I would guess being a parachutist when they're barely inventing airplanes -- that'd be pretty -- pretty scary.

Philip G. Adams:

Yeah. It was to him, anyway.

David Healey:

Yeah. Well, that's interesting.

Philip G. Adams:

But then after I got to be older -- I went to the same school all my life; and when I graduated I had two full-page pictures in the annual, one for being elected by the students most courteous and one for being elected by the faculty the most -- best citizenship.

David Healey:

Well, that's wonderful.

Philip G. Adams:

I got a medal for that. A pretty girl got -- I don't even know who it was.

David Healey:

That's wonderful. What was the name of your high school?

Philip G. Adams:

Lovington High School.

David Healey:

Lovington. And that was in Lovington, New Mexico?

Philip G. Adams:

It's in Lovington, New Mexico.

David Healey:

And whereabouts is Lovington?

Philip G. Adams:

Well, it's between Hobbs and Clovis, on the east side.

David Healey:

Okay.

Philip G. Adams:

My -- my grandfather, my mother's daddy, Monster Lewis -- he and his wife used to live in Roswell. They worked for the Chisholm Cattle Company.

David Healey:

Uh-huh.

Philip G. Adams:

And the Chisholms had been drivers of herds up north, but they had a beautiful place south of Roswell, and they had a place north of Lovington at -- northeast of Tatum, and that was where the last 3,000 buffalo were slain in the United States --

David Healey:

Wow.

Philip G. Adams:

-- by a fellow named Causey, and he has a town named after him in New Mexico.

David Healey:

Now, what -- what all did your father do in Lovington after World War II ended in --

Philip G. Adams:

Well, we did plastering and cement finishing, set jobs up, a lot of dirt work, and we mixed our concrete with mixers that didn't have any motors. They just had a -- had an old Model A truck that we had to sand the gravel on. We'd jack that wheel up, put a big ole flat belt on that, and it would turn the mixer; and you could transmission any speed you wanted the mixer to turn. It was a pretty cute little --

David Healey:

Yeah.

Philip G. Adams:

And then we just keep getting bigger and bigger mixers, until we had to get into the ready-mix concrete business, and we finally had 14 different concrete plants in different towns --

David Healey:

Wow.

Philip G. Adams:

-- in West Texas and Eastern New Mexico. And we got so big that we nearly lost everything, and -- but what -- we were able to pay all the debts and -- and hold on to a lot of the land. Still have quite a bit of the plants and land.

David Healey:

Are -- are the plants still operating?

Philip G. Adams:

No, no. When my dad died at 93, he -- he was operating the Fort Sumner plant; and he drove 80 miles -- a load of -- 10-yard load of concrete 80 miles the day before he got sick, and -- he -- he was quite -- quite a horse.

David Healey:

Wow.

Philip G. Adams:

He was the best cement finisher that most people I talked to ever saw. He was -- he was invited to do the steps on the Empire State, but he wanted to come to Texas.

David Healey:

Wow. So he was well in his 90s when he passed away?

Philip G. Adams:

93. Uh-huh.

David Healey:

And what was the name of the company?

Philip G. Adams:

Adams Concrete, Lovington Ready Mix, and Potash Sand & Gravel.

David Healey:

And did you work in that company --

Philip G. Adams:

Yes.

David Healey:

-- pretty much your whole career?

Philip G. Adams:

Yes. I worked my whole life, from just very early days, say, four, holding the light at night. He'd work during the day pouring -- or setting it up and then pouring it, and then the men would go home, and he'd finish it all night, you know, and go home and get a little dab of sleep and come back, you know, three or four times during the night. We -- we did that pretty well all -- all my growing years. And even if we were stuccoing, we would come back at night and float it because it was too wet in the wintertime. You had to let it set up, you know, and it'd have to set several hours before you get -- throw water on it and float it.

David Healey:

So you were doing this all up through the time you finished high school?

Philip G. Adams:

Yeah. I sure did.

David Healey:

Wow.

Philip G. Adams:

And even when I went to Tech. When I first left for college, I went to Pasadena and -- California and had a wonderful time there for a couple of years at that school, beautiful school in Pasadena. And then, because my grandfather had such a love for Tech, my mother prevailed on me to go there. He had already died in '39, and I started going to Tech in '54. And after I got out of Tech I found out that he had donated the land there in Lubbock for the college, he had helped set the town --

David Healey:

Wow.

Philip G. Adams:

-- lights up, because he had come from Tennessee -- Knoxville, Tennessee, on horseback. Took he and his 9-year-old brother two years to get to Midland, Texas, and one of them went west to El Paso to work, and the other went north to Lubbock, to the LFD store. And then after that, he started working for Chisholm.

David Healey:

Wow. So --

Philip G. Adams:

But they called him back after -- he -- he left the Chisholms in the 1800s and moved to -- to the north part of Lea County because they had fired him, and he liked that country up there. He was a windmill man up there --

David Healey:

Oh.

Philip G. Adams:

-- for the Chisholm Ranch, and he just started using 20 sections in New Mexico and 20 sections in West Texas, had a nice-sized ranch. And he never did really try to buy a whole lot because it was cheaper for him not to pay taxes, but just -- just to use it, you know, and --

David Healey:

Yeah.

Philip G. Adams:

-- not -- not pay anything.

David Healey:

Now, what did you study at Tech?

Philip G. Adams:

Oh, I was -- studied civil engineering and business administration. The degree was a bachelor of business administration, with a major in management and minor in civil engineering.

David Healey:

And then did you go back and work for the family company?

Philip G. Adams:

I did for a few days, but I -- I got married and tried to have a job so I wouldn't have to go to the Army, and then I was drafted even though I didn't know that I wouldn't have had to.

David Healey:

Oh, you would -- you would've been exempt?

Philip G. Adams:

Yeah, if I'd have known she was expecting a baby.

David Healey:

Oh, wow. So that -- that pulled you out of -- out of the business for --

Philip G. Adams:

Yes.

David Healey:

-- a couple of years, huh?

Philip G. Adams:

Yes, it did, and it made it really bad because we -- we were operating in all these different towns. And my mother's heart was real bad. My dad's -- he had sugar diabetes, and they were trying to run all that by themselves. And I finally did get a 90-day executive leave to -- to go help them out when their health -- health both failed.

David Healey:

I see.

Philip G. Adams:

I didn't get paid, you know --

David Healey:

Right.

Philip G. Adams:

-- for those 90 days, but it was sort of the compassionate thing --

David Healey:

Right.

Philip G. Adams:

-- to go help.

David Healey:

Right. Now, when you got drafted into the military -- can you tell me about that? Where'd they have you report, and --

Philip G. Adams:

Well, I reported in my little town, the local draft board there at the county seat, and we went to the courthouse, and they put us on the bus to go to El Paso. Let me just digress a moment and tell about some soldier boys --

David Healey:

Sure.

Philip G. Adams:

-- before the war started. The New Mexico National Guard was called up to go to the Philippines to stave off the Japanese attacks.

David Healey:

This is before World War II?

Philip G. Adams:

Just before World War II. And the day they were leaving on a bus, probably going to El Paso, they couldn't get through because it had come such a flood that the railroad -- the water was between the railroad track and -- and the road. They had to -- I guess they put them in little boats and they paddled across to the bus waiting on the other side. And, of course, we never saw many of those boys again because they were mostly all killed. They were prisoners of war --

David Healey:

They --

Philip G. Adams:

-- you know, if they weren't killed, for five or -- years or so, or six, and very few made it.

David Healey:

So they were caught in the --

Philip G. Adams:

In the --

David Healey:

-- in the Japanese invasion --

Philip G. Adams:

Japanese.

David Healey:

-- in the Philippines?

Philip G. Adams:

Yeah. The Japanese weren't very nice to them.

David Healey:

Oh, terrible.

Philip G. Adams:

They had the death march and everything.

David Healey:

Did you get to know any of the ones that did make it back?

Philip G. Adams:

Well, yes. I was commissioned there in Lovington, and we had -- one of the boys that was there one time -- one of their plants had a fire. And he was a volunteer fireman, and his mother was a schoolteacher in the old -- old-timey days. And he got so excited, he drove right out between the two double doors that had a big ole concrete pilaster. He just took it with him --

David Healey:

Oh, my gosh.

Philip G. Adams:

-- and he put the fire out, but they had to rebuild the fire station.

David Healey:

Oh, man. Man. Did -- I mean, did -- did he kind of carry any of the -- the physical or emotional scars of being in the Philippines with him --

Philip G. Adams:

No. He --

David Healey:

-- after he got back?

Philip G. Adams:

He had a lovely, lovely mother, and he -- you know, she helped get him rehabilitated, and he married and had -- had a child or two, and he -- he retired from the city there. You know?

David Healey:

Oh, wow.

Philip G. Adams:

He never could really do anything physical, but the town was so delighted he came home that they gave him a job for life. So --

David Healey:

So everybody in the town wanted to pitch in and support him when he got back?

Philip G. Adams:

Oh, yeah. Yeah. They -- they really felt bad about those ole boys all getting taken.

David Healey:

And then it was -- a town that small, when you lose a bunch of people -- that's really like losing part of your family.

Philip G. Adams:

Oh, yeah. It's -- it's really hard on everybody during a war. Of course, there's -- the first time's pretty rough out there where we were, you know, being sharecroppers, and we didn't -- didn't have a whole lot. I remember Mother saying she didn't have nylons for -- I believe it was three or four years before she had a pair of socks. So it -- it was tough, but World War II was probably tougher in many ways because you couldn't get anything. There wasn't anything to buy, and if there was something to buy and you were to have money, you couldn't buy it without stamps. You couldn't get stamps because they just issued them for people that were doing the war effort. You know, it was rough.

David Healey:

And your dad was away in Houston, working in the shipyard?

Philip G. Adams:

Yeah. He was working in the shipyards.

David Healey:

So it was you and your mom?

Philip G. Adams:

Yeah.

David Healey:

Did you have any brothers and sisters?

Philip G. Adams:

No. I didn't have any siblings. We had a lot of chickens and cattle and pigs and a big garden during that time that she and I took care of.

David Healey:

Did -- now, during World War II, when things were in short supply, did the people in the town help each other out in -- in, you know, getting everybody some food or what they needed --

Philip G. Adams:

Well, they did.

David Healey:

-- to buy?

Philip G. Adams:

They'd -- they'd trade stamps and different things. You know, my grandmother had a sick headache from not having coffee. She was raised on that Chisholm Ranch and had coffee every day of her life, until they didn't have any more coffee, and everybody in town would help send coffee out to her so she wouldn't have those vicious headaches. One time -- you know, there weren't any doctors left in -- in town. Wasn't much of anything left, and we'd have to go to Lubbock. And one time we all -- about 30 of us piled in a school bus because the school bus had gas tickets. They -- so he took us all to Lubbock. We stopped at Brownfield, and -- I guess to go to the bathroom, and this one ole boy went over to Bandy's Produce. And they didn't have any produce there, but they had had some bananas. And he went out where they throwed them away and picked up a whole grocery sack full of black bananas, and we all ate those, and the next day everybody that rode that bus was sick. They were the sickest you ever saw. Of course, from then on, anytime that any of us saw each other we'd kid each other about the sickness.

David Healey:

Don't eat any black bananas.

Philip G. Adams:

Pretty rough on a person the next day.

David Healey:

That's something else. That's something. Did -- did the Korean conflict have any kind of impact on the town where you lived and --

Philip G. Adams:

No. Not that you could tell. I was still in high school when -- when that happened, when it started, and then we went ahead and -- and, you know, went to college, and then it was over by the time that I was drafted.

David Healey:

But World War II -- that just took over everybody's life?

Philip G. Adams:

Oh, my goodness. We had a girl in our class that -- her father was a machinist, and he had a lot of things to work metal with, and the Government came and confiscated everything he had. But they left a bunch of old junk pipe out in his yard that he had had, you know, the cast-offs from making stuff, and that was what was sustaining the ranchers and people because they were able to use some of that stuff. He could weld it up, and they could get by with it. But our -- every week we'd -- half a day a week, after we brought our money in for the war bonds, we'd -- we'd have to go out and scavenge for whatever there were. We scavenged for tinfoil, aluminum, and this one day we were after metal. And that girl said, "Well, my daddy's got lots of metal in our backyard." So we dumped our stuff to the guy, and we told him, "Just bring the truck up here, and we'll load it up." And we were loading that truck up, and that man came, and you never saw a man almost have a hemorrhage worse than that guy. He said, "They've already stole. They never paid me for any of my equipment, and now you're taking the scrap that everybody in the whole town's depending on." So he made them unload that stuff.

David Healey:

Man.

Philip G. Adams:

But we didn't have to do it. He did it.

David Healey:

Wow. So when -- when everybody came back after the war -- how long after World War II did it take to kind of get things back to normal?

Philip G. Adams:

Well, it -- it just -- started out kind of slow, but it just kept building, and -- you know? There was a lot of work there, and during the war we didn't have anybody to help us except very old people or someone that the Army had sent home on a sight [sic] deck to discharge.

David Healey:

Right.

Philip G. Adams:

We had one guy like that that was helping us, and then these real old people that, you know, wasn't qualified to go to the war. And our work was heavy. You know? We had to go out and get sand and gravel --

David Healey:

Right.

Philip G. Adams:

-- and throw it on the truck and unload it. You know? And it was many miles away where you had to go get it, so we had a rough time during World War II with help. It was really tough. But after the war these fine, strong, brilliant young men came in, and there was a super abundance of them, and they were able to help us just do a lot of work with -- we made a lot of money after those few days, and that helped us, you know, have such a big business.

David Healey:

A lot of pent-up demand --

Philip G. Adams:

Yeah.

David Healey:

-- built up?

Philip G. Adams:

Really.

David Healey:

Was a big boom?

Philip G. Adams:

Really was a big thing after the war.

David Healey:

Now -- now, in your own military service -- you got drafted and got sent to El Paso. Is that where you had basic training or --

Philip G. Adams:

Oh, no. We just got a physical, and that night they sent us to a tour of the town and then over to Juarez; and then the next day we were sworn in and put on a bus to Colorado Springs -- Fort Carson, Colorado, where we had our training.

David Healey:

And what do you remember about that?

Philip G. Adams:

Well, a lot of walking. We'd walk more than 20 miles a day every day, and we camped out, and we'd camp out on the snow. And one time we were camped out on the -- about three foot of snow and pitched those little tents. Shelter half -- you'd put half of yours, the other guy carried his half, and two people would live in that overnight. And then they'd have this snow at night, and 80 percent of our company was in the hospital with pneumonia.

David Healey:

Oh, my gosh.

Philip G. Adams:

I had pneumonia, got really, really bad there, but I made it through. And I had an aunt that lived there in Colorado Springs, and when they sent us to New Jersey I was in charge of that railcar, about 20-odd guys, and we -- she came and said hi to us. And I brought their meals, and we had an experience while we were in Chicago. We had to switch trains in Chicago, and we had about a half a day to see the town, so we all went to this big, tall tower. I think they called it the Chicago Board of Trade. Many of us had never been around an elevator. You know?

David Healey:

Wow.

Philip G. Adams:

And you'd go in there, and they had this big ole room, elevators -- all three sides, and -- you know, there were 10 here and 15 here and 10 here, and the bell would ring, and you'd head this way, and it was really over here. So I -- I went one way, and all my group went the other way, and we never did see each other again. We just -- I went up and down that about 50 times. The elevator wouldn't go all the way up. It'd just go about 20 stories, you know, and then you'd get another and then another one. And then they had a big roof deck and observatory, and I finally found one of my guys. Ole Brague was looking out this telescope, trying to -- trying to see Chicago. You know? But -- he didn't have a dime to put in, but he was -- and I drug him away from that, told him, "We got to go." When we finally got back to the train station, the train was pulling out. The MPs impounded me at the entrance, and one of them carried my duffel bag, and the other carried something else, all that stuff I had for the boys to feed them, and they had me walk, and we got on that train after chasing it about three blocks. You know? Finally, the last car on there -- threw my duffel bag on, and all my guys were there on the train. And I -- I was supposed to have fed them dinner. They didn't even try to get any -- any breakfast or dinner, and finally at suppertime we got this ole boy to open the mess hall up and feed them. And we gave them the tickets, and we -- we got on to New Jersey; and I was able to go -- get a leave and go get my wife and bring her there to New Jersey. And I went through that electrical school there in New Jersey for about 15 weeks, and I took an extra week, and that put me into the atomic stuff, so they sent me back home to San -- to Sandia Base in Albuquerque, and we -- we had a room of over a hundred people taking this training. They were from all four branches of the service. They were all officers, except for two Army-enlisted guys, and we had to do the sweeping and make the coffee and stuff like that. And then after that I was sent to Korea, but to go to Korea, you had to go to Central Texas near Killeen, Fort Hood, to get some -- to get everything loaded on railcars to ship to Washington. And at the same time, they had another company right by our -- where our company was where -- they were going to Germany. And I had to take care of the lawn at the company instead of doing all that camouflage and spraying black paint on all the chrome and glass so -- you know, keep the ships from seeing -- seeing us on water, although there was no war, but we, you know, did it by the book just as though there had have been. Of course, I had all those shots because of going -- going to different theaters, and we -- I made friends with the ole boy that was taking care of the other group that was going to Germany's grass. He had bought a lawn mower because the Army's lawn mowers -- none of them would work. You know, we had to just more or less pull the grass or had a little old hand clipper. It was a big area, you know, lots of it. So he got to let me use his mower, and I was telling him about my little baby. When we had got to Fort Hood, the baby was very near death, and the car was -- no air conditioning, it was hot, and they put the baby in the hospital for several months. And when he finally did get out, he couldn't sleep, and this ole boy told me, "Bring him to my house after -- night." He -- he had read that the town's biggest house -- because a lawyer had a house at Lake Belton that -- he could rent his house for big money to the movie star. His name was Elvis Presley, and he took my baby every night and would hold him and sing to him and -- and walk with him until the baby fell asleep; and we'd take him home, and he'd sleep through the night. And we did that every night for about four weeks. And the whole town was there. When we'd try to park there, we'd have to walk four blocks carrying the baby to get him to Elvis because everybody was having so much fun listening to ole Elvis, you know, and his songs. He was the greatest guy you ever saw.

David Healey:

So -- so Elvis Presley used to sing your baby to sleep at night?

Philip G. Adams:

Oh, yeah. Every night for a month. And then he had this congenital heart operation in Fort -- Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antone, and I was put on a compassionate leave because of him to stay in San Antone because they didn't know what the progress would be -- or the prognosis, and we lived there. And I -- my wife and I had had a good bit of trouble over extramarital affairs. She -- she was going with staff in Lovington and then in New Jersey, with my classmates. And then at Killeen one time a car honked, and all these soldier boys started running out, and she ran out without any clothes on, just putting her -- her dress on, trying to button it and told -- told them to leave, "My husband's here." So then we -- we went to that operation, and I never did really stay with her anymore.

David Healey:

Oh, I see.

Philip G. Adams:

We got a divorce there in Lovington, and over time, you know, before I got out of the service --

David Healey:

But did your child survive the operation?

Philip G. Adams:

Yes. He -- he was -- he used to live with us, and after I got married and had a couple of kids going to school, he -- he -- while I was on the city commission, we lived right next to the chief of police, and I got the guy to give him a ride, and they enjoyed each other so much that it happened every night until school was out. And then he graduated. He wanted to be a policeman, so he went to the state police academy there in that -- Santa Fe and got -- I got him the job as a policeman -- to take him, but he got in trouble with the mayor, good friend of mine, and he -- he called him in, said, "You gave 59 tickets out yesterday, and all of them were to local people. We'd never get -- have given local people tickets, just the Texans going toward Reynosa." You know, they -- they could pay for all the costs because they had plenty of money. And he said, "You -- you -- you're going to have to wake up and not make me lose my -- my job, you know, as mayor." So he -- he worked there several years, and then he got a job at Aztec. And then he wanted to go to Colorado, and he had to go to another school -- police academy in Trinidad. And we went up for graduation, and sure enough, we were there, waiting for the graduation, and -- and they were giving them their last deals and giving them their awards, and they had a tradition. Every class -- they gave a silver revolver to the top policeman. So this student got that -- heard that announcement. He ran out the door to his wife sitting across the street. And being a college campus, this kid come by and hit him and broke his hips up, and they had to air-lift him to Denver or someplace way -- way off.

David Healey:

Wow.

Philip G. Adams:

And his -- that guy's wife had to stand in and take all the awards for him.

David Healey:

Oh, wow.

Philip G. Adams:

She -- she was in all the pictures, you know --

David Healey:

That's something else. That's something else.

Philip G. Adams:

And she got to shoot the gun first.

David Healey:

That's something else. So -- so it sounds like, you -- you know, you had a lot of adventures once you got in the Army and then even after.

Philip G. Adams:

Oh, yeah.

David Healey:

So --

Philip G. Adams:

Well, let me tell you what happened to me in San Antone. My former wife, or distressed damsel, whatever she was, came to my company commander, she and her mother and three sisters, and tried to get me court-martialed for not living with her daughter, I guess, and he made me move on the base, in -- into the barracks and made it pretty rough for a while.

David Healey:

Yeah.

Philip G. Adams:

But I got to be friends with these two boys that were pharmacists, one, Joseph Ackil, and the other, Robert Floyd, and these ole boys would go with me -- I had a nice Roadmaster Buick -- and they'd go with me every night, and we'd go look things over and end -- ended up at the north end of town at Earl Abel's, the best restaurant in town, and this ole boy was there trying to get people to sample his -- his food. And we got to talking to him, and he asked us if we came there every night. And we said, "Oh, yeah. We come here every night." And he said, "Well, I want to hire you boys. I won't -- won't pay you, but you -- you sample my food and tell me what to do to it as I perfect my recipe."

David Healey:

Hmm.

Philip G. Adams:

So we did that every night, and we were sure sorry when he left because we -- we lost all our chicken. It was Colonel Sanders.

David Healey:

Oh, really?

Philip G. Adams:

Was learning how to do his chicken, and it -- it was really a nice deal. He was every bit a gentleman, you know, just like you'd think a Kentucky colonel -- although he wasn't from Kentucky, but he -- he claimed to be --

David Healey:

So he was --

Philip G. Adams:

-- commissioned --

David Healey:

-- working on his recipe there in San Antone, huh?

Philip G. Adams:

Yeah. Yeah. He had the recipe perfected with our help.

David Healey:

That's something else.

Philip G. Adams:

Another lady that I had a wonderful time with -- while I was in Lubbock in management at college there, we studied about all the different early forms of management. You know, we started with Moses --

David Healey:

Yeah.

Philip G. Adams:

-- and his father-in-law, Jethro, having them sit in groups of ten --

David Healey:

Right.

Philip G. Adams:

-- and one guy being a spokesman and all that. And then one of the other people we studied in the early days was the Gilbreths. They -- they had a time-and-motion study that they called Therbligs. It was "Gilbreth" spelled backwards.

David Healey:

Huh.

Philip G. Adams:

And they had 12 children, and they made a movie about them, Cheaper by the Dozen. Of course, he was already dead, but while I was there in San Antone this lady was coming to address the officers, and I wanted to hear her, you know, because she was one of the founders of what -- what I thought it was. So we -- the only way I could get to see her was to volunteer and do KP. I had to help prepare the meal and then wash the dishes after it was over and all that. And I met her, and she wrote me the sweetest letter. She said, "Of all the people that ever came to heard me -- hear me speak, you -- you did the most."

David Healey:

That's something else. That's great.

Philip G. Adams:

And then one time they -- after you've been in college for a long time, you miss those first days of college when people are meeting each other because, you know, they're all --

David Healey:

Right.

Philip G. Adams:

-- trying to meet each other. And they had a college in San Antone called St. Mary's. It was way out west, probably eight or ten miles from the base, pretty good ways. And I went out there with fear by myself because I -- I was afraid that the boys wouldn't want soldier boys meeting their ladies. So we were playing this game, "Pass the Life Saver" from your toothpick to her toothpick. Then you'd go back and get another one from her toothpick, take it to her toothpick. And sure enough, I leaned too quick and got into this cheek and got about -- first battle scar of the war. But, you know, it's mostly healed up, but just the --

David Healey:

Wow.

Philip G. Adams:

-- just the --

David Healey:

That's something else. That scar lasted all these years --

Philip G. Adams:

Yeah.

David Healey:

-- from a toothpick.

Philip G. Adams:

You bet.

David Healey:

Wow.

Philip G. Adams:

So that night I tried to find my big ole Roadmaster Buick, and I couldn't find it anywhere. And I saw about 300 people all around the president's house. He was on a corner, and the yard was up about two foot or two-and-a-half foot above the road. And I looked up there, and there was my car, up there on the president's lawn. Said, "Boy, these guys are going to try to whip me as I run to the car." So I inched my way over and climbed up on that wall and got over there and just kept getting a little closer to the car. I had my key out and ready to open this locked car, and I did and looked back, and nobody was chasing me. I was just dumbfounded. And they were all just standing there watching me. So I -- I knew that with this wall being so much higher than the -- the grass and -- the rock wall, that I'd have to hit it at a pretty fast speed to get over it with that high center. You know? I guess that's what they were hoping I'd do. I don't know, but anyway, I dug out of the deal and -- bound to have left tire marks in that poor president's lawn. But I didn't realize that they had me tied to the water hydrant -- the city water hydrant, and just before I -- or about the time I was in mid-flight going over that wall, that chain tightened up around that water deal, and it pulled 14 foot of it out of the ground, the pipe. And I just sailed on and went to the barracks and drug all that pipe behind my car without anyone telling me it was there. And it was raining. I didn't -- had my car windows up. I had no idea I had something behind my car. The next morning we were out doing reveille and policing up the area, and the sergeant said, "Whose car is that with all that ordnance on it?" And they said, "Well, it's his." And he said, "You take that car off my base and get rid of that ordnance and come back and help us police up." So it -- it wasn't too awful far, less than half a mile, and I drug it out there to the city side, pulled it over the side and started to unhook it from my car and leave the chain there with it. And I got to looking -- boy, that chain is the best chain I ever saw. It's about 40-foot long, and it's just a perfect chain to carry in the back of your car, except it's a little long, but -- you know? So I unhooked the other end, put the chain in my car, and I still have it in my car to this day.

David Healey:

Oh, really?

Philip G. Adams:

Oh, yeah. You betcha. So those are the things that I did in San Antone. Of course, some weekends we'd go down to the beach. You know? It was about a hundred miles to the water, and we'd go to all these different kinds of attractions around there. Wasn't much, but they had Longhorn Cavern and the Aquarena --

David Healey:

Uh-huh.

Philip G. Adams:

-- in San Marcos, where President Johnson is from. They had this underwater ballet, where you watched down below, looking up --

David Healey:

Uh-huh.

Philip G. Adams:

-- in glass, and these mermaids were holding pipes in their mouth to get air and performing these rituals, you know, as -- educational kind of presentation. And so we finally got through with that. And because I had one of the best MOSs that they could have -- that's the reason why the class was all -- our officers from these four branches of service -- everybody wanted to have that MOS because -- they stayed in the Army in peacetime because it was such a critical MOS. And I -- with that MOS, I could go into the guard as a captain, so I told my company -- and, of course, after the pipe incident and my family's involvement with --

David Healey:

Right.

Philip G. Adams:

-- that, I didn't have a very high standing with the administration of my company. You know, it was just one of those sad things that -- they -- they didn't like me too much. And we were with a battle group, and they got the battle group -- well, another bad thing: I got that 90-day excess leave that --

David Healey:

Right.

Philip G. Adams:

-- they never knew of anybody ever getting, and the city couldn't -- that I did it. And, of course, they were really mad at me over that, even though I didn't get paid.

David Healey:

Yeah.

Philip G. Adams:

And they took me to my discharge physical, and they had told this ole boy -- I guess the doctor, and he put in that I was unfit to be in the service, unfit for officer material, mentally incompetent and in bad -- bad shape, and -- and he knocked my commission in the head, and I had to go to the Reserves as a private and had to go back to El Paso for the summer camps and had to stay in, instead of two years, an extra year when President Kennedy enrolled us for another free year because of the Berlin crisis.

David Healey:

The Berlin Wall?

Philip G. Adams:

Well, it was a crisis.

David Healey:

Yeah.

Philip G. Adams:

And you couldn't get the food to the people there.

David Healey:

Right.

Philip G. Adams:

They had to fly it in. It was kind of a -- kind of an iffy thing. Naturally --

David Healey:

Right.

Philip G. Adams:

-- you know, nobody knew --

David Healey:

Right.

Philip G. Adams:

-- what would happen during the Cold War.

David Healey:

Now, where were you during the Berlin Wall crisis?

Philip G. Adams:

Well, I was working in all these plants that we had. We had plants down at the potash mines.

David Healey:

Oh, I see.

Philip G. Adams:

And we worked 10,000 yards for one company -- in two holes for one potash company, IMC. And then they moved over to another area 50 miles away, and they trucked that over from those two places to their refinery, and we were doing the second one during that time. And I got something that had bothered me some in the service called sensitivity to the sun. Of course, that place was the WIPP site, where they were going to detonate an atomic bomb. And since then they've put all that nuclear material in the ground there. And then we got a lot of work up in the north area, on Highway 60, and we were building a five-story dormitory in -- for Dallas, and the -- a married student housing thing, and then had a lot of other work on -- for the -- AT&T, you know, these little shelters coast to coast. And we were doing all the finishing on that dormitory and putting all the stuff on the stairways of -- base code, I guess they called it --

David Healey:

Uh-huh.

Philip G. Adams:

-- about a foot wide all the way down out of -- out of concrete. And --

David Healey:

Did you ever go to Korea? You mentioned that you were fixing to go to Korea.

Philip G. Adams:

No. My people all went, but I didn't get to go. It would've been a delight because all the people that I had gone to school with were -- at that class were in my company and would've been my commanders. Of course, we --

David Healey:

Yeah.

Philip G. Adams:

-- worked in either an underground or a -- at least a separate facility, and the company people couldn't come where we were, you know, because they were -- just existed to take care of us.

David Healey:

So -- so you ended up not being able to go because all the -- your little boy or --

Philip G. Adams:

Yeah.

David Healey:

-- problems?

Philip G. Adams:

And the three-month -- the 90-day leave.

David Healey:

Three-month thing.

Philip G. Adams:

So --

David Healey:

So did you -- did you end up -- did you actually work or serve in the military at the -- the testing grounds, where the atomic weapons were set off?

Philip G. Adams:

Well, no, but, you know, I've been there a lot, being from that --

David Healey:

Oh, I see.

Philip G. Adams:

-- that neighborhood. You know? And then I had a plant in Socorro --

David Healey:

Yeah.

Philip G. Adams:

-- where I did that big diversion dam, poured a half-million yards of concrete there --

David Healey:

Wow.

Philip G. Adams:

-- in Socorro. So we took concrete to the base. The -- the base is big. You know?

David Healey:

Right.

Philip G. Adams:

Started at Alamogordo and went, oh, 200 miles or something to the north, and that was their testing ground.

David Healey:

Wow.

Philip G. Adams:

And they'd fire those rockets to there, and then they got longer rockets, and they had to fire them to Montana or someplace. You know?

David Healey:

Lord. Now, did --

Philip G. Adams:

They closed that -- Highway 60 every time they'd have a --

David Healey:

Yeah.

Philip G. Adams:

-- missile launching so the people couldn't get hurt.

David Healey:

Now, did you -- you know, after you -- you got sent back to El Paso as a private, you were in the Army an extra year because of what was going on in Berlin?

Philip G. Adams:

Of course, that was in -- in the Reserves.

David Healey:

In the Reserves?

Philip G. Adams:

Yeah. We -- we were just going back for summer camp.

David Healey:

Oh, I see.

Philip G. Adams:

It was just two weeks during the summer camp.

David Healey:

I see. And then did you have to go on the weekend or anything?

Philip G. Adams:

Oh, yeah.

David Healey:

Okay.

Philip G. Adams:

You know, we had to go every weekend.

David Healey:

And how long did they have you doing that for?

Philip G. Adams:

Three years. It'd have just been two, but because of Berlin, they made it three.

David Healey:

Did they give you any kind of special training because of that?

Philip G. Adams:

No. There wasn't any training at all. But one time when we were having those -- those -- training, the aggressors would come and try to attack our positions, and one time one of them got in there and took the truck that we were sleeping in, and we -- we were in the back of it. And I took my rifle barrel -- of course, didn't have any shells, but I kept jobbing him until he had to just jump out and left the truck running. Of course, it finally stopped, and we recovered our own truck from the aggressors and brought it back to the base. But I got injured a little in that --

David Healey:

Yeah.

Philip G. Adams:

-- excursion.

David Healey:

Wow.

Philip G. Adams:

But it wasn't a million-dollar wound.

David Healey:

Now, let me ask you this. Did you -- do you have any folks that were friends for life after you left the service?

Philip G. Adams:

Well, I have seen a good many different people, but not really friends for life.

David Healey:

Yeah.

Philip G. Adams:

I -- I don't know of one guy. I would dearly love to see these guys that helped Colonel Sanders, ole Ackil and Floyd, but, you know, they were from the East and --

David Healey:

Okay.

Philip G. Adams:

-- Northeast. No way to find them.

David Healey:

Did it ever surprise you when -- when Colonel Sanders' Kentucky Fried Chicken got to be so popular?

Philip G. Adams:

Oh, my goodness. But I never saw him again. It's just like Elvis. I never saw Elvis again, or Mrs. Gilbreth. Just --

David Healey:

Just one-time -- or meetings over a period of time?

Philip G. Adams:

This one little beauty that got me --

David Healey:

Got --

Philip G. Adams:

You wouldn't call it a hickey.

David Healey:

That is something else. So, I mean, it sounds like your times in the military -- had some -- some real hard times, with your wife and your child, and -- and some really interesting times.

Philip G. Adams:

And -- about my folks. You know, they -- they really did suffer --

David Healey:

Yeah.

Philip G. Adams:

-- from having so much work so far away.

David Healey:

Uh-huh.

Philip G. Adams:

It was just tough. You know?

David Healey:

So was -- it was a relief for them when you got back and --

Philip G. Adams:

Oh, yeah.

David Healey:

-- joined the business again?

Philip G. Adams:

You bet.

David Healey:

And then you worked the rest of your career in that business, huh?

Philip G. Adams:

Yeah. Uh-huh.

David Healey:

Now, what -- I guess your dad died in '93.

Philip G. Adams:

Yeah.

David Healey:

And -- and when did you retire from working in the business?

Philip G. Adams:

Well, after he had -- had passed away.

David Healey:

Yeah.

Philip G. Adams:

I finally got a lot of the equipment sold, just had one plant left and -- two locations left.

David Healey:

And somebody's running that for you now?

Philip G. Adams:

No, no. It's just land that I have to pay taxes on.

David Healey:

Just land. Oh, I see. I see. And --

Philip G. Adams:

In Yoakum County and Lea County.

David Healey:

Right. So they're not operating?

Philip G. Adams:

No. Huh-uh.

David Healey:

You got the land. And is this a son or a daughter or grandson -- or grandchild that you're living with here in Conroe?

Philip G. Adams:

Well, we -- we have our own place. I've got a couple of acres, a real nice brick home there that I paid cash for.

David Healey:

I see.

Philip G. Adams:

They're -- they're in the medical field, as, you know, a regular physician, and she's taking her training at Wilmore, Kentucky, to be a pastor. She's over halfway through and got good grades. And they've adopted two children, and yesterday I stayed with their kids at their house while they had an interview and -- surveying the house so they could adopt a third child.

David Healey:

Oh, wow.

Philip G. Adams:

The children are two and five or six or so. They're sweet little ole kids. The -- the parents and the children -- although none of them are any kin to each other, they are dead ringers for each other. You'd think that -- they got the same color hair, same everything. You know?

David Healey:

I -- that's -- that's interesting. That's interesting.

Philip G. Adams:

The doctor's a real tall guy, good-looking, you know, with blonde hair, and this little boy's got that same hair, and the girl, too, except she's got tinges of red in hers.

David Healey:

That is something else. Now, did -- did you ever -- after -- after you got out of the military reserve, you know, were you in any kind of clubs or groups, you know, made up of people who used to belong to the military or serve in the military?

Philip G. Adams:

Never did have anything like that.

David Healey:

Never did anything like that?

Philip G. Adams:

I -- I had a lot of involvement with, like, church things. Back in '39, we -- we started an encampment near Ruidoso, and this last year they had a fire called Little Bear, and it destroyed 250 cabins up there and just -- you know, it didn't wipe them off the map, but it was tough. You know? Had a couple hundred acres up there.

David Healey:

And that -- that was -- encampment was a -- for church?

Philip G. Adams:

Church. Uh-huh.

David Healey:

Oh, wow.

Philip G. Adams:

Yeah.

David Healey:

So you're still able to go to church?

Philip G. Adams:

Well, I always go to that camp every year. You know, I've been every year but one or two.

David Healey:

And where are your other children living these days?

Philip G. Adams:

Well, I have a boy in Oklahoma City that has a ranch out near Mustang. He's got cattle and feeds out cattle for us to eat, and he has horses. His wife is a precision rider, and both his girls are precision riders, and both the lady and the children have been on teams that got first in the nation.

David Healey:

Wow.

Philip G. Adams:

They're -- they're real good riders at rodeos and at events that -- on horseback. And this lady was -- that he married was a volleyball player in Mustang, and after they moved back to Mustang after living here in Houston a year, they -- the city -- or the schools asked her to be the coach for the -- the volleyball. So she got to coach her own team that she had been part of for the last 20 years.

David Healey:

That's wonderful. That's wonderful. Well, let me --

Philip G. Adams:

And the boy has about seven businesses there in Oklahoma City.

David Healey:

Wow.

Philip G. Adams:

He's got furniture stores and tire stores and used-car lots, and he's got over a hundred cars on one used-car lot.

David Healey:

Wow.

Philip G. Adams:

He's got quite a bit of involvement.

David Healey:

Well, let me ask you this, sir. Is there -- is there -- you had a lot of adventures in the military, but -- but do you think that your military service changed your life or made you, somehow, a different person, that that service really had an impact on --

Philip G. Adams:

Well, it --

David Healey:

-- how you -- how you grew up?

Philip G. Adams:

It -- it did. For ten years I was unmarried and --

David Healey:

Raising boys --

Philip G. Adams:

-- anguish until you get bit, you know --

David Healey:

Yeah.

Philip G. Adams:

-- until I found my wife, but it was pretty tough there, then trying to rebuild the business that -- that had essentially failed while I was in the service; but finally got her all done and all the debts paid and got to keep a little of the stuff. So --

David Healey:

So --

Philip G. Adams:

-- got along good. And I am so thankful for the service because I was able to -- to get medical care that -- for the injuries that I suffered. It -- it made it wonderful, you know, to -- to be able -- in fact, just Thursday, I met this lady that called me here and --

David Healey:

Uh-huh.

Philip G. Adams:

-- at the VA.

David Healey:

Oh, I see. So you're still able to get good medical care --

Philip G. Adams:

Oh, yeah.

David Healey:

-- at the VA here?

Philip G. Adams:

Oh, yeah. Or wherever. I've been to probably 25 different VAs, in Hawaii and different places. I used to do a lot of volunteer work around the world. We've gone to many different countries and built churches and schools and -- and houses and stuff. You know, we'd take a group of men, and we'd pay our passage and take our own food, and then we'd pay for the material, and they would help us put it up with their methods. We'd learn how to do it their way. So --

David Healey:

And where -- did you ever -- were you ever able to bring some of that learning of the things you did in your -- your missions back to New Mexico or Texas and -- and apply any of it?

Philip G. Adams:

Well, I brought it back to our -- our church. My father's aunt helped establish the church at Pilot Point, Texas, in 1908, and -- she and her husband had 200 churches in the south, and there was a group from the west and the east that didn't have but just two or three churches apiece, and they needed this from the south to do it. And when the uncle made the announcement that he was going in with them and -- for a union -- then they had a big shouting match around the tent, and since then the church has prospered, and they're now a million-and-a-half strong --

David Healey:

Wow.

Philip G. Adams:

-- in just a hundred years.

David Healey:

And what's the name of it?

Philip G. Adams:

Church of the Nazarene.

David Healey:

Oh, wow.

Philip G. Adams:

And most of the people in the church are not from the United States. They're converts from overseas. If all churches had done as good on the mission field as our church, there wouldn't be anybody that hasn't heard.

David Healey:

Wow. Wow. That's something else. So --

Philip G. Adams:

But --

David Healey:

Yeah.

Philip G. Adams:

-- back to your question --

David Healey:

Yeah.

Philip G. Adams:

What did I bring back? I brought back the knowledge, and the friends would help me create an organization in the church of contractors, engineers, and architects to help build stuff around the world; you know, here and there, too, and that turned out to be a wonderful thing, to, you know, help with buildings.

David Healey:

That is -- that is awesome. Did -- did anything you learned in the military and the training you got in the military and the electrical and other stuff ever help you out in that?

Philip G. Adams:

Oh, yeah. Yeah. Yeah. It was -- it was wonderful.

David Healey:

That's great. That's great.

Philip G. Adams:

Yeah. I just -- it has -- I'm just so thankful. But, you know, then, I had the draftee's mentality, and I sure didn't appreciate it, and I am so sorry now that I wasn't a better soldier and a better person.

David Healey:

Well, you know, everybody -- everybody does what they can as they can, and you had some real hard circumstances.

Philip G. Adams:

Well, yeah.

David Healey:

You know? You had -- you had your parents and the business. You know, they sacrificed not just having their son away from home, but they sacrificed a lot of their own personal health and their own personal --

Philip G. Adams:

Yeah.

David Healey:

-- finances because taking you away from them really hurt them health-wise --

Philip G. Adams:

My mother died --

David Healey:

-- and business-wise.

Philip G. Adams:

-- shortly after. So that's --

David Healey:

That's a huge --

Philip G. Adams:

It made it tough.

David Healey:

That's a huge, huge sacrifice that your whole family made.

Philip G. Adams:

Yeah.

David Healey:

And then, you know, you had the problems with your first wife, which, you know, if you'd stayed home in New Mexico, maybe it would've happened, maybe not, but --

Philip G. Adams:

Never know.

David Healey:

-- certainly it got brought out.

Philip G. Adams:

Just never know.

David Healey:

So you had that to deal with, and, you know, it -- there's a lot that -- that you can be -- that you gave up in order to do that service. And so, you know, even though you had, perhaps, been drafted, you know --

Philip G. Adams:

Familiarity.

David Healey:

-- you gave up a whole lot more than most people did.

Philip G. Adams:

Yeah. But just think what the military did for me in saving that boy's live.

David Healey:

And that's -- that's --

Philip G. Adams:

You know, he was born in a military hospital, and he was saved in a military hospital.

David Healey:

Yeah.

Philip G. Adams:

So, you know, you can't put a price on that.

David Healey:

No. That's the greatest --

Philip G. Adams:

That's --

David Healey:

-- greatest return of all.

Philip G. Adams:

Oh, yes.

David Healey:

Yeah. So it sounds like --

Philip G. Adams:

He's up in Idaho now --

David Healey:

Oh, is he?

Philip G. Adams:

-- and has five acres paid off and has moose and deer and all kinds of things like that looking at his screen. You know? And he's got an old apple orchard there that he can shoot deer on, you know --

David Healey:

Oh, yeah.

Philip G. Adams:

-- and -- his own deer that ate his own apples.

David Healey:

Homegrown.

Philip G. Adams:

And he has to go into work on a bridge that's seven miles long, and it's bisected by two railroad tracks from the east and the west, and some way through the mountains there it was a pass -- make it come through there, and this lake, you know, happened to be where the trains cross.

David Healey:

Wow. Now, is he still working in law enforcement?

Philip G. Adams:

No. He -- he got injured and couldn't fire his gun anymore, so after he got his retirement in New Mexico, ten years, and ten years' retirement in Colorado -- when he gets old enough to -- to get it, he'll get those, and he lacks three months of having it at Idaho.

David Healey:

Oh, wow.

Philip G. Adams:

And he hasn't been able to get well enough for a job, but he's a greeter at Walmart.

David Healey:

Oh, okay. Well, that's something --

Philip G. Adams:

He -- he enjoys it.

David Healey:

You know, get out there and --

Philip G. Adams:

Yeah.

David Healey:

-- and be active and see people. That's wonderful. Well, you've had a -- you've had one heck of a lot of interesting adventures and experiences --

Philip G. Adams:

Yeah. We --

David Healey:

-- some really hard and horrible and some just really, you know, incredible.

Philip G. Adams:

We've been all around the world.

David Healey:

Yeah.

Philip G. Adams:

You know? One time we got to go to -- to New Guinea, and a guy that was saved at our local church that was a little older than I was a missionary, he and his wife, and we got to go there to help them build a church in the Highlands and help and be with them. And he took us in his boat fishing out to this -- I think it was a lake, maybe -- anyway, the capital city of New Guinea. There's a waterfront there where the Japanese and American bombers --

David Healey:

Right.

Philip G. Adams:

-- were in the water there. Just -- you know, you can dive down and -- and see them.

David Healey:

Right.

Philip G. Adams:

And it's the beginning of this coralline thing in Australia that Cook found --

David Healey:

Yeah.

Philip G. Adams:

-- you know, there.

David Healey:

Yeah.

Philip G. Adams:

I've got a lot of that coral and shells and stuff like that that he gave me and I -- I brought back.

David Healey:

That's something else.

Philip G. Adams:

And -- and another funny thing that happened: On the way over there, he called the pilot of the plane we were on -- it was a New Guinea airplane, and one of the boys that we had sent care packages to -- one -- one of my cousins was a missionary. They were the Hossó parents for all the white children that were in New Guinea to go to their school, and they had a barracks there. And I sent them a whole -- rest of those chiles that were about three years old. You couldn't use them for nothing, but I just throwed them in just --

David Healey:

That's something else.

Philip G. Adams:

And we threw them in, and -- all that tape and put it around the box, had the seeds on it, and they planted it. They had -- they had New Mexico Anaheim chile peppers all over.

David Healey:

That's something else. That's something else.

Philip G. Adams:

But anyway, he called the pilot of the plane. He had been a child at that hospital where we had sent those packages to.

David Healey:

Wow.

Philip G. Adams:

And he had us come up in the cabin and look at the plane.

David Healey:

That's awesome.

Philip G. Adams:

Real nice little plane.

David Healey:

That's awesome.

Philip G. Adams:

Small, but nice.

David Healey:

That's awesome.

Philip G. Adams:

They had to always fumigate all the cabinets --

David Healey:

Uh-huh.

Philip G. Adams:

-- before they'll let you open them. I don't -- I've never been on a deal like that until there, but in -- in the Far East, they sometimes do that.

David Healey:

Yeah. That's something else. Well, you know, it looks like everybody's got to wrap it up now because they've got another set of folks coming in. So, you know, I really want to thank you for -- for your time. I could -- you know, I could sit here forever and listen to your stories because you've had -- you had a lot more interesting stuff happen in your life, some great, some good, some bad, some awful, but all of it interesting, and it's wonderful to listen to, so I may -- may end up giving you a call to come buy some coffee sometime.

Philip G. Adams:

I'm close by.

David Healey:

Well, I might just do that, just give you a call to -- to just talk to you and hear some more about your -- your stories because they're just wonderful. But I do know that this young woman's got to -- more of these projects to do today, and so we've got to let them use this space and let her take a break.

Philip G. Adams:

We sure do thank you for your kindness.

David Healey:

Thank you. I tell you, you've been a wonderful, wonderful repository of wisdom and experience and just fun stories. I really appreciate it. Thank you. (End of interview.)

 
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  October 26, 2011
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