The American missionary. / Volume 49, Note on Digital Production Creation of machine-readable edition. Cornell University Library 470 page images in volume Cornell University Library Ithaca, NY 1999 ABK5794-0049 /moa/amis/amis0049/

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The American missionary. / Volume 49, Note on Digital Production 0049 000
The American missionary. / Volume 49, Note on Digital Production A-B

The American missionary. / Volume 49, Issue 1 [an electronic edition] Creation of machine-readable edition. Cornell University Library 470 page images in volume Cornell University Library Ithaca, NY 1999 ABK5794-0049 /moa/amis/amis0049/

Restricted to authorized users at Cornell University and the University of Michigan. These materials may not be redistributed.

The American missionary. / Volume 49, Issue 1 Congregational work Pilgrim missionary Congregationalist and herald of gospel liberty American Missionary Association. New York Jan 1895 0049 001
The American missionary. / Volume 49, Issue 1, miscellaneous front pages i-ii

JANUARY, 1895 EDITORIAL. V YEAR AMERICAN MISSIONARYLINCOLN \IEMORIAL DAY iN. FR :DERICK DOUGLASS (Illustrated) CALI. ~OR MISSiONARIES TO ALASKA, 7 iWAPD TORRIS KIRK, D.D. (Illustrate ) EW PAMPHLETS. MERR1LL EDWARDS GATES Illustrated) BUREAU OF WOMANS WORK. NUAL M ETING. MESSAGES FROM UNIONS 1 2 3 4 5 6 8 ADDRESS OF MRS. WM. KINCAID, . . 10 REPORT OF SECRETARY, . . . 12 ADDRESS OF MRS. SUSAN WEBB HALL. (Illustrated.) 16 ADDRESS OF Miss KATE LA GRANGE. (Illustrated.) . . . 17 A PLEA FOR COLORED GIRLS Illus- trated.) 19 INTERBLENDING OF HOME AND FOREIGN MISSIONS 22 ADDRESS OF MISS BELLA W. HUME, . 24 RECEIPTS . 26 NEW YORK PUBLiSHED BY THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION, Bible House, Ninth St. and Fourth Ave., New York. Price. 50 Cents a Year in advance. Entered at the Post Office at New York, N. V., as second-class matter, CONTENTS: ~Unericau (NMs~ionarx~ ~ts~ociat tori. PRESIDENT, MERRILL E. GATES, LL.D., MASS. Vice-Presidents. Rev. F. A~ NoRLE, D.D., Ill. REV. HENRY HOPKINS, D.D., Mo. Rev. ALEX. MCKENZW, D.D., MaSS. REV. HENRY A. STIMSON, D.D., N. Y. REV. WASHINGTON GLADDEN, D.D., Ohio. Oorresjonding Secretaries. Rev. M. E. STRIEBY, D.D., Bib/c House, N. Y. Rev. A. F. BEARD, D.D., Bible House, N. Y. Rev. F. P. WOODBURY, D.D., Bible House, N. Y. A ssistant Corresg5onding Secretary. Rev. C. J. RYDER, D.D., Bible House, N. Y, Recording Secretory. Rev. M. E. STRIEBY, D.D., Bible House, N. Y. Treasurer. HENRY W. HUBBARD, Esq. Bible House, N. Y. A uditors. PETER MCCARTEE. JAMES MITCHELL. Executive Committee. CHARLES L. MEAD, Chairman. CHARLES A. HULL, Secretary. For Three Years. For Two Years. For One Year. WILLIAM HAYES WARD, CHARLES A. HULL, SAMUEL HOLMES, JAMES W. COOPER, ADDISON P. FOSTER, SAMUEL S. MARPLES, LUCIEN C. WARNER, ALBERT J. LYMAN, CHARLES L. MEAD, JOSEPH H. TWICHELL, NEHEMIAH BOYNTON, WILLIAM H. STRONG, CHARLES P. PEIRCE. A. J. F. BEURENDS. ELIJAH HOaR. District Secretaries. Rev. GEo. H. GUTTERSON, 21 Congi House, Boston, Mass. Rev. Jos. E. Roy, D.D., 151 Was/zinFtou Street, Chicago, IlL Rev. W. L. C. WRIGHT, D.D., ConglI/ooms, Y.M.C.A. Building, Cleveland, Ohio. Secretary of Womans Bureau. Miss D. E. EMERSON, Bible House, N. Y. COMMUNICATIONS Relating to the work of the Association may be addressed to the Corresponding Secretaries; letters for THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY, to the Editor, at the New York Office; letters relating to the finances, to the Treasurer; letters relating to womans work, to the Secretary of the Womans Bureau. DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS In drafts, checks, registered letters, or post-office orders, may be sent to H. W. Hubbard, Treasurer, Bible House, New York, or, when more convenient, to either of the Branch Offices, 21 Congregational House, Boston, Mass., 151 Washington Street, Chicago, Ill., or Congregational Rooms, Y. M. C. A. Building, Cleveland, Ohio. A payment of thirty dollars constitutes a Life Member. NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS. The date on the address label indicates the time to which the subscription is paid. Changes are made in date on label to the 10th of each month. If payment of subscription be made afterward the change on the label will appear a month later. Please send early notice of change in post-office address, giving the former address and the new address, in order that our periodi- cals and occasional papers may be correctly mailed. FORM OF A BEQUEST. I GIVE AND BEQUEATH the sum of dollars to the American Mission- ary Association, incorporated by act of the Legislature of the State of New York. The will should be attested by three witnesses. - -

The New Year Editorial 1-2

\AJ 6~// THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY VOL. XLIX. JANUARY, 1895. No. i. THE NEW YEAR. We extend the greetings of the New Year to the friends of the As- sociation. But we shall attempt to utter no fine words in reference to the year past or the year to come. The New Year opens to us with an array of formidable difficulties demanding vigorous efforts and effective co~$peration. These are the payment of our debt and the continuance of the work now in hand. If the debt is not seriously reduced during the com- ing winter the appropriations for next year must be cut down beyond all precedent in our past history. Efficient help now will avert this sad reduction and be of much more service than at any future time. Our dependence under God for relief is as ever on those tried friends who have sustained our work in the past, and whose interest in the needy poor we are sure will not flag. But we take the liberty of sug- gesting some special methods that, if adopted, will give greater relief. i. There may be friends of these poor races, who, in the good prov- idence of God, have not suffered during the financial pressure, and who have in their hearts been devising liberal things for the Associa- tion, either by direct gift or by legacy. Now, if one or more of such friends would make a gift that would decidedly reduce our debt, or would endow or provide for the support for one year of one of our larger institutions, they woulcf do much to save disaster that must other- wise inevitably come. 2. There are churches whose pastors or some of whose members are specially interested in some of our schools or churchesa teacher may have gone from the churchwho would find a great satisfaction in pledging the support of one of these schools or teachers,, and would un- doubtedly find it possible to raise a larger collection for such specific object than for the general cause. 3. Many persons intend to aid the missionary societies in their times AMERICAN MISSIONAR YLINCOLN DA K 2 of great need, but the purpose is forgotten, and when the collection is taken the same old sum is put into the plate. But such a purpose is worth remembering, and that can be secured by planning to give a cer- tain per cent. in advance over last yearfor example, 20 per cent. $6 instead of $5, $12 instead of $io. Such an advance would be but a little sacrifice to the individual, but the aggregate would be a large help to the Association. 4. We cheerfully accept the doctrine that a man is to give accordi0ng to that which he hath, and not according to that which he hath not, and that he should give as the Lord has prospered him. Nor do we fail to remember that marvelous story in which it is told that a great treasury was more than doubled by the gift of two mites which make one farth- ing. THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY. It affords us pleasure to present to our readers THE AMERICAN Mis- SLONARY with a new face, and aLtractive pictures inside. A better quality of paper enables us to give pictures satisfactorily, and it is our purpose to use these quite freely. We intend in successive numbers to give special details of our institutions, presenting pictures of buildings, classrooms, shops, kitchens, and other forms of active and practical life, together with sketches of their history, etc. At other times a number will be devoted to the mountain work, another to Indian work, another to the Chinese work, and others to the great work among the Negroes. In other numbers pictures will be presented of prominent workers, pioneers in difficult fields at home and abroad, and others who have had special usefulness in the work of the Association. In the pre- sent number we give portraits of Dr. Kirk, the fourth president of the Association, Dr. Gates, who holds that position now, and of Frederick Douglass, the American orator. This number also contains the report of our Womans Meeting at Lowell. LINCOLN MEMORIAL DAY. Lasi year a committee of gentlemen appointed at the previous annual meeting of the Association made an appeal to the churches for a special contribution to this Association on the Sunday nearest to the birth of Abraham Lincoln. There was also a Concert Exercise prepared for the use of Sunday-schools, giving a sketch of the life of the Great Emanci- pator. We hope that pastors, as far as may seem consistent, will give emphasis to our work on that memorial day. We have copies remaining of the Concert Exercise which we will gladly forward when requested to

The American Missionary Editorial 2

AMERICAN MISSIONAR YLINCOLN DA K 2 of great need, but the purpose is forgotten, and when the collection is taken the same old sum is put into the plate. But such a purpose is worth remembering, and that can be secured by planning to give a cer- tain per cent. in advance over last yearfor example, 20 per cent. $6 instead of $5, $12 instead of $io. Such an advance would be but a little sacrifice to the individual, but the aggregate would be a large help to the Association. 4. We cheerfully accept the doctrine that a man is to give accordi0ng to that which he hath, and not according to that which he hath not, and that he should give as the Lord has prospered him. Nor do we fail to remember that marvelous story in which it is told that a great treasury was more than doubled by the gift of two mites which make one farth- ing. THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY. It affords us pleasure to present to our readers THE AMERICAN Mis- SLONARY with a new face, and aLtractive pictures inside. A better quality of paper enables us to give pictures satisfactorily, and it is our purpose to use these quite freely. We intend in successive numbers to give special details of our institutions, presenting pictures of buildings, classrooms, shops, kitchens, and other forms of active and practical life, together with sketches of their history, etc. At other times a number will be devoted to the mountain work, another to Indian work, another to the Chinese work, and others to the great work among the Negroes. In other numbers pictures will be presented of prominent workers, pioneers in difficult fields at home and abroad, and others who have had special usefulness in the work of the Association. In the pre- sent number we give portraits of Dr. Kirk, the fourth president of the Association, Dr. Gates, who holds that position now, and of Frederick Douglass, the American orator. This number also contains the report of our Womans Meeting at Lowell. LINCOLN MEMORIAL DAY. Lasi year a committee of gentlemen appointed at the previous annual meeting of the Association made an appeal to the churches for a special contribution to this Association on the Sunday nearest to the birth of Abraham Lincoln. There was also a Concert Exercise prepared for the use of Sunday-schools, giving a sketch of the life of the Great Emanci- pator. We hope that pastors, as far as may seem consistent, will give emphasis to our work on that memorial day. We have copies remaining of the Concert Exercise which we will gladly forward when requested to

Lincoln Memorial Day Editorial 2-3

AMERICAN MISSIONAR YLINCOLN DA K 2 of great need, but the purpose is forgotten, and when the collection is taken the same old sum is put into the plate. But such a purpose is worth remembering, and that can be secured by planning to give a cer- tain per cent. in advance over last yearfor example, 20 per cent. $6 instead of $5, $12 instead of $io. Such an advance would be but a little sacrifice to the individual, but the aggregate would be a large help to the Association. 4. We cheerfully accept the doctrine that a man is to give accordi0ng to that which he hath, and not according to that which he hath not, and that he should give as the Lord has prospered him. Nor do we fail to remember that marvelous story in which it is told that a great treasury was more than doubled by the gift of two mites which make one farth- ing. THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY. It affords us pleasure to present to our readers THE AMERICAN Mis- SLONARY with a new face, and aLtractive pictures inside. A better quality of paper enables us to give pictures satisfactorily, and it is our purpose to use these quite freely. We intend in successive numbers to give special details of our institutions, presenting pictures of buildings, classrooms, shops, kitchens, and other forms of active and practical life, together with sketches of their history, etc. At other times a number will be devoted to the mountain work, another to Indian work, another to the Chinese work, and others to the great work among the Negroes. In other numbers pictures will be presented of prominent workers, pioneers in difficult fields at home and abroad, and others who have had special usefulness in the work of the Association. In the pre- sent number we give portraits of Dr. Kirk, the fourth president of the Association, Dr. Gates, who holds that position now, and of Frederick Douglass, the American orator. This number also contains the report of our Womans Meeting at Lowell. LINCOLN MEMORIAL DAY. Lasi year a committee of gentlemen appointed at the previous annual meeting of the Association made an appeal to the churches for a special contribution to this Association on the Sunday nearest to the birth of Abraham Lincoln. There was also a Concert Exercise prepared for the use of Sunday-schools, giving a sketch of the life of the Great Emanci- pator. We hope that pastors, as far as may seem consistent, will give emphasis to our work on that memorial day. We have copies remaining of the Concert Exercise which we will gladly forward when requested to HON. FREDERIGK DOUGLASS. 3 do so. Pastors and school superintendents may vary this exercise by introducing other patriotic addresses or hymns in place of those given. HON. FREDERICK DOUGLASS. The December number of the Century contains a very touching sketch of a visit made by Frederick Douglass when he was Marshal of the Dis- trict of Columbia to the place of his birth on the eastern shore of Mary- land. It tells how he was welcomed by the members of his old masters family, and was conducted over the estate from spot to spot that he remembered and described with all their childish associations; here a spring, there a hedge, a lane, a field, a tree. HON. FREDERICK DOUGLASS.

Hon. Frederick Douglass Editorial 3-4

HON. FREDERIGK DOUGLASS. 3 do so. Pastors and school superintendents may vary this exercise by introducing other patriotic addresses or hymns in place of those given. HON. FREDERICK DOUGLASS. The December number of the Century contains a very touching sketch of a visit made by Frederick Douglass when he was Marshal of the Dis- trict of Columbia to the place of his birth on the eastern shore of Mary- land. It tells how he was welcomed by the members of his old masters family, and was conducted over the estate from spot to spot that he remembered and described with all their childish associations; here a spring, there a hedge, a lane, a field, a tree. HON. FREDERICK DOUGLASS. 4 CALL FOR MISSIONARIES TO ALASKA. Frederick Douglass had another welcome meeting at the late anni- versary of the American Missionary Association in Lowell, Mass., where he met, not the former slaveholders and their descendants, but the friends with whom for so long he has battled against slavery. Mr. Douglass, as is well known, escaped from the South early in life, spent some little time in such labor as came to his hand, but soon was recognized as one of the leaders of the hosts against slavery. His sub- sequent career as a lecturer, an editor, a traveler abroad, and a United States officer here and at Hayti, are familiar to the public. Mr. Douglass had frequently been invited to our annual meetings, but other engage- ments had prevented his attendance. He came now in the ripeness of his years, crowned with his honors and able to deliver a most effective defence of a struggling and rising race. He expressed his great grati- tude for the beneficent work which this Association has done and i~ still doing for the people with whom he is identified. A CALL FOR MISSIONARIES TO ALASKA. Our readers are aware that, owing to the tragic death of Mr. Thorn- ton in Alaska and the removal of Mr. Lopp to take charge of the Rein- deer Station at Port Clarence, our mission station at Cape Prince of Wales, Alaska, was closed during last year. Mr. Lopp and his wife have now returned to the mission and have reopened the school under fa- vorable auspices. But Mr. Lopp and his wife wish to return home next summer, after five years experience in that cold climate, and we desire to find a suitable minister and his wife to take their place. The field is an inviting one. The Eskimos are a rude, barbarous people, but during the continuance of the mission they crowded the school building so that the scholars had to be admitted in succession, and could the school have been continued most favorable results might have been anticipated. But the mission is remote, Cape Prince of Wales being near the Arctic Circle, and the westernmost point of land of the United States. Communication can be had back and forth but once a year. Our call is, therefore, to a consecrated man and woman not be- yond middle life, without children, and willing to remain at least three years. Further information will be cheerfully communicated by application in person or by letter to this office. EDWARD NORRIS KIRK, D.D. Dr. Kirk, the fourth president of the American Missionary Associa- tion, is well remembered as a man of marked ability, an evangelist of great success, an ardent friend of temperance, and pastor for years at

A Call for Missionaries to Alaska Editorial 4-5

4 CALL FOR MISSIONARIES TO ALASKA. Frederick Douglass had another welcome meeting at the late anni- versary of the American Missionary Association in Lowell, Mass., where he met, not the former slaveholders and their descendants, but the friends with whom for so long he has battled against slavery. Mr. Douglass, as is well known, escaped from the South early in life, spent some little time in such labor as came to his hand, but soon was recognized as one of the leaders of the hosts against slavery. His sub- sequent career as a lecturer, an editor, a traveler abroad, and a United States officer here and at Hayti, are familiar to the public. Mr. Douglass had frequently been invited to our annual meetings, but other engage- ments had prevented his attendance. He came now in the ripeness of his years, crowned with his honors and able to deliver a most effective defence of a struggling and rising race. He expressed his great grati- tude for the beneficent work which this Association has done and i~ still doing for the people with whom he is identified. A CALL FOR MISSIONARIES TO ALASKA. Our readers are aware that, owing to the tragic death of Mr. Thorn- ton in Alaska and the removal of Mr. Lopp to take charge of the Rein- deer Station at Port Clarence, our mission station at Cape Prince of Wales, Alaska, was closed during last year. Mr. Lopp and his wife have now returned to the mission and have reopened the school under fa- vorable auspices. But Mr. Lopp and his wife wish to return home next summer, after five years experience in that cold climate, and we desire to find a suitable minister and his wife to take their place. The field is an inviting one. The Eskimos are a rude, barbarous people, but during the continuance of the mission they crowded the school building so that the scholars had to be admitted in succession, and could the school have been continued most favorable results might have been anticipated. But the mission is remote, Cape Prince of Wales being near the Arctic Circle, and the westernmost point of land of the United States. Communication can be had back and forth but once a year. Our call is, therefore, to a consecrated man and woman not be- yond middle life, without children, and willing to remain at least three years. Further information will be cheerfully communicated by application in person or by letter to this office. EDWARD NORRIS KIRK, D.D. Dr. Kirk, the fourth president of the American Missionary Associa- tion, is well remembered as a man of marked ability, an evangelist of great success, an ardent friend of temperance, and pastor for years at ED WARD NORRIS KIRK, D.D. 5 Albany and Boston. During his latter years he was relied on as a speaker at the anniversaries of almost every religious national gathering. But Dr. Kirk was specially fitted for the position as president of this Association. When Garrison was an apprentice in a country printing office, and when Wendell Phillips was a child of nine years, young Kirk, seventeen and a half years old, as a student in the senior class in Prince- ton, delivered an address in strong condemnation of slavery. But there came a time when there was a distinction made between an anti-slavery man and an abolitionist. Dr. Kirk had not as yet arrayed himself among the latter. But as early as 1834, at a meeting held in Albany, the subject was thoroughly discussed, and Dr. Kirk, who was present, arose and said frankly: Brethren, I see that I have been in the wrong, EDWARD NORRIS KIRK, D.D.

Edward Norris Kirk, D.D. Editorial 5-6

ED WARD NORRIS KIRK, D.D. 5 Albany and Boston. During his latter years he was relied on as a speaker at the anniversaries of almost every religious national gathering. But Dr. Kirk was specially fitted for the position as president of this Association. When Garrison was an apprentice in a country printing office, and when Wendell Phillips was a child of nine years, young Kirk, seventeen and a half years old, as a student in the senior class in Prince- ton, delivered an address in strong condemnation of slavery. But there came a time when there was a distinction made between an anti-slavery man and an abolitionist. Dr. Kirk had not as yet arrayed himself among the latter. But as early as 1834, at a meeting held in Albany, the subject was thoroughly discussed, and Dr. Kirk, who was present, arose and said frankly: Brethren, I see that I have been in the wrong, EDWARD NORRIS KIRK, D.D. 6 NEW PAMPHLETS. and from that day onward his pulpit was open to some of the most pro- nounced abolitionists. In 1865, when the Association was just entering upon its great work among the emancipated slaves, it was felt that this society needed as its president a man of wide influence, strong character, and with special interest in the work. The election of Dr. Kirk at the annual meeting held in Brooklyn, N. Y., was recognized as putting the right man in the place. His subsequent service of nine years fully vindicated the wisdom of the choice. NEW PAMPHLETS. Our recent annual meeting has given us a vast body of very interest- ing and useful literature. A large share of this was embodied in the last number of THE AMERICAN MIssIONARy, but the following addresses are put in pamphlet formthat of Drs. Loba, Abbott, McKenzie, Stimson, Clark, Beard, and Hon. Frederick Douglass. Copies of these will be gladly furnished on application. MERRILL EDWARDS GATES, LL.D. Dr. Gates was elected president of the American Missionary Associa- tion two years ago, and has shown himself to be a very efficient presid- ing officer, thoroughly acquainted with the work of this Association and in sympathy with it. He entered upon this position in the prime of a vigorous manhood, and had already made his mark strongly in many useful directionsas a teacher, writer, and speaker. He is a scholar and thinker, and in his wide range of knowledge, and on all ques- tions of civic, educational, philanthropic and religious topics, he has shown himself so competent as to be constantly in demand as a speaker. His career as a teacher began in Albany, N. Y., where his work was remarkably successful. After a year spent abroad he was elected presi- dent of Rutgers College in New Brunswick, N. J. Here he spent eight years of very effective work, and was then called to the presidency of Oberlin College and Amherst College. After due deliberation he ac-. cepted the latter. For several years he has been president of the Board of Indian Commissioners, and has ~presided at the Mohonk Conference. Dr. Gates had early training in his opposition to slavery. His father, Hon. Seth M. Gates, was a member of Congress and a man

New Pamphlets Editorial 6

6 NEW PAMPHLETS. and from that day onward his pulpit was open to some of the most pro- nounced abolitionists. In 1865, when the Association was just entering upon its great work among the emancipated slaves, it was felt that this society needed as its president a man of wide influence, strong character, and with special interest in the work. The election of Dr. Kirk at the annual meeting held in Brooklyn, N. Y., was recognized as putting the right man in the place. His subsequent service of nine years fully vindicated the wisdom of the choice. NEW PAMPHLETS. Our recent annual meeting has given us a vast body of very interest- ing and useful literature. A large share of this was embodied in the last number of THE AMERICAN MIssIONARy, but the following addresses are put in pamphlet formthat of Drs. Loba, Abbott, McKenzie, Stimson, Clark, Beard, and Hon. Frederick Douglass. Copies of these will be gladly furnished on application. MERRILL EDWARDS GATES, LL.D. Dr. Gates was elected president of the American Missionary Associa- tion two years ago, and has shown himself to be a very efficient presid- ing officer, thoroughly acquainted with the work of this Association and in sympathy with it. He entered upon this position in the prime of a vigorous manhood, and had already made his mark strongly in many useful directionsas a teacher, writer, and speaker. He is a scholar and thinker, and in his wide range of knowledge, and on all ques- tions of civic, educational, philanthropic and religious topics, he has shown himself so competent as to be constantly in demand as a speaker. His career as a teacher began in Albany, N. Y., where his work was remarkably successful. After a year spent abroad he was elected presi- dent of Rutgers College in New Brunswick, N. J. Here he spent eight years of very effective work, and was then called to the presidency of Oberlin College and Amherst College. After due deliberation he ac-. cepted the latter. For several years he has been president of the Board of Indian Commissioners, and has ~presided at the Mohonk Conference. Dr. Gates had early training in his opposition to slavery. His father, Hon. Seth M. Gates, was a member of Congress and a man

Merrill Edward Gates, LL.D. Editorial 6-8

6 NEW PAMPHLETS. and from that day onward his pulpit was open to some of the most pro- nounced abolitionists. In 1865, when the Association was just entering upon its great work among the emancipated slaves, it was felt that this society needed as its president a man of wide influence, strong character, and with special interest in the work. The election of Dr. Kirk at the annual meeting held in Brooklyn, N. Y., was recognized as putting the right man in the place. His subsequent service of nine years fully vindicated the wisdom of the choice. NEW PAMPHLETS. Our recent annual meeting has given us a vast body of very interest- ing and useful literature. A large share of this was embodied in the last number of THE AMERICAN MIssIONARy, but the following addresses are put in pamphlet formthat of Drs. Loba, Abbott, McKenzie, Stimson, Clark, Beard, and Hon. Frederick Douglass. Copies of these will be gladly furnished on application. MERRILL EDWARDS GATES, LL.D. Dr. Gates was elected president of the American Missionary Associa- tion two years ago, and has shown himself to be a very efficient presid- ing officer, thoroughly acquainted with the work of this Association and in sympathy with it. He entered upon this position in the prime of a vigorous manhood, and had already made his mark strongly in many useful directionsas a teacher, writer, and speaker. He is a scholar and thinker, and in his wide range of knowledge, and on all ques- tions of civic, educational, philanthropic and religious topics, he has shown himself so competent as to be constantly in demand as a speaker. His career as a teacher began in Albany, N. Y., where his work was remarkably successful. After a year spent abroad he was elected presi- dent of Rutgers College in New Brunswick, N. J. Here he spent eight years of very effective work, and was then called to the presidency of Oberlin College and Amherst College. After due deliberation he ac-. cepted the latter. For several years he has been president of the Board of Indian Commissioners, and has ~presided at the Mohonk Conference. Dr. Gates had early training in his opposition to slavery. His father, Hon. Seth M. Gates, was a member of Congress and a man MERRILL EDWARDS GATES, LL.D. 7 of marked ability and influence, and willing to place himself on the side of the unpopular abolitionists. In Congress he introduced a protest against the annexation of Texasa protest that has sometimes been erroneously attributed to John Quincy Adams. Among the promi- nent anti-slavery men who visited his fathers house, and whose in- fluence the son felt through his whole life, were John Quincy Adams, Gerrit Smith, Joshua Giddings and Frederick Douglass. It was inter- esting that this last honored man should stand on the platform at Low- ell with Dr. Gates as the presiding officer. [We are indebted to T/te Advance for the plate of the excellent picture of Dr. Gates.] MERRILL EDWARDS GATES, LL.D. 8 BUREAU OF WOMANS WORK. BUREAU OF WOMANS WORK. MISS D. E. EMERSON SECRETARY. ANNUAL MEETING. There was no sign of weariness, but rather an evidence of fresh inter- est, as the large audience gathered in the First Church, Lowell, on Thursday afternoon, for the Womans meeting of the American Missionary Association. Expectation of a varied programme was given by the number of ladies seated on the platform. Never before has the Womans Work been so well represented by the co~3perating auxiliaries. There were present Mrs. Burbank, of the Maine Womans Aid; Miss McFarland, Treasurer of the New Hampshire Union; Mrs. Babbitt, President of Vermont Union: Mrs. Kellogg, the new Secret~try of the Massachusetts and Rhode Island organization, with Miss Wilcox, Secretary of the childrens department; Miss Camp, President of the Connecticut Union; Mrs. Kincaid, Presi- dent of the New York Union; Mrs. Herrick, representing Florida, and Miss Hume, President of the Union of Louisiana. Following the devotional exercises, which were led by Miss Anna Harlow, the pastors assistant, each representative of the Unions spoke briefly, of the work undertaken for the A. M. A. by the auxiliaries within her territory. Very interesting messages had been sent from the Unions of Peiinsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Michigan, Kansas, Missouri, California, North Carolina, Alabama, Ten- nessee, Nebraska, and other States, and we regretted that limited time compelled so brief a reference to them. We are happy to give extracts from some of them in these pages. Certainly the shields bearing the names of our United States, placed close together around the entire front of the circular gallery, took new significance as Womans Work was reported from the East and West, the North and South. In connec- tion with these reports came Mrs. Kincaids thoughtful paper on The Relation of the Unions to the National Societies, followed by the an- nual report of the Womans Bureau, ~and then the missionary addresses, so full of vivid description of the field, of faith, hope and encourage- ment. Space permits only limited extracts from these addresses of the field workers, and we are obliged to omit Miss Lords on the Indian work, but they will be printed in full in leaflet form. FROM MRS. CLAFLIN, PRESmENT OF THE ILLINOIS UNION. If we are to covet earnestly the best gifts we certainly may covet the best privileges and inspiration of the best meeting. I assure you the

Annual Meeting Bureau of Woman's Work 8-10

8 BUREAU OF WOMANS WORK. BUREAU OF WOMANS WORK. MISS D. E. EMERSON SECRETARY. ANNUAL MEETING. There was no sign of weariness, but rather an evidence of fresh inter- est, as the large audience gathered in the First Church, Lowell, on Thursday afternoon, for the Womans meeting of the American Missionary Association. Expectation of a varied programme was given by the number of ladies seated on the platform. Never before has the Womans Work been so well represented by the co~3perating auxiliaries. There were present Mrs. Burbank, of the Maine Womans Aid; Miss McFarland, Treasurer of the New Hampshire Union; Mrs. Babbitt, President of Vermont Union: Mrs. Kellogg, the new Secret~try of the Massachusetts and Rhode Island organization, with Miss Wilcox, Secretary of the childrens department; Miss Camp, President of the Connecticut Union; Mrs. Kincaid, Presi- dent of the New York Union; Mrs. Herrick, representing Florida, and Miss Hume, President of the Union of Louisiana. Following the devotional exercises, which were led by Miss Anna Harlow, the pastors assistant, each representative of the Unions spoke briefly, of the work undertaken for the A. M. A. by the auxiliaries within her territory. Very interesting messages had been sent from the Unions of Peiinsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Michigan, Kansas, Missouri, California, North Carolina, Alabama, Ten- nessee, Nebraska, and other States, and we regretted that limited time compelled so brief a reference to them. We are happy to give extracts from some of them in these pages. Certainly the shields bearing the names of our United States, placed close together around the entire front of the circular gallery, took new significance as Womans Work was reported from the East and West, the North and South. In connec- tion with these reports came Mrs. Kincaids thoughtful paper on The Relation of the Unions to the National Societies, followed by the an- nual report of the Womans Bureau, ~and then the missionary addresses, so full of vivid description of the field, of faith, hope and encourage- ment. Space permits only limited extracts from these addresses of the field workers, and we are obliged to omit Miss Lords on the Indian work, but they will be printed in full in leaflet form. FROM MRS. CLAFLIN, PRESmENT OF THE ILLINOIS UNION. If we are to covet earnestly the best gifts we certainly may covet the best privileges and inspiration of the best meeting. I assure you the MESSA GES FROM UNIONS. 9 Illinois Union would be well represented if wishing could make it pos- sible; but this year, instead of going up to the feast, we must be glean- ing our almost barren fields, hoping that by extra diligence we may make a little advance in the amount we sent you last year. Our plan of work this year for the American Missionary Association is the salary of two teachers among the Colored People, one for the Mountain Whites, one for the Indians, four hundred dollars for Indian Hospital, and two hundred and fifty for Chinese work; total, $2,250. We pray that in some way the Lord will provide not only for your present necessities, but for great enlargement of all work of the American Missionary Association. FROM MRS. C. W. NIcHoLS, PRESIDENT MINNESOTA UNION. Our Minnesota Union bids the A. M. A. God speed! We hope to take care of Miss Miners salaryhelp some at Blowing Rock and Lincoln Academy, and take up a special sum towards the Indian work. We want to do solnething to help raise the deficit caused by your giving up government aid for Indian schoolsand we have thought we might do that by making a special effort in some kind of Indian work. We will do what we can. FROM MISS FARRINGTON, SEcRETARY OF NORTH CAROLINA UNION. Though it has been a hard year, yet we have been able to accomplish a little for Him who has done so Inuch for us. We are weak, both numerically and financially, most of our members living in the country, where the money is very scarce; but when the loud call came last February for contributions for the A. M. A. many of the women gave for that cause, some giving their last penny to help the noble society which has been such a blessing to them. May this be a year of great spiritual blessing to all proving the truth of the promise, The liberal soul shall be made fat, and he that watereth shall be watered also him- self. FROM MRS. E. C. BELL, PRESIDENT OF INDIANA UNION. The W. H. M. U. of Indiana sends greetings, and if kind wishes and prayers are of any value,count for anythingthen you are encircled by our wishes and encouraged by our prayers. Your work appeals powerfully to us, and we wish we could do more. Perhaps we may this year; we will try. We hope you may have an inspiring and helpful meeting. FROM MRS. H. H. ROBBINS, SEcRETARY OF IOWA UNION. The women of Iowa wish to express to you their ready sympathy for the work, and their hearty co-operation in every plan which tends to enlarge it or to make it more efficient. We recognize that the most To ADDRESS OF MRS. RINGAID. serious problem pressing upon our nation to-day is the race problem, with all its complexities. We believe that its solution largely lies in such educative work as is being done by the A. M. A. As patriotic women with the nations welfare at heart, we wish a share in the work. FROM MRS. ELLA SHEPPARD MOORE, PRESIDENT OF TENNESSEE UNION. The Womans Union of the Tennessee Association sends greeting to the American Missionary Association and to the sister Unions. The Association is to us a loving parent, and we most affectionately send a loving message from the inspired word, Therefore be ye steadfast, unmovable, always Thounding in the work of the Lord, for as much as ye know that your labor is not in vain in the Lord. Perhaps you realize but little of what you are accomplishing, but the small seed is springing up over this once neglected land and the promise is being ful- filled before our eyes, so Let us not be weary in well-doing, for in due season we shall reap if we faint not. May the dear Lord guide the Womans Unions to larger usefulness in this field for His Names sake. FROM MRS. GEORGE LANE, PRESIDENT MICHIGAN UNION. I enclose some stanzas written by Mrs. Merrill E. Gates, as embody- ing the desire of the women of the Michigan Union, with the assurance that we will endeavor to do our part in the sending forth and sustaining of these, the Kings messengers: (This hymn was read with great ED.) Send Thou, 0 Lord, to every place Swift messengers before Thy face, The heralds of Thy wondrous grace, Where Thou, Thyself, wilt come. Send those whose eyes have seen the King; Those in whose ears His sweet words ring; Send such Thy lost ones home to bring; Send them where Thou wilt come. feeling and power by Miss Camp. To bring good news to souls in sin; The bruised and broken hearts to win; In every place to bring them in, Where Thou, Thyself, wilt come. Raise up, 0 Lord, the Holy Ghost, From this broad land a mighty host, Their war cry, We will seek the lost, Where Thou, 0 Christ, wilt come. EXTRACT FROM ADDRESS OF MRS. WM. KINCAID. I speak to-day for our Womans Home Missionary Unions and their relations to the National Societies. Adam was first formed and then Eve. She was to be his help-meet. Our Unions came into being for the same purpcse. In proportion as we fulfill this ideal we shall be a success. The work of our great National Societies for the evangelizing of our land appealed to our hearts. As Congregational women we responded. A mother rocked her baby girl

Extract from Address of Mrs. Wm. Kincaid Bureau of Woman's Work 10-12

To ADDRESS OF MRS. RINGAID. serious problem pressing upon our nation to-day is the race problem, with all its complexities. We believe that its solution largely lies in such educative work as is being done by the A. M. A. As patriotic women with the nations welfare at heart, we wish a share in the work. FROM MRS. ELLA SHEPPARD MOORE, PRESIDENT OF TENNESSEE UNION. The Womans Union of the Tennessee Association sends greeting to the American Missionary Association and to the sister Unions. The Association is to us a loving parent, and we most affectionately send a loving message from the inspired word, Therefore be ye steadfast, unmovable, always Thounding in the work of the Lord, for as much as ye know that your labor is not in vain in the Lord. Perhaps you realize but little of what you are accomplishing, but the small seed is springing up over this once neglected land and the promise is being ful- filled before our eyes, so Let us not be weary in well-doing, for in due season we shall reap if we faint not. May the dear Lord guide the Womans Unions to larger usefulness in this field for His Names sake. FROM MRS. GEORGE LANE, PRESIDENT MICHIGAN UNION. I enclose some stanzas written by Mrs. Merrill E. Gates, as embody- ing the desire of the women of the Michigan Union, with the assurance that we will endeavor to do our part in the sending forth and sustaining of these, the Kings messengers: (This hymn was read with great ED.) Send Thou, 0 Lord, to every place Swift messengers before Thy face, The heralds of Thy wondrous grace, Where Thou, Thyself, wilt come. Send those whose eyes have seen the King; Those in whose ears His sweet words ring; Send such Thy lost ones home to bring; Send them where Thou wilt come. feeling and power by Miss Camp. To bring good news to souls in sin; The bruised and broken hearts to win; In every place to bring them in, Where Thou, Thyself, wilt come. Raise up, 0 Lord, the Holy Ghost, From this broad land a mighty host, Their war cry, We will seek the lost, Where Thou, 0 Christ, wilt come. EXTRACT FROM ADDRESS OF MRS. WM. KINCAID. I speak to-day for our Womans Home Missionary Unions and their relations to the National Societies. Adam was first formed and then Eve. She was to be his help-meet. Our Unions came into being for the same purpcse. In proportion as we fulfill this ideal we shall be a success. The work of our great National Societies for the evangelizing of our land appealed to our hearts. As Congregational women we responded. A mother rocked her baby girl II WOMANS HOME MISSIONAR Y UNIONS. in a quiet parsonage of the interior, and as she rocked, the possibilities and the plan of these Unions came to her. The baptism of a name came later from another still more retired parsonage in New York. We were called Unions because our work was to be for all the National Societies. It was to be a Union work. Other women have thought and planned, but the vision of the mother with the baby upon her breast has been fulfilled. Our Womans Home Missionary Unions are to-day what she thought they would be. They should be helpers to all our National Home Missionary Socie- ties. Whatever national evangelistic work our Congregational churches approve, or shall approve, there is our legitimate field. None of these should be left out in the perfect Union. The money which we raise may be small, but it should, be divided between all the societies. This divi sion should be in proportion to the work which each society has in hand. A Union cannot do less. We, as Unions, should keep ourselves in perfect sympathy with these great National Societies. Their leaflets, their circulars, and their mag- azines, should lie not only on all our tables, but their contents should be in our heads and on our hearts. I am aware that in so doing the latest story often waits unread and our favorite magazine has its leaves long uncut. The Womans Club and the Art League must some- times be passed by, but there are divine compensations, and large spirit- ual and educational results often come from this keen grasp of practi- cal , national providence. Our Unions are the receivers, not the disbursers, of funds. We were not organized for administration. Let us be careful to keep this dis- tinction clearly in mind. When our missionaries are appointed or with- drawn, let us, if we have questions or objections to urge, not speak them to the ear in closets, but present them directly to the National Societies, assured that ~ve shall have a fair hearing. The settlement of questions on the field, however, often puzzling and perplexing, rests en- tirely with the National Societies. We find in practice that special fields and special missionaries often quicken interest and contributions. These are times of ignorance which our National Societies wink at. These ~peciaZs, however, are beset with trials and temptations, and when our millennium comes, all our money will go into general funds. In justice to the work of our National Societies we should make our Union expenses as light as is consistent with successa golden mean between lavishness and niggardliness. The work of our Unions will be best carried on by steady growth, not by erratic spurts. Let us courageously aim each year for a definite and reasonable advance in auxiliaries and contributions. A boom is the worst thing that can happen to a town or a society. A collapse is sure to 12 REPORT OF SECRETARY. follow. A quiet, persistent advance is better for our Unions and better for the National Societies. I recognize the fact that our National Societies must sometimes incur a debt. This is one of the incidents of so large a work of administration, but we, as Unions, will prove most helpful by a steady advance. Debts less and less appeal to people as a reason for increased gifts. The growth and expansion of the work are, however, omnipotent reasons for constant advance. We do not enjoy paying our butcher when the meat is all gone. I have spoken thus far of our relations as Unions to the National Societieshow about their relations to us? In the future mainly as in the past. They have appreciated our work and labor of love. They have known that our auxiliary and state officers have given lavishly of their besttime, strength and money. They have realized that no other unsalaried people have labored for these great causes so dear to their hearts with more of devotion, with more of persistence, or with more of prayer. The National Societies, as in the past, will freely and abundantly supply us with ammunition for our workfresh and interesting literature. They will give us speakers, as they are able, for our meetings. They will read our reports and know of our plans. They will speak well of us in private, and in their appeals to the churches they will respect our treasuries and honor us and our work. REPORT OF SECRETARY, MISS D. E. EMERSON. The year just closed, of which we are called to make report, has brought to us many opportunities for better work, both in connection with our womens organizations and in the mission field, and our first thought in the brief review is of praise to God, not only for what has been done, but for whdt He yet gives us to do. We rejoice in the access we have to this important field of home missions for Negroes, Indians, Chinese and Highlanders, so strong in its appeal to women, where womans work has so large opportunity and unparalleled influence. We are grateful to God for the many true, loyal helpers in this work of the American Missionary Association, for everyone who has given her per- sonal service, whether as field or home worker, and every one who has given her money, self-denyingly, lovingly, to sustain this work. You who together with us have been so busy in various pans for making known the needs of this field, arousing the uninterested, raising the money pledged, and seeking the conditions that would make each years returns to be larger than the last, you know how much that has entered into a twelve months work can never be told. And yet it is well, perhaps, to note some results, if for no other reason Ihan to say to one another, Be of good courage.

Report of Secretary, Miss D. E. Emerson Bureau of Woman's Work 12-16

12 REPORT OF SECRETARY. follow. A quiet, persistent advance is better for our Unions and better for the National Societies. I recognize the fact that our National Societies must sometimes incur a debt. This is one of the incidents of so large a work of administration, but we, as Unions, will prove most helpful by a steady advance. Debts less and less appeal to people as a reason for increased gifts. The growth and expansion of the work are, however, omnipotent reasons for constant advance. We do not enjoy paying our butcher when the meat is all gone. I have spoken thus far of our relations as Unions to the National Societieshow about their relations to us? In the future mainly as in the past. They have appreciated our work and labor of love. They have known that our auxiliary and state officers have given lavishly of their besttime, strength and money. They have realized that no other unsalaried people have labored for these great causes so dear to their hearts with more of devotion, with more of persistence, or with more of prayer. The National Societies, as in the past, will freely and abundantly supply us with ammunition for our workfresh and interesting literature. They will give us speakers, as they are able, for our meetings. They will read our reports and know of our plans. They will speak well of us in private, and in their appeals to the churches they will respect our treasuries and honor us and our work. REPORT OF SECRETARY, MISS D. E. EMERSON. The year just closed, of which we are called to make report, has brought to us many opportunities for better work, both in connection with our womens organizations and in the mission field, and our first thought in the brief review is of praise to God, not only for what has been done, but for whdt He yet gives us to do. We rejoice in the access we have to this important field of home missions for Negroes, Indians, Chinese and Highlanders, so strong in its appeal to women, where womans work has so large opportunity and unparalleled influence. We are grateful to God for the many true, loyal helpers in this work of the American Missionary Association, for everyone who has given her per- sonal service, whether as field or home worker, and every one who has given her money, self-denyingly, lovingly, to sustain this work. You who together with us have been so busy in various pans for making known the needs of this field, arousing the uninterested, raising the money pledged, and seeking the conditions that would make each years returns to be larger than the last, you know how much that has entered into a twelve months work can never be told. And yet it is well, perhaps, to note some results, if for no other reason Ihan to say to one another, Be of good courage. REPORT OF SECRETARY. 3 There are now forty-one organizations for womans work upon practi- cally the Union plan, and it remains but for each such organization to enlarge the place of its tent, lengthen its cords, strengthen its stakes, break forth on the right hand and on the left, and make every desolate church within its district to be inhabited by an auxiliary, a vigorous woman~ s missionary society capable of an intelligent study of missions, and consecrated to self-denying giving for missions. In this we pledge to every Union the hearty co~5peration of the Womans Bureau of the American Missionary Association. - While all these State org~tnizations are planned for aid to the Ameri- can Missionary Association, are in sympathy with it, and desirous to contribute to it, some of them are not yet co~5perating in its support; but from the twenty-nine that have contributed we have received for this work through their treasurers, from Massachusetts and Rhode Island $3,491.87 Maine 2,752.52 Ohio i,859.83 NewYork 1,719.01 Illinois i,469.39 Connecticut i,4i7.77 Iowa 1,320.94 Vermont 1,264.40 lVlinnesota 795.11 New Jersey 580.70 New Hampshire 417.70 Michigan 409.78 Wisconsin 396.98 Nebraska 265.61 Kansas 185.18 Missouri $ Colorado South Dakota Alabama Pennsylvania Oregon Southern California.... Tennessee, Kentucky and Arkansas California Indiana North Dakota Florida North Carolina Louisiana amounting to $19,185.24. From other womens societies and young peoples bands (additional to $4, 180.40 from Christian Endeavor Socie- ties) we have received $4,593.28; a total of $23,778.52, and an advance of $2,892.38 over the contributions of last year. To all who have thus aided in the support of this work we extend our sincere thanks, and alsp to those who have so thoughtfully aided in sewing for our teachers and boarding-school homes. Especially should we mention the generous work of the New York ladies in renewing the household furnishings in the dormitories of Talladega College. Through our Bureau of Womans Work we have been able, more than ever before, to provide missionary speakers for womens meetings, to furnish programm.es on special departments of work, and material 163.85 149.08 134.79 70.99 68.20 60.99 35.00 33.00 30.00 25.00 23.93 19.00 4.37 10.25 4 REPORT OF SECRETARY. for other programmes. To meet the frequent requests for definite objects of work, the Association has divided the cost of missions in its various fields into portions, thus enabling State organizations, local mis- sionary societies, Christian Endeavor Societies, or Sunday-schools, to have their own special work~such as the support of a missionary at $6oo or $400; Indian scholarships, $I50; mountain white or Negro scholarships, $50; shares in the support of a missionary, $25 each. In response to such assigned contributions the missionary letters have been circulated freely. Forty-two letter writers have written monthly or quarterly from twenty-four mission stations, and contributors have thus learned much of the character of the work and of the every-day life of the missionaries. There is one text of Scripture that has becomo very familiar in con- nection with Womans Work, The Lord giveth the Word. The women that publish the tidings are a great host. Three hundred and ninety women ~nearly four hundredhave been busy in this A. M. A. field of missions during the last year, and of many a one it may be said, She is a host in herself. Lhey have come from our well-known colleges, Wellesley, Mt. Holyoke, Smith, Oberlin, Olivet, Tabor, and from the best normal schools. They have come from homes of refinement and culture, from attractive social and literary circles, and from the very heart of our churches. They have undertaken a difficult work, one that they soon find calls for all their resources, and a slow work not free from discouragements. The love of Christ constraineth them. Some, regardless of any honors that they might win elsewhere, have made this their life-work. In their chosen field of labor they sit beside their Chinese pupils, and make their way through Chinatown to the homes of Chinese women. They live in the humblest quartdrs on the Indian reseivations, or as members of an Indian household in the large board- ing-schools. They go into exile in the Southern mountains, and face there the illiteracy, the feuds, and the terrors of shotguns and whisky, and, bravest of all, they cheerfully endure the withholding of Christian recognition and sympathy that they may help to lift our American Negro race, wronged and then despised, emancipated and yet captive, but from among whom already have developed noble men and women, conquerors of themselx es, their surroundings, and of prejudice. These three hundred and ninety missionary women have been comiected with one hundred and nine of the schools and churches of the American Mis- sionary Association. Very diligently have they published the tidings, and everywhere with good results. From the abundant testimony to this, we mention the recent annual meeting of the Indian Womens Missionary Society, where forty-two Indian societies were represented by delegates, the women coming long REPORT OF SECRETARY. 15 distances to attend; the dignity and self-possession of these Indians as they gave their reports; their sacrifice in working and earning to send missionaries to pagan tribes when ~yet so needy I hemselves. But they realize that in the saving knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ they have the light, and that to send this light to those who remain in darkness is worth all sacrifice. There are hundreds of young colored men and women who go out from our Christian schools every year to the darkest places and most hostile because they have come into the light, and feel that they must bring others out of darkness. We can point to a sweet, simple home-life whereyoung mothers look well to the ways of their households, carefully guard the children from evil associations, and teach them of the Christ-life; because under the guidance of our missionary teachers they, as pupils in the schools, and members of the school homes, were directed into the new life, devel- oped in womanly character, and taught the principles of true home- making. In every part of this A. M. A. field there is marked evidence of wo- mans work and influence. It is indispensable. If we would bring the Indian into Christian civilization there must be homes with intelligent Christian mothers. If we would send light and sweetness and purity to the mountain homes we must so train the children that they will make good mothers. If we would find the manhood and womanhood of our long enslaved Negro race we Thust continue and increase the ministry of a wise womanhood. Should not this be an incentive to women to take a larger part in this large work; with its ii6 schools and 170 churches; with all that they associate of Sunday-schools, women~ s missiouary societies, Christian Endeavor, Y. M. C. X. and temperance work; this large work among four races, requiring with the closest management $400,000 annually? Are we not especially called to a larger part in it by the commission of these three hundred and ninety women missionaries who need our sup- port? The outlook for such help is promising. Never in the history of our womans work have we come to the opening of a year when interest was so manifested, the study of missions so carefully pursued, and the litera- ture so widely in use. Never was the way so plain for a forward move- men t. Let us, then, in this new year, make each State organization a rally- ing point for better service and increased contributions to the American Missionary Association, remembering also the word of our God, Con- cerning the work of my hands,my work,command ye me. ADDRESS OF MRS. SUSAN WEBB HALL. ADDRESS BY MRS. SUSAN WEBB HALL, FORT BERTHOLD, N. DAKOTA. It is ten years since I attended an annual meeting. Then my heart was full of love and zeal for the Indians, as I had learned to know them at Santee for six years. I was ready to live and die for them there, but God had otherwise ordered, and eight years ago I went to Fort Berthold, to a people in the blackness and darkness of heathenism. I seemed to have gone backwards, but my faith and courage were strong, for had I not seen what the power of Gods spirit had done at Santee and other stations among the Sioux? I missed very much the Christian fellowship that I had learned to love in the Indian women at Santee, that unmistakable understanding of kindred spirits in Christ. For six years I worked at Berthold without any of this. We had our Womans meeting, our socials, our visitings; there was a great deal of kindly feeling. I loved the women. I was not discouraged, but some way there was no bottom, no undercurrent, no spring, no life. But now it is all different. In the last two years we have seen a wonderful change, the dawning of the Christ love in darkened hearts, the awaken- ing of the Christ life in dead lives. It has been beautiful. It has been a precious experience. I wish I could impart a little of its joy and beauty to you. I wish I could help you to feel something of the inspir- ation it brings. I would live twice; yes, thrice, those years of darkness if necessary, to witness and feel the power of the dawning. My friends here in the East say, You have lived way out there long enough; for your own sake and your childrens you ought to give up your life and work there. Why, my friends, I have just begun to live there. I never wanted to live and work for the Indians more than I do now. Now we have a band of Christian Indian women to work with us, whose greetings I bring to you, my sisters in Christ. We have Chris- tian homes and Christian mothers, and I cannot express to you the joy and gladness it gives me to tell you this. To show the power of this new life I want to take you into a home. It is our place of meeting, once in two weeks, Sabbath afternoons. Here a trace of the old still remains, for the old man, although friendly, cannot give up his old gods and charms; there they hang on the walls. His daughter for several years has been an earnest Christian school-girl, and has had a quiet, deep influence for Christ at home. Only a few months ago her older sister and husband were married in the Christian

Address by Mrs. Susan Webb Hall Bureau of Woman's Work 16-17

ADDRESS OF MRS. SUSAN WEBB HALL. ADDRESS BY MRS. SUSAN WEBB HALL, FORT BERTHOLD, N. DAKOTA. It is ten years since I attended an annual meeting. Then my heart was full of love and zeal for the Indians, as I had learned to know them at Santee for six years. I was ready to live and die for them there, but God had otherwise ordered, and eight years ago I went to Fort Berthold, to a people in the blackness and darkness of heathenism. I seemed to have gone backwards, but my faith and courage were strong, for had I not seen what the power of Gods spirit had done at Santee and other stations among the Sioux? I missed very much the Christian fellowship that I had learned to love in the Indian women at Santee, that unmistakable understanding of kindred spirits in Christ. For six years I worked at Berthold without any of this. We had our Womans meeting, our socials, our visitings; there was a great deal of kindly feeling. I loved the women. I was not discouraged, but some way there was no bottom, no undercurrent, no spring, no life. But now it is all different. In the last two years we have seen a wonderful change, the dawning of the Christ love in darkened hearts, the awaken- ing of the Christ life in dead lives. It has been beautiful. It has been a precious experience. I wish I could impart a little of its joy and beauty to you. I wish I could help you to feel something of the inspir- ation it brings. I would live twice; yes, thrice, those years of darkness if necessary, to witness and feel the power of the dawning. My friends here in the East say, You have lived way out there long enough; for your own sake and your childrens you ought to give up your life and work there. Why, my friends, I have just begun to live there. I never wanted to live and work for the Indians more than I do now. Now we have a band of Christian Indian women to work with us, whose greetings I bring to you, my sisters in Christ. We have Chris- tian homes and Christian mothers, and I cannot express to you the joy and gladness it gives me to tell you this. To show the power of this new life I want to take you into a home. It is our place of meeting, once in two weeks, Sabbath afternoons. Here a trace of the old still remains, for the old man, although friendly, cannot give up his old gods and charms; there they hang on the walls. His daughter for several years has been an earnest Christian school-girl, and has had a quiet, deep influence for Christ at home. Only a few months ago her older sister and husband were married in the Christian ADDRLSS OF MISS KATE LA GRANGE. 7 way, preparatory to their uniting with our church. Their little children were baptized and received English names, as did also the parents. Now every Sabbath when we go to the home the room is neatly pre- pared, boxes and seats of all sorts placed around, and our hearts made glad by evidences of Christian love in the hearts of these disciples. All things through Gods spirit are possible for these people. Pray for them and for us, and I beg of you, my friends, to enlarge your gifts rather than retrench. Never was the field whiter to the harvest, never had you so large opportunities. EXTRACT FROM ADDRESS OF MISS KATE LA GRANGE. I have been working in East Tennessee, in what is called the Moun- tain White field. The question is often asked, who are those people? I can onl-,T say that every man I have met in Tennessee is proud of his State history, and such men must have some noble blood in their veins. These people are very hospitable. They will welcome you into their homes, though you may have to sleep in the same room with a dozen others, They will give you corn bread and sorghum molasses and roasted sweet potatoes, but you are just as welcome as if it were a tur FORT BERTHOLD.

Extract from Address of Miss Kate La Grange Bureau of Woman's Work 17-19

ADDRLSS OF MISS KATE LA GRANGE. 7 way, preparatory to their uniting with our church. Their little children were baptized and received English names, as did also the parents. Now every Sabbath when we go to the home the room is neatly pre- pared, boxes and seats of all sorts placed around, and our hearts made glad by evidences of Christian love in the hearts of these disciples. All things through Gods spirit are possible for these people. Pray for them and for us, and I beg of you, my friends, to enlarge your gifts rather than retrench. Never was the field whiter to the harvest, never had you so large opportunities. EXTRACT FROM ADDRESS OF MISS KATE LA GRANGE. I have been working in East Tennessee, in what is called the Moun- tain White field. The question is often asked, who are those people? I can onl-,T say that every man I have met in Tennessee is proud of his State history, and such men must have some noble blood in their veins. These people are very hospitable. They will welcome you into their homes, though you may have to sleep in the same room with a dozen others, They will give you corn bread and sorghum molasses and roasted sweet potatoes, but you are just as welcome as if it were a tur FORT BERTHOLD. i8 MOUNTAIN PEOPLE. key dinner. There is something in the spirit of these people that makes you feel that their hospitality is sincere. Our greatest hope lies in reaching the mothers and the children. We cannot hope to reach a great many of the older people who have gone on in the old ways, but invariably when I go to the mothers and say to them, Are you with us in this matter of the education of your chil dren? they reply, Take my children and do all you can for them. Not long ago I visited a mother who lived in a valley. I had to cross two high mountains to reach her home. I asked her why she was so much broken in health and why she seemed so old beyond her years. She said she had married at sixteen and had helped do all the work on the farm. I have seen little girls nine years old plowing all day long. This mountain mother had a burning desire that her children should be edu- cated. Take them, she said, at any cost. The father is now working hard to pay for the tuition of his children. The young women want work, and they are equally ambitious with the young men. A mountain mother said to me, I have had fourteen children to care for; I am fifty years old, and 1 have never seen a railroad train. Yet this woman only lived ten miles from the railroad. Think of it! Never been outside of a radius of ten miles from her own home. That illus- trates their isolation. We have only given a taste of Christian refinement to these mountain peoplejust enough to make them hungry for more. The figures of our schools growth are significant. In two years it grew from 40 to ii~ the MOUNTAIN CABIN. A PLEA FOR COLORED GIRLS. t9 Sunday-school from 12 to ~ the Christian Endeavor Society from no- thing to 5o; the Junior from nothing to 36. Our church membership is 70. Does this look as if this work were a failure? But, friends, that school is closed. There had to be retrenchment somewhere, and our work had to go. But I am sure that the love of God is broader than the measure of mans s mind, and He will provide some way by which these people shall receive better knowledge, better truth, and become better citizens. A PLEA FOR COLORED GIRLS. Miss PARMENTER, THOMASVILLE, GA. To me the point of the most vital importance is the education of the girls, and for those girls I want to get your sympathy and your aid. Those colored girlshow I wish I could make you realize the burden that rests upon them because of their color! You respect womanhood wherever you meet it. In the South a colored woman, no matter how well educated she may be, no matter how refined and cultured, is sub- ject to insult and to injury anywhere. No white man respects her. There are temptations on every side, and she must bear this bur- den. It makes no difference where she may be, she has always this burden to bear. Many of them have said to me, with tears in their eyes, Miss Parmenter, you dont know the temptations that we girls have. Then there is the task that lies before her of making the so- ciety that she must enter. As I think of the young girls in the North, of the help that is thrown around them, of all that is done to make so- ciety pure and wholesome forthem, I realize the immensity of the task that is put upon the colored girl of the South. She has not only to make society for herself, but for her brothers. And this task is made the harder because the very foundation, the influence of the home, is denied her. Home in its truest and best sense is not bounded by the four walls of a negro cabin. The one-roomed cabin has been, and is still, the curse of the negro race. I know I do not over-estimate the facts when I say that at least one-sixth of the seven million colored people are living in homes of one room. Think of it, you mothers, you who have daughters whom you shield from every evil, think of a mother bringing up two or three daughters in a family of seven or eight in one room. Think of your daughter in the midst of such surroundings, and can you blame the girl that goes astray? Can you blame the girl if she steps aside from the path of righteousness? Do you not rather pity her that she has no better influences, no better home? And when you take into consideration that this mother never knew anything better herself, how can she be expected to bring up a family to be any better? iji * *

A Plea for Colored Girls Bureau of Woman's Work 19-22

A PLEA FOR COLORED GIRLS. t9 Sunday-school from 12 to ~ the Christian Endeavor Society from no- thing to 5o; the Junior from nothing to 36. Our church membership is 70. Does this look as if this work were a failure? But, friends, that school is closed. There had to be retrenchment somewhere, and our work had to go. But I am sure that the love of God is broader than the measure of mans s mind, and He will provide some way by which these people shall receive better knowledge, better truth, and become better citizens. A PLEA FOR COLORED GIRLS. Miss PARMENTER, THOMASVILLE, GA. To me the point of the most vital importance is the education of the girls, and for those girls I want to get your sympathy and your aid. Those colored girlshow I wish I could make you realize the burden that rests upon them because of their color! You respect womanhood wherever you meet it. In the South a colored woman, no matter how well educated she may be, no matter how refined and cultured, is sub- ject to insult and to injury anywhere. No white man respects her. There are temptations on every side, and she must bear this bur- den. It makes no difference where she may be, she has always this burden to bear. Many of them have said to me, with tears in their eyes, Miss Parmenter, you dont know the temptations that we girls have. Then there is the task that lies before her of making the so- ciety that she must enter. As I think of the young girls in the North, of the help that is thrown around them, of all that is done to make so- ciety pure and wholesome forthem, I realize the immensity of the task that is put upon the colored girl of the South. She has not only to make society for herself, but for her brothers. And this task is made the harder because the very foundation, the influence of the home, is denied her. Home in its truest and best sense is not bounded by the four walls of a negro cabin. The one-roomed cabin has been, and is still, the curse of the negro race. I know I do not over-estimate the facts when I say that at least one-sixth of the seven million colored people are living in homes of one room. Think of it, you mothers, you who have daughters whom you shield from every evil, think of a mother bringing up two or three daughters in a family of seven or eight in one room. Think of your daughter in the midst of such surroundings, and can you blame the girl that goes astray? Can you blame the girl if she steps aside from the path of righteousness? Do you not rather pity her that she has no better influences, no better home? And when you take into consideration that this mother never knew anything better herself, how can she be expected to bring up a family to be any better? iji * * 20 A PLEA FOR COLORED GIRLS. These are the homes from which our girls come. Their lack and theit need I cannot make you realize. In the day school where I have beeN for four years there were several children who used to come early in the morning, and as soon as the building was unlocked they would walk in, put up their books, take off their aprons, and go to the hall to make their morning toilet. Regularly they did this, prohably for want of the proper materials at home. In my desk I keep a box of shoe buttons and needles and thread. After the lessons are learned it is a frequent request, Please, may I have a shoe-button? and then they thread their needles and sew on the buttons. The missing buttons and unmended rents are quite as often due to the lack of material to remedy the fault as to shiftlessness or wilful NEGRO CABIN. neglect, for the sewing teacher finds them quite willing to spend the sewing hour in improving their personal appearance. Indeed, they fre- quently ask for thread and buttons. If you should step into my school~room one of these bright mornings you might be puzzled to know the use of the tall stalks of sugar-cane standing in the various corners. Each one is a lunch, and when the noon hour is over they have all disappeared. Lazy, we call them? With a potato for breakfast, a stick of sugar-cane for lunch, and a corn dodger for supper, I wonder how energetic we should be! * * * These are the homes that we want to make better. But you say, How can we make them better? The A. M. A. has solved that problem long ago in the boarding-schools which it has established, and where the girls are taught and trained for homemakers. THOMAS VJLLE, GA. 21 I want you to go with me just one day to our boarding-school home among the pines at Thomasville, Ga. You will have to get up at 5.30 in the morning, for I assure you the girls begin to sing that early. As soon as a girl has a broom or a dish-towel in her hands she begins sing- ing. The first thing you will notice will be the happiness in their faces, for they are happy. This is the best home they have ever known. They are glad when school opens and sorry when it closes. At half-past six we have breakfast. Long before breakfast the girls have been doing the work for the day, some preparing the morning meal, some putting the rooms in order, sweeping and dusting and doing all the various kinds of housework. After breakfast the work is put away, and at half- past eight you will find them all in the study room waiting for the open- ing exercises of the school. Then through the hours of the school day you will find them in their recitation rooms, busy with their lessons. In the sewing-room you will find them not only making, but mending, their own clothes and learning how to care for them. In the primary room, which is my especial charge, you will find not only the pupils, but the normal girls, learning the lessons to teach the younger ones. Side by side with me they work through the day, learning how to teach the little ones and to control them according to the better methods. These are the ways in which we train the girls day after day. They become a part in our home life. Before the study hour in the evening they hold a short prayer service and then they-go to their rooms. At nine oclock the lights are all out and the hall is dark. They are up early again in the morning and go through the same programme. SCHOOL BUILDINQ, THOMASVILLE GA. 22 INTERBLENDING OF HOME It is a busy place, and the bright, beautiful days go quickly by. Daily, hourly, they are taught those things that make the educated, cultured and refined woman; the woman who is a power for good in so- ciety or in her own home By example and precept they are taught that work is honorable, and that the great aim of life should be to do all things as unto the Lord and not unto men. Think you they can return to their one-roomed cabins~and be content? No, they will not give up the love that is instilled for a better life, and they go out to build up better society and purer homes. * * * Truly it has been said that the hand that rocks the cradle ru1es the world. It matters little whether the hand be black or white, but, dear friends, it will matter through all eternity whether those hands be guided by minds that are educated. These colored girls cannot make good homes, they cannot take the places they ought to have, unless they have Christian education and h9me training. As your hearts go out in sympathy for them will you not remember the saying of the rough cartman, Aye, but a handful of help is worth a cartload of pity? Let no selfish consideration conflict with your help, your individual help in this great and glorious work for humanity, for your native land, and for Christ your Redeemer. INTERBLENDING OF HOME AND FOREIGN MISSIONS. MRS. G. H. GUTTERSON. There was a man long agoa man who had more to do with our Western civilization than any other man who ever livedwho likened the kingdom of heaven to many things. Perhaps there was one thing to which he likened it which had more to do with woman than anything else that he said on that line. He said, The kingdom of heaven is likened to leaven, which a woman took and hid in three measures of meal until the whole was leavened. He did not say what was to be the quality of the meal; he did not say whether it was to be brown nieal. or dark barley meal, or fine white meal; he said mealsomething in which the leaven would work. Now, I want to ask you ladies what woman in this wide world has the most of this leaven? To-day the voice of Christ sounds in our ears: Take the leaven and hide it in three measures of meal until the whole be leavened. Why have we more leaven to give away than others have? Because long ago some one came to us and put the leaven into our three measures of meal until the whole was leavened. I have been asked to speak about the interblending of home and foreign missions, or the A. M. A. and foreign missions.

Mrs. G. H. Gutterson Gutterson, G. H., Mrs. Interblending of Home and Foreign Missions Bureau of Woman's Work 22-24

22 INTERBLENDING OF HOME It is a busy place, and the bright, beautiful days go quickly by. Daily, hourly, they are taught those things that make the educated, cultured and refined woman; the woman who is a power for good in so- ciety or in her own home By example and precept they are taught that work is honorable, and that the great aim of life should be to do all things as unto the Lord and not unto men. Think you they can return to their one-roomed cabins~and be content? No, they will not give up the love that is instilled for a better life, and they go out to build up better society and purer homes. * * * Truly it has been said that the hand that rocks the cradle ru1es the world. It matters little whether the hand be black or white, but, dear friends, it will matter through all eternity whether those hands be guided by minds that are educated. These colored girls cannot make good homes, they cannot take the places they ought to have, unless they have Christian education and h9me training. As your hearts go out in sympathy for them will you not remember the saying of the rough cartman, Aye, but a handful of help is worth a cartload of pity? Let no selfish consideration conflict with your help, your individual help in this great and glorious work for humanity, for your native land, and for Christ your Redeemer. INTERBLENDING OF HOME AND FOREIGN MISSIONS. MRS. G. H. GUTTERSON. There was a man long agoa man who had more to do with our Western civilization than any other man who ever livedwho likened the kingdom of heaven to many things. Perhaps there was one thing to which he likened it which had more to do with woman than anything else that he said on that line. He said, The kingdom of heaven is likened to leaven, which a woman took and hid in three measures of meal until the whole was leavened. He did not say what was to be the quality of the meal; he did not say whether it was to be brown nieal. or dark barley meal, or fine white meal; he said mealsomething in which the leaven would work. Now, I want to ask you ladies what woman in this wide world has the most of this leaven? To-day the voice of Christ sounds in our ears: Take the leaven and hide it in three measures of meal until the whole be leavened. Why have we more leaven to give away than others have? Because long ago some one came to us and put the leaven into our three measures of meal until the whole was leavened. I have been asked to speak about the interblending of home and foreign missions, or the A. M. A. and foreign missions. AND FOREIGN MISSIONS. 23 In the first place, I want to say that I was born among the Zulus of South Africa. I lived among them in the jungles until I was fifteen years of age. I know the African on his native soil, and I think there are some advantages which have come to the African in this country. Not that you and I meant to give him advantages, not that we can take any credit to ourselves, but the wrath of man is made to praise God. The African is not in his native state patient, obedient, or fond of work. Certainly the colored people of this country have learned to be very patient. They have learned also to obey. And above all else, while we were enslaving them in this commercial age, they were gaining something which has been to them of great value in enabliig them to grasp the advantages of this Western civilization; they have been ac- quiring, without any money of your spending, the English language. They have got it. When my father went so long ago to the Zulus in Africa, he had to spend a long time in learning the language; he had to spend a long time in translating the Bible. But what an advantage you missionaries have here. You can communicate with these people the minute you go among them. There is no long waiting for you; you can speak right to them. A human being that learns the English lan- guage learns what will make him heir of all the ages, if he takes advan- tage of what is offered him, and that is what your negro man will become, if the A. M. A. and America do their duty in the years that are to come. Here he has a great advantage. I think God has sent him across here, in order that we might be a little quicker in taking hold, as it were, of these people and making it almost necessary for them to become Christians. * * ~ I should like to say, in connection with this, that there are certain things in which the interblending of home and foreign missions clearly appears. I think of a man from Virginia who is now away off in Africa, who has got hold of a nation that no white man ever went to, who is wise and patient and willing to wait. I think of a mountaineer, who is away up in the mountains of Thibet, a missionary going about selling his goods and giving freely the Gospel of Christ to those shut-up people. I have heard of Chinese in California who sent $6,ooo back to China in order that they might have the Gospel taken to them. I have heard of a little station away off in Southern India where the thief-caste people, who have been thieves all their lives, have sent $io to the A. M. A. So they intermingle. But how can we talk about intermingling? How do we know where one thing touches another? In the warp and woof of the grand fabric of the great worlds history who can tell which is Chinas influence and which is Indias influence and which is Africas influencethey are woven so closely in and out? * * * I have spoken about the fatherhood of the Anglo-Saxon race because 24 ADDRESS OF MISS BELLA W HUME, it is able to teach the nations which are children. It ought to try to see what it can make out of them. But what about the mothering of the nations? Long ago God gave the work to Eve when He put the two sons on her knees and said, Mother these children; this is your salva- tion. And so it has been. What does He say to us Anglo-Saxon people to-day He says, Mother the world. Why mother the world? Because you can. Why did Christ die to save us? Because He could; and because you are able to go abroad and mother the world, do it. It makes no difference if it is Flying Bys village, or in China, or in the dis- tilleries of the mountains, or in the jungles of India, or among the lions of Africa. It makes no difference where a woman goes. Anywhere in this world to-day a woman may go with the leaven of the Gospel in her hands. ADDRESS OF MISS BELLA W. HUME, NEW ORLEANS, LA. I am to speak to you this afternoon of your relation to all this blessed work we have been hearing about. There surely must remain in all our minds very vivid impressions of the accounts we read not many months ago of the opening up of that new district of Oklahoma. As we tried to picture that mad rush for material possession I believe we were conscious of a sense of humilia- tion. There was in it something of pathos and very much of heroism, along with the ludicrous; but I believe every proud American wished that our great government could devise some more dignified way, to say the least, of bestowing its gratuitous territory. Mankind hardly appeared at good advantage during the sixty minutes following the re- port of that twelve oclock gun. But, Christian friends, Congregational Americans, if you will stop for a moment to think about it, I believe you will feel a far keener humiliationa humiliation which is almost sorrowful shameover that degradation of consecrated stewardship which by its present system of missionary offering forces your mission- ary workers to make a veritable Oklahoma in the church of Christ. We come up from our God-given posts of duty to prepare for the autumnal missionary rush. With the first day of September our ears hear, as it were, the signal gun which tells us that the churches all through the North and East are getting into an attitude of expectancy and promised activity. During the sixty days which follow there is a scramble to see which of us shall reach each given church to enter our missionary pre- emption claim; and whoever comes first, whether it be to the corner lot of a city church or the quiet cross street of a country village, is sure to get a stake down for some pocket territory, the amount depending upon the moving and thrilling character of the claim.

Address of Miss Bella W. Hume Bureau of Woman's Work 24-25

24 ADDRESS OF MISS BELLA W HUME, it is able to teach the nations which are children. It ought to try to see what it can make out of them. But what about the mothering of the nations? Long ago God gave the work to Eve when He put the two sons on her knees and said, Mother these children; this is your salva- tion. And so it has been. What does He say to us Anglo-Saxon people to-day He says, Mother the world. Why mother the world? Because you can. Why did Christ die to save us? Because He could; and because you are able to go abroad and mother the world, do it. It makes no difference if it is Flying Bys village, or in China, or in the dis- tilleries of the mountains, or in the jungles of India, or among the lions of Africa. It makes no difference where a woman goes. Anywhere in this world to-day a woman may go with the leaven of the Gospel in her hands. ADDRESS OF MISS BELLA W. HUME, NEW ORLEANS, LA. I am to speak to you this afternoon of your relation to all this blessed work we have been hearing about. There surely must remain in all our minds very vivid impressions of the accounts we read not many months ago of the opening up of that new district of Oklahoma. As we tried to picture that mad rush for material possession I believe we were conscious of a sense of humilia- tion. There was in it something of pathos and very much of heroism, along with the ludicrous; but I believe every proud American wished that our great government could devise some more dignified way, to say the least, of bestowing its gratuitous territory. Mankind hardly appeared at good advantage during the sixty minutes following the re- port of that twelve oclock gun. But, Christian friends, Congregational Americans, if you will stop for a moment to think about it, I believe you will feel a far keener humiliationa humiliation which is almost sorrowful shameover that degradation of consecrated stewardship which by its present system of missionary offering forces your mission- ary workers to make a veritable Oklahoma in the church of Christ. We come up from our God-given posts of duty to prepare for the autumnal missionary rush. With the first day of September our ears hear, as it were, the signal gun which tells us that the churches all through the North and East are getting into an attitude of expectancy and promised activity. During the sixty days which follow there is a scramble to see which of us shall reach each given church to enter our missionary pre- emption claim; and whoever comes first, whether it be to the corner lot of a city church or the quiet cross street of a country village, is sure to get a stake down for some pocket territory, the amount depending upon the moving and thrilling character of the claim. NEW ORLEANS, LA. 25 I am giving you no caricature, Christian friends, but a solemn fact. The church of Christ which has commissioned some of us to go to the front to fight against Satans vigorous and alert hosts of ignorance, su- perstition and sin, takes this remarkable attitude toward us. Whoever can get her money may do her work. Children of God, is not the church, by such a plan as that, trailing her beautiful robe of consecrated stew- ardship in the very mire? J~ook for one moment at the results. The result for your missionary societies is anxiety and debt. The result for your missionary workers is prostration and depression. If we are to come North, would it not be economy for you of the dear home churches to send us back to our work invigorated and recuperated, in- stead of forcing us to preface our years labor with two months of per- sistent, constant, exhausting travel, and pleading with you to give us that with which we can do our work? But not for the missionary societies nor for the missionary workers is the result most deplorable, but for the home sustaining churches. As I go about from church to church, pastors and members speak to me of the lack of spiritual life in the churches and their consequent insuffi- cient grip upon their respective communities. But in the inspired word I find no promise of immense spiritual outpouring where any portion of the Lords own substance is withheld from him. If the home churches want such spiritual power and such ingathering of souls as we come up to report to you from our missionary churches, oh, then, test God, prove Him, take Him at His very word for one year, and see if He will not pour upon you a blessing such that you will not find room to re- ceive it! May I ask you right here and now to bow your heads with me in one moment of silent prayer, that through this coming year our great Con- gregational churches, pastors and people, may learn not to count their lives dear unto themselves, that thus the church may wear its blessed garment of stewardship, gloriously and spotlessly, as in the very pres- ence of the King. RECEIPTS FOR NOVEMBER, 1894. 1HI$ DANIEL HAND FUND For the Education of Colored People. Income for November $16,25o 00 Previously acknowledged 960 00 $17,210 00

Receipts for November, 1894 25-32

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 25 I am giving you no caricature, Christian friends, but a solemn fact. The church of Christ which has commissioned some of us to go to the front to fight against Satans vigorous and alert hosts of ignorance, su- perstition and sin, takes this remarkable attitude toward us. Whoever can get her money may do her work. Children of God, is not the church, by such a plan as that, trailing her beautiful robe of consecrated stew- ardship in the very mire? J~ook for one moment at the results. The result for your missionary societies is anxiety and debt. The result for your missionary workers is prostration and depression. If we are to come North, would it not be economy for you of the dear home churches to send us back to our work invigorated and recuperated, in- stead of forcing us to preface our years labor with two months of per- sistent, constant, exhausting travel, and pleading with you to give us that with which we can do our work? But not for the missionary societies nor for the missionary workers is the result most deplorable, but for the home sustaining churches. As I go about from church to church, pastors and members speak to me of the lack of spiritual life in the churches and their consequent insuffi- cient grip upon their respective communities. But in the inspired word I find no promise of immense spiritual outpouring where any portion of the Lords own substance is withheld from him. If the home churches want such spiritual power and such ingathering of souls as we come up to report to you from our missionary churches, oh, then, test God, prove Him, take Him at His very word for one year, and see if He will not pour upon you a blessing such that you will not find room to re- ceive it! May I ask you right here and now to bow your heads with me in one moment of silent prayer, that through this coming year our great Con- gregational churches, pastors and people, may learn not to count their lives dear unto themselves, that thus the church may wear its blessed garment of stewardship, gloriously and spotlessly, as in the very pres- ence of the King. RECEIPTS FOR NOVEMBER, 1894. 1HI$ DANIEL HAND FUND For the Education of Colored People. Income for November $16,25o 00 Previously acknowledged 960 00 $17,210 00 CURRENT RECEIPTS. MAINE, $325.09. Cumberland Center. Mary Merrill, in memory of Mrs. S. M. Rideout, for the Missionary box, presented to the Assn. by Silas M. Rideout $soo 00 Cumberland Center. Cong. Ch. and Soc 4 00 Ellswortb. Cong. Ch. to const. REV. DAVID L. YALE L.M 72 59 Ellsworth Falls. Ch. and Cong 3 50 Falmouth. First Cong. Ch 4 25 Farmington. Mrs. B. M. Titcomb, ~ Mrs. C. N. Bixby, e, for Student A id, Pleasant Hill, Teen 7 00 Fort Fairfield. By Miss Paul, for Stu- dent Aid, Blowing Rock, N. C so 00 Macbias. Friends, for Freigkt to Marion, Ala 2 00 New Gloucester. Cong. Ch 42 50 North Ellsworth. Ch. and Cong 3 50 Northfield. Friends 2 22 Norridgewock. Cong. Ch. and Soc 30 40 Pownal. PEEEZ CHAPIN to const. himself L.M., 30; Sab. Sch. Cong. Ch., ~ 35 00 York. First Cong. Ch 8 23 NEW HAMPSHIRE, $585.53. Amherst. Capt. G. W. Bosworth, ~ Mis. G. W. Bosworth, C 5 00 Antrim. First Cong. Ch 7 00 Boscawen. S. N. Allen 5 Concord. First Cong. Ch. and Soc. to coost. MES. FEEDEEICE ALLISON L.M 50 00 Dumbarton. Cong. Ch i~ 86 Francestown. Cong. Ch 23 05 Gilmanton. Mrs. Mary E. Hidden 50 00 Gorham. Cong. Ch 2 00 Hinsdale. Cong. Ch 7 55 Manchester. First Cong. Ch. and Soc. to coost. AUGUSTUS G. STEVENS and FEED. H. ROOEES L.Ms 99 30 Meriden. Cong. Ch. and Soc 20 00 Milton. First Cong. Ch 9 00 New Ipswich. Proceeds of Childrens 32d Annual Fair, for Indicin Sc/cools 00 Peiham. Cong. Ch. and Soc ~5 ~ Webster. Bedding and freight, for Lin- coln Acad., Kings Mountain, N. C.... 4 00 $e8~ 53 ESTATE. Amherst. Estate of ReV. Josiah G. Davis, by Edward Spalding and Rebecca A. Spalding, executors 300 00 $585 53 VERMONT, $82.68. Bethel. Mrs. Laura F. Sparhawk ~s 00 East St. Johosbury. X.P.S.C.E., Cong. Ch., forCentral C/s., New Orleans, La 4 00 Lyndon. Cong. Ch 6 00 Orwell. Cong. Ch i8 40 Rochester. Cong. Ch 3 78 St. Johosbury. First Cong. Ch 3 00 Stowe. Cong. Ch., by H. C. Atkins, Treas 20 00 Swanton. Aid Soc. of Cong. Ch., Box of C., for Williawsi$nrg, Ky Wallingford. Ladies of Cong. Ch. and Soc., 2 Bbls. C., 5oc. for Freight, one Bil for Nat, A la.,and one for Pleasant Hill, Tenn., by Miss Charlotte M. Townsend ci 50 $70 68 ESTATE. Barnet. Estate of Miss Emeline H. Wallace, by John G. T. Wallace 12 00 $82 68 MASSACHUSETTS, $4,704.19. Amesbury. Mrs. A. L. Bayley, 30 of which to coost. REV. Gno. W. CHEISTIE L.M 130 00 Amesbury. Main St. Cong. Ch. and Soc. s 88 Andover. Chapel Cong. Ch. Sab. Sch., for ed. of an Indian boy, Santee, Ne/s.. 1750 Andover. Free Christian Ch., 31.07; A Friend, 36 07 Andover. Frank T. Carleton, Box Papers, etc, for Beaufort, N. C Ashburnham. First Cong. Ch i6 77 Beverley. Extra Off. Washington St. Cong. Ch., for Central C/s., Neso Or- leans, La 12 Boston: Mrs. Anna L. Merriman 25 00 Win. H. Conant, for Lincoln A cad., Kings Mountain, N.C 2000 Y.P.S.~:E. Berkeley Temple, I7.so; Mrs. E. J. W. Colby, 5; for Central C/s., New Or- leans, La 22 10 Miss M. L. Thompson, for mdi. Work, Mars/saliville, Ga 50 00 500 A Friend. 00 Mrs. Chas. H. Parker, for Indian M 00 C. E. Soc. of Shawmut Ave. Cong. Ch., for Student Aid Pleasant Hill, Tenn s 00 Whatsoever Band, for Student A id, Gregory Norwal test.. s 00 Dorchester. Second Cong. Ch., B. C., Hardwick 50 00 Go Forth Mission Band, Second Cong. Ch., for Indian and Colored Work 8 cs~ Roxbury. Immanuel Cong. Ch. 209 07 Boylston. Cong. Ch Brighton. Ladies Aux., for Student A id, Straight U Brimfield. Ladies of Second Cong. Cb., for Freight Broce~o~, Rev. P. M. Griffins Ch., for K/sn/el~ Woife Co., Ky B ookline. Young Ladies Benev. Soc., for Student Aid, Pleasant Ilili, Teun. Lyfield. Friends, for Kings Mountain, N. C Cambridgeport. Pilgrim Cong. Ch Charlemont. First Cong. Ch Dalton. A Christian Endeaveror,for Marion A in Danvers. Maple St. Cong. Ch., to const. MES. E. C. EWING, MES. M. A. FIELDING, Mus. S. L. SAWYEE, Miss ALICE G. MODEE, Miss HAEEIET P. RICHAEDS, MISS CELIA L. STEAW WILLIAM E. CLAPP and H. M. BEAD: STEEET L. Ms Dracut. First Cong. Ch. Harvest Con- cert Offering Dunstable. Cong. Ch., 9.03 and Bbl. Merchandise, for Meridian, Miss Easthampton. First Cong. Ch Easthampton. Mission Band, 5.25 and Sundries, for Student A id, Lincoln A cad., Kings Mountain, N. C Essex. Cong. Ch. and Soc 365 27 50 00 57 50 55 00 3 00 6 25 s6 00 5 00 253 97 50 26 9 03 69 20 5 25 33 00 RECEIPTS. Fall River. Central Cong. Ch., for G. A. and I. Sch., Caj3jiakosic, Va 154 79 Fall River. Cong. Club no Georgetown. First Cong. Ch 30 00 Gilbertville. Sab. Sch. Cong. Ch., for Siadeni Aid, Fisk U 50 00 Glendale. Y. P. 5. C. E., ~ A Friend, 50c. ; for Kings Mouninin, sV.C 250 Globe Village. Free Evang. Soc i6 i~ Gloucester. Lanesville Cong. Ch., 13.13; A Friend, 5 i8 i~ Goshen. Miss Maria Putney 2 50 Grafton. Evan. Cong. Ch 30 ~8 Groton. Extra Offering, Union Cong. Ch.,for Cenira? Ckarck, New Orieans, La 205 35 Groveland. Cong. Ch., 36.40; Merrimac Council, No. 9. Jr., Order U. A. M., s; Groveland Council, A. P. A., 46 40 Hatfield. Cong. Ch. and Soc., to const. MRS. ROSWELL BILLSNos L. M 49 00 Hatfield. Mrs. F. E. Dwight, Bbl. C., for Moore/send, Miss Harvard. Cong. Ch is 00 Holbrook. Winthrop Cong. Ch s~ Holden. Cong. Ch 8 00 Holyoke. Ill Try Mission Band of Second Cong. Ch., for Indian M 50 00 Holyoke. Miss Annie L. Hills 00 Housatonic. Cong. Cli 20 00 Hubbardston. Cong. Ch 24 00 Ipswich. V. P. 5. CE., First Cong. Ch., Harvest Concert 5 5~ Jslington. Cong. Ch i6~ Lawrence. B., in., 5., 20 30 00 Lee. Mrs. A. C. Sparks, for A very Honse, C/tar/es/on, S. C 3 00 Lexington. Hancock Cong. Cli i6 50 Lowell. First Cong. Cli., ~ 5. 5. Class No. 47, First Cong. Ch., in 6~ 00 Lowell. Sab. Sch. High St. Cong. Ch., for Nai,Aia i8 00 Lowell. Sub. Sch., Eliot Ch.,for Ta/ia dega C 8 31 Lowell. Miss M. M Buttrick, for C/sate?, Wa/fe Co., Ky 200 Maynard. Cong. Ch 100 00 Medfield. A Friend, for Indian ill 20 00 Medford. Mystic Cong. Cli., 71.37; Union Cong. Ch., 72 37 Melrose. Melrose Highlands Cong. Cli s 50 Merrimac. First Cong. Cb 30 00 Middleton. Cong. Cli 23 00 Milford. V. P. 5. C. E. by Webster Woodbury, for a room, Bending Oaks Acad., Na/A/a 2500 Milbury. Second Cong. Cli.,for Siudeni Aid, Tkeo. Depi., Howard U i5 00 Mittineague. Sab. 5db. Cong. Cli., for Indian Sckt 35 00 Mittineague. Southworth Paper Co., Box Paperfor Ti//o/son C. andN. Inst. Monson. Cong. Ch 27 37 Natick. A Friend 20 00 New Bedford. Trinitarian Cli 29 53 Newburyport. North Cong. Cli. and Soc., 36; Prospect St. Cong. Cli., 24 6o 00 North Adams. Y. W. M. S. of Cong. Cli., for Indian ilL, Fort Ber/koid, N. D s~ 00 Northampton. A. L. Williston 300 00 Northampton. West Farms Ch., by Oliver Hubbard 43 North Attleboro. First Cong. Ch ~ 45 North Chelrnsford. Second Cos g. Cli 54 84 North Reading. Cong. Ch.,for C/tate?, We/fe Co., Ky 4 00 Orange. Central Evan. Cong. Cli 30 00 Oxford. Infant Class Cong. S S., for C/ti/drens Missio ary, iL/cln/osk, Ga 5 no Peabody. First Ch 25 20 Pepperell. C. E.,for Meridian_liliss 6 so Peru. Cone. Cli . .. ~... 7 50 Pittsfield. A Friend, Thank Offering. 00 Plainfieltl. Mrs. Temperance Atkins, 96 27 years of age, for Moan/am Work. Earned by knitting mittens during the past year ~ no Plainfield. Sub. Sch., by B. F. Dyer, Sec., for Moan/am Work 7 00 Reading. Cong. Cli iS oo Reading. Friends, Cong. Cli., for C/tate/, We/fe Co., Ky 35 Richmond. Cong. Cli 8 ~5 Salem. Tabernacle Cli. and Soc. (of wliicli 96.45 for Cen/ra? C/s., New Or/eans, and 5 for Indian M.), 299.65; Sub. 5db. Tabernacle Cli., for Reading room, Cen/ra? 6)3., New (.ir/e ns, 50... ~49 6~ Salem. J. H. W., for fl~entra/ Ck., New Or/eans 2 00 Sandwich. Sub. 5db. Cong. Cli., for A very Norma? Insi in 00 Shelburne Falls. Ladies Aid Soc. of ~ lad?. Work, Fisk U so 00 Prospect Hill Cli 25 09 South Braintree. Cong. Cli in 00 South Byfield. Cong. Cli., for Sindeni Aid, T/seo. De,s3/., Howard U ~5 no Southampton. Cong. Cli 20 95 Southampton. Miss Bascom,for Siadeni A id, Lincoin A cad., Kings Moan/a/a, NC 500 Southampton. Friends, i.15; Mission Band, soc.,for Kings Moan?ain, N. C 2 35 Springfield. Sub. 5db. North Cong. Cli., for Industria? Work, Fisk U 25 00 Stoneliam. Suosbine Mission Circle, First Cong. Cli., in part, for Teacher, McIn/osh, Ga in on Stoneham. First Cong. Cli. and Soc., adl 7 00 Tapleyville. Miss Sarah Richmond,for C/tate?, Wa/fe Co., Ky 00 Taunton. Winslow Cong. Cli., 6n; Union Cong. Cli., 28.75 78 75 Taunton. Sub. 5db. Winslow Cong. Cli., to const. MRS. HENRY L. DAvis L. M 30 00 Turners Falls. Cong. Cli., s; Mrs.Bennett, s,for Cenir iCk., New Or/eans, La soon Uxbridge. Evan. Cong. Cli. and Soc 20 71 Walpole. A Friend ~ on Waltham. Trio. Cong. Cli 72 26 Ware. Miss S. E. Sage, for Tongn/oo U 50 00 Webster. Blil. C., for Marion, A in Westboro. Ladies Freedmens Asin., Blil. Bedding, for Freig/ti to A ii Hen/ing, N. C 200 West Boxford. Cong. Cli si 34 Westfield. A Friend, for Kings Moan/am, N. C i 00 West Medford. Cong. Cli. (s~ of which for Moantain Work) 26 50 West Newton. Second Cong. Soc 8o 6o West Somerville. Day St. Cong. Cli 6 00 Williamsburg. Cong. Cli 22 in Winchester. C. E. Redfern, for Meri- dian, Miss 20 00 Winchester. Mrs. A. T. Wilder ~ 00 Worcester. Mary A. Smith and Joanna F. Smitli 50 00 Worcester. H. M. Wheeler, 25; Clias. 0. Bachelor, 20 35 00 Worcester. Ladies Missionary Aux. of Plymouth Cli., 22.45, for Chinese H. 22.44,for A/as/ta H 44 89 Worcester. Park Cong. Cli., for Sindeni Aid, Theo. Deti., Howard U ~ 00 Hampden Benevolent Association, by George R. Bond, Treas.: Feeding Hills 9 8o Springfield, Hope 22 64 Springfield, First 34 69 West Springfield, Park St. Ladies Benny. Soc., for Sc/too?, I/easass/ Hi/i, Tenss 55 00 222 23 Womans Home Missionary Association of Mass. and R. I., Miss Sarah K. Burgess, Treas.,for Womans Work.~ 28 Roxbury Aux. of Walnut Ave. Ch RECEIPTS, 97 00 $3,984 29 ESTATES. Andover. Estate of Dea. Edward Taylor, in part, by Oliver B. Taylor, Executor. 200 00 Lawrence. Estate of Maria Tenney Benson, by Mrs. Ada T. Brewster 20 00 Roxbury. Estate of Mrs. Susan Collins, by Austin J. Coolidge, Executor 500 00 $4,704 19 CLomINo, Boous, ETC., RECEIVED AT BOSTON OFFICE: Andover. Mrs. CE. Goodale, Box Books and Papers, for Be alan, N. C. Auburodale. Mrs. Mary Johnson, Pkg. C., for Beau/on, N. C. Baldwinsville. Mrs. M. B. Fisher, Bbl. Books and Papers, for Beaufort, .V. C. Boston. Friends, Box Books and Magazines, for Straight U. Brimfield. Ladies Second Cong. Ch., Mrs. J. W. Morgan, Sec., Bhl. C., for Greenzuic/s, .5. C.. Charlestown. Misses Flint, Pkg. Christ- mas gifts, for Moore/se d, Miss. Medford. Set of Wall Maps, for Blow- ing Rock, N. C. Welifleet. Ladies F. & H. M. Soc., Quilt and Pillow Slips, for Normal Sc/s., Albany, Ga. Westboro. Ladies Freedmens Assn., Miss E. C. Bixby, Sec., Bbl. C , and Bbl. of Supplies, Freight Paid, for Lincoln A cad., All Healing, N. C. RHODE ISLAND, $273.21. Providence. Union Cong. Ch., 272.22; Y.P.S.C.E. of No. Cong. Ch., s.oo; Miss E. B. Hale, Box Valuable Books ~nd Papers 273 25 CONNECTICUT, $5,805.07. Barkhamsted. Cong. Ch ~ Bethlehem. A Friend ~ 00 Danbury. First Cong. Ch 55 00 Danbury. Prim. Dept. S. S. of First Cong. Ch., for Fisk U 20 00 East Hartford. A Friend 200 00 East Hartford. Mrs. J. P. Huntings Class Cong. Sab. Seb., for Central C/surc/s, New Orleans 6 00 Ellington. Cong. Ch 253 24 Goshen. Mrs. Moses Lyman io 00 Hartford. Roland Mather, for Walden- sianM Ion ~ Hartford. A Friend. for Student Aid, Saluda, N. C.. 2000 Warburton Chapel Sab. Seb., for Pleasant Hill, Tenn 55 50 Hartford. Ladies Bible Class So. Cong. Ch. for Sindent A Id, Gregory Normal Inst 8 on Hartford. Primary Sab. Seb. Center Ch., for Central C/s., New Orleans s 00 Ivoryton. Ladies Home Miss. Soc., for Student Aid, Pleasant Hill, Tenn 34 00 Madison. Y. P. 5. C. E., for Big Creek Gap, [eon 25 00 Meriden. Chinese Class First Cong. Sab. Seb., for C/sinese M so on Middletown. Bbl. and Box Bedding, for Ki gs Mountain, N. C New Britain. Sab. Seb. South Cong. Ch., for Indian Student Aid 50 00 New Canaan. Home M. Soc. of Cong. Ch., by Mrs. George Kellogg, Sec., for A lIen Normal Sc/s., T/som sville, Ga 26 oo New Haven. College St. Cong. Ch., ~o; Howard Av. Ch., 27.23; Edmund Pendle- ton, ~ 72 23 New Haven. V. P. 5. C. E. of Ch. of the Redeemer, for Central C/s., New Or leans 34 00 Norfolk. Cong. Ch. and Soc 95 68 Norwich. Broadway Cong. Ch 224 86 Norwich. Second Cong. Ch. and Friends, Box C., Freight paid, for At/sens, Ala Orange. Cong. Ch 8 24 Plainfield. First Cong. Ch. and Soc 22 02 Plainville. Sab. Sch. Cong. Ch 20 00 Plantsville. Sab. Seb. Cong. Ch., for Indian M 10 48 Plymouth. George Langdon 9 9 Rockville. Union Cong. Ch . 48 48 Sound Beach. Pilgrim Cong. Ch. for Student Aid, Lincoln A cad., Kings Mountain, N.C Southington. Sab. Seb. FJ d& ~: ~i~: ~ 25 for mdi. Work, ]ci~k U 22 53 Southington. Sab. Sch. First Cong. Ch., for Central C/s., Neso Orleans 20 South Glastonbury. Cong. Ch. and Sab. Seb 1110 Southport. Friend, for Mountain Work 30 00 Stamford. Geo. W. Edwards, for Stu dent Aid, Pleasant Hill, Tenn 800 Stamford. First Cong. Ch 28 50 Stamford. Sab. Seb. First Cong. Ch., 14.60; Jun. C.E. Soc. of Cong. C., ~, for Central C/s., Neso Orleans 19 6o Suffleld. Bbl. Bedding, for Kings Mountain, A. C Thomaston. First Cong. Ch is Thompson. Cong. Ch 26 32 Unionville. Miss Annie C. Broadhent, for Andersouville, Ga r on Vernon. Cong. Ch 25 80 Voluntown. Rev. John Elderkin and wife, s; for Sterling, his son, 2; and for a dear daughter, deceased, ~ Cong. Ch, 2.58 ii West Stafford. Cong. Ch 2 09 West Torrington. C. E., by Grace E. Jordan, Sec., for Central C/s., New Orleans 6 on Westville. Cong. Ch s5 25 Whitneyville. Sab. Seb. Cong. Ch 20 00 Winchester. Cong. Ch 54 00 Windsor. First Cong. Ch 71 75 Waterbury Womans Benev. Soc. of Second Cong. Ch., for A. A~ and L Sc/s., l/so;nasville, Ga 25 00 Womans Cong. Home Missionary Union of Coon., Mrs. W. W. Jacobs, Treas., for Woozans Work: Bridgeport. Ladies Benev. Soc., South Ch 24 12 Hartford. Jun. Aux, First Ch 5500 Norwich. L. H. M. S 20 on Plainville. L. H. M. S .... 5 00 104 12 $1,756 07 ESTATES. Berlin. Estate of H. N. Wilcox i~ no Groton. Estate of Mrs. B. N. Hurlbutt.. 30 00 07 NEW YORK, $6,458.32. Angola. Miss A. H. Ames 5 00 Big Hollow. Nelson Hitchcock ~ 00 Brooklyn. TompkinsAv. Cong. Ch soon no Brooklyn. Rev. A. F. Beard, D.D., for Cedar Butte, S.D s no Brooklyn. Miss Dahiglish, P. 5. 5. Class, for Student A id, Williamsburg, Ky... ~ on Canandaigna. Bbl. Groceries and C., for Kings Mountain, N.C Canandaigna. Bbl. C., Rock N C for Blowing RECEIPTS, Clifton Springs. Friends, for Kings Mountain, N. C 43 50 Clifton Springs. Mrs. Anna G. Warner and daughter 10 00 Cortland. Cnng. Ch 33 50 East Bloomfield. Mrs. Eliza S. Goodwin 4 50 Fairport. W. H. M. U., ~ and Bhl. Bed- ding and C., for Lincoln Acnd., Kings Mountain, N. C 3 00 Gasport. Bhl. C.,for Marion, Ala Gloversville. Cong. Cli 48 27 Himrods. Mrs. Hester B. Ayers 5 00 Homer. Cong. Ch 7 50 Ithaca. First Cong. Ch.,for Indian N., Santee, N~b 32 45 Jamestown. First Cong. Ch 87 53 Le Roy. Mr. and Mrs. Butler Ward, for mdi. Work, Fisk U 10 00 Lysander. Cong. Cli 6 so McGrawville. H. D. C 2 00 Mount Morris. Alex. W. Smith, for A. G. Sck., Moorekead, Miss 25 00 Mount Vernon. Sab. Seli. Reformed Ch. 20 00 New Rochelle. Mrs. A. C. Pryor 5 00 New York. Broadway Tabernacle (of which 30 from CEPHAS BRAINERD, JR., to coost. himself L. M., and 50 from Mrs. L. H. S.,for Tkunderkasnk, N). 2,758 45 New York. Young Peoples Soc. of Broadway Tabernacle, by Mrs. Win. Thompson 8 00 New York. Mrs. Win. Kemp,for Kings Mountain, N. C 2 50 New York. Miss Grace H. Dodge, Clock, for Ckajlel; Friends, Plush Scarf,for Ckajs3el Desk, Savanna/i, Ga. Norwood. Cong. Soc 6 34 Ogdensburg. Cong. Y. P. 5. C. E., to hel! keep a little girl in School, Kings Mountain, N. C 9 00 Owego. Mrs. Lizzie A. Clark 2 00 Perry Center. Cong. Cli s6 84 Port Richmond. Ref. Cli., Capt. S. Squire 5 00 Sayville. Sali. 5db. Cong Cli 52 64 Sayville. Y. P. 5. C. B., by John de Wall, Chairman, M. C 7 o6 Slierburne. Jun. C. E. S. of First Cong. Cli., for Evarts, Ay 5 00 Smyrna. Miss Cora Barker, for Stu- dent Aid, Kings Mountain, N. C 2 26 Spencerport. Cong. Cli. and Sab. 5db 22 33 Syracuse. Plymouth Cong. Cli 22 00 Utica. Friend, 7.25; Plymouth Cong. Cli., s, for furnishing room, Brewer Nirusol Sek., Greenwood, S. C 22 25 Utica. Bethesda Welsh Cong. Cli 00 Warsaw Cong. Cli .... 8 40 Warsaw. Box Bedding, ..... Kings Mountain, N. C Womans Home Missionary Union of N. Y., by Mrs. J. J. Pearsall. Treas., for Womans Work: Binghamton. Helpers... 20 00 Brooklyn. Annual Meet ing 6~ on Brooklyn. L. W. A., Puritan Cli 2 00 Brooklyn. Cash I on Canandaigua. W. H. M. S 2000 Coventryville 20 00 Elmira. W. H. M. 5 20 00 Fairport. W. H. M. U 8 00 Gloveraville. Prim. Dept. Sab. Seli 6 50 Homer. Aux 25 00 Homer. Mrs. B. W. Payne 5 00 Homer. Miss Jennie M. Stebhins i 00 Paris. Judd Mission Band 22 00 Riverhead. H. M. U 28 90 Rutland. W. M. S., adi. 50 Saratoga Springs. Aux., for Student Aid, Talla dega, C 20 00 Utica. Plymouth Cli., L. M. S., for Chinese Mothers 20 00 29 204 90 $4,458 32 ESTATE. Oriskany. Estate of Mrs. Lavina Halsey, by George H. Graham, Execu tor 2 000 00 $6,458 32 NEW JERSEY, $454.25. Chester. J. H. Cramer, 30; Cong. Cli., 5.25 35 25 East Orange. Trinity Cli. to const. EDwARD E. QUIMBY, MRs. ANNA C. CONEY, WILLIAM H. DYCEMAN and GEORGE W. SILL L. Ms 207 00 Morristown. Friends, 2 Bhls. C. and Literature, for Savannah, Cu Newark. First Cong. Cli 32 42 Paterson. Christian End. Soc. of Auburn St. Cong. Ch. for Student Aid 20 00 Upper Montclair. Christian Union Cong. Cli 26948 PENNSYLVANIA, $32.22. Germantown, First Cong. Cli 7 46 Johnstown. Cong. Cli 8 o6 Philadelphia. Central Cong. Cli 20 00 Shire Oaks. Miss Jane Wilson 2 00 York. Y. P. 5. C. E. Convention, by Lewis S. Lee 3 6o OHIO, $2,265.36. Akron. Sub. 5db. First Cong. Cli., to conat. J. W. LITTLE L. M 35 00 Aslitabula. First Cong. Cli 27 o6 Cincinnati. Member Walnut Hills Cong. Cli 2000 Claridon. Cong. Cli 22 37 Claridon. S. S. of Cong. Cli., for Student Aid, Pleas nt Hill, Tenn i6 00 Cleveland. Pilgrim Cli., 90; Euclid Av. Cong. Cli., adi, 23.40; First Cong. Cli., adI, So 6o 224 20 Cleveland Office. Sale of Mite Boxes 2 po Cuyalioga Falls. S. S. of Cong. Cli 7 oS Dayton. Central Cong. Ch. for Caw~5- ton, Ky 2 50 Dover. Cong. Cli s~ 25 Dover. Sab. 5db. Cong. Cli., so; Mrs. A. Weston, Biblesfor Student Aid, War- ner Just,, fonesboro, Teun 20 00 East Liverpool. Rev. H. D. Kitchelfor Indian N 40 00 Edinburg. C. E. of Cong. Cli 6 50 Harbor. Second Cong. Ch 5 00 Harmar. Ladies Miss. Soc. of Cong. Ch., for Student Aid, Pleasant Hill, Teun e 3200 Lakewood. Cong. Cli 2 00 Lorain. Cong. Cli 9 Mansfield. Sab. 5db. First Cong. Cli., for Tongalon U 20 00 Marysville. First Cong. Cli. i6 ~8 North Ridgeville. Cong. Cli i8 37 Oberlin. Second Cong. Cli., 44.06; Sab. 5db. First Cli, 22.77; Mrs. E. H. H. Reed, 5oc 66 33 Oberlin. Miss Sadie H. Manning, so, for Blacksmith Shot; and 2 Boxes Books and Maps, freight paid, for Barrell Sek., Seinsa, Ala 2000 Olmsted. Second Cong. Cli 23 75 Radnor. Edward D. Jones 5 no Ravenna. Jubilee Singers, by J. F. Lou- din, for Student A Id, Fisk U in 00 Ravenna. C. E. of Cong. Cli 2 90 Richfield. Cong. Cli 22 00 Rockport. Cong. Cli 20 o8 30 Sandusky. First Cong. Ch West Mill Grove. First Cong. Ch Wooster. Mrs Lizzie D. Mullins, for Thanderliasok AT Ohio Womans Home Missionary Union, by Mrs. G. B. Brown, Treas., far Womans Work: Cleveland. Euclid Av. W. H.M.S 200 Marysville. Y. L. M. s 4 00 North Ridgeville. Y.P.S. C.E 576 Toledo. Plymouth 2 00 Unionville. W. H. M. S 5 no Wellington. L. B. and H. M.S 2500 West Williamsheld. Jun. C.E 8oo RECEIPTS. 48 90 2 i8 52 76 $644 84 ESTATE. Oberlin. Estate of Peter Darby, by J. E. Ingersoll 620 52 $1,265 36 INDIANA, $7.00 Cynthiana. Southern Assn., by Mrs. Rev. Levin Wilson, for A laska AT Sparta. John Hawkswell ILLINOIS, $727.78. Abington. Cong. Ch Cambridge. H. G. Griffin Chicago. Lincoln Park Ch., 42.75; Rev. Henry Willard, 25; Cong. Ch. of Zion, 3.50; South, J. H. Parr, 2 Chicago. First Cong. Ch., for Indian AT., Cedar Batte, NeT Chicago. Mrs. E. H. Case, for Student Aid, Straight U Chicago. Geo. E. Willis, for Furnish- ing New Hail, Tilloison C. and N. Inst Dover. Cong. Ch Granville. Cong. Ch Illini. Cong. Ch Kewanee. Cong. Ch Lee Center. Cong. Ch Lockport. Cong. Ch Loda. Cong. Ch Mendon. Cong. Ch., i6.~~ A Former Member, s Neponset. Cong. Ch Oak Park. Ridgeland Cong. Ch., 28.39; Sab. Sch., 20.03, by W. F. Van Bergen, Treas Obey. Cong. Ch Princeton. Cong. Ch Ravenswood. Cong. Ch Shabbona. Blanche Langford, for Sin- dent Aid, A. G. ScA,, Moorhead, Miss.. Sterling. Cong. Ch Sterling. Cong. Ch. Box Books, etc., for Pleasant Hill, Teun Thawville. Cong. Ch Toulon. Cong. Ch., 25.37; Cong. Sab. Sch., 22.20 Turner. Cong. Ch Waverley. Cong. Ch., is.i8; Y. P. 5. C. E., 3.46 Illinois Womans Home Missionary Union, Mrs. L. A. Field, Treas., far Wonsans Work. Avon. W. M. S 3 50 Chebanse. W. M. S 2 00 Chicago. Lincoln Park W. M. 5., 22; New England W. M. S., 8.~o; Covenant, W. M. 5., 2.40; Leavitt St. W. M. S., i.6o 33 50 Illini. W. M. S 20 04 Naperville. J. C. E 3 oo 5 00 6 in 73 25 50 00 25 00 24 o8 62 63 8 00 20 52 22 55 4 55 z8 42 7 35 72 98 43 47 2 50 32 07 4 8o 27 57 8 ~0 24.64 OakPark. W.M.S Port Byron. W. M. S Rantoul. W. M. S Rockford. Second Ch. W. M. S Sterling. W. M. S 20 50 5 00 26 00 25 00 229 6~ MICHIGAN, $269.63. Ann Arbor. Bbl. C., for Athens, Al..... Charlotte. First Cong. Ch Grand Haven. C. E. Soc. of Cong. Ch., Miss Reynolds, 2 for Tub/son C. and N. Inst Grand Rapids. Mrs. Geer. Kinder- garten Materials, for Knoxville, Tean. Kalamazoo. First Cong. Ch Lansing. Bement Sons, 9.bo; Plymouth Cong. Sab. Seb., 6., for Stove and Freight, Greenwood, S. C Lansing. Plymouth Ch Olivet. Cong. Ch Romeo. Cong. Ch Womans Home Missionary Union of Michigan, by Mrs. E. F. Grabill, Treas., for Womans Work. Addison. W. H. M. S 0 25 Bronson. W. H. M. S 2 00 Hancock. L. M. S 25 oo Mulliken. W. H. M. 5.... 0 25 Rockford. W. H. M. 5.... 0 25 South Haven. W. H. M. 5. 5 00 7 55 3 00 82 53 25 20 2 90 i6 90 45 03 $294 63 ESTATE. Nuns. Estate of James Lewis, M.D 75 00 $269 63 IOWA $290.25. Big Rock. Cong. Ch Cedar Rapids. Busy Bees, Box C., and Literature, for Student A id, Beach Inst., Savannah, Ga Danville. Cong. Ch Davenport. Edwards Cong. Ch Dubuque. First Cong. Ch. (Special) Eldon. Cong. Ch Hampton. Mrs. W. D. Buroham, Pkg. Material, for Sewing DeAt., Beach Inst Lansing. Rev. Andrew Kern Manchester. Cong. Ch., adl Monticello. Cong. Ch New Hampton .J unior C. E. Soc., for Stadent Aid, Beach Inst., Savannah, Ga Shelby. Rev. Andrew Kern Tabor. Cong. Ch Tabor. Junior C. E. Soc., for Student A id, Beach Inst., Savannah, Ga Iowa Womans Home Missionary Union, Miss Belle L. Bentley, Treas., for Womans Work: Belle Plain. Jr. Y. P. 5. C. E 300 Big Rock. Mrs. Hickson 2 50 Cedar Rapids. W. M. 5 2 00 Chester Center. W. M. S.. no Council Bluffs. W. M. 5 20 00 Decorah. V. P. 5. C. E 23 66 Des Moines. Plymouth W. M. 5., 20.69, Plym. Rock. M. 5., 20 30 69 Farragut. W. M. S 20 00 Grinnell. W. M. S 4 46 Harlan. W. M. S 8 70 Iowa Falls. W. M. S 5 30 McGregor. W. M. 5., 9.25; Primary Sab. Sch. Class, 2.72; A. P. Daniels, 3.28.. 24 25 4 25 8 30 29 50 24 43 25 I 50 3 30 68 ni 2 40 31 RECEIPTS. Montour. Jr. Y. P.S. C. E. Ogden. W.M.S Sibley. W. M. S Sloan. W. M. S Tabor. W. M. S Toledo. W. NI. S Waterloo. W. M. S Undesignated 5 00 3 50 5 00 9 35 3 36 6 77 5 77 10 WISCONSIN, $85.58. Barabon. Cong. Ch Clintonville. Cong. Cli Darlington. Cong. Ch Menasha. Cong. Cli Oak Center. Mrs. S. B. Howard Spring Green. Cong. Cli Wisconsin Womans Home Missionary Union, Mrs. C. M. Blackman, Treas., for Womans Work: Leeds. W. NI. S 2 00 Whitewater. Cong. 5. 5... oo 00 MINNESOTA, $61.69. Alexandria. Sab. 5db. Cong. Cli Detroit. Cong. Cli Freeborn. Sab. 5db. Cong. Cli Hancock. Sab. 5db. Cong. Cli Lake City. First Cong. Cli Litclifield. Friends, for Meridian, Miss Marsliall. Cong. Cli Minneapolis. Fiftli Ave. Cong. Cli., by Willis A. James, Treas., 4.50 Fiftli Ave. Sab. 5db., 4.30; Rodelmer 2.50. Plainview. Cong. Cli KANSAS, $6.oo. Diamnod Springs. Cong. Cli Olatbo. S. S. Class, Pkg. by Mrs. Parker, for blowing Rock N. C Topeka. Mrs. Officer, for Meridian, Miss MISSOURI, $16.62. Amity. Cong. Cli.. Neosbo. Cong. Cli Old Orchard. Cong. Cli St. Louis. Mrs. Sadie E. Long, Box Papers, for Benafori, N. C St. Louis. Campton Hill Cong. Cli St. Louis. Cong. Cli., for Biacksnzitk Sioo/, Borreil Sek., Seinsa, Am Sedalia. First Cong. Cli NEBRASKA, $244.05. Crete. L. P. Matliews Harbine. Cong. Cli Hoidredge. Cong. Cli Red Cloud. Cong. Cli York. First Cong. Cli Womans Home Missionary Union of Nebraska, by Mrs. G. J. Powell, Treas., for Wonoans Work. W. H. M. U. of Neb SOUTH DAKOTA, $3.75. Buffalo Gap. Cong. Cli Spearfisli. Cong. Cli Soutli Dakota. Womans Home Mission- ary Union, Mrs. Adda M. Wilcox, Treas., for Indian Sindeni, Sanlee, Neb.: Armour. W. M. S ~ Clark. W. M. S 000 Columbia. W. NI. S 000 Deadwood. W. NI. S 3 25 Henry. W. M. S i 40 Mitoliell. W. M. S o Oalie. W. M. S., for Deli. 2 00 Valley Springs. W. M. 5.. 00 4 4 9 07 27 75 o6 So 5 00 02 00 3 03 4 00 2 93 7 75 8 00 oo 88 II 30 23 69 5 00 5 00 8 00 25 00 9 25 5 42 33 95 00 00 O 6o 0 o6 5 90 50 00 74 39 5 00 5 00 Vermillion. Jr. S. C. E.... 6 00 Yankton. NI. B 2 00 ______ $22 75 COLORADO, $7.05. Central City. Yours for tlie Cause... 4 00 Crested Butte. Union Cong. Cli 3 o5 CALIFORNIA, $433.35. East Higlilands. Sab. 5db. Cong. Cli 5 40 Los Angeles. First Cong. Cli 240 00 Pasadena. E. B. Nasli, deceased, by A. K. Nash, Admr., to const. FRED C. NASH L. NI 30 00 Pftsadena. First Cong. Cli 02 00 San Francisco. Receipts of tlie California Chinese Mission (see itemobelow) 239 6~ San Rafael. First Cong. Cli 6 30 WASHINGTON, $7.50. Seattle. Taylor Cong. Cli 7 50 VIRGINIA, $9.90. Herndon. Member Cong. Cli., by Geo. H. Pratt, Treas 9 90 NORTH CAROLINA, $8.5o. Higli Point. Cong. Cli Strieby. Cong. Cli . Womans Home Missionary Union of North Carolina by Miss A. E. Farring. ton, Treas.: Higli Point. A Friend, for In- dma ill GEORGIA, ~ NIclntosli. Midway Cli., o.I~ Cong. Cli., o.6s Rutland. Cong. Cli., ~ Miss. Soc. of Cong. Cli., o Savannali. Received at Beach Inst., Pkgs. Literature from Unknown Sources Woodville. Pilgrim Cli ALABAMA, $s.~. Atbens. Trinity Cong. Cli ... . Montgomery. Cong. Cli. Talladeba. Cong. Cli 2 00 O 50 5 03 4 45 3 co 2 49 2 97 FLORIDA. Fernandina. E. F. Ricliardson, Box Books, etc., for Beanjori, N. C LOUISIANA, $s.~o. Ablieville. Saint Mary Cong. Cli Lousiana Womans Missionary Union, by Mrs. C. S. Shattuck, Treas., for Wo;nnns Work. New Orleans. Central Cli. Au,... MISSISSIPPI, ~ Tougalno. Sab. 5db. Cong. Cli Tougaloo. Carrie E. Parkliurst, for Sin- denlAid, Tongaioo U Moorhead. Miss S. L. Emerson, for A. G. Sck 2 00 3 4 7 9 50 00 TEXAS, $o8.oo. Austin. Tradesmen of Austin, for Black- smith Shop, Tilloison C. and N. Insi... o8 00 _____ Friend 24 copies Gospel Hymn Books, No. 6,for Knoxville, Bean ____ Bhl. C., for Blowing Rock, N. C. ENGLAND, $200.00. London. Mrs. Marriage Allen, for In dasirial Work, Le Moyne Insi 200 00 32 RECEIPTS. CHINA, $so.oo. Tientsin. Shansi. Rev. J. B. Thompson and wife 50 00 Donations $14,813 38 Estates 3,772 52 $18,585 90 INCOME, $~,i~o.oo. Avery Fund/or Mmdi M 560 00 De Forest Fund, for Presiden/s Chair, Taliadega C 125 00 Hsley Schp. Fund, for Fisk U 25 00 Hastings Schp. Fund, for Al- lan/a U 18 75 Howard Then. Endowment Fund, for Howard U 83 75 Le Moyne Sehp. Fund, br Meat- .~5kis, Than 125 00 Luke Memorial Sehp. Fund, for Tailadega C 10 00 Plumb Sehp. Fund, for Fisk U.. 50 00 Stone Sehp. Fund, for Tol- ladega C .... ...... ... 25 00 Straight University Sehp Fund.. 20 00 Tuthill King Fund/or Borca C. 87 50 1,130 00 TUITION, $3,553.47. Evarts, Ky. Tuition 4 oo Lexington, Ky. Tuition .92 i5 Williamsburg, Ky. Tuition i6 90 Jonesboro, Tenn. Tuition 22 Knoxville, Tenn. Tuition 29 00 Memphis, Tenn. Tuition 557 20 Nashville, Tenn. Tuition 709 52 Pleasant Hill, Tenn. Tuition 69 8o Beaufort, N. C. Tuition 20 Blowing Rock, N. C. Tuition 00 Hillsboro, N. C. Tuition 20 i~ Kings Mountains, N. C. Tuition is 00 Saluda, N. C. Tuition 6 6~ Tiny, N. C. Tuition 2 Whittier, N. C. Tuition 8 is Wilmington, N. C. Tuition 594 40 Charleston, S. C. Tuition ~ 87 Greenwood, S. C. Tuition ~ 82 Atlanta, Ga. Storrs Seb., Tuition iSi 88 Macon, Ga. Tuition 289 50 Savannah, Ga. Tuition 220 31 Thomasville, Ga. Tuition 63 8o Woodville, Ga. Tuition.... ..... 4 ~o Athens, Ala, Tuition 35 6i Marion, Ala. Tuition 42 95 Nat, Ala. Tuition 75 50 Selma, Ala. Tuition io8 05 Orange Park, Fla. Tuition 47 00 New Orleans, La. Tuition... .. 465 8~ Meriden Miss Tuition 76 00 Moorhead, Miss. Tuition 12 8o Austin, Tex. Tuition 67 50 3,813 47 Total for November $23,529 37 SUMMARY. Donations $24,765 64 Estates . 7,621 38 $32,387 02 Income s,s6o 00 Tuition 4,517 04 Total from Oct. i to Nov. 30 $38,064 o6 FOR THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY. Subscription for November $20 25 Previously acknowledged 19 43 Total $s~ 68 RECEIPTS OF THE CALIFORNIA CHINESE MISSION William Johostone, Tress. FROM LOCAL MISSIONS: Fresno. Chinese Mon. Offs.... ~ Hanford. Chinese Mon. Offs.. Los Angeles. Chinese Month lies 2 25 Marysville. Chinese Monthlies, 8.~o; Rents, 13 50 Oroville. Chinese Monthlies as Petaluma. Chinese Monthlies, 1.25; Rents, 75 cents 2 00 Riverside. Chinese MontLlies, ss cents; Rent, i.oo 1 Sacramento. Chinese Month- lie, ~ Rents, 8.25 II 25 San Bernardino. Chinese Monthlies 3 00 San Diego. Chinese Month- lies, i.9o; Rent, i 2 90 San Francisco. Central Chinese Monthlies 7 6~ San Francisco. Barnes (hinese Monthlies 2 00 San Francisco. West Chinese Monthlies 4 75 Santa Barbara. Chinese Month- lies, 3.90; Rents, 1.50 5 40 Santa Cruz. Chinese Monthlies, i.o;Rents,5 610 Stockton. hinese Monthlies, 2 25; Rents, 2 4 25 Ventura. Chinese Monthlies, 250;Rents,225 475 Watsonville. Chinese Month- lies 5 35 $84 8s Receipts for the expenses of fiscal year which ended Aug. 31, 1894. Fresno. Rev. E. G. Chaddock, s; Wing Gow, ~ 9 00 Hanford. Miss Amy E. Clarke 14 70 Oakland. Joe Ock Nong 2 on Oroville. Miss Leggett, ~ Tong Ay, 4 6 00 Petaluma. Cong. Ch in 00 Riverside. Annual Member- ship 2 00 San Franci~co Central. Annual Members 4 00 San Francisco. Bethany Ch., C. H. Coggins, ~.so; Mrs. Hicks, San Diego. Anniversary Pledges Ventura. C. L. Sheldon FEOM INOIvIOUAL HELPERS: Hon. Giles H. Gray 5 ~ Portland, Oregon. Joe Jet, ~ Wong Due, s in 00 FROM EASTERN FRIENos: Portland, Me. Chinese Sunday Seb. Sec. Cong. Ch., i~ Chinese Pupils, ~ 3 to conat. M. C. ARTHUR DUNLAP, Supt. L.M.; Chinese Annual Members, 8 DONATIONS FOR CHINESE WOMEN: Greenfield, Mass. Mrs. E. B. Loomis 5 00 Stratford, Coon. Miss Cordelia Sterling 20 on Albany, N.Y. Friends, by Miss Janet MeNaughton 00 Oakland, Cal. Mrs. L. C. Agard in 00 3 50 4 6~ ~6 85 15 00 33 00 50 00 Total $239 6~ H. W. HUBBARD, Treas., Bible House, N. Y.

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The American missionary. / Volume 49, Issue 2 Congregational work Pilgrim missionary Congregationalist and herald of gospel liberty American Missionary Association. New York Feb 1895 0049 002
The American missionary. / Volume 49, Issue 2, miscellaneous front pages 32A-32B

FEBRUARY, 1895 liEn VOL. XLIX No.2 L c~ \~!t ~4 / ..~,,.iv EU IiiIIdIII CONTENTS OUR LIsT OF MISSION FIELD WORKERS. 33 HOWARD UNIVERSITY MCINTOSH, GA. 34 FINANCIAL STATEMENTLINCOLN MEMO- RIAL DAY, . . . . 35 LEWIS TAPPAN, WITH PICTURE, . . 36 HON. WILLIAM JACKSON, WITH PICTURE. 37 SKOKOMISH MISSION (Illustrated),HON- ORABLE RECORD FOR INDIANS - . 88 TRIALS OF MISSIONARY LIFE, . . 39 GRAND VIEW, TENN.GOSPEL TRANS ~ORMATIONS, . , . 40 THE POOR HELPING THE POOREST, CIIILDRENS CAUSES FOR THANKFULNESS, To HELP HER OWN PEOPLE, CONTRASTS OF MISSION CHURCH WORK (Illustrated) GLEAMS OF SUNSHINE IN CHINESE MIS SION WORK, . - . TRIBUTE TO OUR MISSIONARIES LIST OF OUR FIELD WORKERS, RECEIPTS, NEW YORK PUBLISHED BY THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION, Bible House, Ninth St. and Fourth Ave., New York. Price, 50 Cents a Year in advance. Entered at the Post Office at New York, N. Y., as second-class matter. 61 IIQI J itel 41 43 44 46 48 49 80 ~Lttucdcan i$$ionatx2 ~tssociation. PRESIDENT, MERRILL E. GATES, LL.D., MASS. Vice-Presidents. Rev. F. A. NOBLE, D.D., Ill. REv. HENRY HOPKINS, D.D., Mo. Rev. ALEX. MCKENZIE, D.D., Mass. REV. HENRY A. STIMSON, D.D., N. Y. REV. WASHINGTON GLADDEN, D.D., Ohio. Corre.~ponding Secretaries. Rev. M. E. STRIEBY, D.D., Bible House, N. Y. Rev. A. F. BEARD, D.D., Bible House, N. Y. Rev. F. P. WOODBURY, D.D., Bible House, N. Y. Assistant Carresjonding Secretary. Rev. C. J. RYDER, D.D., Bible House, N, Y. Recording Secretary. Rcv. M. B. STRIEBY, D.D., Bible House, N. Y. Treasurer. HENRY XV. I-IUIII;ARD, Esq., Bible Hause, N. }~ A uditors. PET ~ MCCART E. JAMES MITCHELL. Executive committee. CHARLES L. MEAD, Chairman. CHARLES A. HUL.L, Secretary. For Three Ye. rs. For Two Years. For One Year. WILLIAM HAYES WARDS CHARLES A. HULL, SAMUEL HOLMES, JAMES W. COOPER, ADDISON P. FOSTER, SAMUEL S. MARPLES, LUCIEN C. WARNER, ALBERT J. LYMAN, CHARLES L. MEAD, JOSEPH H. TWICHELL, NEHEMIAH BOYNTON, WILLIAM H. STRONG, CHARLES P. PEIRCE. A. J. F. BEHRENDS. ELIJAH HOaR. District Secretaries. Rev. GEo. H. GUTTERSON, 21 (ongi House, Boston, Mass. Rev. Jos. E. Roy, D.D., 151 Washington Street, (hica~o, IlL Rev. W~ B. C. WRIGHT, D.D., 6onglRoo;ns, Y.M.c.A. Builainp, (lez;elaud, Ohio. Secretary of Womans Bureau. Miss D. B. EMERSON, Bible House, N. V. COMMUNICATIONS Relating to the work of the Association may be addressed to the Corresponding Secretaries; letters for THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY, to the Editor, at the New York Office; letters relating to the finances, to the Treasurer; letters relating to womans work, to the Secretary of the Womans Bureau. DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS In drafts, checks, registered letters, or post-office orders, may be sent to H. XV. Hubbard, Treasurer, Bible House, New York, or, when more convenient, to either of the Branch Offices, 21 Congregational House, Boston, Mass., 151 Washington Street, Chicago, Ill., or Congregational Rooms, Y. M. C. A. Building, Cleveland, Ohio. A payment of thirty dollars constitutes a Life Member. NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS.The date on the address label indicates the time to which the subscription is paid. Changes are made in date on label to the ioth of each month. If payment of subscription be made afterward the change on the label will appear a month later. Please send early notice of change in post-office address, giving the former address and the new address, in order that our periodi- cals and occasional papers may be correctly mailed. FORM OF A BEQUEST. I GIVE AND BEQUEATH the sum of dollars to the American Mission- ary Association, incorporated by act of the Legislature of the State of New York. The will should be attested by three witnesses.

Our List of Mission Field Workers 33-34

THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY VOL. XLIX. FEBRUARY, 1895. No. 2. OUR LIST OF MISSION FIELD WORKERS. We commend to our readers the catalogue of our missionary workers and their stations, in our magazine of this month. Mere names and places have very little interest to the general reader, but a study of this list to one who is interested in mission work, and who has the welfare of his country at heart, will prove to be very suggestive. Some of the larger institutions, schools~and churches, are familiar to many, but the greater number probably have nevcr been located by our readers upon the map. There are 243 stations with 617 workers. Each station represents a great deal of missionary consecration and devoted servic~ for the Master. Could our readers look in upon these workers it would quicken the spirit of their own consecration and benev- olence. If they could hear the bell which early calls the students to prayers, and to their studies; if they could unite with those engaged in their morning devotions; if they could listen to the faithful and able instruction of line upon line, and precept upon precept, this list would cease to be a mere catalogue of names and places, and would become alive with history. Nobly are these missionaries doing their work. Let them have the prayerful sympathy of those whom they represent. Let them feel that their burdens are lightened and their days are brightened because they are remembered by their home churches. Do not forget them when you utter the prayer of our Master, Thy kingdom come, thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. These missionaries, teachers, and ministers, do not ask the com- passion of those who remain at home. They are happy in their chosen work. They see the need as it cannot be told. They have a rich 34 HOWARD UNIVERSITY. reward in the assurance that their lives, which they have invested in this way, are bringing abundant returns. We call attention also to the supplemental list, which shows the names and residences grouped together side by side. This grouping itself is interesting as showing the nationality of our work. May we not hope that these who have gone out from us shall be spared the anxiety and sorrow which must come by a contraction of their work unless those from whom they have gone shall be able to meet its pecuniary necessities? Will not those to whom these words shall come unite their prayers and contributions with those of the faithful workers at the front, that they may be saved from the disaster of retreat from the work to which they have given their hearts and hands? MEMORANDUM. It would be well for those who are interested in the American Missionary Association work to preserve this February magazine, because it contains the catalogue of our workers for the year. HOWARD UNIVERSITY, THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. The Junior class is the best qualified that has entered within the knowledge of the present teachers. The general standard of scholarship steadily advances. The students are very useful in all kinds of church and mission work in the city. Rev. C. H. Butler is doing excellent work in place of his honored father, who was so long connected with us. Dr. Pitzer, of the Southern Presbyterian Church, who was also long our faithful co-worker, gave an eloquent address at our last anniversary, and has just kindly remembered us with a valuable gift to our library. Rev. Mr. Reoch, the new pastor of the Fifth Congregational Church, is doing enthusiastic work in Rev. Mr. Jones place, and in place of Rev. Mr. Small, Rev. Dr. Little gives our students the benefit of his rich ex- perience as their instructor in pastoral theology. McINTOSH, GEORGIA. PROF. FRED. w. FOSTER. We are beginning our years work with much better promise than in any previous year. Our enrollment is a fourth greater now than at the close of October last year, when it was greater than ever before at that time. Our boarding department is also filling up much faster. Better than this is the very marked gain in the tone of the school and in the character of the work done, and the orderliness and studiousness of the pupils, It i~ cheering to look through the various rooms and note the

Howard University, Theological Department 34

34 HOWARD UNIVERSITY. reward in the assurance that their lives, which they have invested in this way, are bringing abundant returns. We call attention also to the supplemental list, which shows the names and residences grouped together side by side. This grouping itself is interesting as showing the nationality of our work. May we not hope that these who have gone out from us shall be spared the anxiety and sorrow which must come by a contraction of their work unless those from whom they have gone shall be able to meet its pecuniary necessities? Will not those to whom these words shall come unite their prayers and contributions with those of the faithful workers at the front, that they may be saved from the disaster of retreat from the work to which they have given their hearts and hands? MEMORANDUM. It would be well for those who are interested in the American Missionary Association work to preserve this February magazine, because it contains the catalogue of our workers for the year. HOWARD UNIVERSITY, THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. The Junior class is the best qualified that has entered within the knowledge of the present teachers. The general standard of scholarship steadily advances. The students are very useful in all kinds of church and mission work in the city. Rev. C. H. Butler is doing excellent work in place of his honored father, who was so long connected with us. Dr. Pitzer, of the Southern Presbyterian Church, who was also long our faithful co-worker, gave an eloquent address at our last anniversary, and has just kindly remembered us with a valuable gift to our library. Rev. Mr. Reoch, the new pastor of the Fifth Congregational Church, is doing enthusiastic work in Rev. Mr. Jones place, and in place of Rev. Mr. Small, Rev. Dr. Little gives our students the benefit of his rich ex- perience as their instructor in pastoral theology. McINTOSH, GEORGIA. PROF. FRED. w. FOSTER. We are beginning our years work with much better promise than in any previous year. Our enrollment is a fourth greater now than at the close of October last year, when it was greater than ever before at that time. Our boarding department is also filling up much faster. Better than this is the very marked gain in the tone of the school and in the character of the work done, and the orderliness and studiousness of the pupils, It i~ cheering to look through the various rooms and note the

Prof. Fred. W. Foster Foster, Fred. W., Prof. McIntosh, Georgia 34-35

34 HOWARD UNIVERSITY. reward in the assurance that their lives, which they have invested in this way, are bringing abundant returns. We call attention also to the supplemental list, which shows the names and residences grouped together side by side. This grouping itself is interesting as showing the nationality of our work. May we not hope that these who have gone out from us shall be spared the anxiety and sorrow which must come by a contraction of their work unless those from whom they have gone shall be able to meet its pecuniary necessities? Will not those to whom these words shall come unite their prayers and contributions with those of the faithful workers at the front, that they may be saved from the disaster of retreat from the work to which they have given their hearts and hands? MEMORANDUM. It would be well for those who are interested in the American Missionary Association work to preserve this February magazine, because it contains the catalogue of our workers for the year. HOWARD UNIVERSITY, THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. The Junior class is the best qualified that has entered within the knowledge of the present teachers. The general standard of scholarship steadily advances. The students are very useful in all kinds of church and mission work in the city. Rev. C. H. Butler is doing excellent work in place of his honored father, who was so long connected with us. Dr. Pitzer, of the Southern Presbyterian Church, who was also long our faithful co-worker, gave an eloquent address at our last anniversary, and has just kindly remembered us with a valuable gift to our library. Rev. Mr. Reoch, the new pastor of the Fifth Congregational Church, is doing enthusiastic work in Rev. Mr. Jones place, and in place of Rev. Mr. Small, Rev. Dr. Little gives our students the benefit of his rich ex- perience as their instructor in pastoral theology. McINTOSH, GEORGIA. PROF. FRED. w. FOSTER. We are beginning our years work with much better promise than in any previous year. Our enrollment is a fourth greater now than at the close of October last year, when it was greater than ever before at that time. Our boarding department is also filling up much faster. Better than this is the very marked gain in the tone of the school and in the character of the work done, and the orderliness and studiousness of the pupils, It i~ cheering to look through the various rooms and note the FINANCIALLINCOLN MEMORIAL DA 1K 35 cheerful diligence with which they are at work. The reverse side of all this is our lack of room, and the great poverty of our people this year, caused by a most unfavorable season. The generosity of our friends at the North can help us meet the latter, and Christian Endeavor Hall would completely remove the former difficulty. FINANCIAL STATEMENT. For the three months ending December 31, 1894, our receipts, as compared with the corresponding months of the previous year, show a slight increase in donations, but a falling off in estates, income and tuition. The last item is sad, but not surprising, for the people in the South are so utterly impoverished that the payment of tuition is well-nigh impossible. On the side of expenditures, as compared with last year, there has been reduction in all items, mission, publication, collecting agency and administration, and yet the balance of indebtedness for the three months is $15,671.10, which, added to the previous indebtedness of $66,360.97, makes a total of $82,032.07. We can only lay these figures before the friends of the poorest and most depressed of the peo- ple of our land and invoke such help as patriotism and Christianity will dictate. LINCOLN MEMORIAL DAY. We call the attention of our readers once more to the observance of Lincoln Memorial Day, February ioth being the Sunday nearest the birthday of the Great Emancipator. Last year, in accordance with the recommendation of our annual meeting, the churches interested in our great work were invited to observe the day in commemoration of the emancipation of the slaves in its bearings on the great work which eman- cipation involvedthe preparation of these people for their new life. We regard the renewal of this observance as specially fitting now, be- cause the colored people of the South are passing through a terrible ordeal, and need all the encouragement and help that is possible, to save them from utter discouragement. It is said that the work of this As- sociation is among the agencies most helpful in their elevation. Last year a Concert Exercise was prepared in this office for the use of Sunday- schools, giving a sketch of the life of the Great Emancipator. We have copies remaining, which we will gladly forward when requested to do so. Pastors and school superintendents may vary this exercise by intro- ducing other patriotic addresses or hymns in place of those given.

Financial Statement 35

FINANCIALLINCOLN MEMORIAL DA 1K 35 cheerful diligence with which they are at work. The reverse side of all this is our lack of room, and the great poverty of our people this year, caused by a most unfavorable season. The generosity of our friends at the North can help us meet the latter, and Christian Endeavor Hall would completely remove the former difficulty. FINANCIAL STATEMENT. For the three months ending December 31, 1894, our receipts, as compared with the corresponding months of the previous year, show a slight increase in donations, but a falling off in estates, income and tuition. The last item is sad, but not surprising, for the people in the South are so utterly impoverished that the payment of tuition is well-nigh impossible. On the side of expenditures, as compared with last year, there has been reduction in all items, mission, publication, collecting agency and administration, and yet the balance of indebtedness for the three months is $15,671.10, which, added to the previous indebtedness of $66,360.97, makes a total of $82,032.07. We can only lay these figures before the friends of the poorest and most depressed of the peo- ple of our land and invoke such help as patriotism and Christianity will dictate. LINCOLN MEMORIAL DAY. We call the attention of our readers once more to the observance of Lincoln Memorial Day, February ioth being the Sunday nearest the birthday of the Great Emancipator. Last year, in accordance with the recommendation of our annual meeting, the churches interested in our great work were invited to observe the day in commemoration of the emancipation of the slaves in its bearings on the great work which eman- cipation involvedthe preparation of these people for their new life. We regard the renewal of this observance as specially fitting now, be- cause the colored people of the South are passing through a terrible ordeal, and need all the encouragement and help that is possible, to save them from utter discouragement. It is said that the work of this As- sociation is among the agencies most helpful in their elevation. Last year a Concert Exercise was prepared in this office for the use of Sunday- schools, giving a sketch of the life of the Great Emancipator. We have copies remaining, which we will gladly forward when requested to do so. Pastors and school superintendents may vary this exercise by intro- ducing other patriotic addresses or hymns in place of those given.

Lincoln Memorial Day 35-36

FINANCIALLINCOLN MEMORIAL DA 1K 35 cheerful diligence with which they are at work. The reverse side of all this is our lack of room, and the great poverty of our people this year, caused by a most unfavorable season. The generosity of our friends at the North can help us meet the latter, and Christian Endeavor Hall would completely remove the former difficulty. FINANCIAL STATEMENT. For the three months ending December 31, 1894, our receipts, as compared with the corresponding months of the previous year, show a slight increase in donations, but a falling off in estates, income and tuition. The last item is sad, but not surprising, for the people in the South are so utterly impoverished that the payment of tuition is well-nigh impossible. On the side of expenditures, as compared with last year, there has been reduction in all items, mission, publication, collecting agency and administration, and yet the balance of indebtedness for the three months is $15,671.10, which, added to the previous indebtedness of $66,360.97, makes a total of $82,032.07. We can only lay these figures before the friends of the poorest and most depressed of the peo- ple of our land and invoke such help as patriotism and Christianity will dictate. LINCOLN MEMORIAL DAY. We call the attention of our readers once more to the observance of Lincoln Memorial Day, February ioth being the Sunday nearest the birthday of the Great Emancipator. Last year, in accordance with the recommendation of our annual meeting, the churches interested in our great work were invited to observe the day in commemoration of the emancipation of the slaves in its bearings on the great work which eman- cipation involvedthe preparation of these people for their new life. We regard the renewal of this observance as specially fitting now, be- cause the colored people of the South are passing through a terrible ordeal, and need all the encouragement and help that is possible, to save them from utter discouragement. It is said that the work of this As- sociation is among the agencies most helpful in their elevation. Last year a Concert Exercise was prepared in this office for the use of Sunday- schools, giving a sketch of the life of the Great Emancipator. We have copies remaining, which we will gladly forward when requested to do so. Pastors and school superintendents may vary this exercise by intro- ducing other patriotic addresses or hymns in place of those given. 36 LEWIS TAPPAN, ESQ. LEWIS TAPPAN, ESQ. Probably the two most unpopular men in New York fifty years ago were Arthur and Lewis Tappan. They were ostracized, ridiculed, slan- dered, mobbed, and their lives threatened. It is said that the best apples in the orchard are on the tree that has the most clubs under it. If this rule applies to people as well, then the Tappans were very good men. They were honest and prosperous in business; they were sincere and active Christians, giving liberally to all forms of benevolent effort, foreign and home missions, the Bible and Tract Societies, theological and college education, but their one great fault was they were abolition- is/sa fault that covered a multi- tude of their virtues. They were both deeply interested in the American Missionary Associa- tion, but Mr. Lewis Tappan was most active in its behalf, and it is of him that we wish to speak. Lewis Tappan took a promi- nent part in the organization of some of the missionary societies that preceded the American Mis- sionary Association, and that were finally mergrd into it. He was very efficient in his activities in securing the organization of the Association, was present at the meeting in Albany, was elected one of its executive board, and its first treasurer. This last office he held for many years, entirely without compensation. He interested himself in every form of its activities, and was a frequent contributor to THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY. A * affixed to many articles shows a portion of his contributions to the early issues of this periodical. Mr. Tappan was an earnest Christian man and very conscientious in regard to the distribution of his wealth. He wrote two tracts, endeav- oring to show that men should not accumulate property to be left to be subject to litigation after dealh, but that it should be expended during life. Mr. Tappan lived up to his own theorygiving much during life and leaving little at his death. Mr. Tappan had the gratification of seeing the slaves emancipated

Lewis Tappan, Esq. 36-37

36 LEWIS TAPPAN, ESQ. LEWIS TAPPAN, ESQ. Probably the two most unpopular men in New York fifty years ago were Arthur and Lewis Tappan. They were ostracized, ridiculed, slan- dered, mobbed, and their lives threatened. It is said that the best apples in the orchard are on the tree that has the most clubs under it. If this rule applies to people as well, then the Tappans were very good men. They were honest and prosperous in business; they were sincere and active Christians, giving liberally to all forms of benevolent effort, foreign and home missions, the Bible and Tract Societies, theological and college education, but their one great fault was they were abolition- is/sa fault that covered a multi- tude of their virtues. They were both deeply interested in the American Missionary Associa- tion, but Mr. Lewis Tappan was most active in its behalf, and it is of him that we wish to speak. Lewis Tappan took a promi- nent part in the organization of some of the missionary societies that preceded the American Mis- sionary Association, and that were finally mergrd into it. He was very efficient in his activities in securing the organization of the Association, was present at the meeting in Albany, was elected one of its executive board, and its first treasurer. This last office he held for many years, entirely without compensation. He interested himself in every form of its activities, and was a frequent contributor to THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY. A * affixed to many articles shows a portion of his contributions to the early issues of this periodical. Mr. Tappan was an earnest Christian man and very conscientious in regard to the distribution of his wealth. He wrote two tracts, endeav- oring to show that men should not accumulate property to be left to be subject to litigation after dealh, but that it should be expended during life. Mr. Tappan lived up to his own theorygiving much during life and leaving little at his death. Mr. Tappan had the gratification of seeing the slaves emancipated I/ON. WiLLIAM 7ACKSON. 37 and the still greater gratification of aiding with all his strength of brain and purse in fitting them for the responsibilities and privileges of their new life. His was a life worth living. HON. WILLIAM JACKSON. XVhen the American Missionary Association was formed in 1846 it was so unpopular on account of its anti-slavery attitude that it was not easy to find an able and influential man with sufficient courage to accept its presidency. But the man was found. Hon. William lackson, a citizcn of Boston, and an active and suc- cessful business man, was so deeply in sympathy with the poor slave that he was willing to as- sume the position. and all the more because others shrunk from it. Mr. Jackson was a member of the Massachusetts Legislature, and afterward was elected to Congress, and xvas subsequently rei~lected for an- other term by an almost unani- mous vote. He was selected by the Liberty Party as its first candidate for Govcrnor of the State of Massachusctts. He was a warm and efficient advocate of the temperance cause. He devoted much of his time and energies to the establishment of railroads in Massachusetts among others the Boston and Albany, Boston and Worcester, and Providence and Worcester. In variou3 capacities as director or general agent he rendered efficient service in the work of these roads. But the charm of Mr. Jacksons life was its Christian element. At the age of thirty-seven he moved to Newton, Mass., where he spent the remainder of his life. He was actively engaged in the erection of the church edifice and gathering the new church, and was steadfast in his attendance at the prayer meeting, monthly concert, Sunday-school, and other exercises. Advanc- ing years and failing health led him to make a somewhat extended trip

Hon. William Jackson 37-38

I/ON. WiLLIAM 7ACKSON. 37 and the still greater gratification of aiding with all his strength of brain and purse in fitting them for the responsibilities and privileges of their new life. His was a life worth living. HON. WILLIAM JACKSON. XVhen the American Missionary Association was formed in 1846 it was so unpopular on account of its anti-slavery attitude that it was not easy to find an able and influential man with sufficient courage to accept its presidency. But the man was found. Hon. William lackson, a citizcn of Boston, and an active and suc- cessful business man, was so deeply in sympathy with the poor slave that he was willing to as- sume the position. and all the more because others shrunk from it. Mr. Jackson was a member of the Massachusetts Legislature, and afterward was elected to Congress, and xvas subsequently rei~lected for an- other term by an almost unani- mous vote. He was selected by the Liberty Party as its first candidate for Govcrnor of the State of Massachusctts. He was a warm and efficient advocate of the temperance cause. He devoted much of his time and energies to the establishment of railroads in Massachusetts among others the Boston and Albany, Boston and Worcester, and Providence and Worcester. In variou3 capacities as director or general agent he rendered efficient service in the work of these roads. But the charm of Mr. Jacksons life was its Christian element. At the age of thirty-seven he moved to Newton, Mass., where he spent the remainder of his life. He was actively engaged in the erection of the church edifice and gathering the new church, and was steadfast in his attendance at the prayer meeting, monthly concert, Sunday-school, and other exercises. Advanc- ing years and failing health led him to make a somewhat extended trip 38 SKOKOMISI# MISSION. through Europe. But life was coming to its end, and it closed with him in deepening interest in the cause of Christ at home and abroad, and in the strongest assurances of a triumphant faith. SKOKOMISH MISSION. The venerable Dr. Cushing Eells left behind him many mementoes of his remarkable activity in promoting educational and missionary work in Oregon and Washington, on the Pacific coast. Nor with his decease has his good work ceased. Two sons of his have gone forward in simi- lar lines of effort. His son, Major Edwin Eells, was one of the first nominees of the American Missionary Association under General Grants Peace Policy, and he was renominated by us so long as we were allowed to make nominations, and he has been continued ever since, ma king a total service of twenty-three years and a half. During this time the Indians have received titles to their lands and have become citizens. His effective hand has been seen in all their improvement. But now we learn that he has been notified that he is soon to be relieved. His re- moval is said to be due solely to politics. We are sorry for the Indians, and we are ashamed of a Government that will deprive them for par- tisan purposes of a good agent. Another son of Dr. Eells, Rev. Myron Eells, was appointed as a mis- sionary at the Skokomish Agency by the American Board, and when the transfer of missions was made he was continued at the post under the American Missionary Associationa position that he still holds. The subjoined sketch from his pen shows that in point of honesty, in some respects, at least, the Indians surpass their white neighbors. HONORABLE RECORD FOR INDIANS. BY REV. MYRON EELL5, 5 KOKOMISH AGENCY WASHINGTON. During the late financial stringency the principal business man near this reservation failed, and put his property into the hands of a receiver. The Skokomish Indians owed him about three thousand dollars, and the whites owed him over twenty thousand. The first business of the re- ceiver was to try to collect these debts. After he had made consider- able effort in this direction he said to me substantially as follows: These Jndians have made more honest efforts to pay these debts than the whites have, as a whole. As the Indians have become citizens they have been required to work road taxes among their other duties. The road supervisor said to me: I obtained more satisfactory work out of the Indians than I did out of

S'kokomish Mission 38

38 SKOKOMISI# MISSION. through Europe. But life was coming to its end, and it closed with him in deepening interest in the cause of Christ at home and abroad, and in the strongest assurances of a triumphant faith. SKOKOMISH MISSION. The venerable Dr. Cushing Eells left behind him many mementoes of his remarkable activity in promoting educational and missionary work in Oregon and Washington, on the Pacific coast. Nor with his decease has his good work ceased. Two sons of his have gone forward in simi- lar lines of effort. His son, Major Edwin Eells, was one of the first nominees of the American Missionary Association under General Grants Peace Policy, and he was renominated by us so long as we were allowed to make nominations, and he has been continued ever since, ma king a total service of twenty-three years and a half. During this time the Indians have received titles to their lands and have become citizens. His effective hand has been seen in all their improvement. But now we learn that he has been notified that he is soon to be relieved. His re- moval is said to be due solely to politics. We are sorry for the Indians, and we are ashamed of a Government that will deprive them for par- tisan purposes of a good agent. Another son of Dr. Eells, Rev. Myron Eells, was appointed as a mis- sionary at the Skokomish Agency by the American Board, and when the transfer of missions was made he was continued at the post under the American Missionary Associationa position that he still holds. The subjoined sketch from his pen shows that in point of honesty, in some respects, at least, the Indians surpass their white neighbors. HONORABLE RECORD FOR INDIANS. BY REV. MYRON EELL5, 5 KOKOMISH AGENCY WASHINGTON. During the late financial stringency the principal business man near this reservation failed, and put his property into the hands of a receiver. The Skokomish Indians owed him about three thousand dollars, and the whites owed him over twenty thousand. The first business of the re- ceiver was to try to collect these debts. After he had made consider- able effort in this direction he said to me substantially as follows: These Jndians have made more honest efforts to pay these debts than the whites have, as a whole. As the Indians have become citizens they have been required to work road taxes among their other duties. The road supervisor said to me: I obtained more satisfactory work out of the Indians than I did out of

Rev. Myron Eells Eells, Myron, Rev. Honorable Record for Indians 38-39

38 SKOKOMISI# MISSION. through Europe. But life was coming to its end, and it closed with him in deepening interest in the cause of Christ at home and abroad, and in the strongest assurances of a triumphant faith. SKOKOMISH MISSION. The venerable Dr. Cushing Eells left behind him many mementoes of his remarkable activity in promoting educational and missionary work in Oregon and Washington, on the Pacific coast. Nor with his decease has his good work ceased. Two sons of his have gone forward in simi- lar lines of effort. His son, Major Edwin Eells, was one of the first nominees of the American Missionary Association under General Grants Peace Policy, and he was renominated by us so long as we were allowed to make nominations, and he has been continued ever since, ma king a total service of twenty-three years and a half. During this time the Indians have received titles to their lands and have become citizens. His effective hand has been seen in all their improvement. But now we learn that he has been notified that he is soon to be relieved. His re- moval is said to be due solely to politics. We are sorry for the Indians, and we are ashamed of a Government that will deprive them for par- tisan purposes of a good agent. Another son of Dr. Eells, Rev. Myron Eells, was appointed as a mis- sionary at the Skokomish Agency by the American Board, and when the transfer of missions was made he was continued at the post under the American Missionary Associationa position that he still holds. The subjoined sketch from his pen shows that in point of honesty, in some respects, at least, the Indians surpass their white neighbors. HONORABLE RECORD FOR INDIANS. BY REV. MYRON EELL5, 5 KOKOMISH AGENCY WASHINGTON. During the late financial stringency the principal business man near this reservation failed, and put his property into the hands of a receiver. The Skokomish Indians owed him about three thousand dollars, and the whites owed him over twenty thousand. The first business of the re- ceiver was to try to collect these debts. After he had made consider- able effort in this direction he said to me substantially as follows: These Jndians have made more honest efforts to pay these debts than the whites have, as a whole. As the Indians have become citizens they have been required to work road taxes among their other duties. The road supervisor said to me: I obtained more satisfactory work out of the Indians than I did out of TRIALS OF MISSIONARY LIFE. 39 the white men. The Indians had often said that the roads were theirs, and they wanted to use them, so that they were not losing anything, even if they worked a little over their time, and several of them who were over fifty years of age voluntarily gave a days work or two. While the Indians by no means always d& as I wish to have them, yet these facts are encouraging. THE TRIALS OF MIssIONARy LIFE.The hardships and dangers to which our Indian missionaries are exposed are illustrated in the sad ex- perience of Rev. T. L. Riggs, the superintendent of the missions of the Association at Gahe, S. D. The exposure to the blazing sun and cutting winds and excessive cold of the Dakota winters has produced acute inflammation of the eyes, so that Mr. Riggs is entirely blind. We trnst this is only temporary, but the pain and confinement in a dark room, and necessary retirement from the active work which Supt. Riggs so energetically carries on, are a painful trial, and will awaken the sympathy of all our readers. A sad affliction has also befailen our honored missionary, Dr. A. L. Riggs, and his family, of Santee, Neb. Their little grandson, the child of the missionary daughter in China, has recently died of small-pox under very painful circumstances. The entire family in China had this dis- ease, but at last accounts all but the little child were recovering. MISSION HOME, SKOKOMISH.

The Trials of Missionary Life 39-40

TRIALS OF MISSIONARY LIFE. 39 the white men. The Indians had often said that the roads were theirs, and they wanted to use them, so that they were not losing anything, even if they worked a little over their time, and several of them who were over fifty years of age voluntarily gave a days work or two. While the Indians by no means always d& as I wish to have them, yet these facts are encouraging. THE TRIALS OF MIssIONARy LIFE.The hardships and dangers to which our Indian missionaries are exposed are illustrated in the sad ex- perience of Rev. T. L. Riggs, the superintendent of the missions of the Association at Gahe, S. D. The exposure to the blazing sun and cutting winds and excessive cold of the Dakota winters has produced acute inflammation of the eyes, so that Mr. Riggs is entirely blind. We trnst this is only temporary, but the pain and confinement in a dark room, and necessary retirement from the active work which Supt. Riggs so energetically carries on, are a painful trial, and will awaken the sympathy of all our readers. A sad affliction has also befailen our honored missionary, Dr. A. L. Riggs, and his family, of Santee, Neb. Their little grandson, the child of the missionary daughter in China, has recently died of small-pox under very painful circumstances. The entire family in China had this dis- ease, but at last accounts all but the little child were recovering. MISSION HOME, SKOKOMISH. 40 GRAND VIEW, TENN.GOSPEL TRAN~FORMAt1ONS. GRAND VIEW, TENN. BY SECRETARY RYDER. I reached Pleasant Hill last Saturday, driving from Grand View. It is of Grand View that I want to report ~irst. They are in the best condition that I have ever seen. The teachers are doing well, and the new pastor has taken hold most earnestly and successfully. No one can question the bringing in of the mountain people, both in church and school. More than two-thirds of the pupils are of native families, and the native people are filling the church. Mr. Dorman, the new pastor, has put the second service into the evening again, so as to get more of the mountain folk, and he succeeds. It was a grand thing to get him, coming with so good an education and devoted spirit. The people are feeling happier than for years, and co~5perating cordially. The institute is full. They cannot get on without more room. Jn the primary grade they enroll sixty-nine, and have seats for twenty- eight. The attendance is fairly well up to the enrollment and they abso- lutely cannot get on long this way. It is a splendid work. The Amen. can Missionary Association has reason to be proud of it, but it seems imperative to have more room. The work all over this portion of the mountains is thoroughly encour- aging. GOSPEL TRANSFORMATIONS. BY A MOUNTAIN PREACHER. This autumn has been for me a season of hard labor, and, at the same time, one of great rejoicing. For more than a month I have been labor- ing night and day almost incessantly striving to lead souls to Jesus, and the dear Lord has blessed me to see more than thirty happy conver- sions. Tired, almost exhausted, still I must press on, for there is yet much to be done. In the meetings held this fall I have realized more fully than ever be- fore in my life the mighty power of the Spirit, and the blessedness of the religion of the Lord Jesus Christ. At a place in Scott County, Tenn., where I held a ten days meeting, this fact of the Holy Spirits power and the blessedness of the Christian religion was most beautifully illustraled, as the following incident will show. When I began preaching there the neighborhood was in a universal state of ferment. Fussings, fightings, hard feelings between neighbors were everywhere; and between denominations most bitter prejudice

Secretary Ryder Ryder, Secretary Grand View, Tenn. 40

40 GRAND VIEW, TENN.GOSPEL TRAN~FORMAt1ONS. GRAND VIEW, TENN. BY SECRETARY RYDER. I reached Pleasant Hill last Saturday, driving from Grand View. It is of Grand View that I want to report ~irst. They are in the best condition that I have ever seen. The teachers are doing well, and the new pastor has taken hold most earnestly and successfully. No one can question the bringing in of the mountain people, both in church and school. More than two-thirds of the pupils are of native families, and the native people are filling the church. Mr. Dorman, the new pastor, has put the second service into the evening again, so as to get more of the mountain folk, and he succeeds. It was a grand thing to get him, coming with so good an education and devoted spirit. The people are feeling happier than for years, and co~5perating cordially. The institute is full. They cannot get on without more room. Jn the primary grade they enroll sixty-nine, and have seats for twenty- eight. The attendance is fairly well up to the enrollment and they abso- lutely cannot get on long this way. It is a splendid work. The Amen. can Missionary Association has reason to be proud of it, but it seems imperative to have more room. The work all over this portion of the mountains is thoroughly encour- aging. GOSPEL TRANSFORMATIONS. BY A MOUNTAIN PREACHER. This autumn has been for me a season of hard labor, and, at the same time, one of great rejoicing. For more than a month I have been labor- ing night and day almost incessantly striving to lead souls to Jesus, and the dear Lord has blessed me to see more than thirty happy conver- sions. Tired, almost exhausted, still I must press on, for there is yet much to be done. In the meetings held this fall I have realized more fully than ever be- fore in my life the mighty power of the Spirit, and the blessedness of the religion of the Lord Jesus Christ. At a place in Scott County, Tenn., where I held a ten days meeting, this fact of the Holy Spirits power and the blessedness of the Christian religion was most beautifully illustraled, as the following incident will show. When I began preaching there the neighborhood was in a universal state of ferment. Fussings, fightings, hard feelings between neighbors were everywhere; and between denominations most bitter prejudice

A Mountain Preacher A Mountain Preacher Gospel Transformations 40-41

40 GRAND VIEW, TENN.GOSPEL TRAN~FORMAt1ONS. GRAND VIEW, TENN. BY SECRETARY RYDER. I reached Pleasant Hill last Saturday, driving from Grand View. It is of Grand View that I want to report ~irst. They are in the best condition that I have ever seen. The teachers are doing well, and the new pastor has taken hold most earnestly and successfully. No one can question the bringing in of the mountain people, both in church and school. More than two-thirds of the pupils are of native families, and the native people are filling the church. Mr. Dorman, the new pastor, has put the second service into the evening again, so as to get more of the mountain folk, and he succeeds. It was a grand thing to get him, coming with so good an education and devoted spirit. The people are feeling happier than for years, and co~5perating cordially. The institute is full. They cannot get on without more room. Jn the primary grade they enroll sixty-nine, and have seats for twenty- eight. The attendance is fairly well up to the enrollment and they abso- lutely cannot get on long this way. It is a splendid work. The Amen. can Missionary Association has reason to be proud of it, but it seems imperative to have more room. The work all over this portion of the mountains is thoroughly encour- aging. GOSPEL TRANSFORMATIONS. BY A MOUNTAIN PREACHER. This autumn has been for me a season of hard labor, and, at the same time, one of great rejoicing. For more than a month I have been labor- ing night and day almost incessantly striving to lead souls to Jesus, and the dear Lord has blessed me to see more than thirty happy conver- sions. Tired, almost exhausted, still I must press on, for there is yet much to be done. In the meetings held this fall I have realized more fully than ever be- fore in my life the mighty power of the Spirit, and the blessedness of the religion of the Lord Jesus Christ. At a place in Scott County, Tenn., where I held a ten days meeting, this fact of the Holy Spirits power and the blessedness of the Christian religion was most beautifully illustraled, as the following incident will show. When I began preaching there the neighborhood was in a universal state of ferment. Fussings, fightings, hard feelings between neighbors were everywhere; and between denominations most bitter prejudice PILE POOR HELPING THE POOREST 41 and cruel jealousies. There were men there, close neighbors and kins- folk, who had not spoken to each other for three years. Some were so angry with each other that they were fighting occasionally and trying to kill each other. They came to church with their pistols in their pock- ets to shoot each other, and I expected that we might have war in the church yard at any time and men killed. But while they held their thumbs on their pistol hammers I wielded the hammer of Gods word with unrelenting force. While they were getting ready to fire revolvers I was firing red hot gospel shot into them with deadly effect. Their hard hearts softened, they weakened, they fell before the sword of the Spirit. Strong men broke down and wept like children. Grasping each other by the hand, embracing each other in their arms amidst a flood of tears, they confessed to each other their faults, and begged pardon and prayed and shouted as I never saw men do before in my life. Hostile enemies were made happy friends, would-be murderers were converted to God, hard feelings among neighbors were swept away, denomina- tional prejudice was forgotten, and brotherly love and Christian peace reigned supreme. And besides this some twenty-five precious souls were saved; among them an old grandmother was brought to Jesus. And still the good work goes on. Praise the Lord for His wonderful love and for His mighty power which He has manifested in the salvation of precious souls. THE POOR HELPING THE POOREST. A Charming Picture of Se/f-Sacriftce. PROFESSOR F. T. WATERS. The extreme poverty among many of the colored people of Wilmington, N. C., led me to think that there would be many families that would have no Christmas gifts unless given by those who could spare, even from their scant living, a portion to be given to those wholly destitute. Accord- ingly I invited the children in all the rooms in Gregory Institute to bring such offerings as they were willing to make, to be afterward distributed to those who otherwise would have no Christmas and were without the necessities of life even. The idea seemed to meet with general approval among teachers and pupils. Friday, the last day before the Christmas vacation, was appointed to bring in the gifts, and the amount contrib- uted wholly exceeded qur most extravagant hopes. Shortly after 8 oclock the school children began to arrive laden with gifts, consisting of almost every imaginable article that could be used. Some brought a sweet potatoalways the largest they could findothers a pound of sugar, rice, flour, bacon, pork, beans, peas, corn meal, cabbages, tur

Professor F. T. Waters Waters, F. T., Professor The Poor Helping the Poorest 41-43

PILE POOR HELPING THE POOREST 41 and cruel jealousies. There were men there, close neighbors and kins- folk, who had not spoken to each other for three years. Some were so angry with each other that they were fighting occasionally and trying to kill each other. They came to church with their pistols in their pock- ets to shoot each other, and I expected that we might have war in the church yard at any time and men killed. But while they held their thumbs on their pistol hammers I wielded the hammer of Gods word with unrelenting force. While they were getting ready to fire revolvers I was firing red hot gospel shot into them with deadly effect. Their hard hearts softened, they weakened, they fell before the sword of the Spirit. Strong men broke down and wept like children. Grasping each other by the hand, embracing each other in their arms amidst a flood of tears, they confessed to each other their faults, and begged pardon and prayed and shouted as I never saw men do before in my life. Hostile enemies were made happy friends, would-be murderers were converted to God, hard feelings among neighbors were swept away, denomina- tional prejudice was forgotten, and brotherly love and Christian peace reigned supreme. And besides this some twenty-five precious souls were saved; among them an old grandmother was brought to Jesus. And still the good work goes on. Praise the Lord for His wonderful love and for His mighty power which He has manifested in the salvation of precious souls. THE POOR HELPING THE POOREST. A Charming Picture of Se/f-Sacriftce. PROFESSOR F. T. WATERS. The extreme poverty among many of the colored people of Wilmington, N. C., led me to think that there would be many families that would have no Christmas gifts unless given by those who could spare, even from their scant living, a portion to be given to those wholly destitute. Accord- ingly I invited the children in all the rooms in Gregory Institute to bring such offerings as they were willing to make, to be afterward distributed to those who otherwise would have no Christmas and were without the necessities of life even. The idea seemed to meet with general approval among teachers and pupils. Friday, the last day before the Christmas vacation, was appointed to bring in the gifts, and the amount contrib- uted wholly exceeded qur most extravagant hopes. Shortly after 8 oclock the school children began to arrive laden with gifts, consisting of almost every imaginable article that could be used. Some brought a sweet potatoalways the largest they could findothers a pound of sugar, rice, flour, bacon, pork, beans, peas, corn meal, cabbages, tur 42 U/IL MING TON, N. C. nips, tea, coffee, matches, apples, oranges, grits, and if there are any other things to be found among eatables I think I can produce them from the packages now deposited in the sewing room. Besides this quite a quantity of wood was brought, and a good supply several bundles, at leastof fat pine for lighters, and considerable clothing. One special gift I must mention. It was from a little girl in the primary class. The girl is about eleven or twelve years old, and very poor. She worked all last summer and saved her money to pay her tuition in our school this year, and, as I have learned, had secured nearly enough to pay her tuition during the year. But, alas, poor little Mary. For some reason, probably to get the food necessary to live, her mother was obliged to take her hard earned and slowly accumulated money, and before school began she found that ~vhat she had so long hoped and planned for she could not realize. However, she did not give up her cherished plan of coming to school, but worked away, got her some clothes, and about the first of November presented herself as wishing to come to school. She brought all the money she had left, ten cents, and said if I would only let her come she was sure she could pay the rest before long. I kept track of her and found from her teacher that the poor girl could not obtain anything further for her tuition, but that she was a very promising girl, so I have let her come, and I have prayed that some one may be led to contribute $8 for her tuition. But what surprised me most was the Christmas offering this child made. Just before school called, she came tugging two large sticks of wood, the combined weight being twenty pounds. This she had got cut into two pieces and had carried it more than a mile in order that some one poorer than she might be blessed at Christmas time. This little incident made me feel that I had never known sacrifice beforefor here was one who often goes hungry to bed, without any of the comforts of life, yet to make others happy gave literally all she had. Truly, were the blessed Lord here His words regarding the poor widow must have been repeated. [ feel that the wood she brought is almost too sacred to be put to common use. I would that a piece of it were in every Christian home to teach the lesson of true sacrifice. On Christmas morning a dozen homes will be made happy by thesc humble gifts. One old lady in our visits we found so destitute that sh.e had tasted nothing from Saturday night till Tuesday, when one of the girls of Gregory school took her in her breakfast. The old lady telling about it said she knew the Lord would not let her starve. The teachers have voluntarily taxed themselves ten cents a month, which provides for her food at least. I need not multiply these cases. Many sacrifices in kind, if not in degree, could be mentioned equal to that of little Mary, and many cases of need as extreme as that of Aunt Maggie. THANKFULNESSPARAGRAPH. 43 The scanty purses of the A. M. A. teachers, many of whom, as in my own case, are obliged to economize in every way to keep our own fami- lies from actual want, are inadequate to meet the demand, and why should we multiply their cases on our minds when we are powerless to help? CHILDRENS CAUSES FOR THANKFULNESS. MISS LILLIAN L. GOAR, BLOWING ROCK, N. c. Dear Friends: I want to tell you of our Junior Thanksgiving serv- ice last Wednesday eve. The meeting was led by a Junior. After prayer by one of the members the leader asked of each one: What haveyou to be thankful for? We had so many blessings given that a large blackboard was covered, with reports of the many thankful- nesses. The following are a few of the many: For Christ most of all, the Holy Bible, health, warm sunshine, blue sky, I dont know of anything Im not thankful for, for plenty of every- thing, bread and fruit and everything to eat, for forgiveness, Junior meetings, to bring wood and water for our mothers and fathers. One of the several four-year-olds in school was thankful for a stove, love (for) our brothers, to play, eatin an things to cook it in. And this same little boy, who comes from a home anything but attract ive, had this sentence in his prayer, thankful for home. Another dear Junior was thankful for good times and for my little sister an father an mother. The privilege to go to school was another cause of thankfulness, while many times, both in prayer and speaking, was the dear teacher mentioned. The prayers were earnest, simple and sincere, and I felt much nearer heaven after the little ones had gone from their childish meeting. And I felt more than ever before the divine presence with us. The Juniors carry their Christian ideas into everything. Jn school one day I asked What is the heart for? And a little girl (a Junior) replied quickly To let Jesus come in. As the hoped-for advancement lies with the children, I feel that the work is very encouraging. To HELP HER OWN PEOPLE.A minister in a Northern State sends to us a check for $500, which he says is the gift of a colored lady of over seventy years of age, to aid in the education of her people in the South. She has $500 more, which she retained for the present in view

Miss Lillian L. Goar Goar, Lillian L., Miss Children's Causes for Thankfulness 43

THANKFULNESSPARAGRAPH. 43 The scanty purses of the A. M. A. teachers, many of whom, as in my own case, are obliged to economize in every way to keep our own fami- lies from actual want, are inadequate to meet the demand, and why should we multiply their cases on our minds when we are powerless to help? CHILDRENS CAUSES FOR THANKFULNESS. MISS LILLIAN L. GOAR, BLOWING ROCK, N. c. Dear Friends: I want to tell you of our Junior Thanksgiving serv- ice last Wednesday eve. The meeting was led by a Junior. After prayer by one of the members the leader asked of each one: What haveyou to be thankful for? We had so many blessings given that a large blackboard was covered, with reports of the many thankful- nesses. The following are a few of the many: For Christ most of all, the Holy Bible, health, warm sunshine, blue sky, I dont know of anything Im not thankful for, for plenty of every- thing, bread and fruit and everything to eat, for forgiveness, Junior meetings, to bring wood and water for our mothers and fathers. One of the several four-year-olds in school was thankful for a stove, love (for) our brothers, to play, eatin an things to cook it in. And this same little boy, who comes from a home anything but attract ive, had this sentence in his prayer, thankful for home. Another dear Junior was thankful for good times and for my little sister an father an mother. The privilege to go to school was another cause of thankfulness, while many times, both in prayer and speaking, was the dear teacher mentioned. The prayers were earnest, simple and sincere, and I felt much nearer heaven after the little ones had gone from their childish meeting. And I felt more than ever before the divine presence with us. The Juniors carry their Christian ideas into everything. Jn school one day I asked What is the heart for? And a little girl (a Junior) replied quickly To let Jesus come in. As the hoped-for advancement lies with the children, I feel that the work is very encouraging. To HELP HER OWN PEOPLE.A minister in a Northern State sends to us a check for $500, which he says is the gift of a colored lady of over seventy years of age, to aid in the education of her people in the South. She has $500 more, which she retained for the present in view

To Help Her Own People 43-44

THANKFULNESSPARAGRAPH. 43 The scanty purses of the A. M. A. teachers, many of whom, as in my own case, are obliged to economize in every way to keep our own fami- lies from actual want, are inadequate to meet the demand, and why should we multiply their cases on our minds when we are powerless to help? CHILDRENS CAUSES FOR THANKFULNESS. MISS LILLIAN L. GOAR, BLOWING ROCK, N. c. Dear Friends: I want to tell you of our Junior Thanksgiving serv- ice last Wednesday eve. The meeting was led by a Junior. After prayer by one of the members the leader asked of each one: What haveyou to be thankful for? We had so many blessings given that a large blackboard was covered, with reports of the many thankful- nesses. The following are a few of the many: For Christ most of all, the Holy Bible, health, warm sunshine, blue sky, I dont know of anything Im not thankful for, for plenty of every- thing, bread and fruit and everything to eat, for forgiveness, Junior meetings, to bring wood and water for our mothers and fathers. One of the several four-year-olds in school was thankful for a stove, love (for) our brothers, to play, eatin an things to cook it in. And this same little boy, who comes from a home anything but attract ive, had this sentence in his prayer, thankful for home. Another dear Junior was thankful for good times and for my little sister an father an mother. The privilege to go to school was another cause of thankfulness, while many times, both in prayer and speaking, was the dear teacher mentioned. The prayers were earnest, simple and sincere, and I felt much nearer heaven after the little ones had gone from their childish meeting. And I felt more than ever before the divine presence with us. The Juniors carry their Christian ideas into everything. Jn school one day I asked What is the heart for? And a little girl (a Junior) replied quickly To let Jesus come in. As the hoped-for advancement lies with the children, I feel that the work is very encouraging. To HELP HER OWN PEOPLE.A minister in a Northern State sends to us a check for $500, which he says is the gift of a colored lady of over seventy years of age, to aid in the education of her people in the South. She has $500 more, which she retained for the present in view 44 CONTRASTS OF MISSION CHURCH WORK of emergencies, but which she intends ultimately to give to the Associa- tion for the same purpose. The minister says she is intelligent, a dili- gent reader, and an interesting person to meet. She has been a tailor- ess and probably has earned most of her money with her needle, Such a person is an honor to her race and to the church of Christ. CONTRASTS OF MISSION CHURCH WORK, BY SEC. r. P. WOOD13URY, Our mission churches of the South reach different classes of people. Some are in the large cities, others in populous towns, others in smaller country villages, and still others in entirely rural districts among the l)lantations. The methods of these churches vary as widely as their location. Some of them take advantage of institutional methods of church work in all their various forms of Christian service. IViany churches which do not undertake so large a distribution of effort still have their circles of Kings Sons and Daughters, missionary societies, and, almost everywhere, their Christian Endeavor Societies, Many of the smaller churches have day schools closely associated with the con- gregation, sometimes under the conduct of the pastor or his wife, or both. Among our more prominent ch irches is the Howard Chapel, of Nash- ville, Tenn., a picture of which, with the new parsonage, is found on this page. This church is located on the origirn 1 site of Fisk Univer HOWARD CHAPEL AND PARSONAGE,

Sec. F. P. Woodbury Woodbury, F. P., Sec. Contrasts of Mission Church Work 44-46

44 CONTRASTS OF MISSION CHURCH WORK of emergencies, but which she intends ultimately to give to the Associa- tion for the same purpose. The minister says she is intelligent, a dili- gent reader, and an interesting person to meet. She has been a tailor- ess and probably has earned most of her money with her needle, Such a person is an honor to her race and to the church of Christ. CONTRASTS OF MISSION CHURCH WORK, BY SEC. r. P. WOOD13URY, Our mission churches of the South reach different classes of people. Some are in the large cities, others in populous towns, others in smaller country villages, and still others in entirely rural districts among the l)lantations. The methods of these churches vary as widely as their location. Some of them take advantage of institutional methods of church work in all their various forms of Christian service. IViany churches which do not undertake so large a distribution of effort still have their circles of Kings Sons and Daughters, missionary societies, and, almost everywhere, their Christian Endeavor Societies, Many of the smaller churches have day schools closely associated with the con- gregation, sometimes under the conduct of the pastor or his wife, or both. Among our more prominent ch irches is the Howard Chapel, of Nash- ville, Tenn., a picture of which, with the new parsonage, is found on this page. This church is located on the origirn 1 site of Fisk Univer HOWARD CHAPEL AND PARSONAGE, CONTRASTS OF MiSSION CHURCH WORK 45 sity, and was formerly the chapel of the University. The building is a commodious brick structure. The church has had many fluctuations in its membership and condition, but under its present pastor, Rev. J. E. Moorland, formerly Y. M. C. A. secretary at Washington, D. C., it has taken on new life and vigor. The membership has rapidly grown. All the various forms of Christian activity are thoroughly organized, and the pastor has commended himself not only to the members of the church and congregation, but to the residents of all that portion of the city. Lately the congregation took up the question of affording their pastor a parsonage, and have built a neat and comfortable struc- ture at the side of the church, which they are now making payment for from their own means. In strong contrast with this city church work is the McElderry Mis- sion, formed and carried on by Rev. J. NI. Roan, of Ironaton, Ala. Mr. Roan, like many other pastors, was anxious that his church should take hold of aggressive Christian work, and formed a mission at some dis- tance from the church, out among the plantations. His young men took hold vigorously with him in the new work and put up the log cabin chapel, which is shown in the accompanying illustration. It is an inter- esting indication of their Christian consecration that the members of this mission church were so desirous. to take hold themselves of mis- sion work among those of their people still less favored than they. Mr. THE McELDERRY MISSION, ALA. 46 GLEAMS OT SUNSHINE. Roan says that they are proud of their little log cabin mission and that its congregation has steadily increased. There are now nine Congre- gational members living near the mission. Of late there has been quite a desire on the part of many to build a church in place of the mission cabin, and the people are already beginning to raise means for this pur- pose. A flourishing Sunday-school is carried on in ,connection with this mission work. GLEAMS OF SUNSHINE. BY REV. W. c. POND, D. D. The new year of our Chinese Mission opened cloudily. We had passed through three months of close and anxious questioning about ways and means; most of the teachers and helpers had received no sal- ary for from one to three months. Hard times had been crowding our Chinese out of employment. Families in which they had served felt compelled to do without them. They were moving to and fro with less inclination to study, or, possibly, to listen to the word of life, than in the days when plenty of hard work left them weary in frame, but not heartsore. At any rate-for these reasons or for others the reports for Sep- tember were, on the whole, less cheering, I think, than any I had ever received; but now, with the October reports all at hand, we find the clouds breaking away and have sunshine in our souls. The membership of the schools was larger by 33 and the average attendance by 17, but the gleams that bring best cheer are such as these: From Chin Foy, in Sacramento: Eight names have been signed to pledge cards for the Christian Endeavor members. Hope this society will be established before long. Four new members have united with our Association [thus professing faith in Christ and full consecration to Him. W. C. P.], and three brethren expect to be baptized by Dr. Hoyt and to unite with the church next communion. Thank God for His blessing. The work is encouraging lately. This brother, whose name may be familiar to the constant and attentive readers of THE MIssIONARY, and who has been for ten years or more one of our most useful helpers, instructs me to reduce his scanty salary two-thirds (from $30 to $io per month), and will try to make up what is lacking by other work, so that with our reduced resources our work may not be hindered. Loo Quong writes from Fresno concerning a sick brother who was converted in China, and has never been identified with any of our mis- sions; Miss Beaton [the teacher] found him sick on the street and

Rev. W. C. Pond, D.D. Pond, W. C., Rev., D.D. Gleams of Sunshine 46-48

46 GLEAMS OT SUNSHINE. Roan says that they are proud of their little log cabin mission and that its congregation has steadily increased. There are now nine Congre- gational members living near the mission. Of late there has been quite a desire on the part of many to build a church in place of the mission cabin, and the people are already beginning to raise means for this pur- pose. A flourishing Sunday-school is carried on in ,connection with this mission work. GLEAMS OF SUNSHINE. BY REV. W. c. POND, D. D. The new year of our Chinese Mission opened cloudily. We had passed through three months of close and anxious questioning about ways and means; most of the teachers and helpers had received no sal- ary for from one to three months. Hard times had been crowding our Chinese out of employment. Families in which they had served felt compelled to do without them. They were moving to and fro with less inclination to study, or, possibly, to listen to the word of life, than in the days when plenty of hard work left them weary in frame, but not heartsore. At any rate-for these reasons or for others the reports for Sep- tember were, on the whole, less cheering, I think, than any I had ever received; but now, with the October reports all at hand, we find the clouds breaking away and have sunshine in our souls. The membership of the schools was larger by 33 and the average attendance by 17, but the gleams that bring best cheer are such as these: From Chin Foy, in Sacramento: Eight names have been signed to pledge cards for the Christian Endeavor members. Hope this society will be established before long. Four new members have united with our Association [thus professing faith in Christ and full consecration to Him. W. C. P.], and three brethren expect to be baptized by Dr. Hoyt and to unite with the church next communion. Thank God for His blessing. The work is encouraging lately. This brother, whose name may be familiar to the constant and attentive readers of THE MIssIONARY, and who has been for ten years or more one of our most useful helpers, instructs me to reduce his scanty salary two-thirds (from $30 to $io per month), and will try to make up what is lacking by other work, so that with our reduced resources our work may not be hindered. Loo Quong writes from Fresno concerning a sick brother who was converted in China, and has never been identified with any of our mis- sions; Miss Beaton [the teacher] found him sick on the street and CHINESE MISSION WORK 47 asked him to come and live in the mission, in Gods name. No one dared to speak for him to help him in any way whatever, outside our mission. I asked him, at length, after he had been with us many months, if he would like to go back home. He says it would be the best way. Thus far I succeeeded in taking up subscriptions for his passage. [There are $45.30 outside of Fresno, and $28 which was taken up here.] The Christian Endeavor of the Congregational Church, through Rev. J. H. Collins, their pastor, gave him passage from here to San Francisco. It was a kind act of them all. I think God has blessed us all by enabling us to have this thing done so well in His name, because Mr. Lai Fat [the beneficiary] is not a member of the Association, nor have any of us known him before. May God send him to his family all right, and may his family be blessed through his return to them, and may the Lord spare him many days with his family in order to lead them to Christ! Surely there is a gleam of sunshine in this act of Christian love. All, or nearly all, our missions joined in it. It is really no unusual thing with us. Miss Bradley, of Ventura, writes: As soon as Yong Kay came [who divides his time as helper between the two neighboring missions of Santa Barbara and, Ventura] he began measures to revive our C. E. Society, and now we have one of twelve members. Its meeting are held on Friday evening, commencing about 9 o clock, and continuing indefinitely. It is wonderful how they seem to realize the meaning of the pledge and keep true to it. There is no lagging; no awful pauses. About two weeks ago they began preparations for a Christian Endeavor social. Invitations were sent out to all the ministers and other Christians, specially interested in missions. More than fifty assembled and listened to the programme, which lasted about an hour. Yong Kays address was very fine; his use of Scripture was so apt, and his illustrations so good~. Yong Wo Quon, a good, earnest Christian, will join the church next Sunday morning. I am satisfied that he understands the step he is tak- ing, and that he will be a great help to us. In like manner from Santa Cruz comes this word: I am most happy to write that the Chinese I asked you to pray for has joined the, Associ- ation and is very happy in our Christian work. Let us continue to pray for two 9thers who are holding back, but are almost persuaded, an~il from Joe Dun, in our new mission at Watsonville, this: We do thank the Lord for His choosing and saving souls. Tuesday evening of last week one of the associate members [I. e., of the new C. E. society] became active. Last night we have meeting, and he rose and gave testimony. Said he: I am glad to-night, for I believed in Jesus Christ, and He will save my soul. But my space is more than filled. We rejoice and take courage. 48 TRIBUTE TO OUR MISSiONARIES. TRIBUTE TO OUR MISSIONARIES. Apropos of the roll of our missionaries and teachers we quote an elo- quent tribute from one of the children of the American Missionary As- sociation who is now the strong pastor of a strong church in the South. He alludes to a teacher who had devoted many years of her life to our missionary work and had brought to it a sweetness of spirit and devo- tion that had won the confidence and inspired the zeal of those for whom she labored. We quote: The work which these teachers did was the result of no small sacri- fice. For a woman to leave her Northern home of comfort and refine- ment to come South to engage in such a work and all that it implies was not a popular thing even at the North, but in spite of unpopularity at the North and unworthy treatment at the South, these self-exiled men and women wrought wonderfully. They proved the best friends thatAhe black man has ever had. In the school they showed us the light of letters, which had never before dawned upon us. In the church they showed us the Light of the world, which was strangely dim in our souls. In the shop they showed us the light of life about us, of which we were densely ignorant. Thoughtful minds, skillful hands, enlight- ened heartsthis is the heritage they brought us. Throughout the length and breadth of the Southland there are such women among us working in a humble way. The work done by these moral heroes and heroines is work in the shade, but one day, when the sunlight of Gods justice shall shine upon it, as it surely will, men will see it and admire it. For these friends we are devoutly grateful. Deep down in our hearts, too deep in many cases for tears, lies the feeling of whole-souled gratitude for these moral heroes and heroines. The half has never been told. We thank God for those who left home and went to the war to die, if need be, that the slave might be free. But we thank God equally for those brave men and braver women who, before the smoke of battle cleared away, came South, and, with the spelling book in one hand and Gods holy word in the other, set the millions of freed- men on the way toward reading, reasoning and righteousness. Around Gods throne may their crowns of life eternal glitter with the peniten- tial tears of a grateful people redeemed unto a common Father by their prayers, their tears, their lives! Our last Annual Report is printed, and will be sent to those making application for it to this office.

Tribute to Our Missionaries 48-49

48 TRIBUTE TO OUR MISSiONARIES. TRIBUTE TO OUR MISSIONARIES. Apropos of the roll of our missionaries and teachers we quote an elo- quent tribute from one of the children of the American Missionary As- sociation who is now the strong pastor of a strong church in the South. He alludes to a teacher who had devoted many years of her life to our missionary work and had brought to it a sweetness of spirit and devo- tion that had won the confidence and inspired the zeal of those for whom she labored. We quote: The work which these teachers did was the result of no small sacri- fice. For a woman to leave her Northern home of comfort and refine- ment to come South to engage in such a work and all that it implies was not a popular thing even at the North, but in spite of unpopularity at the North and unworthy treatment at the South, these self-exiled men and women wrought wonderfully. They proved the best friends thatAhe black man has ever had. In the school they showed us the light of letters, which had never before dawned upon us. In the church they showed us the Light of the world, which was strangely dim in our souls. In the shop they showed us the light of life about us, of which we were densely ignorant. Thoughtful minds, skillful hands, enlight- ened heartsthis is the heritage they brought us. Throughout the length and breadth of the Southland there are such women among us working in a humble way. The work done by these moral heroes and heroines is work in the shade, but one day, when the sunlight of Gods justice shall shine upon it, as it surely will, men will see it and admire it. For these friends we are devoutly grateful. Deep down in our hearts, too deep in many cases for tears, lies the feeling of whole-souled gratitude for these moral heroes and heroines. The half has never been told. We thank God for those who left home and went to the war to die, if need be, that the slave might be free. But we thank God equally for those brave men and braver women who, before the smoke of battle cleared away, came South, and, with the spelling book in one hand and Gods holy word in the other, set the millions of freed- men on the way toward reading, reasoning and righteousness. Around Gods throne may their crowns of life eternal glitter with the peniten- tial tears of a grateful people redeemed unto a common Father by their prayers, their tears, their lives! Our last Annual Report is printed, and will be sent to those making application for it to this office. OUR FIELD WORKERS. 49 THE EJELD. 1894-1895. The following list gives the names of those who are in the work of the Churches, Institutions and Schools of the American Missionary Association. TIlE SOUTH. Rev. G. S. Dickerman, Field Superintendent. George W. Moore, Field Missionary. Mr. E. E. McKibban, Builder. Gilbert Walton, General Mountain Missionary. WASHINGTON, D. C. THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT, HOWARD UNIvERSITy. Rev. J. E. Rankin, D.D., LL.D., Washington, D.C. J. L. Ewell, A.M., Isaac Clark, A.M., George 0. Little, D.D., Sterling N. Brown, A.M., Charles H. Butler, Adam Reoch, A.B., Teunis S. Hamlin, I).D., John T. Jenifer, Eugene Johnson, Prof. Win. J. Stephens, Mr. Clement L. Brumbaugh, WASHINGTON (LINCOLN MEMORIAL CHURCH). Pastor and Missionary~ Rev. E. A. Johnson, XVashington, D.C. Mrs. E. A. Johnson, WASHINGTON (PLYMOUTH CHURCH). Minister, Rev. S. N. Brown, Washington, DC VIRGINIA CAPPAHOSIC. GLOUCESTER HIGH AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. Princ~5ai.Prof. W. B. Weaver, Cappahosic, Va. Mrs. A. B. Weaver, Miss Lizzie Baytop, Ark, Va.

List of Our Field Workers 49-80

OUR FIELD WORKERS. 49 THE EJELD. 1894-1895. The following list gives the names of those who are in the work of the Churches, Institutions and Schools of the American Missionary Association. TIlE SOUTH. Rev. G. S. Dickerman, Field Superintendent. George W. Moore, Field Missionary. Mr. E. E. McKibban, Builder. Gilbert Walton, General Mountain Missionary. WASHINGTON, D. C. THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT, HOWARD UNIvERSITy. Rev. J. E. Rankin, D.D., LL.D., Washington, D.C. J. L. Ewell, A.M., Isaac Clark, A.M., George 0. Little, D.D., Sterling N. Brown, A.M., Charles H. Butler, Adam Reoch, A.B., Teunis S. Hamlin, I).D., John T. Jenifer, Eugene Johnson, Prof. Win. J. Stephens, Mr. Clement L. Brumbaugh, WASHINGTON (LINCOLN MEMORIAL CHURCH). Pastor and Missionary~ Rev. E. A. Johnson, XVashington, D.C. Mrs. E. A. Johnson, WASHINGTON (PLYMOUTH CHURCH). Minister, Rev. S. N. Brown, Washington, DC VIRGINIA CAPPAHOSIC. GLOUCESTER HIGH AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. Princ~5ai.Prof. W. B. Weaver, Cappahosic, Va. Mrs. A. B. Weaver, Miss Lizzie Baytop, Ark, Va. 50 OUR FIELD WORKERS. Miss Carrie E. Steele, Estelle I. Sprague, Mr. D. D.Weaver, J. H. Lockley, Charleston, S.C. Takoma Park, D.C. Cappahosic, Va. NORTITI CAROLINA. WILMINGTON. Rev. Frank W. Sims, Minister, Aberdeen, Miss. GREGORY INSTITUTE (613 Nun Street). Princziz5ai.Prof. F. T. Waters, A7~I., Oberlin, 0. Miss Jennie L. Blowers, Westfield, N.Y. Susan M. Marsh, E. Northfield, Mass. Mrs. Virginia C. Logie, St. Louis, Mo. Miss Georgia M. Belyea, Ashland, N.B. Stella M. Hopkin son, Oberlin, 0. Minnie T. Strout, Salem, Mass. Katharine M. Jacobs, S. Hadley Falls, Mass. Mary L. Thompson, Rouses Point, N.Y. Emma J. Bryce, Springfield, Out. Mrs. Lucy M. Mellen, Oberlin, 0. BEAUFORT. Rev. J. P. Sims, Minister. WASHBURN SEMINARY. Princz25al.Prof. Fred. S. Hitchcock, Mrs. Fred. S. Hitchcock, Miss Ella Louise Cheney, Anna M. Cooper, Lilla L. Johnson, Rev. S. P. Smith, DUDLEY. Minister, Talladega, Ala. Cambridgeport, M~ass. Oberlin, 0. Boalsburg, Pa. Sherburne, Vt. Chicago, Ill. RALEIGH. Minister and General Missionary, Rev. A. W. Curtis, D.D., Crete, Neb. OAKS, CEDAR CLIFF, AND MELVILLE. Minister and Missionary, Rev. Anthony Peden, Miss E. XV. Douglass, Teacher at Oaks, Teacher at Cedar Clijif, Oaks, N. C. Decorah, Iowa. Mr. Win. R. Hall, Raleigh, N. C, OUR FIELD WORKERS. 5 Teacher at Melville, Miss Jennie S. Irwin, Raleigh, N. C. MeLEANSYILLE. tlYlinister, Rev. S. S. Sevier, McLeansville, N. C. Teachers at McLeansville, Mrs. Elizabeth Smith, McLeansvi lie, N. C. S. S. Sevier, HILLSBORO. Teachers, Miss Bessie C. Bechan, Toronto, Canada. Julia H. Curtis, Syracuse, N. Y. MALEE. Teacher, Mr. Solomon A. Stanford, Oaks, N. C. STRIEBY, SALEM AND HIGH POINT. Minister, Rev. Z. Simmons, Strieby, N. C. Teacher at Strieby, Mr. H. R. Walden, Strieby, N. C. Special Missionary, High Point, Miss A. E. Farrington, Portland, Me. TROY, PEKIN, DRY CREEK AND NALLS. Minister, Rev. C. C. Collins, Newark, N. J. Teachers at Troy, Miss Evelyn Segsworth, Toronto, Canada. Laura G. Segsworth, Teacher at Pehin, Mr. Columbus Green, Pekin, N. C. Teacher at Dry Creek, Mrs. Kate J. P. Green, Dry Creek, N. C Teacher at Nalls, Mr. R. H. Saunders, Nalls, N. C. CARTERS MILLS. Teacher and Preacher, Mr. W. P. Newkirk, Carters Mills, N. C. 52 OUR FiELD WORKERS. ALL HEALING (KINGS MOUNTAIN P. 0.). LINCOLN ACADEMY. Principal. Miss Lillian S. Cathcart, Miss May E. Newton, Susie T. CathCart, Nellie D. Cooley, Isadore M. Caughey, Minneapolis, Minn. Springfield, Mo. Tangerine, Fla. North Amherst, Mass. North Kingsville, Ohio. BLOWING ROCK. SKYLAND INSTITUTE. Princ::pal. Miss F. Annette Jackson, Miss Agnes Ruth Mitchell, Lillian Lavinia Goar, N. S. Dennis, SALUDA. Pioneer Evangelist, Rev. E. W. Hollies, SALUDA SEMINARY. Prinezpai.Miss Mary C. Phelps, Ph.B., Miss Hattie M. Fairchild, Minnie A. Hollies, Rev. E. W. Hollies, Mrs. S. Hollies, WHITTIER. Rev. Robert Humphrey, Minister, Teachers, Hudsonville, Tenn. Acworth, N. H. Montevideo, Minn. Salem, Mich. Topeka, Kan. Nova, Ohio. Frankfort, Mich. Topeka, Kan. Whittier, N. C. Rev. Robert Humphrey, Mrs. Olive A. Humphrey, VALDESE (MORGANTON). Minister, Rev. Enrico Vinay, Teachers, Mr. M. A. Jahier, Antoine Grill, BREVARD, DUNNS CREEK, GOLDEN CREEK. Minister, Rev. W. A. Hamet, Whittier, N. C. Valdese, N. C. Valdese, N. C. VALLEY AND ISLANI) Brevard, N. C. HENRIETTA, McCLURDS, MOORHEAD AND PRIMS GROV E Minister, Rev. L. C. White, Mooresboro, N. C OUR FIELD WORKERS. SOUTH CAROLINA. CHARLESTON. Minister, Rev. George C. Rowe, Charleston, S. C. AVERY NORMAL INSTITUTE ~ ~ Bull Street). Princzt5aZ.Prof. Morrison A. Holmes, Lee, Mass. Miss Maude L. Barnum, Oberlin, Ohio. Mary T. Richardson, B.A., Chicago, Ill. Maude A. Robinson, Battle Creek, Mich. Mr. Edward A. Lawrence, Charleston, S. C. Miss Mary L. Deas, Marion R. Birnie, Lora D. Tanner, Mrs. M. A. Holmes, GREENWOOD. Minister, Grand Ledge, Mich. Lee, Mass. Rev. J. M. Robinson, BREWER NORMAL SCHOOL. Princ:~pai.Rev. J. M. Robinson, Mrs. J. M. Robinson, Miss Julia P. Seymour, Julia R. Mitchell, Clara S. Boyd, Harriet E. Bell, Marie E. Hoover, Jennie M. street, Alice A. Holmes, Rev. E. H. Wilson, COLUMBIA. Minister, Detroit, Mich. Detroit, Mich. Rootstown, Ohio. Utica, N. Y. Greenfield, Ohio. Brecksville, Ohio. Rushville, N. Y. Detroit, Mich. Lansing, Mich. Columbia, S. C. GEORUIA. ATLANTA. * FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH. Rev. H. H. Proctor, Mi ister, Nashville, Tenn. STORR5 SCHOOL (120 Houston St.). Princz~pai. Miss Ella E. Roper, Miss Julia A. Condict, Carrie E. Tambling, Alice A. Clarke, A. Laura Humphries, Worcester, Mass. Adrian, Mich. Oberlin, Ohio. North Hannibal, N. Y. Marathon, Iowa. 4 OUR FIELD WORKERS. Miss Nina B. Mosher, Mrs. A. S. Webber, * This church is self-supporting. Painesville, Ohio. Worcester, Mass. MACON. Minister, Rev. John R. McLean, BALLARD NORMAL 5CHOOL PrincipaL Prof . Geo. C. Burrage, A. Miss Eva F. Chesley, Mrs. John Orr, Miss E. B. Scobie, Ruth M. French, Carrie E. Browne, Lucy E. Fairbanks, Anna M. Woodruff, M. R. Ruckman, Helen Hanson, Clara A. Dole, Kate L. Snow, Mr. John Orr, * Rev. L. B. Maxwell, SAVANNAH. Minister, Macon, Ga. (806 Pine St.). B., Worcester, Mass. E. Barrington, N. H. Olivet, Mich. Everett, Ohio. Hudson, Ohio. West Bloomfield, N. Y. Woodstock, Vt. Rose View, N.Y. La Porte, Indiana. Stoneham, Mass. Parkman, Ohio. Fredonia, N. Y. Olivet, Mich. Savannah, Ga. BEACH INSTITUTE (30 Harris St.). Princ~/al.Miss Julia B. Ford, Morristown, N. J. Miss Ada Louise Wilcox, Monroe, Mich. May Belle Nicholson, Kalamazoo, Mich. L. J. Hanscom, Winthrop, Maine. Julia E. McMillan, Oberlin, 0. Nellie J. Arnott, Nashua, Iowa. L. C. Holman, Vincennes, Iowa. * This church is self-supporting. THOMAS VILLE. Minister and Missionary, Rev. Chas. F. Sargent, Thomasville, Ga ALLEN NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. PrinczpaL Miss A. Merriam, Westboro, Mass. Miss C. M. Dox, Kalamazoo, Mich. Edna Harris, Huron Ohio. Nellie D. Sheldon, New York City. B~ P... Parmenter, Rockford, Iowa. OUR FIELD WORKERS. 55 Miss Frances M. Williams, Minerva A. Kinney, Mr. H. C. Sargent Rev. R. B. Johns, Orange, N. J. Whitewater, Wis. Thomasville, Ga. McINTOSH. Minis/er, DORCHESTER ACADEMY. Princz 5a1. Prof. Fred. W. Foster, Miss Charlotte J. Knowlton, Jennie Curtis, S. Josephine Scott, Emma J. Rosecrans, Nellie I. Reed, Carrie E. Leadbetter, Harriet E. Leach, Mrs. Mary W. Foster, Mr. B. F. Perkins, Reading, Pa. Castine, Me. Creston, Ohio. Housatonic, Mass. Hamilton, Ohio. Hammond, Ohio. Oberlin, Ohio. Pulpit Harbor, Me. Norwich, Conn. Castine, Me. CYPRESS SLASH. (P. 0. McIntosh.) Minis/er, Rev. J. A. Jones, Rev. Wilson Callen, Rev. Paul L. La Cour, MILLERS STATION. Minis/er, Talladega, Ala. Savannah, Ga. ATHENS, Minister, Athens, Ga. KNOX INSTITUTE, PrincipaLProf. L. S. Clark, Miss Emma S. Morton, Eliza B. Twiggs, Mrs. P. L. La Cour, MARSHALLVILLE. Teachers, Mrs. A. W. Richardson, Miss L. J. Blackmore, A. R. Magrath, Marshailville, Ga Woociville, Miss. Charleston, S. C. WOODVILLE. (P. 0. Savannah.) Minis/er and Teacher, Rev. J. H. H. Sengstacke, Mr. J Loyd, Savannah, Ga. 61 61 Athens, Ga. 56 0 U~? FIELD WORKERS. MARIETTA. Rev. Calvin Lane, Mrs. Calvin Lane, Mr. F. H. Henderson, Mrs. F. H. Henderson) Minister and Teache;-, Marietta, Ga. (~ (~ CUTHBERT. Teachers, AL1~ANY. Cuthbert, Ga. ~ ALBANY NORMAL SCHOOL. Princ~t5aLProf. Thos. S. Inborden, Oberlin, Ohio. Mr. Isadore Martin, Charleston, S. C. Mrs. Alice Davis, Oberlin, Ohio. Miss Lincolnia C. Haynes, Macon, Ga. BAJNBRIDGE. WHITTIER SCHOOL. Mr. A. W. Bowman, Teacher, Bainbridge, Ga. RUTLAND AND BYRON. Rev. H. T. Johnson, Mrs. E. S. Johnson, Minister, Teacher at kutland ANDERSON VILLE. Newburgh, N. Y. Newburgh, N. Y. Miss Teachers, FLORIDA. ORANGE PARK. Rev. T. S. Perry, Minister, Limerick, Me. NORMAL SCHOOL. Princz~pal.Prof. B. D. Rowlee, Miss Edith M. Robinson, Helen S. Loveland, Margaret A. Ball, Carrie E. Bishop, Mary E. Sands, Harriet M. Smith, Mrs. Julia E. Rowlee, Julia E. Titus, Mr. Otis S. Dickinson, Fulton, N. Y. Battle Creek, Mich. Newark Valley, N. Y. Orange Park, Fla. New Haven, Conn. Saco, Maine. Hartington, Neb. Fulton, N. Y. Moravia, N. Y. Granville, Mass. OUR FIELD WORKERS. 5, MARTIN. Princ:he5td.Miss Mattie J. Brydie, Miss Sarah L. Hunt, Mary A. McClelland, Rev. Spencer Snell, ALAI~AMA. TALLADEGA. 1AliinisPr, TALLMI~EGA COLLEGE. PresidenL~=Rev. H. S. De Forest, D.D., Rev. Geo. W. Andrews, D. D., Prof. William E. Hutchison, Martin Lovering, A.B., Edwin C. Silsby, Mr. Edgar A. Bishop, B.S., George Williamson, Prof. Herbert F. Burrage, B. S., Miss J. A. Ainsworth, Etta M. Hitchcock, Emma F. King, Harriet Towne, Caroline E. Frost, Harriet E. White, Justia C. Hoy, Ada J. Ringheim, Louie Savery, Susan Sands, Clara E. Noble, Ruth K. Kingsley, A. B. Chalfant, L. A. Pingree, Mrs. A. E. Foote, MARION. Minister, Rev. W. J. Larkin, Athens, Ga. Sparta, Ga. Nashville, Tena. Taflade~a, Ala. Talladega, Ala~ Tuckahoe, N. V. Talladega, Ala. Worcester, Mass. Hyde Park, Mass. Lewis, N. Y. Elmhurst, Ill. Langdon, N. H. Methuen, Mass. Olivet, Mich. Bellefonte, Pa. Nevada, Iowa. Talladega, Ala. Belmont, Iowa. Valparaiso, Ind. Syracuse, N. Y. Lebanon, S. D. Denmark, Me. Omaha, Neb. Marion, Ala. LINCOLN NORMAL scHooL. Princzjpzl.Miss M. E. Wilcox, Benson, Minn. Miss Edna M. Heald, Nashua, Iowa. Lillian J. Beecroft, Madison, Wis. Minnie M. Gates, Phenix, N. Y. Mary D. Hyde, Mazeppa, Minn. Ida C. Chapin, Gasport, N. V. Mrs. W. J. Larkin, Marion, Ala. OUR FIELD WORKERS. Rev. J. S. Jackson, Rev. J. J. Scott, Rev. Marion S. Jones, Miss Mary E. McLane, Mrs. H. S. Williams, Miss L. E. Woodruff, Mary E. Perkins, MONTGOMERY. Minister, ALCO. Mirns/er, ATHENS. Minister~, TRINITY SCHOOL. Teachers, Montgomery, Ala. Alco, Ala. Tougaloo, Miss. New Haven, Conn. Athens, Ala. Sheffield, Ohio. Norwich, Conn. Rev. A. T. Burnell, SELMA. Minister, Denver, Col. BURRELL SCHOOL (366 Selma St.). Princz~paZ. Rev. A. T. Burnell, Ph. D., Denver, Col. Mrs. Mary A. Burnell, Miss EdithM. Thatcher, Miss Myra J. Lamb, Miss Helen M. Hyde, Mr. James A. Merriman, Mrs. N. D. Merriman, Mrs. Mary A. Dillard, Oberlin, Ohio. Ladoga, Wis. Sandy Hill, N. Y. Selma, Ala. KYMULGA. Minister, Talladega, Ala. LAWSONVILLE AND COVE. Minister, Rev. Z. Jones, Rev. M. L. Baldwin, Rev. J. I. Donaldson, Rev. J. B. Grant, Rev. J. M. Roan, Mrs. J. M. Roan, SYLACAUGA. Minister, JENIFER. Afinzster, IRONATON. Minister and Teacher, Talladega, Ala. Talladega, Ala. Talladega, Ala. Talladega, Ala. OUR FIELD WORKERS. 59 SHELBY IRON WORKS. Shelby, Ala. CHILDERSBURG. Minister, Rev. W. P. Hamilton, ANNISTON AND FORT llihnzster, Rev. James Brown, Rev. J. R. Sims, Rev. J. L. Cole, Rev. Talladega, Ala. PAYNE. Anniston, Ala. GADSDEN. Minister, BIRMINGHAM. ilfinister, NEW DECATUR. Minister, Talladega, Ala. Birmingham, Ala. NAT (BENDING OAKS). GREEN ACADEMY. Princ~z5aZ.Prof. H. E. Sargent, Mrs. H. E. Sargent, Miss Edith M. Hatfield, Miss Libbie A. Hatfield, Miss Edith E. Lamb, FLORENCE. Clearwater, Minn. Charlestown, Ohio. Ladoga, Wis. Minister, Rev. William L. Johnson, Florence, Ala. CARPENTER HIGH SCHOOL. Teachers, Florence, Ala. Rev. William L. Johnson, Miss Mary Lucy Corpier, COTTON VALLEY (P. 0. FORT DAVIs). COTTON VALLEY SCHOOL. Princ~t5aZ.Miss Lilla V. Davis, Miss Hattie A. Dejarnette, Corrie N. Johnson, Boston, Mass. Montgomery, Ala. Oberlin, Ohio. BLOCTON AND BELLE SUMPTER. Minister, Rev. D. M. Lewis, Blocton, Ala. Zifinister,. Rev. A. Simmons, 6o OUR FIELD WORKERS. TENNESSEE. NASHVILLE. Minis/er, Rev. Chas~ W. Dunn, FISK UNIVERSITY. PresidentRev. E. M. Cravath, D. D, Rev. A. K. Spence, A.M., F. A. Chase, A.M., E. C. Stickel, AM., Prof. Charles XV. Dunn, A. M, B. D., Rev. Eugene Harris, A. M., B. D., Prof. H. C. Morgan~ AM, Prof. H. H. Wright, A.M., Miss Anna T. Ballantine, Dora A. Scribner, B.A., Emma L. Parsons, M.A., Mary A. Spence, M.A, Mary A. Bye, B.S., M. Antoinette Kellogg, Alice M. Garsden, Caroline Wandell, Alice L. Walker, Ph.B., Nellie F. Comings, Miriam E. Carey, Emily R. Bishop, Mrs. Lucy R. Greene, Miss Jennie A. Robinson, Mary E. Chamberlain, Mrs. Luretta C. Stickel, B.L., Miss Alice M. Grass, Frances L. Yeomans, Mrs. W. D. McFarland, Miss Frances M. Andrews, Susan A. Cooley, Mrs. Alice M. Brown, Nashville, Tenn. Nashville, Tenn. Gossville, N.H. Le Roy, N.Y. Nashville, Tenn. Minneapolis, Minn. Elmira, N.Y. Westmoreland, N.Y. Phcenix, N.Y. Grinnell, Iowa. St. Paul, Minn. Freeport, Ill. Keene, N.H. Amherst, Mass. Nashville, Tenn. Bryan, 0. Danville, Ill. Granby, Conn. Milltown, N.B. Bavaria, Kan. Rochester, N.Y. NASHVILLE (HOWARD CHURCH). Minister, Rev. J. E. Moorland, Nashville, Tenn. NASHVILLE (THIRD CHURCH, JACKSON STREET). Minister, Rev. E. E. Scott, Nashville, Tenn. OUR FIELD WORKERS, GOODLETTSVILLE. Minister, [Supplied from Fisk Theological Seminary.] MEMPHIS. Minister, * Rev. George V. Clark, Atlanta, Ga. LE MOYNE INSTITUTE ~ Orleans St.). Princ~z5aZ.Prof. Andrew J. Steele, A. M., Whitewater, Wis. Miss Esther A. Barnes, Tallmadge, 0. Luella Waring, Kalamazoo, Mich. Ella A. Hamilton, Whitewater, Wis. Celestia S. Goldsmith, Chester, N. H. Mary W. Bryant, Dell Rapids, S. Dak. Nellie Bishop, Palmyra, Wis. Emma 0. Kennedy, Memphis, Tenn. Cornelia E. Lewis, Mary E. Johnson, Mary E. Brereton, Mary E. Simonds, Mrs. M. L. Jenkins, B. C. Brown, Mr. Elias S. Webb, 0. R. Brown, * This church is self supporting. JONESBORO. ilfznzster, Rev. Sandy A. Paris, WARNER INSTITUTE. Princ~z5ai.Miss Anna R. Miner, Miss Alice M. Whitsey, Gertrude Harnar, Belle F. Burr, Mary D. Backenstoe. Bailey, Tenn. Acorn, Wis. Hartland, Wis. Chautauqua, N. Y. Downers Grove, Ill. Memphis, Tenn. Downers Grove, Ill. Brookfield Centre, Coun. Lyme, Conn. Dover, Ohio. Xenia, Ohio. Toronto, Canada Evansville, Wis. KNOXVILLE. Rev. B. A. lines, Afzmsfer, Knoxville, Tenn 5LATER TRAINING SCHOOL (6o6 Payne St.). Princz 5a1.Miss Ida F. Hubbard, Miss Bena P. Gummershach, Emilie Weiss, A. Irene Reed, Ascutneyville, Vt. New York City, N. V. J enkintown, Pa. 62 OUR FIELD WORKERS. CHATTANOOGA, TENN. * Rev. J. E. Smith, * This church is self-supporting. TENNESSEE MOUNTAIN WORK. Chattanooga, Tenn. GRAND VIEW. Minister and Instructor in Biblical Department, Rev. W. W. Dorman, B D , Somerville, Mass. GRAND VIEW NORMAL INSTITUTE. Princ~z5al.Prof. W. F. Cameron, PhB., South Bend, md. Rev. W. W. Dorman, B.D., Somerville, Mass. Mrs. W. F. Cameron, South Bend, md. Miss Grace Putnam, Chattanooga, Tenn. Maud Taylor, Grand View, Tenn. Gertrude Huntington, Mrs. Carrie Ferree, Miss Katherine P. Williamson, Englewood, Ill. PLEASANT HILL. Minister Rev. W. E. Wheeler, PLEASANT HILL ACADEMY. Principal. Rev. Warren E. Wheeler, Mrs. Kate L. Wheeler, Miss Hattie E. Hayes, Flora M. Cone, E. Josephine Orton, Emma F. Dodge, Mrs. S. A. Hayes, Mr. Chas. R. Blanks, Rev. B. Dodge, General Agent, Richfield, Ohio. Richfield, Ohio. X~akeman, Ohio. Masonville, N. Y. Chicago, Ill. Pleasant Hill, Tenn. Wakeman, Ohio. Pine Bluff, Tenn. Pleasant Hill, Tenn. POMONA AND CROSSVJLLE. Rev. H. E. Partridge, Mrs. A. E. Graves, Mr. Thos. Snodgrass, Geo. Burnett, Minister, Teacher at Pomona, Teachers at Crossville, MOSSY GROVE. Minister, Pomona, Tenn. Pomona, Tenn. Crossville, Tenn. Rev. J. B. Cabble, Whetstone, Tenn. OUR FIELD WORKERS. 63 DEER LODGE, PIONEER AND RUGBY. Minister, Rev. George Lusty, Deer Lodge, Tenn. GLEN MARY, HELENWOOD, ROBBINS AND MILL CREEK. Minister, Rev. M. N. Sumner, Mill Creek, Tenn. BON AIR AND ROCK HOUSE. Minister, Rev. E. N. Goff, Rev. W. G. Olinger, Rev. L. C. Partridge, HARRIMAN. Minister, JELLICO. Minister, Bon Air, Tenn. Harriman, Tenn. J ellico, Tenn. PINE MOUNTAIN. Rev. BIG CREEK. Rev. George Ames, Miss Kate LaGrange, Clue LaGrange, Minister, Berea, Ky. BIG CREEK GAP. /eackers, Feura Bush, N. Y. CUMBERLAND GAP. Minister, Rev. A. A. Myers, Cumberland Gap, Tenn. HARROW SCHOOL Princzjpal.Prof. G. A. Hoizinger, Mrs. A. A. Myers, Miss M. M. Lickorish, Mabel A. Wightman, L. Belle Knott, I. Ola Akin, KENTUCKY. LEXINGTON. Minister, J~ev. Byron Gunner, CHANDLER NORMAL SCHOOL (351 Brincijpal.Miss Fanny J. Webster, Winona, Minn. Cumberland Gap, Tenn. Elyria, Ohio. Rock Creek, Ohio. Clifton, Ohio. Waterloo, Iowa. Lexington, Ky. North Broadway). Sacramento 64 OUR FIELD WORKERS. Miss Katharine S. Dalton, Gertrude Takken, Susan I. Estabrook, Mary H. Ewans, Hester A. Washburn, Susa H. Breck, Mary S. Larkin, Fremont, Ohio. Saugatuck, Mich. Olivet, Mich. Belfontaine, Ohio. Delavan, Wis. Topeka, Kan. Marion, Ala. HAND PRIMARY SCHOOL. Miss Elnora M. Winter, B:rdie M. Wills, Nashville, Tenn. LOUISVILLE. Minister, Rev. E. G. Harris, Washington, D. C. KENTUCKY MOUNTAIN WORK. WILLIAMSBURG. Minister, ReV. W. B. Frey, Williamsburg, Ky. WILLIAMSBURG ACADEMY. Principai.Prof. Chas. M. Stevens, Miss Ella M. Andrews, Amelia L. Ferris, M. Amelia Packard, Carrie M. Ruddock, Julia B. Glines, Nora Hill, Minnie Ferree, Rev. George Ames, ROCKHOLD, CORBIN, WOODEINE AND PLEASANT VIEW. Minister, Rev. George Ames, Berea, Ky. CLOVER BOTTOM, GRAY-HAWK, COMBS AND MIDDLE FORK 2lihnister, Williamsburg, Ky. Frankfort, MiCh. Oneida, Ill. Brooklyn, N. Y. Clarksfield, Ohio. Elmira, N. Y. Williamsburg, Ky. Harriman, Tenn. Berea, Ky. Rev. Mason Jones, Combs, Ky. CARPENTER, MARSH CREEK AND LICK CREEK. Mink/er, Rev. Samuel Sutton, Williamsburg, Ky, RED ASH (PROCTOR) AND PIONEER. 16/mister, Rev, L. C. Partridg% Jellico~ Term. OUR FIELD WORKERS. 6; MORGAN AND WOLFE COUNTY MISSIONS. SPRADI~ANG, MAYTOWN, FLAT ROCK AND CAMPTON. Rev. J. XV. Doane, Mirns/er, Teachers at Carnpto;i, Mrs. Sarah G. Street, Miss Mary L. Baird, Campton, Ky. Kennedy, Neb. Mallet Creek, Ohio. BLACK MOUNTAIN (P. 0. EVARTS.) illinister. Rev. Herbert Carleton, A. M., BLACK MOUNTAIN ACADEMY. Rev. Herbert Carleton, A.M., Miss Belle M. lodge, Sarah E. Ober, Mrs. Blanche B. Carleton, SANDERS CREEK. JJIzmster, Rev. Samuel Sutton, Evarts, Ky. Deer Lodge, Tenn. Beverly, Mass. Evarts, Ky. Williamsburg, Ky. Rev. Y. B. Sims, ARKANSAS. LITTLE ROCK. Minister and Teacher, HELENA. Talladega, Ala. HELENA NORMAL SCHOOL. Priucipai.Prof. Chas. W. Driskell, Stanfordville, Ga. Mrs. Chas. W. Driskell, Miss Bettie A. Gunner, Lexington, Ky. Miss Ella M. Thomason, Athens, Ala. OKLAHOrIA. GUTURIE. Rev. Thomas J. Au.,tin. A/mister, LANGSTON. Jackson, Tenn. Aihnzster, Rev. R. J. Holloway, tIIsSIsSIpPI. TOUGALOO A/mister, Rev. Frank G. Woodwortb, D.D., Langston, OkIa. Ter. Tougaloo, Miss. Evarts, Ky. 66 OUR FiELD WORKERS. TOUGALOG UNIVERSITY. President.Rev. F. GWoodworth, D.D., Tougaloo, Miss. Rev. Henry E. Sawyer, A.M., Boston, Mass. Prof. Albert S. Hill, A.M., Columbus, Ohio. Mr. L. J. Carrier, Phcenix, N. V. A. H. Stone, B.S., Philliston, Mass. Frank H. Ball, Worcester, Mass. A. H. Bennett, Holden, Mass. Miss Elizabeth Ainsworth, Hyde Park, Mass. Mary M. Booth, AB., New Britain, Conn. Edith M. Hall, Oberlin, Ohio. Mary E. Hodge, B.S., Hartland, Wis. Bertha M. Kaestner, Chicago, Ill. Myrta A. Lyman, Grinnell, Ia. Carrie E. Parkhurst, Manchester, N. H. C. E. Pingree, M.D., Denmark, Me. Emma C. Redick, Mansfield, Ohio. Emma Robertson, Concord, N. H. Mary P. Roberts, Jacksonville, Ill. S. M. Noble, Fluvanna, N. Y. Margaret K. Russell, Jacksonville, Ill. Mrs. L. J. Carrier, Phoenix, N. V. Helen M. Sawyer, Boston, Mass. L. M. Sisson, Windsor, Vt. MERIDIAN. ./Jihnzster, Rev. C. L. Harris, Meridian, Miss. Teachers, Princt~pal.Mrs. H. I. Miller, Topeka, Kan. Miss May Knox, Chester, Mass. Maria Myers, Kidder, Mo. Hattie J. Lovewell, Willow Springs, Mo. Ella C. Abbott, Winchester, Mass. C. E. Kendall, Dunstable, Mass. MOORHEAD. ALMEDA GARDNER scHooL. Princi~z5aZ.Miss S. L. Emerson, Hallowell, Me. Miss E. L. Parsons, Mount Morris, N. V. S. J. Lime, Port Carbon, Pa. JACKSQN. Teachers, Miss Mary Jane Gibson, Jackson, Miss. Sarah Jane Thomas, Summit, Miss. OUR FIFLD WORKERS. 67 MOUND BAYOU. NORMAL INSTITUTE. Teachers, Mr. Isaiah T. Montgomery, Miss Mary V. Montgomery, M. Nellie Crump, Mound Bayou, Miss. Nashville, Teun. NEW RUHAMAH, PLEASANT RIDGE, SALEM AND COLUMBUS. Afissionaries, Mrs. M. A. F. Tapley, Miss I. D. Feemster, Columbus, Miss. LOUISIANA. NEW ORLEANS. Minister (University Church). Rev. George W. Henderson, North Craftsbury, Vt. STRAIGHT UNIVERSITY (490 Canal St.). President. Prof. Oscar Atwood, A. M., Jeffersonville, Vt. Rev. George W. Henderson, A. M., North Craftsbury, Vt. Mr. Arthur C. Cole, A.B., Olivet, Mich. Miss Emily W. Nichols, Clinton, N. Y. Mary W. Culver, Buchanan, Mich. Mrs. Edwin J. Pond, Washington, D. C. Miss Margaret E. Reed, Princeton, Ill. Mrs. L. St. John Hitchcock, Simsbury, Conn. Miss Mary D. Coghill, New Orleans, La. Anna M. Paddock, North Craftsbury, Vt. Nettie M. White, New Castle, N. H. Mr. George L. Dewey, Norwich, Conn. Mrs. George L. Dewey, Mr. Emerson C. Rose. James D. Gordon, Miss Jennie Fyfe, Carrie E. Hodgman, Belle C. Harriman, New Orleans, La. Lansing, Mich. Princeton, Ill. North Craftsbury, Vt. DANIEL HAND Miss Louise Denton, Deborah B. Johnson, Mrs. E. E. McKibban, Miss Harriet M. Markham, PREPARATORY SCHOOL. Freeport, N. Y. New Orleans, La. Manhattan, Kan. Chicopee Falls, Mass. OUR FIELD WORKERS. NEW ORLEANS (CENTRAL CHURCH) INSTITUTIONAL. Minister, Rev, John W. Whittaker, New Orleans, La. Assistani Minister, Miss Bella W. Hume, New Haven, Conn. Missionary, Miss Helen Taylor, New Orleans, La. NEW ORLEANS (SPAIN ST. CHURCH). Minister, Rev. Cornelius W. Johnson, New Orleans, La. NEW ORLEANS (MORRIS BROWN CHURCH). Minister, Rev. I. H. Hall, New Orleans, La. NEW IBERIA. Minister, THIBODEAUX. Minister, HAMMOND. Minister, ROSELAND. Minister, Rev. C. H. Claiborne, Rev. J. E. Smith, Rev. C. H. Crawford, Rev. Henry Kendall, Rev. M. W. Whitt, Rev. J. A. Herod, New Orleans, La. New Orleans, La. Glenwood, Ia. Roseland, La. BELLE PLACE. Minister, ABBE VILLE. Minister, SCHRIEVER. ( MORNING STAR AND ST. MARK S Minister, LOCKPORT. Minister, William Brown Belle Place, La. Abbeville, La. CHURCHES.) Schriever, La. Charles Sands, Lockport, La 68 OUR FIELD WORKERS. 69 Rev. C. W. Johnson, ST. SOPHIE. Minister, St. Sophie, La. TEXAS. AUSTIN. St. Johnsbury, Vt. TILLOTSON INSTITUTE. President.Prof. W. S. Goss, A.B., Mrs. XV. S. Goss, Miss Florence A. Sperry, Ada M. Sprague, B.S., Helen L. Robertson, Ida F. Hayden, Elizabeth B. Meek, B.S., Phoebe B. Parsons, Margaret Portune, Ella A. Perley, Marie D. Holzinger, Martha J. Adams, Mr. Thomas J. Larkin, James S. Bingham, CORPUS CHRISTI AND GOLIAD. Rev. J. D. Pettigrew, Rev. Mitchell Thompson, Rev. A. C. Garner, Rev. A. C. Garner, Mrs. A. C. Garner, Minister, HELENA. Jifinister, PARIS. Minister, Teachers, St. Johnsbury, Vt. Rock Creek, Mich. Keene, Ohio. Churchville, N.Y. Medford, Mass. Bellefonte, Pa. Marcellus, N.Y. Cincinnati, Ohio. Portland, Me. Olivet, Mich. Columbus, Wis. Marion, Ala. Winsted, Conn. Corpus Christi, Tex. Helena, Tex. Chicago, Ill. Chicago, Ill. Rev. R. H. Henson, Rev. E. E. Sims, Nirs. E. E. Sims, DODD AND ROXTON. Minister and Teacher, DALLAS. Minister and Teacher, Paris, Tex. Dallas, Tex. Rev. W. S. Goss, Minister, 70 OUR FIELD WORKERS. INDIAN fHSSIONS. SANTEE AGENCY, NEBRASKA. NORMAL TRAINING SCHOOL. Superintendent and Minister. Rev. A. L. Riggs, D. D., Santee Agency, Neb. Teachers, Mr. F. B. Riggs, Miss Harriet B. lisley, Edith Leonard, Williametta 0. Nash, Carolette Smith, Mr. Eli Abranam, Rev. James Garvie, Mr. C. W. Hoffman, Miss S. Lizzie Voorhees, (Boys Cottage.) Miss Ella Worden, (Whitney Hall.) Mrs. A. C. Slaughter, (Dakota Home.) Miss Harriet A. Brown, (Birds Nest.) Mrs. B. J. Black, (Dining Hall.) Santee Agency, Neb. Newark, N. J. Rochester, Mass. South Norwalk, Conn. Grand Rapids, Mich. Native Teachers, Santee Agency, Neb. Elbow Woods, No. Dak. Matrons, Rocky Hill, N. J. Santee Agency, Neb. Hudson, Ohio. Rocky Point, N. V. Santee Agency, Neb. Missionaries, Mrs. A. L. Riggs, F. B. Riggs, C. R. Lawson, W. H. Hamlin, J. 1?. Wold, H. L. Stone, Miss May Slaughter (Clerk), Industrial Department, Iver P. Wold, Shoemaking, Charles R. Lawson, Printing, Robert Y. Gray, Blacksmithing, William H. Hamlin, Farm Supt., Homer L. Stone, Bakery, Santee Agency, Neb. Hudson. Ohio. Santee Agency, Neb. OUR FIELD WORKERS. 7 Miss Ella Worden, Cooking School, Santee Agency, Neb. Miss Jennie M. Lind, Sewing School, Yankton, So. Dak. Native Pastor, Rev. Artemas Ehnamani, Santee Agency, Neb. PONCA AGENCY, NEB. Native Missionary, Rev. James Garvie, Santee Agency, Neb. CHEYENNE RIVER AGENCY, S. D. Rev. T. L. Riggs, General Missionary. CENTRAL STATION, OAHE, SOUTH DAKOTA. Minister, Mr. David Lee, Bad River, S. D. OAHE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. Treasurer, Mr. Elias Jacobsen, Oahe, 5. 1). Teachers, Mrs. T. L. Riggs, Oahe, S. D. Miss Eva F. Dixon, Dnnstable, Mass. Florence E. Hunnewell, Olivet, Mich. OUT-STATIONS. BAD RIVER. Mr. Stephen Yellow-Hawk, Oake, S. D. ELIZABETII WINYAN MEMORIAL STATION, CHEYENNE RIVER. Rev. Edwin Phelps, Collamer, S. D. Mrs. Ellen Phelps, *PLUM CREEK BOARDING SCHOOL, CHEYENNE RIVER. Mr. William M. Griffiths, Chicago, Ill. Mrs. Martha H. Griffiths, Ross, Ohio. CHERRY CREEK CHEYENNE RIVER. Mr. Clarence Ward, Leslie, S. D. Mrs. Estelle Ward, TOUCH THE CLOUD STATION, CHEYENNE RIVER. Mr. Justin Black-Eagle, Leslie, S. D. WHITEHORSE STATION, MOREAU RIVER. Mr. Ansel Chapin, Leslie, S. D. Mrs. Mary Chapin, 72 OUR FIELD WORKERS, REMINGTON STATION, MOREAU RIVER. Mr. John Bluecloud, Mrs. Nora Bluecloud, Miss Dora B. Dodge, HOPE STATION, MOREAU RIVER. Mr. Daniel Yawa, Mrs. Mary Yawa, Sisseton Agency, S. D. Brooklyn, N. Y. Moreau River, S. D. THUNDER BUTTE, MOREA U RIVER. Mr. Daniel White-Thunder, Leslie, S. D. Mrs. Elida White-Thunder, *Supported by the Society for Propagating the Gospel. ~Supported by the Native Missionary Society. STANDING ROCK AGENCY, N. D. CENTRAL STATION. Rev. George W. Reed, Mrs. Charlotte M. Reed, Springfield, Mass. ELKHORN STATION. Miss Mary C. Collins, Mr. Huntington Wakutemani, Mrs. Louisa Wakutemani, Keokuk, Iowa. Grand River, S. D. LONG HILL STATION. Miss Mary P. Lord, Wellesley, Mass. OAK CREEK STATION. Mr. Elias Gilbert, Mrs. Mary Gilbert, Sisseton Agency, S. I). ROCK CREEK STATION. Mr. Simon Kirk, Mrs. Julia Kirk, Sisseton Agency, S. D. THUNDER HAWK STATION. Mr. David Many Buffalo, Mrs. Martha Many Buffalo, MISSOURI RIVER STATION. *Mr. Arthur Tibbetts, Grand River, S. D. Cannon Ball, N. D. CANNON BALL STATION. Mr. Arthur Tibbetts, *Supported by the Native Missionary Society. Cannon Ball, N D. OUR FIELD WORKERS. 73 ROSEBUD RESERVATION, SOUTH DAKOTA. ROSEBUD AGENCY. Rev. James F. Cross, Mrs. Stella P. Cross, Rosebud Agency, S. D. BURRELL STATION (P. 0. Basin, Neb.). Rev. Francis Frazier, Mrs. Maggie Frazier, PARK 5T1~EET CHURCH STATION (White River, P. 0. Stearns). Mr. Lot Frazier, Rosebud Agency, S. D. Mrs. Rebecca Frazier, BLACK PIPE BRANCH. Mr. Solomon B. Yellow-Hawk, Fort Pierre, S. D. Mrs. Josephine Yellow-Hawk, PORT BERTHOLD AGENCY, NORTH DAKOTA. Rev. C. L. Hall, Mrs. S. W. Hall, Superintendent and Missionaries, Fort Berthold, N. D. Teachers and Matrons, Miss A. Z. Powell, Annie R. Creighton, Annette P. Brickett, Jessie McKenzie, Mr. H. A. Hatch, Templeton, S. D. Dundee, Scotland. Haverhill, Mass. Minneapolis, Minn. Lindenville, Ohio. Santee Agency, Neb. MOODY STATION, NO.1 (Independence). Miss Otta Wolf, Fort Berthold, N. C. MOODY STATION, NO.2 (Elbow Woods). Chicago, Ill. Miss Elizabeth Kehoe, WASHINGTON. SKOKOMISH AGENCY. Missionary, Rev. Myron Eells, Union City, Wash. PIONTANA. CROW AGENCY. Rev. J. G. Burgess, Mrs. J. G. Burgess, Crow Agency, Mont. G~ ALASKA. CAPE PRINCE OF WALES. Mr. W. T. Lopp, Mrs. W. T. Lopp, C~tpe Prince of Wales, Alas. OUR FIELD J~tORKER. CHINESE MISSIONS. Superi;zlendeii/, Rev. Win. C. Pond, D.D., San Francisco, Cal. FRESNO. Miss J. R. Beaton, Loo Quong. Mrs. T. M. Webb, Miss Mattie A. Flint, Chung Moi, Miss Rosa B. Lamont Tip Bow, Miss Estella Chase, Miss Reese, Mrs. M. N. Colby, Mrs. W. N. Wyckoff, Mrs. S. E. Carrington, Chin Toy, Mrs. E. M. Davis, Gin Foo King, Mrs. E. M. Stetsoh, Horn Goon, leacliers, Fresno, Cal. Los Angeles, Cal. Marysville, Cal. LOS ANGELES. Teacher, MARYSVILLE. Teachers, OAKLAND. Teachers, OROvILLE. Teachers, PETALUMA. Tea flier, RIVERSIDE Teacher, SACRAMENTO. Teachers, SAN BERNARDINO. Teachers, SAN DIEGO. Teachers~ San Francisco, Cal. Oakland, Cal. Oroville, Cal. Petalurna~, Cal. Riverside, Cal. Sacramento, Cal. San Bernardino, Cal. San Diego, Cal. OUR FIELD WORKERS. 75 SAN FRANCISCO (CENTRAL). Teachers, Mrs. H. W. Lamont, M. A. Greene, Miss J. G. Morrison, J ee Gain, San Francisco, Cal. (~ SAN FRANCISCO (BARNES). Teacher, Miss Olive Patton, San Francisco, Cal. SAN FRANCISCO (WEST). Miss V. W. Lamont, Chin Quong, Miss Lida A. Thompson, Mrs. Snell, Mrs. Kate V. Hall, Pon Fang, Mrs. A. P. Patterson, Miss Alma Bradley, Mrs. Henry, Yong Kay, Miss Ella Thomson, Mrs. Martha Ellis, Joe Dun, Teachers, SANTA BARBARA. Teachers, SANTA CRUZ. Teachers, STOCKTON. Teacher, VENTURA. Teachers, VERNONDALE. Teacher, WATSON VILLE. Teachers, San Francisco, Cal. Santa Barbara, Cal. L~ ~ Santa Cruz, Cal. Stockton, Cal. Ventura, Cal. Vernondale, Cal Watsonville, Cal OUR FIELD WORKERS. TEACHERS RESIDENCES. MAINE. Castine.Prof. Fred. W. Foster, Mrs. Mary W. Foster, Mr. B. F. Perkins. DenmarkMiss C. E. Pingree, M.D., Miss L. A. Pingree. HallowellMiss S. L. Emerson. LimerickRev. T. S. Perry. PortlandMiss A. E. Farrington, Miss Ella A. Perley. Pulpit Harbor.Miss Carrie E. Leadbetter. SacoMiss Mary E. Sands. Wintl~rop.Miss L. J. Hanscom. NEW HAMPSHIRE. Acworth.Miss Agnes Ruth Mitchell. Chester.Miss Celestia S. Goldsmith. Concord.Miss Emma Rohertson. East Barrington.Miss Eva F. Chesley. GosavilleMiss Dora A. Scriboer, B.A. Keene.Miss Emily R. Bishop. Langdon.Miss Harriet Towne. ManchesterMiss Carrie E. Parkhurst. New CastleMiss Nettle M. White. VERMONT. AscutneyvilleMiss Ida F. Huhhard. JeffersonvilleProf. Oscar Atwood, A.M. North Craftsbury. Miss Belle C. Harriman, Rev. Geo. W. Henderson, AM., Miss Anna M. Pad- dock. SherburneMiss Lilla L. Johnson. St. JohosburyProf. W. S. Goss, AB., Mrs. W. S. Goss. WindsorMrs. S. M. Sisson. Woodstock.Miss Lucy E. Fairbanks. MASSACHUSETTS. AmherstMrs. Lucy R. Greene. BeverlyMiss Sarah E. Oher. BostonMiss Lilla V. Davis, Rev. Henry E. Sawyer, A.M., Mrs. Helen M. Sawyer. CambridgeportProf. Fred. S. Hitchcock, Mrs. Fred. S. Hitchcock. Chester.Miss May Knox. Chicopee FallsMiss Harriet M. Markham. DunstableMiss Eva F. Dixon, Miss C. E. Kendall. East Northfield.Miss Susan M. Marsh. Granville.Mr. Otis S. Dickinson. HaverhillMiss Annette P. Brickett. Holden.Mr. A. H. Bennett. Housatonic.Miss Jennie Curtis. Hyde Park.Miss Elizabeth Ainsworth, Miss J. A. Ainswortb. Lee.Prof. Morrison A. Holmes, Mrs. M. A. Holmes. Medford.Miss Ida F. Hayden. Methuen.Miss Caroline E. Frost. North Amherst.Miss Nellie D. Cooley. Philliston.Mr. A. H. Stone, B.S. Rochester.Miss Edith Leonard. SalemMiss Minnie T. Strout. SomervilleRev. W. W. Dorman, B.D. So. Hadley FallsMiss Katharine M. Jacobs. SpringfieldRev. Geo. W. Reed, Mrs. Charlotte M. Reed. StonebamMiss Helen Hanson. WellesleyMiss Mary P. Lord. WesthoroughMiss A. Merriam. WinchesterMiss Ella C. Abbott. WorcesterMr. Frank H. Ball, Prof. Geo. C. Burrage, A.B., Prof. Herbert F. Burrage, B.S. Miss Ella E. Roper, Mrs. A. S. Webber. CONNECTICUT. Brookfield CentreRev. Sandy A. Paris. Granby.Mrs. W. D. McFarland. Lyme.Miss Anna R. Miner. New Britain.Miss Mary M. Booth, A.B. New Haven.Miss Carrie E. Bishop, Rev. G. S. Dickerman, Miss Bella W. Hume, Miss Mary E. McLane. Norwich.Mr. Geo. L. Dewey, Mrs. Geo. L. Dewey, Miss Harriet E. Leach, Miss Mary E. Perkins. Simsbury.Mrs. L. St. John Hitchcock. South NorwalkMiss Williametta 0. Nash. Winsted.Mr. James S. Bingham. NEW YORK. BrooklynMiss Dora B. Dodge, Miss M. Amelia Packard. ChautauquaMrs. M. L. Jenkins. Churchville.Miss Helen L. Robertson. ClintonMiss Emily W. Nichols. ElmiraMiss Julia B. Gltnes, Miss Antoinette Kellogg. Feury BushMiss Kate C. LaGrange, Miss Ollie LaGrange. FluvannaMiss S. M. Noble. Fredonia.Miss Kate L. Snow. FreeportMiss Louise Denton. FultonProf. B. D. Rowlee, Mrs. Julia E. Rowlee. Gasport.Miss Ida C. Chapin. Le RoyMiss Emma L. Parsons, M.A. Lewis.Miss Etta M. Hitchcock. MarcellusMiss Phoebe B. Parsons. MasonvilleMiss Flora M. Cone. Moravia.Mrs. Julia E. Titus. Mount Morris.Miss E. L. Parsons. Newark ValleyMiss Helen S. Loveland. Newburgh.Rev. H. T. Johnson, Mrs. E. S. Johnson. New York City.Miss Bena P. Gummershach, Miss Nellie D. Sheldon. North HannibalMiss Alice A. Clarke. PhoenixMr. L. J. Carrier, Mrs. L. J. Carrier, Miss Minnie M. Gates, Miss Caroline Wandell. RochesterMrs. Alice M. Brown. Rocky Point.Miss Harriet A. Brown. Rose View.Miss Anna M. Woodruff. Rouses Point.Miss Mary L. Thompson. Rushville.Miss Marie E. Hoover. Sandy HillMiss Helen M. Hyde. SyracuseMiss Julia H. Curtis, Miss Ruth K. Kingsley. Tuckahoe.Prof. Martin Lovering, A.B. Utica.Miss Julia R. Mitchell. West BloomfieldMiss Carrie E. Browne. WestfieldMiss Jennie L. Blowers. WeatmorelandMiss Alice M. Garsden. NEW JERSEY. MorristownMiss Julia B. Ford. Newark.Rev. C. C. Collins, Miss Harriet B. Isley. OrangeMiss Frances M. Williams. Rocky HillMiss S. Lizzie Voorhees. PENNSYLVANIA. BellefonteMiss Justia C. Hoy, Miss Elizabeth B. Meek, B.S. Boalsburg.Miss Anna M. Cooper. Jenkintown.Miss Emilie Weiss. Port Carbon.Miss S. J. Lime. ReadingRev. R. B. Johns. 76 OUR FIELD WORKERS. DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. Tacoma Park.Miss Estelle I. Sprague. Washington.Mr. Clement L. Brambaugh, Rev. Sterling N. Brown, A.M., Rev. Charles H. Butler, Rev. Isaac Clark, AM., Rev. J. L. Ewell, A.M., Rev. Tennis S. Hamlin, D.D., Rev. E. G. Harris, Rev. John T. Jenifer, Rev. E. A. Johnson, Mrs. E. A. Johnson, Rev. Eugene Johnson, Rev. Geo. D. Little, D.D., Mrs. Ed- win J. Pond, Rev. J. B. Rankin, D.D., L.L.D., Rev. Adam Bench, A.B.. Prof. Win. J. Stephens. OHIO. BelfontaineMiss Mary H. Ewans. Brecksville.Miss Harriet E. Bell. BryanMiss Alice M. Grass. CharlestownMiss Edith M. Hatfield, Miss Lihhie A. Hatfield. CincinnatiMiss Margaret Portune. Clarksfield.Miss Carrie M. Ruddock. CliftonMiss L. Belle Knott. ColumbusProf. Aihert S. Hill, A.M. Creston.Miss Charlotte J. Knowlton. Dover.Miss Alice M. Whitsey. ElyriaMiss M. M. Lickorish. Everett.Miss E. B. Scohie. Fremont.Miss Katharine S. Dalton. GreenfieldMiss Clara S. Boyd. HamiltonMiss S. Josephine Scott. Hammond.Miss Emma J. Rosecrans. HudsonMiss Ruth M. French, Mrs. A. C. Slaughter, Miss May Slaughter. Huron.Miss Edna Harris. Keene. Miss Ada M. Sprague, B.S. Lindenville.Mr. H. A. Hatch. Mallet CreekMiss Mary L. Baird. MansfieldMiss Emma C. Redick. North Kingsville.Miss Isadore M. Caughey. NovaMiss Mary C. Phelps, Ph.B. OherlinMiss Maude L. Barnum, Miss Ella Louise Cheney, Mrs. Alice Davis, Miss Edith M. Hall, Miss Stella M. Hopkinson,Prof Thos. S. Inhorden, Miss Corrie N. Johnson, Miss Julia E. MeMillan, Mrs. Lucy M. Mellen, Miss Nellie I. Reed, Miss Carrie E. Tamhling, Miss Edith M. Thatcher, Prof. F. T. Waters, A.M. Painesville.Miss Nina B. Mosher. Parkman.Miss Clara A. Dole. RichfieldRev. Warren E. Wheeler, Mrs. Kate L. Wheeler. Rock Creek.Miss Mabel A. Wightman. Rootstown.Miss Julia P. Seymour. RossMrs. Martha H. Griffiths. SheffieldMiss L. E. Woodruff. TailmadgeMiss Esther A. Barnes. Wakeman.Miss Hattie E. Hayes, Mrs. S. A. Hayes. Xenia.Miss Gertrude Harnar. INDIANA. LaporteMiss M. R. Ruckman. South BendProf. W. F. Cameron, Ph.B., Mrs. W. F. Cameron. ValparaisoMiss Clara E. Nohie. ILLiNOIS. Chicago.Rev. A. C. Garner, Mrs. A. C. Garner, Mr. Win. M. Griffiths, Miss BerthaM. Kaestner, Miss Elizaheth Kehoe, Miss E. Josephine Orton, Miss Mary T. Richardson, BA., Rev. S. P. Smith. DanvilleMiss Frances L. Veomans. Downers Grove.Mr. 0. R. Brown, Mrs. B. C. Brown. Elmhurst.Miss Emma F. King. EnglewoodMiss Katharine P. Williamson. Freeport.Miss Miriam E. Carey. Jacksonville.i\Iiss Mary P. Roberts, Miss Mar- garet K. RusselL Oneida.i\Iiss Amelia L. Ferris. PrincetonMiss Carrie E. Hodgman, Miss Mar garet E. Reed. MICHIGAN. AdrianMiss Julia A. Condit. Battle CreekMiss Edith M. Robinson, Miss Maude A. Robinson. BuchananMiss Mary W. Culver. DetroitRev. J. M. Robinson, Mrs. J. M. Robin- son, Miss Jennie M. Street. Frankfort.Miss Ella M. Andrews, Miss Hattie M. Fairchild. Grand Ledge.Miss Lora D. Tanner. Grand RapidsMiss Carolette Smith. KalamazooMiss C. M. Dox, Miss May Belle Nicholson, Miss Luella Waring. LansingMiss Jennie ~yfe, Miss Alice A. Holmes. Monroe Miss Ada Louise Wilcox. OlivetMiss A. Irene Reed, Mr. Arthur C. Cole, AB.. Miss Susan T. Estabrook, Miss Marie D. Hoizinger, Miss Florence E. Hunne- weli, Mr. John Orr, Mrs. John Orr, Miss Har- riet B. White. Rock CreekMiss Florence A. Sperry. SalemMiss N. S. Dennis. SaugatuckMiss Gertrude Takken. IOWA. BelmontMiss Susan Sands. Decorab-Miss E. W. Douglass. GrinnellMiss Myrta A. Lyman, Miss Alice L. Walker, Ph.B. KeokukMiss Mary C. Collins. Marathon. Miss A. Laura Humphries. NashuaMiss Nellie J. Arnott, Miss Edna M. Heald. NevadaMiss Ada I. Riugheim. Rockford.Miss B. B. Parmenter. VincennesMiss L. C. Holman. WaterlooMiss I. Ola Akin. MISSOURI. Kidder.Miss Maria Myers. SpringfieldMiss May E. Newton. St. Louis.Mrs. Virginia C. Logie. Willow SpringsMiss Hattie J. Lovewell. WISCONSIN. AcornMiss Mary B. Brereton. ColumbusMiss Martha J. Adams. Delavan-Miss Hester A. Washburn. EvansvilleMiss Mary D. Backenstoe. HartlandMiss Mary B. Hodge, B.S., Miss Mary B. Simonds. LadogaMiss Edith E. Lamb, Miss Myra J. Lamb. MadisonMiss Lillian J. Beecroft. PalmyraMiss Nellie Bishop. WhitewaterMiss Ella A. Hamilton, Miss Minerva A. Kinney, Prof. A. J. Steele, A.M. KANSAS. BavariaMiss Susan A. Cooley. Manhattan~Mr. E. E. MeKibban, Mrs. B. B. TopekaMiss Susa H. Breck, Rev. B. W. Hol- lies, Mrs. S. Hollies, Miss Minnie Hollies, Mrs. H. I. Miller. MINNESOTA. BensonMiss M. E. Wilcox. ClearwaterProf. H. E. Sargent, Mrs. H. E. Sargent. Mazeppa.Miss Mary D. Hyde. MinneapolisMiss Mary A. Bye, B.S., Miss Lil- lian S. Catheart, Miss Jessie McKenzie. Montevideo.Miss Lillian Lavinia Goar St. PaulMiss Nellie F. Comings. WinonaProf. G. A. Hoizinger. NEBRASKA. CreteRev. A. W. Curtis, D.D. Hartington.Miss Harriet M. Smith. 77 OUR FiELD WORKERS. NEBRASKA (Continued). Kenpedy.Mrs. Sarah G. Street. Omaha.Mrs. A. E. Foote. 5antee AgencyMr. Eli Abrahan Mrs. E. j. Black, Rev. Artemas Ehnamani, Rev. Francis Frazier, Mrs. Maggie Frazier, Rev. James Garvie, Mr. Robert G. Gray, Mr. William H. Hamlin, Mrs. W. H. Hamin. Mr. Charles R. Lawson, Mrs. C. R. Lawson, Rev. A. L. Riggs, D.D., Mrs. A. L. Riggs, Mr. F. B. Riggs, Mrs. F. B. Riggs, Mr. John Rouiliard, Mrs. Mary Roulliard, Mr. Homer L. Stone, Mrs. Homer L. Stone, Mr. Iver P. Woid, Mrs. Iver P. Wold, Miss Ella Worden. NORTH DAKOTA. Cannon BallMr. Arthur Tibbetts. Elbow Woods.Mr. C. W. Hoffman. Fort Berthold.Rev. C. L. Hall, Mrs. S. W. Hall, Mica Otta Wolf. SOUTH DAKOTA. Bad River.Mr. David Lee. Collamer.Rev. Edwin Phelps, Mrs. Ellen Phelps. Dell RapidsMiss Mary W. Bryant. Fort Pierre.Mr. Solomon B. Yellow-Hawk, Mrs. Josephine Yellow-Hawk. Grand River.Mr. David Many Buffalo, Mrs. Martha Many Buffalo, Mr. Huntington Waku. temani, Mrs. Louisa Wakutemani. Lebanon.Miss A. B. Chalfant. Leslie.Mr. Justin Black Eagle, Mr. Ansel Chapin, Mrs. Mary Chapin, Mr. Clarence Ward, Mrs. Estelle Ward, Mr. Daniel White-Thunder, Mrs. Elida White-Thunder. Moreau River.Mr. Daniel Yawa, Mrs. Mary Yawa. Oahe.Rev. T. L. Riggs, Mrs. T. L. Riggs, Mr. Elias Jacobsen, Mr. Stephen Yellow-Hawk. Rosebud AgencyRev. James F. Cross, Mrs. Stella P. Cross, Mr. Lot Frazier, Mrs. Rebecca Frazier. Sisseton Agency.Mr. John Blueclood, Mrs. Nora Bluecloud, Mr. Elias Gilbert, Mrs. Mary Gilbert. Mr. Simon Kirk, Mrs. Julia Kirk. TempletonMiss A. Z. Powell. Yankton.Miss Jennie M. Lind. MONTANA. Crow AgencyRev. J. G. Burgess, Mrs. J. G. Burgess. COLORADO. DenverRev. A. T. Burnell, Ph.D., Mrs. Mary A. Burnell. OKLAHOMA TERRITORY. Langston.Rev. R. J. Holloway. WASHINGTON. Union CityRev. Myron Ecils. CALIFORNIA. FresnoMiss J. R. Beaton, Loo Quong. Long BeachMiss Fanny J. Webster. Los AngelesMrs. T. M. Webb. Marysville.Miss Mattie A. Flint, Chung Moi. OaklandTip Bow. OrovilleMiss Estella Chase, Miss Reese. Petaluma.Mrs. M. N. Colby. RiversideMrs. W. N. Wyckoff. SacramentoMrs. S. E. Carrington, Chin Toy, Miss Fanny J. Webster. San BernardinoMrs. E. M. Davis, Gin Foo King. San DiegoMrs. E. M. Stetson, Hum Goon. San Francisco.Mrs. M. A. Greene, Mrs. H. W. Lamont, Miss Rosa E. Lamont, Miss V. W. Lamont. Miss .1. G. Morrison, Miss Olive Pat- ton, Rev. W. C. Pond, D.D., Jee Gain, Chin Quong. Santa Barbara.Miss Lida A Thompson, Mrs. Sneli. Santa Cruz.Mrs. Kate V. Hall, Pon Fang, Miss H. P. Shepard. StocktonMrs A. P. Patterson. Ventura.Miss Alma Bradley, Mrs. Henry, Yong Kay. VernondaleMiss Ella Thomson. Watsonville.Mrs. Martha Ellis, Joe Dun. ALASKA. Cape Prince of WalesMr. W. T. Lopp, Mrs. W. T. LQpp TENNESSEE. BaileyMiss Mary E. Johnson. Bon Air.Rev. E. N. Goff. ChattanoogaMiss Grace Putnam, Crossville.Mr. George Burnett, Mr. Thomas Snodgrass. Cumberland Gap.Rev. A. A. Myers, Mrs. A. A, Myers. Deer Lodge.Miss Belle M. Hodge, Rev. George Lusty. Grand ViewMrs. Carrie Ferree, Miss Gertrude Huntington, Miss Maud Taylor. Harriman.Miss Minnie Ferree, Rev. W. G Olinger, Mr. Gilbert Walton. Hudsonville.Miss F. Annette Jackson. JacksonRev. Thos. J. Austin. Jellico.Rev. L. C. Partridge. KnoxvilleRev. B. A. lines. Memphis.Miss Emma 0. Kennedy, Miss Cor. nelia E. Lewis, Mr. Elias S. Webb. Mill CreekRev. M. N. Sumner. NashvilleMiss Anna T. Ballantine, Miss Mary E. Chamberlain, Rev. F. A. Chase, A.M., Rev. E. M. Cravath, D.D., Miss Nettle Crump, Rev. Chas. W. Dunn, Rev. Eugene Harris, A.M., B.D., Miss Mary A. McClelland, Rev. Geo. W. Moore, Rev. J. E. Moorland, Prof. H. C. Mor. gao, A.M., Rev. H, H. Proctor, Miss Jennie A. Robinson, Rev. E. E. Scott, Rev. A. K. Spence, A.M., Miss Mary A. Spence, AM., Rev. E. C. Stickel, AM., Mrs. Luretta C. Stickel, B.L., Miss Birdie M. Wills, Miss Elnora M. Winter, Prof. H. H. Wright, A.M. Pine BluffMr. Charles R. Blanks. Pleasant HillRev. B. Dodge, Miss Emma F. Dodge. PomonaMrs. A. E. Graves, Rev. H. E. Par- tridge. WhetstoneRev. J. B. Cabble. KENTUCKY. Berea.Rev. George Ames. Campton.Rev. J. W. Doane. Combs.Rev. Mason Jones. Evarts.Rev. Herbert Carleton, A.M., Mrs. Blanche B. Carleton. LexingtonP ..v. Byron Gunner, Miss Bettie A. Gunner. WilliamsburgRev. W. B. Frey, Miss Nora Hill, Rev. Chas. A. Stevens, Rev. Samuel Sutton. JIRGINIA Ark.Miss Lizzie Baytop. Cappahosic.Mr. J. H. Lockley, Mr. D. D. Weaver, Prof. W. B. Weaver, Mrs. A. B. Weaver. NORTH CAROLINA. Brevard.Rev. W. A. Hamet. Carters MillsMr. W. D. Newkirk. Dry CreekMrs. Kate J. P. Green. McLeansville.Rev. S. S. Sevier, Mrs. S. S. Sevier, Mrs. Elizabeth Smith. Mooresboro.Rev. L. C. White. Nalls.Mr. R. H. Saunders. OaksRev. Anthony Peden, Mr. Solomon A. Stanford. Pekin.Mr. Columbus Green. RaleighMr. Win. R. Hall, Miss Jennie S. Irwin. 78 OlAR FIELD WORKEIiS. NORTH CAROLINA (Continued). Strieby.Rev, Z. Simmons, Mr H. R Walden. Valdese.Mr. Antoine Grill, Mr. M. A. Jahier, Rev. Enrico Vinay. Whittier-Rev. Robert Humphrey, Mrs. Olive A, Humphrey. SOUTH CAROLINA. CharlestonMiss Marion R. Birnie, Miss Mary L. Deas, Mr. Edward A, Lawrence, Miss A. R. Magrath, Mr. Isadore Martin, Rev. George C. Rnwe, Miss Carrie E. Steele. ColumbiaRev. E. H. Wilson. GEORGIA. AthensMiss Mattie J Brydie, Prof. L. S. Clark. Rev, Paul L. La Cour, Mrs. P. L. La Cour Miss Emma S. Morton, Miss Eliza B. Twiggs. AtlantaRev. Geo V. Clark. Bainbridge.Mr. A, W. Bcwman. Cuthbert,Mr. F. H Henderson, Mrs. F. H. Henderson. MaconMiss Lincolnia C. Haynes, Rev. John R, McLean. MariettaRev. Calvin Lane, Mrs. Calvin Lane. Marshaliville. Mrs A. W. Richardson, SavannahRev. Wilson Callen Mr. J. Loyd, Rev. L. B. Maxwell, Rev. 3. H. H. Sengstacke. SpartaMiss Sarah L. Hunt. Stanfordville.Prof. Chas. W. Driskell Mrs. Chas. W. Driskell. Thomasville.Rev, Chas, F. Sargent Mr. H. C. Sargent. FLORIDA. Orange ParkMiss Margaret A. BaN. TangerineMiss Susie T. Cathcart. ALABAMA. Alco.Rev. J. J. Scott. Anniston.Rev. James Brown. AthensMiss Ella M. Thomason, Mrs. H. S. Williams. BirminghamRev. J. L. Cole. Blocton.Rev. D. M. Lewis. FlorenceMiss Mary Lucy Corpier, Rev. Will- iam L. Johnson. MarionMiss Mary S. Larkin, Mr. Thins J Lar- kin, Rev. XV. J. Larkin, Mrs. W. J. Larkin. MontgomeryMiss Hattie A. Dc Jarnette, Rev. J. S. Jackson. Selma.Mrs. Mary A. Dillard, Mr. James A. Merriman, Mrs. N. D. Merriman. Shelby. Rev. A. Simmons. Talladega.Rev. Geo. W. Aadrews.~ Th,t~., Rev. M. L. Baldwin, Prof. Edgar A. Bishop, B.S., Rev. H S. DeForest, D.D., Rev. J. I. Donald- son, Rev. J. B. Grant, Rev. W. P. Hamilton, Prof. William E. Hutchison, Rev. Z. Jones, Rev. 3. A. Jones, Rev. J. M. Roan, Mrs. 3. M. Roan, Miss Louje Savery, Prof.. Edwin C. Silaby, Rev. J. P. Sims, Rev. J. R. Sims, Rev. Y. B. Sims, Rev, Spencer Snell, Prof. George Wiliiamson. MISSISSIPPI. Aherdeen.Rev. Frank W. Sims. ColumbusMiss I. D. Feemster, Mrs. M. A. F. Tapley. JacksonMiss Mary Jane Gibson. MeridianRev. C. L. Harris. Mound BayouMr. Isaiah, T. Montgomery, Miss Mary V. Montgomery, SummitMiss Sarah Jane Thomas. Tougaioo.Rev. Marion S. Jones, Rev. Frank G. Woodworth, DO. WoodvilleMiss L. j. Blackmore. - LOUISIANA. Abbeville.Rev. J. A. Herod. Belle PlaceRev, M. W. Whitt. Gi.~nwood.Rev C. H. Crawford. Lockport.--Mr. Chas. Sands. New OrleansRev. C. H. Claiborne, Miss Mary D. Co bill, Mr. James D. Gordon, Rev. I. H. Hall, Miss Deborah B. Johnson, Rev. Cornelius W. Johnson, Mr. Emerson C. Rose, Rev. 3. E. Smith, Miss Helen Taylor, Rev. John W. Whit- taker. RoselandRev. Henry Kendall. Schriever.Mr. Win. Brown. St. SophieRev. C. W. Johnson. Corpus Christi.Rev. J. D. Pettigrew. DallasRev. E. E. Sims, Mrs. E. E. Sims. HelenaRev. Mitchell Thompson. ParisRev. H. R. Henson. CANADA. AshlandMiss Georgia M. Belyea. Milltown, N. BMiss Frances M. Andrews. Springfield, OntMiss Emma J. Bryce. TorontoMiss Bessie C. Bechan, Miss Belle F. Burr, Miss Evelyn Segsworth, Miss Laura G. Segsworth. SCOTLAND. DundeeMiss Annie R. Creighton. CORRESPONDENCE Relating to the work of the Association should be directed to one of the Corresponding Secretaries; relating to the finances, to the Treasurer, BIBLE HousE, New York. DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS May be sent to the Treasurer, H. W. Hubbard, Esq., BIBLE HOUSE, New York, or, when more con- venient, to one of the District Secretaries. A payment of $3o.oo at one time constitutes a Life Member. WOMANS BUREAU. Correspondence of Womans Local and State Organizatioms, and all interested in womens work, may be held with Miss D. E. Emerson, Secretary, Bible House, N. Y. THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY. The monthly AMEBICAN MIssioNAEv gives facts, incidents and discussions of the work, and will have an increased amount of interesting and valuable information during the coming year: Subscriptions received at any time. Price, 50 cents. 79 RECEIPTS FOR DECEMBER, 1894. 1HI$ DANIEL HAND FUND For the Education of Colored People. Income for November $16,250 00 Previously acknowledged 960 00 $17,210 00 CURRENT RECEIPTS MAINE, $463.54. Bangor. First Ch. and Soc Blue Hill. To coost. MRS. LIZZIE A. TUCKER L. M Brewer. First Cong. Cli Brewer. Capt. Robert Parker, for Stu- dent Aid, so; Cong. Ch., 7.10; Y. P. 5. C. E., 2.50; Jun. C. E. Soc., s: Henry Stone, knife,for Mcintosh, Ga Calais. First Cong. Soc Castine. Cong. Ch. (~ of which/or Stu- dent Aid),ss; Rainbow Band, s.5o; Mrs. C. E. Cushmanfor Freight, i.5o; J. W. Dresser, s; Mary W. Webster, ~ Geo. L. Weeks, 4; Rainbow Band, Bbl. C., etc.; Friends, Large Case Goods,for Student Aid, McIntosh, Ga Cumberland Center. Cong. Cb., for McIntosh, Ga., Freight Eastport. Sab. Sch. by Mrs. H. J. Rey- nolds, 8; Harold and Leon Reynolds, s; Miss E. Bilbers S. S. Class, s, for McIntosh, Ga Gouldsboro. Mrs. Helen F. T. Cleaves, for McIntosh, Ga Gray. Cong. Ch Harrison. Cong. Ch Kennebunkport. Mrs. C. H. Pope, for Grand River Indian Field Lewiston. Pine St. Cong. Ch Monson. Cong. Ch North Bridgton. Cong. Ch Norway. Second Cong. Ch Ocean Park. J. C. E. Soc/or Mcintosh, Ga Orland. Mrs. H. T. and S. E. Buck, for Student Aid, McIntosh, Ga Portland. Williston Ch., 133.42; Second Parish Ch., so; W. C. Rideout, i Portland. Y. P.S. C. E. Williston Cong. Ch.,for Student Aid, Chandler Sch... Portland. Miss. Soc., by Miss Lizzie C. Fuller, for Wilmington, N. C Presque Isle. Y. P. S. C. E., of Cong. Ch Richmond. Mrs. Hazen, for Mcintosh, Ga Rockport. Cong. Ch., for McIntosh, Ga Sandy Point. Cong. Ch., ~ Cong. Soc., Bbl. C., for McIntosh, Ga Sherman Mills. Washburn Memorial Ch Thomaston. Cong. Ch., for McIntosh, Ga Vinal Haven. Kings Daughters, for Student Aid, McIntosh, Ga Winterport. Mrs. E. A. Smith, for McIn- tush, Ga 58 54 30 00 21 6o 25 6o 45 00 24 00 5 00 4 00 3 00 500 I 50 3 50 5 00 3 00 144 42 50 00 800 5 00 2 00 8 ~6 4 00 5 00 ~ 25 Maine Womans Aid to A. M. A., Mrs. C. A. Woodhury, Treas., for Womans Worh. Biddeford. Second Ch. Y. P. S.C.E 936 ___ A Friend, Thank Offering 6 00 s~ NEW HAMPSHIRE, $434.32. Concord. Dna. Frank Coffins S.S. Class, for Wilmington, N. C ~ 00 Concord. First Cong. Ch., 2 Bbls C., for Moorhend, Miss. Durham. Cong. Soc 50 00 East Derry. Mrs. Chas. H. Day, for Student Aid, Gregory Inst ~ Franklin. Cong. Ch ~ 00 Gilsum. Cong. Ch 4 00 Goffstown. Miss Mary A. Hadley s 00 Hampton. Sab. Sch. Cong. Ch 14 33 Hancock. Miss L. H. Kimball 00 Henniker. Mrs. Lucy S. Connor s 00 Hinsdale. Sab. Seb. of Cong. Ch ~ Hudson. Cong. Ch 9 30 Keene. First Cong. Ch., by W H. Spalter, Co. Treas 43 77 Keene. Miss M. A. Wheeler, for Indian Sh., Santee, Mel., and to coost MRS. ANGIE W. COFFIN L.M 30 00 Keene. Prim. Dept. Cong. S.S., for Childrens Miss s 00 Kingston. C. E. Soc. of Cong. Ch., for a Teacher, Pleasant Hill A cad s~ 00 Kingston. Cong. Ch 9 25 Lancaster. Cong. Ch iS 00 Lisbon. First Cong. Ch 9 52 Manchester. A Iliriend, for Indian M 10 00 Mason. Cong. Ch 13 35 Nashua. Pilgrim Ch., to coost JOSEPH L. CLOUGH and MISS JESSIE E WELL- MAN L.Ms 62 02 Newcastle. Cong. Ch., for Mountain 1Vorh 7 75 New Ipswich. A. N. Townsend 50 North Hampton. Cong. Ch ~ 00 Peterboro. Extra Cent a Day Band, by Miss Julia M. Buckminster, Treas 20 00 Raymond. Cong. Ch. and Soc 7 00 Rindge. Cong. Ch., by W. H Spalter, Co. Treas 2 12 Salem. Cong. Ch 3 00 Seabrook and Hampton Falls First Evan. Cong. Ch 57 00 Swanzey. Cong. Ch., by W. H Spalter, Co. Treas 20 00 Temple. Mrs. James Bragg 00 Walpole. Cong. Ch. and Soc 9 iS Winchester. Mrs. P. F. E. Aibrees Sab. Sch. Class, 20; and Sab. Sch., 15, for Stndent A id, Grand View Normal Inst 35 00 $430 03

Receipts for December, 1894 80-88

RECEIPTS FOR DECEMBER, 1894. 1HI$ DANIEL HAND FUND For the Education of Colored People. Income for November $16,250 00 Previously acknowledged 960 00 $17,210 00 CURRENT RECEIPTS MAINE, $463.54. Bangor. First Ch. and Soc Blue Hill. To coost. MRS. LIZZIE A. TUCKER L. M Brewer. First Cong. Cli Brewer. Capt. Robert Parker, for Stu- dent Aid, so; Cong. Ch., 7.10; Y. P. 5. C. E., 2.50; Jun. C. E. Soc., s: Henry Stone, knife,for Mcintosh, Ga Calais. First Cong. Soc Castine. Cong. Ch. (~ of which/or Stu- dent Aid),ss; Rainbow Band, s.5o; Mrs. C. E. Cushmanfor Freight, i.5o; J. W. Dresser, s; Mary W. Webster, ~ Geo. L. Weeks, 4; Rainbow Band, Bbl. C., etc.; Friends, Large Case Goods,for Student Aid, McIntosh, Ga Cumberland Center. Cong. Cb., for McIntosh, Ga., Freight Eastport. Sab. Sch. by Mrs. H. J. Rey- nolds, 8; Harold and Leon Reynolds, s; Miss E. Bilbers S. S. Class, s, for McIntosh, Ga Gouldsboro. Mrs. Helen F. T. Cleaves, for McIntosh, Ga Gray. Cong. Ch Harrison. Cong. Ch Kennebunkport. Mrs. C. H. Pope, for Grand River Indian Field Lewiston. Pine St. Cong. Ch Monson. Cong. Ch North Bridgton. Cong. Ch Norway. Second Cong. Ch Ocean Park. J. C. E. Soc/or Mcintosh, Ga Orland. Mrs. H. T. and S. E. Buck, for Student Aid, McIntosh, Ga Portland. Williston Ch., 133.42; Second Parish Ch., so; W. C. Rideout, i Portland. Y. P.S. C. E. Williston Cong. Ch.,for Student Aid, Chandler Sch... Portland. Miss. Soc., by Miss Lizzie C. Fuller, for Wilmington, N. C Presque Isle. Y. P. S. C. E., of Cong. Ch Richmond. Mrs. Hazen, for Mcintosh, Ga Rockport. Cong. Ch., for McIntosh, Ga Sandy Point. Cong. Ch., ~ Cong. Soc., Bbl. C., for McIntosh, Ga Sherman Mills. Washburn Memorial Ch Thomaston. Cong. Ch., for McIntosh, Ga Vinal Haven. Kings Daughters, for Student Aid, McIntosh, Ga Winterport. Mrs. E. A. Smith, for McIn- tush, Ga 58 54 30 00 21 6o 25 6o 45 00 24 00 5 00 4 00 3 00 500 I 50 3 50 5 00 3 00 144 42 50 00 800 5 00 2 00 8 ~6 4 00 5 00 ~ 25 Maine Womans Aid to A. M. A., Mrs. C. A. Woodhury, Treas., for Womans Worh. Biddeford. Second Ch. Y. P. S.C.E 936 ___ A Friend, Thank Offering 6 00 s~ NEW HAMPSHIRE, $434.32. Concord. Dna. Frank Coffins S.S. Class, for Wilmington, N. C ~ 00 Concord. First Cong. Ch., 2 Bbls C., for Moorhend, Miss. Durham. Cong. Soc 50 00 East Derry. Mrs. Chas. H. Day, for Student Aid, Gregory Inst ~ Franklin. Cong. Ch ~ 00 Gilsum. Cong. Ch 4 00 Goffstown. Miss Mary A. Hadley s 00 Hampton. Sab. Sch. Cong. Ch 14 33 Hancock. Miss L. H. Kimball 00 Henniker. Mrs. Lucy S. Connor s 00 Hinsdale. Sab. Seb. of Cong. Ch ~ Hudson. Cong. Ch 9 30 Keene. First Cong. Ch., by W H. Spalter, Co. Treas 43 77 Keene. Miss M. A. Wheeler, for Indian Sh., Santee, Mel., and to coost MRS. ANGIE W. COFFIN L.M 30 00 Keene. Prim. Dept. Cong. S.S., for Childrens Miss s 00 Kingston. C. E. Soc. of Cong. Ch., for a Teacher, Pleasant Hill A cad s~ 00 Kingston. Cong. Ch 9 25 Lancaster. Cong. Ch iS 00 Lisbon. First Cong. Ch 9 52 Manchester. A Iliriend, for Indian M 10 00 Mason. Cong. Ch 13 35 Nashua. Pilgrim Ch., to coost JOSEPH L. CLOUGH and MISS JESSIE E WELL- MAN L.Ms 62 02 Newcastle. Cong. Ch., for Mountain 1Vorh 7 75 New Ipswich. A. N. Townsend 50 North Hampton. Cong. Ch ~ 00 Peterboro. Extra Cent a Day Band, by Miss Julia M. Buckminster, Treas 20 00 Raymond. Cong. Ch. and Soc 7 00 Rindge. Cong. Ch., by W. H Spalter, Co. Treas 2 12 Salem. Cong. Ch 3 00 Seabrook and Hampton Falls First Evan. Cong. Ch 57 00 Swanzey. Cong. Ch., by W. H Spalter, Co. Treas 20 00 Temple. Mrs. James Bragg 00 Walpole. Cong. Ch. and Soc 9 iS Winchester. Mrs. P. F. E. Aibrees Sab. Sch. Class, 20; and Sab. Sch., 15, for Stndent A id, Grand View Normal Inst 35 00 $430 03 RECEIPTS, ESTATE. Cornish. Estate of Sarah W. Westgate, by E. G. Kenyon, Trustee, Cong. Soc.. 24 29 $454 32 VERMONT, $602.63. Bartons Landing. L. H. M. U. Case and Pkg. Bedding and C., Freight paid, for Mcfn/osk, Go. Bellows Falls. First Cong. Ch ~ Bennington. Miss S. E. Park, Box C. for WzYiiisrnbarg, Ky. Burlington. Mrs. Van Patten, for Mc- Ia/os/i, Ga ~ no Cabot. Mrs. H. A. Russell, 3; Mrs. L. McAllister, 25C 3 25 Chelsea. Hope Sherman. for Siudea/ Aid, McIntosh, Ga 4 no Chelsea. By Mrs. S. W. Sherman, Tub Maple Sugar, 2for Freight; Cong. Ch., Two Bbls. C.,for McIntosh. Ga 2 00 Chester, Cong. Ch 22 6o Coventry. Cong. Ch. and Soc 25 00 East Hardwick. Cong. Ch., 27; Cong. Sab. Sch., 28.26 45 27 Essex. Cong. Ch 2 77 Franklin. F. L. Hopkins, Bbl. and half Bbl. New Goods, 78c. for Freight. for McIntosh, Ga 78 Groton. Mrs. B. A. Taft 8 00 Manchester. Friends from Chicago, by Mrs. E. Wickham, io; L. H. M. S., 2 Bbls. C., Freight paid, for McIntosh, Ga 20 00 Manchester. Miss E. J. Kellogg 5 00 Montpelier. Bethany Cong. Ch 32 05 Newbury. First Cong. Ch. and Soc 28 63 New Haven. A Friend, to coost. J. M. LANOON and Mas. S. H. BOYNTON L. Ms 200 00 North Bennington. Mrs. S. D. Jennings 20 00 North Brook6eld. Mrs. C. M. Morse, Bbl. C., for McIntosh, Ga. Putney. L. B. Soc., Cong. Ch., for Mc/ntosk, Ga. Saint Johnsbury. South Cong. Ch 6o 84 Saint Johosbury. Mrs. Rebecca P. Fair- banks, s ; Opportunity Circle, s Mrs. H. M. Carpenter, 2, for Mclntosk, Ga 1100 Salisbury. Cong. Ch., for Indian hI ii no Shoreham. Bbl. C., Freight paid, for Mclatosh, Ga. Waitsfield. Mrs. Jones, ; A Friend, s,for McIntosh, Ga 2 00 Wallingford. Miss C. M. Townsend,for lndian M s 00 Waterbury. Cong. Ch 26 09 West Barnet. V. P. 5. C. E ~ 00 Friends in Vermont io no Womans Home Missionary Union of Vermont, by Mrs. William P. Fair- banks, Treas.,for Womans Work.~ Barnet. W. M. S ~ Bennington, North. W. H. M. S 230 Burlington. College St. Ch. Junior C. E., for Indian Sck~ s 00 Coventry. Busy Bees 8 00 Fairfax. Mrs. Purmort, ~ Mrs. A. B. Beeman, i 00 Fairfield, East. Junior C. E., for Indian cAt no Newport. W. H. M. S 22 40 Rutland. W. H. M. S 25 00 Ryegate. Junior C. E. for In- diaa Schp 2 00 Saxtons River. L. B. Soc 5 00 Wells River. W. H. M. S 7 00 Westminster, West. S. S., for Indian Scht 4 3 Woodstock. Primary Sab. Sch., for Indian SckjS 7 00 8i MASSACHUSETTS, $io,i8s.68. Acton. Cong. Ch Amesbury. R. H. King, for Caltahosic, Va Amherst. North Cong. Ch Amherst. Ladies M. Soc., First Ch., Bbl. C., for Fisk U. Andover. Mrs. A. M. Whittemore 2 on Andover. Miss Lucy F. Partridge, for Indiaa M., Standing Rock, N. D no Andover. Miss G. L. Merrill, Bbl. C., fdr Kings Mt., N. C. Andover. V. P. 5. C. E., South Cb., Pkg. Papers, for Not, Ala. Ashby. Ortho. Cong. Ch 20 25 Athol. Ladies Union, BbS. C.,forMcln- tosh, Ga. Attleboro. Second Cong. Ch ~ Auburn. Cong. Ch 43 o6 Auburodale. Cong. Ch., in part 272 39 Beverly. Dane St. Ch., 2 Bbls. C., for Eziarts, I{y, Boston: Mount Vernon Ch 499 70 Shawmut Cong. Ch. (ion of which for Indian M).... 225 no Ladies of Old South (h., for Student Aid, Pieasant Hi/i Acad 70 no Rev. Francis E. Clarke, for Cedar Butte, S. D 25 00 Miss Alice White, for Caji- /ahosie, Va 5 no The Whatsoever Band, for Stade t Aid, Greg- ory lost on A Friend . 25 Aliston. Cong. Ch 22 Charlestown. Mrs. C. H. Flint, Christmas Box, for Moor- head 14iss Dorchester. Village Ch 22 23 Extra Cent a Day Band of Second Cong. Ch., for Waidensian M 20 on Mrs. C. P. Potter, for Stu- dent Aid, Gregory Inst.. 8 on Mrs. Mary Houston, ~ J. C. Clarke, i, for McIn- tosh, Ga. . fion Go Forth Mission Band, Second Cong. Ch., for Indian H 2 30 Jamaica Plain. Helen C. Laughlin,for McIntosh, Ga. i on Jamaica Plain. Central Cong. Ch., adl 05 Roxhury. Mrs P. N. Liver- more, for Student A id, Girls, Pie sant Iltil A cad Roxhury. Friend in Eliot Ch. ,~ for Indian M South Boston. Phillips Cong. Ch Phillips Ch.,. for Student Aid, Fisk U 25 no 5no 37 50 35 50 98899 Boxford. Cong. Ch 30 07 Boxford. Sub. Sch. Cong. Ch., for Indian M 25 00 Bradford. Bradford Academy, Class of 2895, 24 Kate Derr, s, for indian M., Standing Rock, N. P 25 00 Braintree. First Cong. Ch 6 4~ Brockton. Porter Evan. Ch. and Soc., to coost. WILsoN TIRRELL and Miss. MARY L. PIERCE L.Ms 62 23 Byfield. Cong. Ch 22 50 Cambridgeport. Womans M. Soc. of Pilgrim Ch.,for Sc/st., Straight U 25 no Cambridgeport. Scatter Good Soc., Box Christmas Goods, for Marion, A in. Campello. South Cong. Ch 235 no 25 no 3 00 68 59 82 RECEZPTS. Campello. South Cong. Sab. Sch., for Williamsburg A cademy, Ky io io Canton. Cong. Ch 122 00 Carlisle. Cong. Ch 3 oo Chelsea. First Cong. Ch., s i; Third Cong Ch., ~ 20 45 Chelsea. Ladies, for Indian Mission, Standing Rock, N. D 2 00 Cohasset. Second Cong. Ch is 57 Colerain. Bbl. Bedding, for Kings Mountain, N. C. Dalton. Cong. Sab. Sch., for Furnish- ing Home, Chandler Sc/i 20 oo Danvers Center. Extra Cent a Day Band ofFirstCh 3 00 Dover. Cong. Ch 4 07 Dudley. Miss Nicholas, for Meridian, Miss 2 00 Duxhury. Pilgrim Ch.. .. 4 35 East Bridgewater. Cong. Ch 7 47 East Hampton. Payson Cong. Ch., to const. CHARLES B. WALKER, MRS. M. B. GAYLORD, MRS. JOHN MAYHER and MRS. A. C. NEVINS L.Ms 220 92 Enfield. Ladies Miss. Soc., by Mrs. Amanda W. Ewing 25 00 Fall River. Central Cong. Ch. (6o of which br Robert K. Remington Memorial Mission) 257 53 Fall River. Central Cong. Ch., Extra Col.,for Exj5enses of StecialAtj5eal 250 00 Fitchbury. Cal. Cong. Ch 44 5 Framiogham. A Friend, for Indian Sch~ 27 50 Framiogham. Cong. Ch., Bbl. C., for Willianosburg, Ky. Freetown. Mrs. G. L. Nichols, ~ Des. J.D.Wilson,2 . ~oo Gill. V. P. 5. C. E., ad, for Central CA., New Orleans,La 9 45 Goshen. Cong. Ch 10 00 Great Barrington. L. M. S for Student Aid,LincolnAcad 1000 Greenlield. Second Cong. Ch 49 3 Groton. Cong. Ch., adi i cci Hanson. Cong. Ch. and Soc 3 28 Haverhill. Mrs. Mary B. Jones, by Samuel Merrill 000 00 Haveihill. Sab. Sch., West Cong. Ch., 30, to const. J. W. GOODIELL L. M.; Chas. Coffin, 4.50 34 50 Hingham. A Friend in Evan. Cong. Ch 50 00 Hinsdale. C. T. Huntington, to const: SIMON H. WRITE L.M 35 00 Holbrook. Miss S. J. Holbrook, for Straight U 20 00 Holbrook. SaW Sch., Winthrop Ch.,for Student Aid, Straight U 20 0o Holliston. V. P. 5. C. E. of Cong. Ch., for Central CA., New Orleans, La 5 on Hoiliston. Sab. Sch. of Cong. Ch., s; Miss W. T. White. 2, /or Student A id, Gregory Inst 7 00 Housatonic. Sab. Sch. Cong. Ch. (5 of whichfor McIntosh, Ga.) 22 64 Huntington. Second Cong. Ch. and Soc 6 28 Hyde Park. First Cong. Ch 24 20 Hyde Park. Sab. Sch. Cong. Ch., for McIntosh, Ga 8 00 Lakeville. W. H. M. Soc., by Mrs. A. C. Southworth, Sec., for Student Aid, Santee Indian SeA 2500 Lakeville. A Friend, for Indian M.. 9 30 Lancaster. Womans Aux., by Mrs. Har- riet N. Eaton, Tress., is, for Teacher, Santee Indian Sc/i.; 25, for Teacher, Straight U., and to const. MRS. ISA BELLA S. ROWELL L. M 50 00 Lenox. Cong. Cb 22 00 Leverett. First Cong. Cb. and Soc 27 ~5 Lowell. Collected by Miss B. R. Par- menter at Annual Meeting, for 7honeasville Ga 3200 Lowell. A Friend for Student Aid, Evans, Ky Lowell. Sab. Sch. Eliot Cb., for Indian SeA., Fort Benthold, N. IS Ludlow. A Grateful Christian Lynn. First Cong. Ch., 41.10; Central Ch., ~s . Maiden. From Douglass Lecture, 70; E. S. Convers, 5o; Mrs. C. C. Convers, io; Dr. D. P. Wadsworth, ~ Mrs. Daniels, ~ Mr. Richings, s; W. H. Barrett, 2.50, for Gloucester SeA., Cattahosic, Va.. Maiden. First Ch Malden. Sab. Seb., First Cong. Cb., for Indian M., Standing Rock, N. IS Manomet. Cong. Ch Medfield. C. E. Soc., for Meridian, Miss Medford. Sab. Seb. Cong. Ch.,for Stu- dent Aid, Pleasant I-/ill Acad Medway. E. F. Richardson, Bbl. books and L.,for Nat Ala. Meirose Highlands. Junior C. E. Cong. Ch.,for indian M Meirose Highlands. Mrs. H. G. Barber. Middleboro. Thomas P. Carleton Milford. Cong. Ch Millbury. First Cong. Ch. and Soc. (io of which from A Friend ) Milton. Bbl. C., for Kings Mt., N. C. Montague. First Cong. Ch Neponset. Stone Mission Circle, Trinity (.h., for St-aight U Newburyport. Miss Grace M. Scott, for a little girl,z5u~tl, A ibany, Ga Newton. V. L. Soc. of Eliot Ch., for Indian M., Santee, Neb Newton. Friend in Eliot Ch., for In- dian M Newton Highlands. Thanksgiving Offer- ing, for Indian Al Newton Highlands. Two Friends, for Student A Id, Pleasant Hill, Tean Newionville. Central Cong. Ch North Adams. Cong. Ch North Amherst. Whatsoever Soc., ic; Mrs. G. E. Fisher, s, for Fish U.. North Amherst. Sab. Seb. of Cong. Ch., for indian Al Northampton. A. L. Williston, 3oo; A Friend, Soc North Andover. Cong. Ch . North Woburn. Cong. Cb Orange. V. P. 5. C. E. of Cong. Ch., for Saluda, N, C., and to const. IDA E. BARNES L. M Orleans. Cong. Ch Pittsfield. First Cong. Ch Pittsfield. Mary A. Bissell, Pkg. Papers, forAllany, Cu. Plymouth. Chiltonville Cong. Ch. Raynham. First Cong. Ch. and Soc Reading. Mrs. Sarah Smith Royalston. First Cong. Cb. (s of which for Alountain JVorh) Salem. Crombie St. Ch Salem. Crombie St. Cb., 2 Bbls. C., for Wilmington, N. C. Saxonville. Edwards Cong. Cb Shelburne Falls. Cong. Ch. and Soc Shirley Village. Ortho. Cong. Ch. and Soc.... l~ Southampton. Friend Spencer. V. P. 5. C. E. of Cong. Ch., ~ Ladies M. Soc., ~ G. E. Manleys S. S. Class, IO. Springfield. Memorial Ch.... Springfield. Miss Abhie L. Sanderson, for Cup/ahosic, t a Springfield. Paper Co., s Cases Station- ery, for IVilmington, N. C. Stockbridge. Cong. Ch Southbridge. Mrs. George Bradford, for Indian Al 25 00 s 68 243 50 38 86 25 00 5 00 5 00 5~ 6~ 63 47 8 00 5on 3 00 50 00 5 00 50 00 30 00 Iii 95 47 55 35 00 i6 00 300 50 25 00 20 64 30 00 6 00 45 00 20 40 7 89 47 25 9 25 24 50 i3 79 22 30 28 95 20 25 RECEIPTS. Tyngsboro. Evan. Ch 6 22 Tyngsboro. Friend in Cong. Cli., for indian N 2 00 Wakeman. Sab. Sch. Mission Band, Bbl. C., for Freight, far Pleasant Hill, Teno 2 00 Walpole. Cong. Ch 24 00 Ware. George E. Tucker, for Reading Room, Central Gb., New Orleans, La.. 25 00 Ware. First Cong. Ch., for Indian M... 24 25 Xtare. Cong. Ch., adl.,for Central Gb., New Orleans, La 2 49 Ware. Ladies of First Cli., Bbl. C., Freight paid, for Mcintosh, Ga. Warren. Ladies Benev. Soc., a Large Cases C., 6.3o for Fre?g/st; V. P. S. C. E., ~, for Stadent A Id, McIntosh Ga 10 30 Webster. First Cong. Cli 36 33 Wellesley. Miss Mary P. Lord, for Two New Native Missionaries, Grand River, N. D 200 00 Wellesley. Mrs. R. W. T. Crowell, for IndinaM 20 00 Wellesley. Miss Valentine, i; Friends of the Work, 75c., for Indian M., Standing Rock, N. 1) 75 Welifleet. Mrs. G. S. Holbrook and Friends, Box Bed clothing, for Albany, Ga. Westboro. Ladies Freedmens Assn, for Freight to Salnda,N.C 00 Westhoro. Bbl. Bedding and C., for Kings Moantain, N. C. West Boylston. Cong. Cli 8 ~5 West Medway. Third Cong. Cli i6 50 West Medway. Dorcas H. M. Circle, Third Cong. Cli., Bhl. C., for Nat, Ala. West Newbury. Ladies Aux. of First Parish Cong. Cli., for Central C/s., New Orleans, La 2 CO Whitinsville. Cong. Cli. and Soc 997 So Whitman. Cong. Cli., Communion Set, for Rvnrts, Ky. Williamsville and Vicinity. By Mrs. C. Woodruff, 2 Blils. C., Freight paid, for /lfJclntosk, Ga. Wilmington. Rev. Elijah Harmon 3 00 Winchester. First Cong. Cli so 00 Worcester. Plymouth Cong. Cli 28 6a Worcester. V. P. 5. C. E. of Salem St. Cong. Cli., by Miss Nellie A. Keyes 23 6~ Yarmouth. First Cong. Cli 25 00 Friend in Mass., for Bailding, Crow Mission, N. D 30 00 Hampden Benevolent Association, by George R. Bond, Treas.: Ludlow. First Cli x6 07 West Springfield. First Cli. (in of which from A Friend); 36 to coost. EDwARo C. SMITH L .M.; Park St. Cli., 22.18; Mit tineague Cli., 30.27 87 45 203 52 Womans Home Missionary Association of Mass, and R. I., Miss Annie C. Bridgman, Treasfor Wonoans Work: For Salaries of Teachers.... 776 94 South Boston. Mrs. Horace Smith, for Alaska N 5 00 Mansfield. Ladies M. Soc 20 00 Framingliam. Plymouth Cli. Aux., 9.20; Ply- mouth Cli. Primary Sab. 5db., 3, for Central C~h., New Orleans, La 22 20 West Somerville. Day St. Cli. Aux. Memorial, Mrs. N. B. Wilder s 00 Curtisville. Cong. Cli 14 36 823 40 ESTATES. Boston. Estate Mary A. Blood, by Joseph H. Curtis, Executor 220 00 83 Douglas. Estate of Mary A. Wells, by Chas. Gibson, Executor 45 00 Whitinsville. Estate of William H. Whitin, by Edward Whitin, Executor.. 200 00 $io,i8i 68 CLOTHINO, BOOKS, ETC., REcEIvEO AT BOSTON OFFICE: Aslifield. Ladies Soc., Cong. Cli., Bbl. C., for Evans, Ky. Brimfield. Ladies Union, Blil. Sundries, for Brewer N. Sek., Greensnood, S. C. Westhoro. Ladies F. Assn., Blil. C., for Salada Sew., N. C. RHODE ISLAND, $225.55. Bristol. First Cong. Cli Bristol. C. E. Soc., for Evans, Ky Central Falls. Cong. Cli East Providence. Newman Cli., to const. GEONCE HENRY CUETIS L. M Kingston. Cong. Cli Providence. Mrs. G. G. Hale for Glon- cester Sch., Cat.z5abosic. Va Providence. V. P. 5. C. E., of North Cong. Cli Providence. Mrs. James McAuslen, Box C., for Fisk U. Woonsocket. Miss Jean Harris, for Mc- Intosh, Ga 39 14 25 00 53 26 30 0 52 65 2 50 4 00 CONNECTICUT, $3,684.92. Andover. Cong. Cli 3 00 Bethlehem. A Friend 20 00 Black Rock. Cong. Cli 25 50 Bloomfield. Cong. Cli., Box Books, for Evarts, Ky. Bolton. Cong. Cli 22 88 Bridgeport. Park St. Cong. Cli., to coost. DEA. CHANLES M. M INON and EDWAEO S. BLAKE L. Ms 72 81 Bridgeport. C. E. Soc., Park Cong. Cli., for WilliamsbargAcad., Ky 5 20 Bridgeport. Mrs. J. H. Manchester, Pkg. Papers, for McIntosh, Ga. Brookfield. Cong. Cli 24 24 Clinton. Cong. Cli. and Soc 43 15 Columbia. Cong. Cli 35 46 Columbia. Mrs. Hattie Little, for Sin- dent Aid, 8; A Friend,for Freight, 2,for McIntosh, Ga 20 03 Danbury. Ladies M. Circle, for Stadent Aid. WillianzsburgAcad 6 00 East Canaan. Cong. Cli 4 17 Falls Village. Cong. Cli 5 05 Farmington. First Cong. Cli 8s ov Guilford. V. P. 5. C. E., Third Cong. Cli., for Central Ch., New Orleans, La 20 00 Haddam. First Cong. Cli 20 23 Hartford. Sab. Scli., Pearl St. Cong. Cli., for Rose/sad Indian N., So. Dak 34 So Hartford. V. P. S. C. E., Windsor Ave. Cli., for Student A id, Fisk U 50 00 Hartford. Pearl St. Cong. Cli., 62.02; Mrs. Mary C. Bemis, 5o; Park Cong. Cli., adl, 39.66 ; V. P. 5. C. E., Wind- sor Ave. Cong. Cli., 20 s6o 63 Hartford. C. E. Soc. of Fourth Cli., for Central Gb., New Orleans 20 00 Habron. V. P. 5. C. E., for Grand Vielv, Tena 5 00 Hig~anum. Sab. Sch. Cong. Cli., to coost. Ray. THOMAS C. RICHARDS L. M 30 00 Ledyard. J. F. Leach, Saw Filing Clamp, for Mc/ntosh, Ga. Lyme. V. P. 5. C. E., for Warner inst 5 00 Madison First Cong. Cli s ss Meriden. Center Cli., adI, 5o; E. K. Breckenridge, 50, to coost. C. E. BRaCE- ENEIDOK L.M 200 00 Meriden. Ladies Soc., Box C., for T/sosnasville, Ga, 84 RECEIPTS. Middletown. First Ch 29 55 Naugatuck. Sab. Sch., 24; Cong. Ch., Bbls. C., Box C. and Box Books, br Evarts 24 00 Naugatuck. Y. P. 5. C. E. of Cong. Cli 13 50 Nepaug. V. P. 5. C. E 7 00 New Canaan. Cong. Cli 30 i5 New Haven. Douglass Lecture, Grand Ave. Cong. Ch., 67.72; Sab. 5db., Grand Ave. Cong. Ch., 50, bar Gloucester Sck., C /~j3akosic, Va 11772 New Haven. Golden Links, Dwight P1. Cli., for Fisk U i8 00 New Haven. Robert Crane, M.D., in; Cli. of the Redeemer, adl, ~ i~ no New Haven. Rev. G. S. Dickerman, Blil. C., for Kings Mountoio, N. C. New Haven. Mrs. Geo. P. Browning, Box Papers,for Nat, Ala. Norwalk. Forget Me Not~~ Circle of K.D., for Skyland Inst., Biowing Rock, N.C 2500 Nortliford. Cong. Cli 5 00 Norwich. Friends, for Student A id, Mclntosk, Ga 29 00 Norwich. Friend, Blil. C., for Mc- Zntosk, Ga. Old Saybrook. Cong. Cli 32 05 Old Saybrook. V. P. S. C. E. for Read- ing Roo,u, Centrol Ck., New Cr1 ans, La 27 ~8 Plainville. A Friend 2 ~ Plantsville. Ladies mdl. Soc. of Cong. Cli.,for Allen Normal Sck., Tkonoas- yule, Ga 35 00 Putnam. Second Cong. Cli 33 27 Sound Beach. Jr. V. P. 5. C. E., Pilgrim Cong. Cli., Bhl. C., for Kings Moun- tain. N. C. South Britain. Cong. Cli 27 13 South Canaan. Cong. Cli 7 10 South Norwalk. Cong. Cli 50 29 Suffield. Circle of K. D., Blil. C., for Blowing Rock, N. C. Stamford. V. P. 5. C. B. of Cong. Cli., for Grand View, Teno 17 00 Stratiord. Cong. Cli iS 34 Talcottville. Cong. Cli. and Soc 82 si Wapping. Cong. Cli ii 33 West Avon. Cong. Cli s no Westcliester. Cong. Cli 4 i6 West Hartford. First Ch. of Christ 37 74 West Hartford. Henry C. Butler, for Indian Al 5 00 West Winsted. Second Cong. Cli. and Soc 30 00 Whitneyville. Childrens Earnings for Missi6ns, by Rev. Chas. F. Clarke 8 02 Windsor. V. P. 5. C. E., by M. G. Marsli, Treas ii 00 Windsor. Sab. Sch., First Cong. Ch. for Santee Indian Sck 938 Wolcott. Cong. Ch 7 91 Woodstock. First Cong. Cli. and Soc i6 48 Woodstock. L. A. S. N., Bbl. C., 2 for Freigkt, for Moorkead, Miss 2 00 Womans Cong. Home Missionary Union of Coon., Mrs. W. W. Jacobs, Treas., for Wowans Work. Norwich. Friend in Park Cli in no Westchester. Soc. of Cliris tam Bees ~ no 25 00 $1,579 93 ESTATES. Cornwall. Estate (If Silas C. Beers 433 50 Norfolk. Estate of Mrs. Mary Langdon Porter, by F. E. Porter, Executor I,67I 49 $3,684 92 NEW YORK, $3,462.24. Alfred. Mrs. Ida F. Kenyon 5 00 Antwerp. First Cong. Ch 27 27 Berksliire. First Cong. Ch. and Soc 48 25 Brasher Falls. Mrs. Eliza A. Bell in 00 Brooklyn. Lewis Av. Cong Cli., for IndiouM 209 78 Brooklyn. South Cong. Cli 72 00 Brooklyn. Y. P. 5. C. E. of Central Cong. Ch., for a Teacker, Blowing Rock, N. C . 50 00 Brooklyn. Royal Workers of Park Cli., W. H. M. U. of Park Cli., s, for a Teacker, Blowing Rock, N. C 20 no Brooklyn. Lewis Av. Cli., for Big Creek Got, Tenu i 00 Buffalo. First Cong. Ch 227 53 Canandaigua. Sab. Sch., Cong. Cli., for Mountain Work i6 in Castile. G. A. Davis ~ 00 Chateaugay. Joseph Shaw 5 00 (.ohoes. Coil. V. W. C. Asso. Meeting, for CaAz3akosic Va 752 Corona. V. P. 5. C. E., Bbl. C., Litera- ture, etc., for Savannak, Ga. Elmira. Mrs. J. Glines, for Student Aid, Grand View Nornoal Inst en Elmira. Park Ch., 2 Bbls. C., for Will- ianesburg, Ky. Gloversville. Junior Soc. of C. E.,for C. E. Hall, Mcintosk, Ga in 00 Huntington. Rev. W. J. Jennings s 00 Lansingburg. Bapt. Cli., Rev. C. L. Stanley, Pastor 8 38 Lawrenceville. L. Hulburd 5 00 Lebanon. Chas. P. Day, s; Silas W. Sey- mour, i; Alfred Seymour, 3 00 Lima. Miss M. D. Warner 50 Lockport. First Cong. Cli., Self Denial Offering 2 56 Middleton. First Cong. Cli 27 07 Morrisville. V. P. 5. C. E. of Cong. Cli., for Central Ck., New Orl~ans, La 22 00 Mount Sinai. Cong. Ch., hal. to coost. DnA. SAMUEL J. HOPKINS L. M 25 00 Mount Vernon. Mrs. D. Pearson, for Put us, Sanlee Indian Sek 70 00 Newark Valley. Mrs. Ruth Kimball 5 00 Newburg. Friends, for Sewing Class, Mclntosk, Ga 2 00 New Lots. C. E. Soc. of Dutch Ref. Cli., for Student A id, Williamsburg A cad 25 00 New York. Miss D. B. Emerson,for A. G. Sek., Moorkead, Miss 30 no New York. Mrs. Catherine Young, for WillianosburgAcad in no New York. Broadway Tab. Cli., H. N. Marshall 3 00 Nortliville. Sab. Sch. Cong. Cli in on North Walton. Y. P. 5. C. E.,for Tkun- derkawkM 23 30 Orient. Sub. Sch. Cong. Cli 25 00 Rochester. T. 0. Hamlin 25 00 Sag Harbor. Chas. N. Brown, to coost. JAMEsSIMMI L.M 3000 Saratoga. Mrs. A. H. Perry in no Saugerties. Cong. Cli 29 73 Saugerties. V. P. 5. C. B., for Big Creek GagI, Teun 6 8~ Sing Sing. Mrs. Cornelia B. Judd and Mrs. Harriet M. Cole, 30 each, for Indian and Ckinese M 6o no Spencerport. Two Blils. C., Freight paid, for Kings Mountain, N. C. Syracuse. Chas. A. Beach 50 00 Ticonderoga. Two Blils. C., for Kings Mouni in, N. C. Troy. Fifth Ave. Bapt. Cli., 28.24; First Bapt. Cli., 23.44; Friends, is; V. W. Asso. Meeting, 23.73; Win. Shaw, in; 3. Clacksworthy, ~ Mrs. M. E. Hart, s, for Gloucester Sck., ~attukosic, V ino 42 Warsaw. Cong. Cli i~ ~ Wautagh. Cong. Cli 3 ~s Westmoreland. First Cong. Cli 4 50 RECEIPTS. West Winfield. Mrs. Wheeler, 5 Miss Spencer, 51cr Big Creek Gaj5, Than... Woodhaven. First Cong. Ch Woodville. Cong. Ch Yonkers. J. T. Warren, for Ca15jbakos Ic, Va Womans Home Missionary Union of N. Y., by Mrs. J. J. Pearsall, Tress., for IVovoans LVork: Albany. First Ch., L. H. M. S 2500 Binghamton. Helpers, to const. Miss MARY P. MASON L.M 30 00 Brooklyn. Central Ch., L. B. S., 5o; Lewis Ave. Ch., L. M. 5., 50; East Ch. S. 5., 40; Tompkins Ave. Kings Daughters, a~ Pil- grim Ch., W. H. M. 5., ParkCh.,L.M.C.,6 s86oo Homer. Mrs. Coleman Hitchcock, 2.50 ; Mrs. Joseph Stebbins, 3 50 Middletown. First Ch., Crane Mission 5 00 MilIville. Lee Allen. 26 New York. Broadway Tab- ernacle, Soc. for Womens Work, to coost. Mas. CEPHAS BRAINERO, Ja., L. M 3000 Paris. Judd Mission Band ii 00 Poughkeepsie. L. H. M. S.,23S.S.,s5;C.E.,Io 5000 Syracuse. Geddes Ch., Willing Workers s 00 Warsaw. Earnest Work- ers 9 00 7 50 5 00 354 76 $1,461 24 ESTATE. Gloveraville. Estate of Isaac V. Place, Wayland D. West and Cyrus Stewart, Executors 2,000 00 $3,461 24 NEW JERSEY, $371.80. Jersey City. Mrs. Celia G. Dickinson, for Furnishing New Mali, Touyaloo U 4000 Lakewood. A. W. Kenney 25 00 Paterson. Auburn St. Cong. Ch 21 8o Upper Montclair. Cong. Ch., adl ~ Westfield. Cong. Ch 255 00 Womans Home Missionary Union of the N.. J. Assn., by Mrs. J. H. Denison, Treas.,for Womans Work: Paterson. A Friend, Mem. Off., W. H. M. S., Auburn St. Cong. Ch.... 20 00 Washington, D. C. W. H. M. S. of First Cong. Ch.. 25 00 35 00 PENNSYLVANIA, $232.50 Fallsington. Mrs. Phebe H. Burgess, for GaiS.i5akosic, Va 2 00 Germantown. Rev. Dr. C. Wood, for Ca/z3abosic, Va ~ Gugs Mills. Simeon 0. Fitch s Philadelpoia. The Old Abolitionists Soc., for Gloucester Sck., Ca.t5i5akosic, Va 100 00 Pittsburg. Cash 200 00 Riceville. First Cong. Cb s 00 Ridgway. Cong. Ch.,for Mefootosh, Ga. s oo Scranton. F. K. Tracy 00 Pennsylvania. Womens Missionary Union, by Mrs. T. W. Jones, Treas., for Womans Work. Cambridgeboro. W. M. Soc 20 00 85 OHIO, $436.24. Alliance. Y. P. 5. C. E. of Cong. Ch.... Bellevue. First Cong. Ch Claridon. L. T. Wilmot Cleveland. A Friend, 5o; Hough Av. Cong. Ch., 6.41 Cleveland. Unknown Friend, Av. Ch., for Indian M., Standing Rock, N. 113 Cleveland. Mrs. Laura V. Toliver, ; A Friend, i, for Student A Id, Albany. Ga Cleveland. Mount Zion Ch. and Ober- lin Friends, Organ, for Albany, Ga. Chatham Center. Cong. Ch Colinwood. Cong. Ch Columbus. Eastwood Cong. Ch Hartford. Cong. Ch Hudson. Cong. Ch Jefferson. Cong. Ch Kingaville. Miss Eliza Cummings, s; Miss Ella Richmond, s, for Student Aid, Lincoln Acad Kirtland. Mr. and Mrs. D. H. ......... Lorain. Mrs. T. F. Daniels Madison. Central Cong. Ch Mount Vernon. First Cong. Ch North Fairfield. Ladies of Cong Ch., Bbl. C., for Pleasant Hill, Tenn. North Kingaville. Mrs. Sarah C. Kellogg, for Indian M. . . Oberlin. Mrs. lcrd, Bbis. Books, Freight paid; Friends, Bbl. Books, etc.,forAibanyG Painesville. W. H. Stocking Ruggles. Cong. Ch. (of which 8oc. for Mountain Work and ~ for Indian M.), 24.23; Coral Workers, ~ and Y. P. 5. C. E., 1.05, to const. Miss NETTlE E. GAULT L.M Sardinia. S. W. Huggins Sheffield. Ridge Soc., by R. White, Sec. Springfield. First Cong. Ch., 6.70; La- gonda Av. Cong. Ch., s Wakeman. Cong. Cb. and Soc Wellington. Edward West York. Cong. Ch Youngstown. A Friend, Plymouth Ch Ohio Womans Home Missionary Union, Mrs. G. B. Brown, Treas., for Wo- mans Work: Alliance. Pearl Thomas, 2.25; LouisaLoyd,.8o.... 205 Bellevue. W. M. S a 75 Cleveland. Euclid Av. W. H. M. S., for Student Aid, Ballard N. Inst., Macon, Ga ifi 00 Cleveland. Euclid Av. Y. L. M. S., for Student Aid, Ballard N. inst., Macon, Ga 8 00 Tallmadge. V. L. M. S., 40; Cheerful Workers, ~.. 45 00 INDIANA, $30.00. Richmond. A Friend, for Grand View, Bonn 3 00 6 20 56 48 I 00 17 8o 800 9 49 8 50 100 8 ii 20 38 51 91 500 30 28 5 00 5 00 II 70 20 52 29 00 2 00 73 8o 30 00 ILLINOIS, $862.44. Aurora. New England Ch., ~: First Cb., Igi; Japan, ~ N. L. James, 20. 40 91 Brimfield. Cong. Ch 20 00 Canton. Cong. Ch 22 52 Chicago. First Cong. Cb., 203.42; South Cong. Ch., 56.26; University, 25.80; Leavitt St. Ch., .82; New England Ch., 22.04; Central Park Ch., ~ Warren Av. 22433 86 RECEIPTS. Chicago. A Friend, for W idense S. S Evanston. Cong. Ch Greenville. Cong. Ch Hamilton. Mrs. H. D. Grubb Hinsdale. Cong. Ch Lombard. First Ch Morrison. Miss Ellen S. Brown Oak Park. Cong. Ch., 138.87; Rev. Jos. E.Roy,D.D.,s Payson. H. F. Scarborough Peoria. First Cong. Ch Pittsfield. Cong. Ch Pontiac. Rev. S. Penfield Quincy. First Union Cong. Ch Rockton. Cong. Ch Shabbona. Blanche Langford, for S/u- den! A id, Moorhead, Miss Sheffield. Cong. Ch Shelbyville. B. P. Dearing, Freighi, 2.64, for Mcintosh, Ga Sterling. V. P. 5. C. E.... Wheaton. The College Ch. of Christ. ... Wheaton. First Cong. Ch. and Sab. Sch., 4; also a Christmas Box for Gumber- land Gaji Illinois Womans Home Missionary Union, Mrs. L. A. Field, Treas., for Womans Work: Chicago. Warren Ave. W. Ms 250 Elgin. W. M. S 15 00 Joy Prairie. W. M. S 10 00 La Salle. W. M. S., for Stadent A id, Toogaloo U 386 Miliburn. W. M. S ~ 00 Oak Park. W. M. S 2 50 Poplar Grove. W. M. 5... 3 70 MICHIGAN, $2,233.38. Agricultural College. Prof. R. C. Ked- zie Alamo. Julius Hackley Ann Arbor. First Cong. Ch Battle Creek. Mrs. H. L. Root. Canton. Geo. R. Woodworth Detroit. First Cong. Ch., 30.72; Plymouth Tabernacle, 9.86 Dexter. Dennis Warner Eaton Rapids. V. P. 5. C. E., Cong. Ch. , for S/ode / Aid, chandler ScA.. Gaylord. Rev. P. M. Crips. Milford. William A. Arms, to const. ALBERT ARMS BENNETT L. M Noble. Mrs. Mary B. Bogardus. Olivet. 3 Sab. Sch. Classes, Cong. Ch., for Student A Id, Chandler .Sch. Vermontville. Orlin P. Fay Whittaker. Cong. Ch Womans Home Missionary Union of Michigan, by Mrs. E. F. Grabill, Treas for Womans Work: Allendale. W. H. M. S ... 5 00 Alpena W. H. M. S 25 00 Benton Harbor. W. H. M. S 500 Covert. W. M. S.,for S/a- den! A id, Pleasant Hill 5 25 Grape. W.H.M.S is South Emmett. W. H. M. S., for Studen! Aid, San- tee Indian Sch 5 00 5 00 25 00 35 75 243 87 2 50 63 i6 23 24 5 00 4 00 I 30 6~ 83 I 64 5 00 38 73 4 00 42 ~6 40 00 37 50 50 40 38 5 00 30 00 5 00 5 00 50 ___- 4080 $233 ~8 ESTATE, Ann Arbor, Estate of Dr. C. L. Ford, by E. C. Walker, Executor i,ooo 00 $2,233 38 IOWA, $422.52. Afton. Mrs. M. A. Clark i~ on Atlantic. Bear Grove V. P. 5. C. E., for Student Aid, Beach Inst 3 on Cedar Fulls. Cong. Ch., to coost. MRS. D. N. HURDL.M Cedar Rapids. Mrs. J. C. Brocksmit... . ~ no Chester Center. Cong. Ch. and V. P. 5. C.E 742 Davenport. Edwards Cong. Ch., Box Booksfor Selnia, Ala. Earlville. Cong. Ch 8 20 Grinnell. Cong. Ch., adl 8 ~5 Hampton. Pkg. Material for Sewing Dept. and Pkg. Literature, for Savan- nah, Ga. McGregor. Cong. Ch iio in McGregor. Ladies of Cong. Ch., Bbl. C. and 2 for Freight, for New Orleans, La 2 00 Montour. Cong. Ch, to const. W. W. CUEPHY and WILLIAM CRAm LE GEANO L. Ms 6i 22 Muscatine. First Cong. Ch 21 67 New Hampton. Jr. C. E. Soc., by Mrs. G. L. Hanscome, Supt., Box C., for Savanak, Ga. Osage. W. M. Soc., Box C., Literature, etc. for Savannah, Ga. Postville. Cong. Ch 7 30 Red Oak. Cong. Ch 26 23 Rock Rapids. Cong. Ch., for Indian Sek., Fort Berthold, N. D 67 Rockwell. First Cong. Ch 20 00 Sioux City. Mrs. Penfield 00 Sioux City. Cong. Ch., for Student Aid, Pleasant HillAcad no Iowa Womans Home Missionary Union. Miss Belle L. Bentley, Tress., for Woman s 1/Vork: Clinton. L. M. S 7 25 Danville. L. M. S 2 00 Davenport. Edwards V. P. S. C. E 14 64 Eariville, W. M. S 20 00 Grinnell. W. M. S 2 87 McGregor. W. M. S., to coost. MRS. Q. A. SLOAN L.M 33 20 Magnolia. W. M. S ~ 50 Riceville. W. M. S 4 6o WISCONSIN, $274.94. Belost. First Cong. Ch., adi Berlin. Union Ch Burlington. Cong. Ch Clinton. Cong. Ch., adi Delavan. Sab. Sch., Cong. Ch Janesville. First Cong. Ch., to const. CHASLES W. BILLiNGS and Miss SUSIE JEFFEIES L.Ms Leeds Center. Cong. Ch Menomonie. Cong. Ch Milwaukee. North Side Osseo. Cong. Ch Ravine. Mrs. M. B. Erskine, for Schjl., Pleasant Hill Acad Racine. Herbert Probert Travor. Liberty Ch Two Rivers. V. P. 5. C. E Windsor. Union Cong. Ch Wisconsin Womans Home Missionary Union, Mrs , for Wo man s Work: Arena. W. M. S i gs Elkhorn. W. M. S 25 no Madison. W. M. S 25 on Plattville. W. M. S 90 Whitewater. W. M. S 6 05 74 96 3 00 22 30 3 00 6 25 s 67 23 55 3 6o 3 00 68 no 5 00 3 00 6 38 8 29 48 go RECEIPTS. MINNESOTA, $322.69. Austin. L. M. 5., ~ Bbls. C., for Jones- boro, Tenn. Fort Fairfield. Cong. Ch Litchfield. Mrs. W. Weeks, for Merid- ian Miss Litchfield. Mrs. Chany, for Indian M., Sianding Rock, N. D Minneapolis. Pilgrim Ch New Ulm. Cong Ch Northfield. First Cong. Ch Saint Anthony Park. Cong. Ch Saint Anthony Park. W. A. Larkin,for Sindeni Aid, Lincoln Normal Sck. Saint Paul. Sab. Sch., Plymouth Ch., 3.92; Atlantic Cong. Ch., 2.56 Spring Valley. Bbl. C., for Jonesboro, Tenn. Womans Home Missionary Union of Minnesota, hy Mrs. M. W. Skinner, Treas. for Womans Work: Alexandria in no Belgrade 32 Benson S.S 5 50 Minneapolis Plymouth, 23.97; Como Av., 15; First, 6; Park Av. Prim- ary Dept., for Reindeer, Alaska M.,5 49 97 Morris. Y. P. for Indian Sindeni 3 00 Northfield. Carleton Col- lege, 35.49; W. H. M. U., to coost. MRS. ALICE S. F. KINSEY LM., 30 . 6s 49 Saint Paul. Plymouth, s~ Plymouth C. E. Soc. for Ceniral Ck., New Or- leans, La., 25 ; Atlantic, 5; Bethany, I 46 oo Wadena. Young Ladies, for Sindeni Aid, Allen Normal Sck., Thomas ville, Ga 9 00 KANSAS, $33.42. Laurence. Plymouth Ch Manhattan. Cong. Ch., 2 Boxes, Books and C.,for Selma, Ala. Smith Center. First Cong. Ch MISSOURI, $355.82. Camden, Mrs. Hiram Smith Holden. Mrs. S. E. Hawes,for mdi a M. Kansas City. Y. L. M. S. of Olivet Cong. Ch.,for Blowing Rock, N. C St. Louis. Ladies, for Big Creek GajS, Tenn St. Louis. Y. P. 5. C. E., Pilgrim Cong. Ch., Pkg. Papers,for McIntosh, Ga. Wehster Groves. First Cong. Ch Womans Home Missionary Union of Mo., hy Mrs. K. L. Mills, Treaa., for Woma s Work. St. Louis. W. H. M. S. of Campton Hill Cong. Ch 3100 St. Louis. L. H. M. S., Pilgrim Ch 200 00 St. Louis. Y. P. 5. C. E., Ch. of the Redeemer 5 00 St. Louis. Y. L. M. S., Campton Hill Ch 4 00 5 00 5 00 77 50 8 43 6 48 186 28 31 42 50 00 I 50 5 00 3 50 si 82 240 00 NEBRASKA, $46.69. 4rhorville. Cong. Ch 2 72 Exeter. First Cong. Ch 5 8~ Lincoln. First Cong. Ch., 33.52; Cong. Ch. and C. E., ~ 38 52 87 SOUTH DAKOTA, ~ Custer City. First Cong. Ch Drakola. Cong. Ch Wehster. Cong. Ch COLORADO, $40.00. Boulder. Cong. Ch Womans Home Missionary Union of Col., hy Mrs, Horace Sanderson, Treas.,for Womans Work. W. H. M. U. of Coin 3 00 2 55 4 20 30 00 WASHINGTON, $4.00. Poyallup. Cong. Ch i Tacoma. East Ch 2 50 CALIFORNIA, $93.00. Haywards. John J. Bo~th 25 00 Pomona. A Friend ~n on Redlands. Cong Ch ... 5800 DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, $25.00. Washington. First Cong. Ch., A Friend, How rd U 15 00 Washington. Mrs. A. H. Bradford, Pres. W. H. M. U., N.J. Assn., s; Mr. Hagen, ~, for Indian M., Sianding Rock, N. D in 00 MARYLAND, $44.26. Baltimore. Second Cong. Ch 2 00 Baltimore. Leaden HaP St. Bapt. Ch., 12.C9 ; Friends at a Parlor Meeting, in; First Bapt. Ch.(White), 7.27; First Bapt. Ch. (Col.), 4.95 ; Friends, 4.95 ; Mr. and Mrs. Lee Taylor, 2 ; Kate Taylor, s,for Gloacesier Sch., Ca..oSpahosic, Va. 42 26 KENTUCKY, ~ Campton. Friends, for Morgan County Sck 134 75 Covington. Y. P. 5. C. E., First Pres. Ch., Box Papers,for Nat, Ala. Red Ash. Cong. Ch 3 00 Williamshurg. From Unknown Source, Bbl. Bed Clothing and Papers. DELAWARE, $io.oo. Newark. Prof. W. H. Bishop so 00 VIRGINIA, $i~i.~. Hampton. C. E. Soc., Hampton Inst., for Indian M., Si nding Rock, N. D.. 2 75 RECEIPTS FOR GLOUCESTER SCHOOL, CAPPAHOSIC, VA. Bethel. Puhlic Sch., Misses Lancaster and Gordon, Teach ers 9 50 Cappahosic. Friends sod Collections 97 86 Gloucester. Quarterly S. S. Union, 9.95 ; S. S. Quarterly Union, ~ 57 24 Glos.~cester Co. By Rev. James Smith, ~ Misses Scott and Anderson, 3.75; Rohhins Neck S. S., I 52 70 Great Bridge. A Poiner 1 00 Indian Road. Puhlic School, Miss M. Carter, Teacher 3 00 Locust Grove. Puhlic School Children, Miss A. Bagtop, Teacher 6 ~ Matthews Co. Sons and Daughters of Charity, iso; Zion Bapt. S. S., s ; United Friends, G. 0. of 0. F., i.... 3 50 INCOME, $2,907.50. Avery Fund,for Mendi Al E. A. Brown Schp. Fund, for Talladega C DeForest Fund, for Presidents Chair, Talladega C Fisk University. Then. Fund... General Endowment Fund Graves Schp. Fund, for Ta/la- dega C 88 Middlesex. Calvary Bapt. S. S Perton. Public 5db., 3. A. Lemon, Teacher Rising Valley. Public Sch., Miss B. Gregory, Teacher... Robbins Neck. Public Sch., Miss L. C. Wyatt, Teacher... Smithfield. Educational Soc.. Truheart. I. S. P. Robinson, 1.70; A. S. Billip, s Urbana. Ed. Fitzgerald Williamsburg. By R. Jackson. 4 40 6 ~9 25 00 2 70 3 30 TENNESSEE, $24.50. Nashville. Rev. F. A. Chase Nashville. Jackson St. Ch NORTH CAROLINA, ~ Blowing Rock. Mrs. H. Bailey, for Freight Harrisburg. Moorhead Ch High Point. Cong. Ch Oaks, A Friend, ~o; Cong. Ch., 2.... Raleigh. W. H. M. U., 2 Comfortables, for Kings Mountain, N C. Saluda. A Friend Wilmington. Cong. Ch., by Rev. F. W. Sims GEORGIA, $16.25. McIntosh. Emma 3. Rosecrans, s; Prof. Fred. W. Foster, ~, for Student Aid, McIntosh McIntosh. Miss H. E. Leach, ~ Cong. Ch., ~ Bbl. C. from Unknown Source. Savannah. Box Sheets, Pillow Cases, etc., from (Jukoown Source. Thomasville. Box Bed Linen,for Beau- fort, N. C. Woodville. Pilgrim Ch., .84; Rev. 3. Loyd, .i6; Rev. 3. H. H. Sengatacke, .25 FLORIDA, $3.00. Macdenny. Rev. A. A. Stevens ALABAMA, $11.20. Lapine. Cong. Ch. Lincoln. Cong. Ch Montgomery. By Miss H. A. De Jarnette, for Gloucester Sch., iai3i5ahosic, Va... Montgomery. Cong. Ch Coil. Thanksgiving Service at Mission near Lincoln, Ala., by Rev. M. L. Baldwin TEXAS, $s~.oo. Austin. Tradesmen of Austin,for Black- smith Shot, Tougaloo U.. CANADA, $~.oo. Montreal. Chas. Alexander 242 25 25 75 ilo 00 22 50 125 00 RECEIPTS. i88 72 4 50 i 8o 2 50 32 00 2 15 400 8 00 700 I 25 3 00 50 30 8 40 15 00 Hammond Fund,for Straight U. Hastings Schp. Fund,for Atlan- t U Howard Then. Endowment Fund,for Howard U Le Moyne Fund, for Memj5his, Teon Lincoln j: i~i; for Ta/la- dega C Scholarship Fund, for Straight U Tuthill King Fund,for Berea C. Tulbill King Fund,for Atlanta U Seth Wadhams Then. Fund,for Talladeg C 3. and L. H. Wood Schp. Fund, for Talladega C Yale Library Fund, for Talla- dega C ~6 25 6 25 871 88 96 25 22 50 51 25 37 50 222 50 22 50 25 00 9 00 1,907 50 TUITION, $3,767.80. Cappahosic, Va. Tuition s~ 00 Evarts, Ky. Tuition 27 30 Lexington, Ky. Tuition 68 25 Williamsburg, Ky. Tuition 53 20 Bcaufort, N. C. Tuition 21 05 Blowing Rock, N. C. Tuition ii Hillaboro, N. C. Tuition 40 25 Kings Mountain, N. C. Tuition 22 00 Saluda, N. C. Tuition 22 25 Tiny, N. C. Tuition Whittier, N. C. Tuition 7 12 Wilmington, N. C. Tuition 212 00 Charleston, S. C. Tuition 328 38 Greenwood, S. C. Tuition 59 21 Grand View, Tenn. Tuition i~ 00 Jonesboro, Tenn. Tuition io6 ~ Knoxville, Tenn. Tuition 39 25 Nashville, Tenn. Tuition 563 o6 Pleasant Hill, Tenn. Tuition 96 87 Albany, Ga. Tuition 241 00 Atlanta, Ga. Storra Sch., Tui- tion 173 77 McIntosh, Ga. Tuition 100 98 Savannah, Ga. Tuition 194 46 Thomasville, Ga. Tuition ~8 88 Woodville, Ga. Tuition Athens, Ala. Tuition 44 8o Florence, Ala. Tuition 3 20 Marion, Ala. Tuition 50 47 Nat, Ala. Tuition 64 00 Selma, Ala. Tuition 125 6o Talladega, Ala. Tuition 29 8o Orange Park, Fla. Tuition 90 00 New Orleans, La. Tuition 482 5 Meridian, Miss. Tuition 112 00 Moorhead, Miss. Tuition ii 40 Austin, Tex. Tuition 82 25 -3,767 8o Total for December $30,020 25 SUMMARY. Donations $43,626 31 Estates 13,115 66 $56,731 97 Income 3,067 50 Tuition 8,284 84 Total from Oct. to Dec. ~r $68,084 31 FOR THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY. Subscriptions for December $69 40 Previously ekoowledged 39 68 Total $109 oS H. W. HUBBARD, Treas., Bible House, N. Y. 5 00 Donations $18,85o 67 Estates 5,494 28 $24,344 95

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The American missionary. / Volume 49, Issue 3 Congregational work Pilgrim missionary Congregationalist and herald of gospel liberty American Missionary Association. New York Mar 1895 0049 003
The American missionary. / Volume 49, Issue 3, miscellaneous front pages 88A-88B

Tisis NUMBERFIELD NOTES, . . ARE THEY GRATEFUL?.... 91 PIONEER MISSIONARY IN AvRIcA (Illus trated), 92 PIONEER MISSIONARY AMONG INL)IANS (Illustrated), A SOUTHERN JOURNEY, NY SEC. BEARD, 94 VALUE OF PURE ANT) INTELLIGENT CHURCHES, 97 TILLOTSON, AUSTiN, TEXAS (illustrated), 98 DEATH OF DR. TAYLOR 10~ DEATH OF REV. C. C. PAINTERONE MISSrONARY DAY 103 SOUTHERN FIELD NOTES, . . . 105 A SCHOOLBOYS COMPOSITION, . . 107 WOMANS STATE ORGANIZATIONS 108 RECEIPTS 110 NEW YORK PUBLISHED BY THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION, Bible House, Ninth St. and Fourth Ave., New York. Price, 50 Cents a Year in advance. Entered at the Post Office at New York, N. Y., as second-class matter. MARCH, 1895 VOL. XLIX No.3 CONTENTS PRESIDENT, MERRILL E. GATES, LL.D.. MASS. Vice-Presidents. Rev. F. A. Nor~vE, D.D., IlY. REV. HENRY HOPKINS, D.D., Mo. Rev. ALEX. MCKENZIE, D.D., Mass. REV. HENRY A. STIMSON, D.D., N. Y. REV. WASHINGTON GLADDEN. D.D.. Ohio. Corresjonding Secretaries. Rev. M. E. STRIEBY, D.D., Bible Jiouse, ~N. Y. Rev. A. F. BEARD, D.D., Bible House, N. Y. Rev. F. P. WOODBURY, D.D., Bible House, N. 1 Assistant Corresponding Secretary. Rev. C. J. RYDER, D.D., Bible House, N. Y. Recording Secretary. Rev. M. E. STRIEBY, D.D., Bible House, N. Y. Treasurer. HENRY W. HUBBARD, Esq., Bible House, N. Y. Auditors. PETER MCCARTER. JAMES MITCHELL. Executive Committee. CHARLES L. MEAD, Chairman. CHARLES A. HULL, Secretary. For Three Years. For Two Years. For O~se Year. WILLIAM HAYES WARD, ChARLES A. HULL, SAMUEL HOLMES, JAMEs.W. COOPER, ADDISON P. FOSTER, SAMUEL S. MARPLES, LUCIEN C. WARNER, ALBERT J. LYMAN, CHARLES L. MEAD, JOSEPH H. TWICHELL, NEHEMIAH BOYNTON, WILLIAM H. STRONG, CHARLES P. PEIRCE. A. J. F. BERRENDS. ELIJAH HORR. District Secretaries. Rev. GRO. H. GUTTERSON, 21 ConglHouse, Boston, Mass. Rev. Jos. E. ROY, D.D., 151 Washington Street, C~hicago, Ill. Rev. W. E. C. WRIGHT, D.D., Congl Rooms, Y.M.C.A. Building, Ckveland, Ohio. Secretary of Womans Bureau. Miss D. E. EMERSON, Bible House, N. Y. COMMUNICATIONS Relating to the work of the Association may be addressed to the Corresponding Secretaries; letters for THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY, to the Editor, at the New York Office; letters relating to the finances, to the Treasurer; letters relating to womans work, to the Secretary of the Womans Bureau. DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS In drafts, checks, registered letters, or post-office orders, may be sent to H. W. Hubbard, Treasurer, Bible House, New York, or, when more convenient, to either of the Branch Offices, 21 Congregational House, Boston, Mass., i~i Washington Street, Chicago, Ill., or Congregational Rooms, Y. M. C. A. Building, Cleveland, Ohio. A payment of thirty dollars constitutes a Life Member. NOTICE TO SUBScRIBERS. ----The date on the address label indicates the time to which the subscription is paid. Changes are made in date on label to the ioth of each month. If payment of subscription be made afterward the change on the label will appear a month later. Please send early notice of change in post-office address, giving the former address and the new address, in order that our periodi- cals and occasional papers may be correctly mailed. FORM OF A BEQUEST. I GIVE AND BEQUEATh the sum of dollars to the American Mission- ary Association, incorporated by act of the Legislature of the State of New York. The will should be attested by three witnesses.

This Number 89

THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY VOL. XLIX. MARCH, 1895. No. 3. In this number of THE MISSIONARY we present our readers with an interesting variety of information, embracing sketches of per- sonal observation by secretaries of the Association, letters from field workers, pictures of pioneers in two important fields, and pictures of one of our higher institutions. It is with sorrow that we are compelled to notice the death of our late honored and beloved President, Dr. Will- iam M. Taylor, and that of Professor Painter, so successful and so faithful in his work among the Indians. FIELD NOTES. BY SECRETARY RYDER. MOUNTAIN WORK.A very interesting spiritual awakening seems to prevail in many points of our mountain field. From a pastor of one of these churches among our American Highlanders we have received the following: I have held meetings a couple of weeks, first at the church, and then at the academy. A large number have been reached. The open meetings disclosed the new life to all. We held daily meetings of prayer in the evening, and a large percentage of the students attended. All took part. The Y. P. S. C. E. has increased fourfold, and all the time is occupied in their meetings, and often two or three arise to speak at once. Six names were presented for active membership, and two for associate. The work is not confined to this single church and academy. I went recently to another village and half a dozen committed themselves for Christ. The Association needs an evangelist to visit these fields. Audiences fill the churches, most of them people who are out of Christ. All that prevents meetng this crying want of these mountain people in supplying to them more intelligent and consecrated ministers Qf the GQspel is the lack of money consecrated and given tQ

Secretary Ryder Ryder, Secretary Field Notes 89-91

THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY VOL. XLIX. MARCH, 1895. No. 3. In this number of THE MISSIONARY we present our readers with an interesting variety of information, embracing sketches of per- sonal observation by secretaries of the Association, letters from field workers, pictures of pioneers in two important fields, and pictures of one of our higher institutions. It is with sorrow that we are compelled to notice the death of our late honored and beloved President, Dr. Will- iam M. Taylor, and that of Professor Painter, so successful and so faithful in his work among the Indians. FIELD NOTES. BY SECRETARY RYDER. MOUNTAIN WORK.A very interesting spiritual awakening seems to prevail in many points of our mountain field. From a pastor of one of these churches among our American Highlanders we have received the following: I have held meetings a couple of weeks, first at the church, and then at the academy. A large number have been reached. The open meetings disclosed the new life to all. We held daily meetings of prayer in the evening, and a large percentage of the students attended. All took part. The Y. P. S. C. E. has increased fourfold, and all the time is occupied in their meetings, and often two or three arise to speak at once. Six names were presented for active membership, and two for associate. The work is not confined to this single church and academy. I went recently to another village and half a dozen committed themselves for Christ. The Association needs an evangelist to visit these fields. Audiences fill the churches, most of them people who are out of Christ. All that prevents meetng this crying want of these mountain people in supplying to them more intelligent and consecrated ministers Qf the GQspel is the lack of money consecrated and given tQ FIELD NOTES. 90 this great service. This mountain field is now ripe to the harvest. Will not the churches multiply their gifts so that we can send into this har- vest field more devoted men who are ready to go if they can do their work and simply be supported? The hard times and the difficulty of the mountain people to get clothing is illustrated in the following, which comes to us in a recent missionary letter from this mountain field: There would have been much more suffering had it not been for the clothing which has ~gone out from this school. When seven chickens bring only thirty-five cents the poor mountain people do not have much chance. A pastor of the Association among our American Highlanders writes as follows: This has been a most blessed and glorious season of re~ freshing. In the bounds of my work this fall and winter I have held and assisted in meetings which have in all resulted in something more than ioo hopeful conversions. My work now is especially to care for and look after the welfare of these precious souls lately brought ~o Christ and to give as much time as possible to my studies. INDIAN WORK. Our friends will remember the appeal made by Rev. James F. Cross, of Rosebud Agency, S. D., at our annual meeting at Elgin, Ill., for a chapel to be built at Cedar Butte, S. D. President Gates, moved by the appeal, took it up so enthusiastically that nearly $400 came from him and other generous givers. The Indians drew the logs and have just erected the chapel under the direction of Superin- tendent Cross. A note just received from the field contains the follow- ing, which abundantly proves the wisdom of opening this new station at Cedar Butte and helping the Indians in the erection of their church: Last week I was up to Cedar Butte church. It was the first time since it was built that I have been there for service. I received two young men into the church. It was a warm day and the thermometer has not been ten degrees away from zero, except to go thirteen below, since. This chapel at Cedar Butte is the center of a new work, and this mes- sage brings the hopefulness of the field. We received five grown persons to our church fellowship on Sunday, and two children were baptized. Three Christian Indian families were constituted by Christian marriage at the same time. Praise God! So writes Supt. C. h Wall, of Fort Berthold Indian Mission, N. D. GI?A TITUDE. 9 ARE THEY GRATEFUL? REV. CHAS. F. SARGENT, THOMASVILLE, GA. Very often we are asked if the people among whom we labor are grate- ful for the work that is done for and among themwhether there is self- denial on their part in helping themselves in church and school work. It is very important that we should have some expression on their part in regard to this. There are many incidents in which grateful acknowledgment is made. A few incidents will best answer the above question. A flttle more than a mile from here there lives in an almost uninhabit- able cabin an old lady who is called Aunt Eliza. I saw her first one cold day last winter, when I called and found her in bed sick with pneu- monia. We ministered unto her as we best could, providing medicine, food and clothing. From a missionary barrel garments were obtained which helped to make her body comfortable. She depended on the kindness of a neigh- bor to gather sticks for her and draw water. At times there was only enough fire in the fire-place to give a faint glimmer, not enough to make the room cheerful. Aunt Eliza is old and crippled, and it was only with much care and patient waiting that in the goodness of God she was restored to health. Some time passed after her recovery before I saw her. She came to our house on a hot summer day to bring an offering of gratitude for Gods mercy in giving her back health and strength. She brought to us in a corner of her handkerchief fifty-five cents which she had saved from little gifts from children and grand- children nearly as poor as herself. She had at this time only meal enough in her house to make one pone of bread. Gratefully she urged upon us her self-denying gift of thanksgiving. Of course we accepted it, only to return it to her in the name of the Master, who is the Great Gilt Giver. Later in the season our sister remembered us again. She had saved for us two chickens, but a con/uror came along and said he would tell her fortune for them. He succeeded in beating her out of her offering for the Lord, and in return she received nothing. She came and told us all about it. This good woman did not rest until she brought us one at a time the chickens that she had promised. When the Association met with us a few days ago she brought, as her part to help, a few eggs. There are other incidents in her life which are interesting, but we cannot tell them all now. She certainly is grateful and gives the widows mite in giving all that she has. She has been to our church and been blessed in meeting God in the sanctuary. The first Sunday that she came she bowed and courtesied to the people as she cr~me in, much to their amusement.

Rev. Chas. F. Sargent Sargent, Chas. F., Rev. Are They Grateful? 91-92

GI?A TITUDE. 9 ARE THEY GRATEFUL? REV. CHAS. F. SARGENT, THOMASVILLE, GA. Very often we are asked if the people among whom we labor are grate- ful for the work that is done for and among themwhether there is self- denial on their part in helping themselves in church and school work. It is very important that we should have some expression on their part in regard to this. There are many incidents in which grateful acknowledgment is made. A few incidents will best answer the above question. A flttle more than a mile from here there lives in an almost uninhabit- able cabin an old lady who is called Aunt Eliza. I saw her first one cold day last winter, when I called and found her in bed sick with pneu- monia. We ministered unto her as we best could, providing medicine, food and clothing. From a missionary barrel garments were obtained which helped to make her body comfortable. She depended on the kindness of a neigh- bor to gather sticks for her and draw water. At times there was only enough fire in the fire-place to give a faint glimmer, not enough to make the room cheerful. Aunt Eliza is old and crippled, and it was only with much care and patient waiting that in the goodness of God she was restored to health. Some time passed after her recovery before I saw her. She came to our house on a hot summer day to bring an offering of gratitude for Gods mercy in giving her back health and strength. She brought to us in a corner of her handkerchief fifty-five cents which she had saved from little gifts from children and grand- children nearly as poor as herself. She had at this time only meal enough in her house to make one pone of bread. Gratefully she urged upon us her self-denying gift of thanksgiving. Of course we accepted it, only to return it to her in the name of the Master, who is the Great Gilt Giver. Later in the season our sister remembered us again. She had saved for us two chickens, but a con/uror came along and said he would tell her fortune for them. He succeeded in beating her out of her offering for the Lord, and in return she received nothing. She came and told us all about it. This good woman did not rest until she brought us one at a time the chickens that she had promised. When the Association met with us a few days ago she brought, as her part to help, a few eggs. There are other incidents in her life which are interesting, but we cannot tell them all now. She certainly is grateful and gives the widows mite in giving all that she has. She has been to our church and been blessed in meeting God in the sanctuary. The first Sunday that she came she bowed and courtesied to the people as she cr~me in, much to their amusement. 92 REV. GEORGE THOMPSON. A PIONEER MISSIONARY IN AFRICA. Rev. George Thompson was early enlisted as a missionary in the Mendi Mission on the west coast of Africa. He had been a most ardent friend of the slave, active in aiding their escape from the house of bondage, and as a consequence had spent five years in the Mis- souri State Prison. He went to Africa in 1848 under the commis- sion of the American Missionary Association, and proved himself to be remarkably useful. One of his most far-reaching efforts was in the work as a peacemaker. A fierce and unrelenting war had been raging among the tribes around the mission, and this was brought to a close through the wise and persistent efforts of Mr. Thompson. He was chosen umpire for the contending chiefs, and after repeated and wearying excursions, and ten interviews or councils with both parties, he at length succeeded. Then came the joy which peace brings. Warriors met and fell on each others necks; chiefs, who were REV. GEORGE THOMPSON. for years enemies now shook hands and embraced each other with the affection of long-separated friends; sisters,wives and daughters, long captives, fell into each others arms, weeping for joy. A chiefs daughter was seen running to embrace her fathers feet, a wife hastened to welcome her husband and children, and entire towns were filled with cries of gladness. The beatitude, Blessed are the peacemakers, belongs to Mr. Thompson. Ill health at length compelled Mr. Thompson to relinquish the work in Africa, and in 1856 he returned to Oberlin, Ohio, where he spent five years in publishing his book on Africa, entitled, Palm Land, and in educating two boys whom he brought with him from Africa. In i86ihe removed with his family to northwestern Michigan, where he labored a~ a home missionary for eighteen years, being the pastor for fifteen years of a church which he established. He then returned to Oberlin, where he remained until his death in 1893. In all these years Mr. Thompson was a laboriow and usef.ul man, actively en, aged in awakening the

A Pioneer Missionary in Africa 92-93

92 REV. GEORGE THOMPSON. A PIONEER MISSIONARY IN AFRICA. Rev. George Thompson was early enlisted as a missionary in the Mendi Mission on the west coast of Africa. He had been a most ardent friend of the slave, active in aiding their escape from the house of bondage, and as a consequence had spent five years in the Mis- souri State Prison. He went to Africa in 1848 under the commis- sion of the American Missionary Association, and proved himself to be remarkably useful. One of his most far-reaching efforts was in the work as a peacemaker. A fierce and unrelenting war had been raging among the tribes around the mission, and this was brought to a close through the wise and persistent efforts of Mr. Thompson. He was chosen umpire for the contending chiefs, and after repeated and wearying excursions, and ten interviews or councils with both parties, he at length succeeded. Then came the joy which peace brings. Warriors met and fell on each others necks; chiefs, who were REV. GEORGE THOMPSON. for years enemies now shook hands and embraced each other with the affection of long-separated friends; sisters,wives and daughters, long captives, fell into each others arms, weeping for joy. A chiefs daughter was seen running to embrace her fathers feet, a wife hastened to welcome her husband and children, and entire towns were filled with cries of gladness. The beatitude, Blessed are the peacemakers, belongs to Mr. Thompson. Ill health at length compelled Mr. Thompson to relinquish the work in Africa, and in 1856 he returned to Oberlin, Ohio, where he spent five years in publishing his book on Africa, entitled, Palm Land, and in educating two boys whom he brought with him from Africa. In i86ihe removed with his family to northwestern Michigan, where he labored a~ a home missionary for eighteen years, being the pastor for fifteen years of a church which he established. He then returned to Oberlin, where he remained until his death in 1893. In all these years Mr. Thompson was a laboriow and usef.ul man, actively en, aged in awakening the PIONEER MISSIONARY AMONG INDIAM, 93 churches to an interest in Africa, in writing his books and educating his children. In his later years, while living in Oberlin, he was abundant in labors in connection with Sunday-schools and feeble churches in Ohio and other States. A PIONEER MISSIONARY AMONG THE INDIANS. In 1843 a number of young men from Oberlin entered upon a mission among the Ojibway Indians in the northern part of what is now Minne- sota, under the auspices of the Western Evangelical Missionary Society, which was soon afterward transferred to the American Missionary Association. Of the inaccessibility of this field, a competent authority has said: There is probably no missionary field to-day on the face of the earth more difficult to r@ach than this was at that time. Among this group of mission- aries was Rev. S. G. Wright. As a part of his experience it is said that after a short visit at home, Mr. Wright returned to the mis- sion taking his young wife with himtheir wedding tour. It was a journey of over a month made in a canoe. They were both compelled to walk at intervals twenty-two miles in the swamps along the side of the stream until they reached Mr. Barnards station. These walks were varied by sickness; Mr. Wright some- times had chills every day, but at Mr. Barnards station he re- covered. There remained yet twenty miles of their journey, and this was undertaken on foot, but soon a storm brought five inches of snow. Mr. Wright says: REV. S. G. WRIGHT. My wife was very lame, and what woman would not be after walking twenty long miles through mire and water, over high hills and through gullies, in snow from four to five inches deep? The change wrought by these missionaries can be indicated in a sen- tence: When they went there the Indians cultivated almost no land and their only domestic animals were dogs. They maintained a precarious

A Pioneer Missionary Among the Indians 93-94

PIONEER MISSIONARY AMONG INDIAM, 93 churches to an interest in Africa, in writing his books and educating his children. In his later years, while living in Oberlin, he was abundant in labors in connection with Sunday-schools and feeble churches in Ohio and other States. A PIONEER MISSIONARY AMONG THE INDIANS. In 1843 a number of young men from Oberlin entered upon a mission among the Ojibway Indians in the northern part of what is now Minne- sota, under the auspices of the Western Evangelical Missionary Society, which was soon afterward transferred to the American Missionary Association. Of the inaccessibility of this field, a competent authority has said: There is probably no missionary field to-day on the face of the earth more difficult to r@ach than this was at that time. Among this group of mission- aries was Rev. S. G. Wright. As a part of his experience it is said that after a short visit at home, Mr. Wright returned to the mis- sion taking his young wife with himtheir wedding tour. It was a journey of over a month made in a canoe. They were both compelled to walk at intervals twenty-two miles in the swamps along the side of the stream until they reached Mr. Barnards station. These walks were varied by sickness; Mr. Wright some- times had chills every day, but at Mr. Barnards station he re- covered. There remained yet twenty miles of their journey, and this was undertaken on foot, but soon a storm brought five inches of snow. Mr. Wright says: REV. S. G. WRIGHT. My wife was very lame, and what woman would not be after walking twenty long miles through mire and water, over high hills and through gullies, in snow from four to five inches deep? The change wrought by these missionaries can be indicated in a sen- tence: When they went there the Indians cultivated almost no land and their only domestic animals were dogs. They maintained a precarious 94 A SOUTHERN 7OURNEY. existence by hunting and fishing, and the gathering of wild rice, with starvation as no uncommon experience. In a few years these Indians raised their own supplies of corn and potatoes, with some to sell to procure other necessaries; they began to build houses for themselves; had the benefit of a saw mill and a grist mill, with the blessings of a church and boarding school. The Association withdrew from the mission in 1859, but Mr. Wright returned under other auspices, and spent several years in effective and useful work. He still lives and is active in Christian labors as a mem- ber of the church in Oberlin. A SOUTHERN JOURNEY. 13Y SECRETARY A. F. I3EARD. a It included every Southern State in extent from Virginia to Texas, and from Texas to Florida. It was a study of schools, their methods and attainments; it was the acquaintance of new teachers and their work, the greeting of those who have become old friends, the look into the eyes of more colored youth in schools than usually falls to one per- son. It was a comparative study of classes of all grades in schools of the same grade, and of schools in different States and environments. It was an.examination of industries in agriculture, industries in mechanics, of schools, normal and collegiate. It was an inspection of properties; an inquiry as to the prices of paints and brick and lime anti wall papers. It was a visit to churches, a handshake with pastors and deacons, a gathering of congregations to make their wants and wishes known to the Association. One soon learns that the correct use of the definite article to designate the A. M. A. is not confined to those who have studied grammar. There is only one Association for these people. They never call it American nor even ~Missionary. The is all sufficient, and it does one good to hear his society thus alphabetically abbreviated, as it does to meet these warm-hearted brethren of the col- ored churches which have been nourished with life by The Associa- tion. If anyone is suffering from iciness in the cardiac region, there is no better place for him to get the cockles of his heart well warmed up than in some of the colored congregations churches which I visited. I said some. Alas! there is a difference in churchesin the South: I find the schools full of interest, and that in the higher institutions the girls and young women are side by side in nearly equal numbers with lads and young men in climbing up the steep hills of education. It is, indeed, climbing. It takes more time, more patience and more resolution than most white students with happier conditions can realize. The characteristics of the student are changing somewhat from the

A. F. Beard, Secretary Beard, A. F., Secretary A Southern Journey 94-97

94 A SOUTHERN 7OURNEY. existence by hunting and fishing, and the gathering of wild rice, with starvation as no uncommon experience. In a few years these Indians raised their own supplies of corn and potatoes, with some to sell to procure other necessaries; they began to build houses for themselves; had the benefit of a saw mill and a grist mill, with the blessings of a church and boarding school. The Association withdrew from the mission in 1859, but Mr. Wright returned under other auspices, and spent several years in effective and useful work. He still lives and is active in Christian labors as a mem- ber of the church in Oberlin. A SOUTHERN JOURNEY. 13Y SECRETARY A. F. I3EARD. a It included every Southern State in extent from Virginia to Texas, and from Texas to Florida. It was a study of schools, their methods and attainments; it was the acquaintance of new teachers and their work, the greeting of those who have become old friends, the look into the eyes of more colored youth in schools than usually falls to one per- son. It was a comparative study of classes of all grades in schools of the same grade, and of schools in different States and environments. It was an.examination of industries in agriculture, industries in mechanics, of schools, normal and collegiate. It was an inspection of properties; an inquiry as to the prices of paints and brick and lime anti wall papers. It was a visit to churches, a handshake with pastors and deacons, a gathering of congregations to make their wants and wishes known to the Association. One soon learns that the correct use of the definite article to designate the A. M. A. is not confined to those who have studied grammar. There is only one Association for these people. They never call it American nor even ~Missionary. The is all sufficient, and it does one good to hear his society thus alphabetically abbreviated, as it does to meet these warm-hearted brethren of the col- ored churches which have been nourished with life by The Associa- tion. If anyone is suffering from iciness in the cardiac region, there is no better place for him to get the cockles of his heart well warmed up than in some of the colored congregations churches which I visited. I said some. Alas! there is a difference in churchesin the South: I find the schools full of interest, and that in the higher institutions the girls and young women are side by side in nearly equal numbers with lads and young men in climbing up the steep hills of education. It is, indeed, climbing. It takes more time, more patience and more resolution than most white students with happier conditions can realize. The characteristics of the student are changing somewhat from the BY SECRETARY A. F. BEARD. 95 former days. Pupils are pushing into the more advanced grades earlier in years. They have not the memories of slavery as had the genera- tions before them only the traditions of it, and certain of its influences for influences do not die when institutions pass away. There is not, for example, much old-fashioned Puritanism stalking about in New York in these days, but considerable of Puritan influence is alive and is just now contributing to the hopefulness of the times and the interests of municipal reform and even of the State government. Influences con- tinue, and it will take time for those of slavery or the effect on both races to pass away. One may not particularize among so many schools and churches as were in the path of my visitation, and one must generalize if he will keep within limits. For ten years now it has been my privilege to study the South as a personal observer, not only in schools and churches and not only on the regular routes of travel, but in the by- paths of rural life and in talks with all classes and conditions of men of every shade of color. I may, therefore, be permitted to generalize. First, it is often said that those who live among evils best understand them and know how to meet them. This is a fallacy. The mission- aries in Chiha knew better what was for the good of China than did the Emperor himself. There are people in the United States, also, who could give some good points to the new Emperor of Russia, and if he would take them and use them it would be for the advantage of that country. It is true that impressions are not facts, and one cannot run over a fashionable route of travel holding converse with some hospitable Southern host and return with much more than impressions. Such are likely to speak with more confidence than knowledge, but, on the other hand, one who confines himself to a single locality in the South and to the local facts is more likely to have his views lean to inclination than to truth. Ones opinion ought to be estimated by his information. I have known an otherwise intelligent citizen of New Orleans to be ignorant of the existence of Straight University with its 500 students and its noble accomplishment. A citizen of New York in this case could give the citizen of New Orleans some information about the South. Secondly, the negroes are gaining. Never were the schools better in their entire range in different States, the studies more exacting, the purpose on the part of students for mastery in their work more resolute. Never was there manifested a more self-reliant spirit. The people are having a hard time just now; many are poorer than ever before, but the negroes are gaining, inch by inch. There are millions in schools and unreached millions yet who could not read a word in the New Testa- ment if they had one; but the gain is seen in many ways; in schools, in churches, in homes, and in the improved quality and character of the 96 A SOUTHERN 7OURNEY. newspapers edited by colored men, as also in their increased numbers. The schools under the direction and superintendence of colored teach- ers are gaining in standing and worthiness. Thirdly, the white South is gaining. Not very rapidly, but gaining. The lawless part of the Southand there is a lawless partis as law- less as ever. The lower and more violent elements, however, are but a small part of the Southern people. Still they know that the general public opinion is not positive enough to condemn them in any question between the negroes and the whites; hence they are not afraid to do what they will with the negro. The great body of the Southern people are law-abiding, with the single exception that they do not propose to respect the Fifteenth Amendment. They are committed against this. They deprecate lawlessness. They are personally kind to the negroes. They are busy in the ordinary duties of life, but the lawless know that these good people will never disturb them in their injustices to the negro. Then, there is a relatively small ele- ment of the people who are prophets of a better day. They them- selves often feel the slavery of a public opinion which puts odium upon them when they are too friendly in behalf of the oppressed colored man. They cannot oppose many things which they feel to be wrong without losing their influence. These seers of the future are in hearty sympathy with our work and give it such personal encourage- ment as they may under the tyrannical conditions of a public opinion not friendly to equal rights on the part of the negro. There is a great gain, also, in Southern public opinion as to the ca- pacity of the colored man and his possible future. This gain is seen in the better provisions for the colored public schools, in towns and cities. The schools of the A. M. A. are both object lessons and incentives for the education of the white as well as the colored in the public schools. The South is exceedingly sensitive as to the opinion of the North. A trifle of published criticism, for example, goes through the Southern papers with rebuttals enough to break down a national constitution. An imperfect and incorrect report of an interview, which lived just long enough to be printed, has been lately passionately confuted in cer- tain Southern newspapers with a profusion of epithets which were out of all proportion to the harmless nonsense committed to the press by an untrained reportera new illustration of the extreme sensitiveness of the SOuth to Northern opinion. Northern sentiment is often ridiculed, and frequently sends not a few Southern newspapers into spasms, but it is heeded. Let it be kindly and true, and pressed fraternally and constantly In His Name who came To take a way transgressions And set the captive free. PURE CHURCHES. 97 THE VALUE OF PURE AND INTELLIGENT CHURCHES. The extract given below has the true ring. It is from one of the pas- tors of the American Missionary Association educated at Tougaloo and Howard Theological Seminary. If sometimes our church work seems small and discouraging there are many things to be remembered. Many times we are told by the pastors of our churches we could have larger churches and more of them if we would accept the standards of those about us. Moreover, some little church with fifty members may be doing more for the cause of Christ than some big church of ten times the number. But, read the extract: In the battle of Millikens Bend, a color bearer was seen far in ad- vance of his company. The captain shouted to him, Bring those colors back to the army! The reply was sent back, Bring the army up to the colors. Just so, in the Carolinas, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee, and the South generally, our church is lifting up the standard, and although men are constantly trying to get the standard bearer to fall back to the army of biased, narrow humanity, the church ever shouts back the reply of the immortal color bearer, Bring the army up to the colors. Every man and woman going out from our schools is imbued with the thought that he or she is to hold up the standard of Godnot man for the people. Every church, school or mission fostered by the A. M. A. is holding up the highest ideals of all life. And while our work does not grow in numbers as rapidly as we could wish, we are broad- casting the good seeds of the Kingdom over all the land, and here and there they are springing into life, bringing forth fruitsome thirty, some sixty, and some an hundred fold; so we go on grinding out the grist ever and anon holding one for toll. I am not ignorant of what other churches are doing, and some are doing nobly, but ours is the great work. It has been my observation, that wherever an enterpris- ing work is being carried on in church or school, the leading force is generally the product of Congregational effort, directly or indirectly. So take away our work, then it would be like blotting out the sun, moon and most of the stars from the sky. A COLORED MAN WINSCharles W. Wood, of Chicago, a colored contestant for oratorical honors, has won the first prize in Beloit College, Wis. A few years ago he was a newsboy upon the street, but he made up his mind to have an education. With the aid of a generous patron he has nearly completed his college course and justified the high hopes of his many friends.

The Value of Pure and Intelligent Churches 97-98

PURE CHURCHES. 97 THE VALUE OF PURE AND INTELLIGENT CHURCHES. The extract given below has the true ring. It is from one of the pas- tors of the American Missionary Association educated at Tougaloo and Howard Theological Seminary. If sometimes our church work seems small and discouraging there are many things to be remembered. Many times we are told by the pastors of our churches we could have larger churches and more of them if we would accept the standards of those about us. Moreover, some little church with fifty members may be doing more for the cause of Christ than some big church of ten times the number. But, read the extract: In the battle of Millikens Bend, a color bearer was seen far in ad- vance of his company. The captain shouted to him, Bring those colors back to the army! The reply was sent back, Bring the army up to the colors. Just so, in the Carolinas, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee, and the South generally, our church is lifting up the standard, and although men are constantly trying to get the standard bearer to fall back to the army of biased, narrow humanity, the church ever shouts back the reply of the immortal color bearer, Bring the army up to the colors. Every man and woman going out from our schools is imbued with the thought that he or she is to hold up the standard of Godnot man for the people. Every church, school or mission fostered by the A. M. A. is holding up the highest ideals of all life. And while our work does not grow in numbers as rapidly as we could wish, we are broad- casting the good seeds of the Kingdom over all the land, and here and there they are springing into life, bringing forth fruitsome thirty, some sixty, and some an hundred fold; so we go on grinding out the grist ever and anon holding one for toll. I am not ignorant of what other churches are doing, and some are doing nobly, but ours is the great work. It has been my observation, that wherever an enterpris- ing work is being carried on in church or school, the leading force is generally the product of Congregational effort, directly or indirectly. So take away our work, then it would be like blotting out the sun, moon and most of the stars from the sky. A COLORED MAN WINSCharles W. Wood, of Chicago, a colored contestant for oratorical honors, has won the first prize in Beloit College, Wis. A few years ago he was a newsboy upon the street, but he made up his mind to have an education. With the aid of a generous patron he has nearly completed his college course and justified the high hopes of his many friends. 98 TILL OTSON INSTITUTE, TILLOTSON, AUSTIN, TEXAS. BY SECRETARY A. F. BEARD. In the year 1875 the Rev. George J Tillotson, of Connecticut, visited various points of the South with a view to the establishment of a school. He was accompanied by a secretary of the Association. After a careful survey they selected Austin, Texas, as the most promis- ing point. About twenty-five acres of partially wooded land just beyond the eastern boundary of the city of Austin were purchased for $5,000, the gift of Mr. Tillotson. In the following year a charter was obtained and the work of raising money for the building was entered upon. The funds were finally secured, and in i879 the foundations were laid, and the building, 104 feet in length and 42 in depth, constructed of white pressed brick with dress stone trimmings, rose to its five stories in height. On the 17th of January, i88i, the school opened. Two of the five floors were then open spaces. Eleven pupils only were enrolled at the beginning, but the term closed in June with 107. During this year the building was completed and named Allen Hall, in honor of one of the largest givers. At the opening of the fall term the beginning of the next year, the accommodations were taxed to the utmost. In August, 1882, the report reads, Allen Hall is full to repletion, ioo in the boarding department. Work cannot unfold for need of more room. Young men and young women in the same build- ing make an urgcnt appeal for a new building. At no time since the beginning of the second year have there been adequate accommodations for all desiring to attend. For ten years the institution under the name of Tillotson Collegiate and Normal Institute has furnished to students from all parts of the great State of Texas with its half million of colored people, and from other States, and from Mexico, not only an opportunity to acquire a thoroughly practical common-school education, but also a more extended course to prepare students for entrance to the highest educational insti- tutions in the land; and a normal training course for teachers for all positions in the public schools. Within this period of time a church has been formed for the students of the institution and others, which has been regularly ministered to by the president of the institution. In the year i888 a building for carpentry and manual instruction was erected and a teacher was appointed for industrial training. The picture following is that of Allen Hall as it looks down upon the Yalley of the river Colorado. In every direction the views are of great extent, and include many picturesque scenes. The State capitola mile distantand the various public buildings of Austin, are before the eye. Since electricity has been introduced, Austin by

A. F. Beard, Secretary Beard, A. F., Secretary Tillotson, Austin, Texas 98-102

98 TILL OTSON INSTITUTE, TILLOTSON, AUSTIN, TEXAS. BY SECRETARY A. F. BEARD. In the year 1875 the Rev. George J Tillotson, of Connecticut, visited various points of the South with a view to the establishment of a school. He was accompanied by a secretary of the Association. After a careful survey they selected Austin, Texas, as the most promis- ing point. About twenty-five acres of partially wooded land just beyond the eastern boundary of the city of Austin were purchased for $5,000, the gift of Mr. Tillotson. In the following year a charter was obtained and the work of raising money for the building was entered upon. The funds were finally secured, and in i879 the foundations were laid, and the building, 104 feet in length and 42 in depth, constructed of white pressed brick with dress stone trimmings, rose to its five stories in height. On the 17th of January, i88i, the school opened. Two of the five floors were then open spaces. Eleven pupils only were enrolled at the beginning, but the term closed in June with 107. During this year the building was completed and named Allen Hall, in honor of one of the largest givers. At the opening of the fall term the beginning of the next year, the accommodations were taxed to the utmost. In August, 1882, the report reads, Allen Hall is full to repletion, ioo in the boarding department. Work cannot unfold for need of more room. Young men and young women in the same build- ing make an urgcnt appeal for a new building. At no time since the beginning of the second year have there been adequate accommodations for all desiring to attend. For ten years the institution under the name of Tillotson Collegiate and Normal Institute has furnished to students from all parts of the great State of Texas with its half million of colored people, and from other States, and from Mexico, not only an opportunity to acquire a thoroughly practical common-school education, but also a more extended course to prepare students for entrance to the highest educational insti- tutions in the land; and a normal training course for teachers for all positions in the public schools. Within this period of time a church has been formed for the students of the institution and others, which has been regularly ministered to by the president of the institution. In the year i888 a building for carpentry and manual instruction was erected and a teacher was appointed for industrial training. The picture following is that of Allen Hall as it looks down upon the Yalley of the river Colorado. In every direction the views are of great extent, and include many picturesque scenes. The State capitola mile distantand the various public buildings of Austin, are before the eye. Since electricity has been introduced, Austin by 99 A USTIN, TEXAS. night presents a brilliant outlook from the grounds of the institu- tion, but the light which shines from these buildings on the hill sends its beams farther than those of the electric plant, and pierces a denser darkness than that of night. ALLEN HALL. The industrial ~~jldjngs~~ViZ., the shop for carpentry, another for ~~~cksmithing, for repairing of vehicles, and for paintingare at a suit- able distance in the rear on the boys side of the grounds. Below them are located the barn, wagon house, hennery, etc. On the crest ol a second eminence, several hundred feet from Allen Hall, is the attractive new building (see picture, page too) used as a dormitory for teachers and young women pupils. In this building are the culinary department also,and the dining room for each hall. There are forty dormitOry rooms in this hall which will accommodate sixty pupils and their teachers In addition to its dining-hall for all the pupils within the institution there are reading and sewing rooms, etc., which add to its completeness. There are not many school buildings anywhere with more diversified landscape and beautiful natural 5~~rounding5 than those of TillOtsOn. ~~compassed by oak trees large enough for shade and shelter, but not 0~~r~tOwering the prospect, free from the distract- ing noises and dust of the streets, and yet possessing all the advan- tages of a thrifty and beautiful city, the student at TillotsOn will have at least one period in life that may not be commiserated. 100 TILL OTSON INSTITUTE, This new building has not yet been duly named, and if anyone of those who may read this sketch will give $i,ooo to be used as an endowment fund, the interest to be applied year by year as long as the school stands, we shall be glad to name this new hall after the giver, unless the name should happen to be too un-euphonious. Would not this beautiful ball be a fine monument to bear the name of some consider- ate and generous giver? Tillotson was chartered under the corporate name of Institute. This charter has now expired, and since the institution has blossomed out with the possibilities of a college it is hoped that under the new charter it may bear the name of College. It has the following departments: Common English, Normal, College Preparatory, College, Vocal and Instrumental Music, and Industrial, and a department for trained nurses. The faculty of the institution has consisted of the president, the normal principal, the industrial teacher, and ten other teachers. The boarding department is conducted upon the model of a Christian household. The intention is by no means simply to furnish rooms and meals for those who are in attendance, but also to inculcate ideas of right living and thinking, which are indispens- able to true manhood and womanhood. NEW HALL: DORMITORY FOR TEACHERS AND PUPILS. 101 A USTIN, TEXAS. In the Common English department the purpose is to prepare the pupils thoroughly for the practical duties of life. The College Preparatory gives a careful preparation in the way of language studies which will fit them to enter into the more generous course of study in which they may be fitted to be intelligent preach- ers and leaders of their race. The demand for college-educated men among the negroes is an intelligent one. This race cannot be elevated unless there can be raised a sufficient number of strong, earnest men, thoroughly trained intellectually, as well as morally; men who shall have a larger than a local vision, and who shall stand forth as repre- sentative leaders and teachers of those less fortunate than them- selves. The Normal department adds the study of subjects and methods, for those who are preparing to become teachers among their own people. The Industrial includes not only manual instruction, but carpentry, blacksmithing and mechanical drawing for boys and young men, and also sewing and dressmaking for girls and young women For a young institution the record of Tillotson is excellent. There are few places in the great empire of Texas where it has not already become known through its pupils, or through t ache s who b v r ceived their edu tiQn within it~ wall MANUAL NsTRUcTIoN SHOP. 102 DEATH OF DR. TAYLOR. Being under the care of a distinctively Christian organization it car- ries out the intention of its founders in providing religious instruction for all who attend. Its Sunday School, its Christian Endeavor Socie- ties, its social worship, its church service, its mission work, all intensify the religious influence and religious life. Tillotson is far away and needs friends who will give it help. It needs scholarships and professorships. It needs a library, chemical and philosophical apparatus, and a printing press. It needs gifts of bedding, tableware for the halls, and clothing for needy students. Friends, it needs your Christian sympathy and Christian prayers, that the great and blessed Teacher may dwell within its walls and in the hearts of the inmates. DEATH OF DR. TAYLOR. Nine years ago we were called upon to record the death of Governor Washburn, President of this Association. While he was seemingly in the fullness of life and while on the platform at the meeting of the American Board he suddenly and unexpectedly fell asleep in death. In a far different way did his successor, Rev. XVilliam M. Taylor, D.D., meet in quietude and with patient resignation the summons that called him home. The premonition of death came three years ago, and the march has been steady to the close. During these months his patience and sweet assurance have been as marked illustrations of the power of the Gospel as other graces were in his more active career. Dr. Taylor, long before he became President of this Association, took a deep interest in its work and brought to it his own personal influ- ence and that of his large and wealthy congregation. As a presiding officer he was constant in his attendance, a:id by the dignity of his man- ner and his great force of character gave guidance and strength to the gatherings of our annual meeting. Rut Dr. Taylor was broad, and his sympathies went forth to every form of endeavor for the spread of the Gospel and the benefit of mankind. With a strong character derived from his Scottish ancestry, he had made his mark as a pastor in the growth of a church under his care in the old country. Nearly a quarter of a century ago he came to this city, and by his commanding elo- quence, his pastoral gifts and the books which flowed from his pen, he has exerted a wide and salutary influence. On great occasions, at college anniversaries and at missionary and ecclesiastical gatherings, Dr. Taylor was one of the most acceptable and efficient speakers. One marked characteristic of Dr. Taylor came from his great hearts and mel- lowed and sweetened all his other powers~ He has finished a glorious course, and has gone to his reward.

Death of Dr. Taylor 102-103

102 DEATH OF DR. TAYLOR. Being under the care of a distinctively Christian organization it car- ries out the intention of its founders in providing religious instruction for all who attend. Its Sunday School, its Christian Endeavor Socie- ties, its social worship, its church service, its mission work, all intensify the religious influence and religious life. Tillotson is far away and needs friends who will give it help. It needs scholarships and professorships. It needs a library, chemical and philosophical apparatus, and a printing press. It needs gifts of bedding, tableware for the halls, and clothing for needy students. Friends, it needs your Christian sympathy and Christian prayers, that the great and blessed Teacher may dwell within its walls and in the hearts of the inmates. DEATH OF DR. TAYLOR. Nine years ago we were called upon to record the death of Governor Washburn, President of this Association. While he was seemingly in the fullness of life and while on the platform at the meeting of the American Board he suddenly and unexpectedly fell asleep in death. In a far different way did his successor, Rev. XVilliam M. Taylor, D.D., meet in quietude and with patient resignation the summons that called him home. The premonition of death came three years ago, and the march has been steady to the close. During these months his patience and sweet assurance have been as marked illustrations of the power of the Gospel as other graces were in his more active career. Dr. Taylor, long before he became President of this Association, took a deep interest in its work and brought to it his own personal influ- ence and that of his large and wealthy congregation. As a presiding officer he was constant in his attendance, a:id by the dignity of his man- ner and his great force of character gave guidance and strength to the gatherings of our annual meeting. Rut Dr. Taylor was broad, and his sympathies went forth to every form of endeavor for the spread of the Gospel and the benefit of mankind. With a strong character derived from his Scottish ancestry, he had made his mark as a pastor in the growth of a church under his care in the old country. Nearly a quarter of a century ago he came to this city, and by his commanding elo- quence, his pastoral gifts and the books which flowed from his pen, he has exerted a wide and salutary influence. On great occasions, at college anniversaries and at missionary and ecclesiastical gatherings, Dr. Taylor was one of the most acceptable and efficient speakers. One marked characteristic of Dr. Taylor came from his great hearts and mel- lowed and sweetened all his other powers~ He has finished a glorious course, and has gone to his reward. PROF. PAINTERONE MISSIONARY DA V. 103 REV. CHAS. C. PAINTER. The recent death of Prof. Painter has removed a most useful and efficient worker in behalf of the Indians. He died at his home in Wash- ington, of heart disease, after an illness of only twerve hours. He was sixty-two years old, born in Virginia, but resident for most of his life in New England, where he was an acceptable pastor. lie was called from that position into the service of the American Missionary Associ- ation, acting for a time as Professor in Fisk University. He, however, soon gave his life to promoting the education and civilization of the Indians, and for ten years was connected with the Indian Rights Associ- ation. It was a tribute to his knowledge and service in the Indian work that about a year ago he was appointed a member of the Board of Indian Commissioners. ONE MISSIONARY DAY. MISS S. E. OBER, EvARTS, Ky. At work again. Back from the rest and change of the summer va- cation. Leaving behind friends and home, comforts and pleasures, and nearly all the advantages of civilization. But coming to a greater joy, a higher privilege than any of these can affordthe high calling of our Master, to minister to poor, needy souls in His name. So with great happiness we gather up the loose threads and the dropped stitches of last years work, and start anew. Come with us through one day, and taste a few of a missionarys joys. After our household tasks are over, and we have gained new power from our daily devotions, we start out on our work. Over one hundred boys and girls give us bright greetings as we ride past. We must go on horseback, as there are no good roads in our vicinity. We are entirely compassed about with mountains; on every side they lift their grand heads in everlasting testimony of the wonderful handi- work of the Almighty. But we have little time to gaze upon their beauty, for more precious creations of the same great Hand are need- ing our attention. See this little hovel, built of rough logs, scarcely serving to keep out the wind or the rain. Let us enter. A most pitiful sight awaits us. The fever has been before us. For months it has raged, and two human souls have been taken from the family which dwells here. On a rude filthy bed lies the wasted frame of a once stalwart man. He is as feeble as the infant; a wan child is sitting near by. The mother, in tattered garments, totters about her work, so enfeebled by the disease that her strength is inadequate for her tasks. Three of the children are nothing

Rev. Chas. C. Painter 103

PROF. PAINTERONE MISSIONARY DA V. 103 REV. CHAS. C. PAINTER. The recent death of Prof. Painter has removed a most useful and efficient worker in behalf of the Indians. He died at his home in Wash- ington, of heart disease, after an illness of only twerve hours. He was sixty-two years old, born in Virginia, but resident for most of his life in New England, where he was an acceptable pastor. lie was called from that position into the service of the American Missionary Associ- ation, acting for a time as Professor in Fisk University. He, however, soon gave his life to promoting the education and civilization of the Indians, and for ten years was connected with the Indian Rights Associ- ation. It was a tribute to his knowledge and service in the Indian work that about a year ago he was appointed a member of the Board of Indian Commissioners. ONE MISSIONARY DAY. MISS S. E. OBER, EvARTS, Ky. At work again. Back from the rest and change of the summer va- cation. Leaving behind friends and home, comforts and pleasures, and nearly all the advantages of civilization. But coming to a greater joy, a higher privilege than any of these can affordthe high calling of our Master, to minister to poor, needy souls in His name. So with great happiness we gather up the loose threads and the dropped stitches of last years work, and start anew. Come with us through one day, and taste a few of a missionarys joys. After our household tasks are over, and we have gained new power from our daily devotions, we start out on our work. Over one hundred boys and girls give us bright greetings as we ride past. We must go on horseback, as there are no good roads in our vicinity. We are entirely compassed about with mountains; on every side they lift their grand heads in everlasting testimony of the wonderful handi- work of the Almighty. But we have little time to gaze upon their beauty, for more precious creations of the same great Hand are need- ing our attention. See this little hovel, built of rough logs, scarcely serving to keep out the wind or the rain. Let us enter. A most pitiful sight awaits us. The fever has been before us. For months it has raged, and two human souls have been taken from the family which dwells here. On a rude filthy bed lies the wasted frame of a once stalwart man. He is as feeble as the infant; a wan child is sitting near by. The mother, in tattered garments, totters about her work, so enfeebled by the disease that her strength is inadequate for her tasks. Three of the children are nothing

Miss S. E. Ober Ober, S. E., Miss One Missionary Day 103-105

PROF. PAINTERONE MISSIONARY DA V. 103 REV. CHAS. C. PAINTER. The recent death of Prof. Painter has removed a most useful and efficient worker in behalf of the Indians. He died at his home in Wash- ington, of heart disease, after an illness of only twerve hours. He was sixty-two years old, born in Virginia, but resident for most of his life in New England, where he was an acceptable pastor. lie was called from that position into the service of the American Missionary Associ- ation, acting for a time as Professor in Fisk University. He, however, soon gave his life to promoting the education and civilization of the Indians, and for ten years was connected with the Indian Rights Associ- ation. It was a tribute to his knowledge and service in the Indian work that about a year ago he was appointed a member of the Board of Indian Commissioners. ONE MISSIONARY DAY. MISS S. E. OBER, EvARTS, Ky. At work again. Back from the rest and change of the summer va- cation. Leaving behind friends and home, comforts and pleasures, and nearly all the advantages of civilization. But coming to a greater joy, a higher privilege than any of these can affordthe high calling of our Master, to minister to poor, needy souls in His name. So with great happiness we gather up the loose threads and the dropped stitches of last years work, and start anew. Come with us through one day, and taste a few of a missionarys joys. After our household tasks are over, and we have gained new power from our daily devotions, we start out on our work. Over one hundred boys and girls give us bright greetings as we ride past. We must go on horseback, as there are no good roads in our vicinity. We are entirely compassed about with mountains; on every side they lift their grand heads in everlasting testimony of the wonderful handi- work of the Almighty. But we have little time to gaze upon their beauty, for more precious creations of the same great Hand are need- ing our attention. See this little hovel, built of rough logs, scarcely serving to keep out the wind or the rain. Let us enter. A most pitiful sight awaits us. The fever has been before us. For months it has raged, and two human souls have been taken from the family which dwells here. On a rude filthy bed lies the wasted frame of a once stalwart man. He is as feeble as the infant; a wan child is sitting near by. The mother, in tattered garments, totters about her work, so enfeebled by the disease that her strength is inadequate for her tasks. Three of the children are nothing 104 ONE MISSIONARY DA V. but skeletons, and sit listlessly on the floor, taking but little notice of anything going on about them. The thin faces light up at sight of us, and a cordial welcome is extended. The only whole, chair is brought forward for our use. You might expect a torrent of complaints from these poor creaturesf But no, instead come words of praise to God that He had spared so many of their lives, that He had been with them in their sufferings. A year ago, when we visited this hut, we found them stolid and indifferent, cari~g nothing for spiritual things. The woman sat smok- ing over the fire, scarcely vouchsafing Us a word, and muttered to a crony, Wots thet thar woman nosing bout yere for? Shed er heap sight better let we uns erlone. It was very hard to ask permission to hold prayers with them in such a hostile atmosphere, but it is our duty to sow beside all waters, so we proffered our request. Yer kin ef yer mines ter. I haint er carin, was the ungracious reply. But what a change now. The womans face glows with a light that only comes from the light of the world. Gods been mighty good ter we uns, she says. Ef hit hedn~t ben fer Him wed er died. An we uns air bound ter do ez near right ez we kin, an serve ther Lord, ther hull lot on us. Does it not make our own hearts glow to hear such words, and see the wonders God hath wrought? And with thanksgiving we read and pray with them, and strengthen their faith with Gods Word. After noting their needs, and promising to supply them from the articles sent us by generous Northern friends, we go on to the next house. We find the same sad state of affairs; fever-worn men and women, wasted children, and starvation and want staring them in the face. But we find also the same great change. Gods Spirit has been working among them, and hearts are softened and lives changed by His power. So we go from hut to hut, until the way becomes too steep to ride, and we leave our horses and climb, on foot, the lofty, rocky ridges. We find men who were reckless and bad ready to listen to Gods Word, and in broken voices asking for prayers. We find women who have lived lives of open shame penitent and contrite, showing by their abandonment of their evil ways that they are sincere when they say, oh so earnestly, We uns air tryin ter do right. But all is not so encouraging. We must visit homes where vice reigns supreme; where women are lost to shame, and glory in their sin; where even the children have the trail of the serpent upon their young faces; where th~ men are brutal and beastly, and even sickness dQCS nQt touch them, SOUTHERN FIELD NO TES. 105 Let us call at this old log house as we pass; nestled under a high cliff, with the creek flowing past, it looks like some ugly blot on the face of nature. But it is a schooZ-house. There is no window, no chimney, only a hole in the side of the house, opening into a sort of pen of rocks, in which the fire is built; ~fn admirable arrangement to send all the heat out of doors, and the smoke into the house. Several rough benches (that do not invite to ease or comfort) and an ancient chair complete the furniture of the room. Several boards painted black form the blackboards. Here we find two tattered urchins and three tiny girls, whose faces have evidently not made the acquaintance of soap and water for some days. The teacher is one of the advanced pupils of our academya bright young man, who will attend our school when his is completed. We ask where the rest of the scholars are. Pulling fodder or stripping cane, is the reply. And the children have to work so much in the fields that they seldom have the chance of attending school. Out of fifty or sixty scholars only a very few ever attend these public schools. But it is growing late, and we have a long, rough way before us, so we spur on toward home, reaching it just as the glow of the sunset dies away from the last distant peak and the dusky twilight settles down over the whole land. A hurried supper and then to the church prayer meetiig. Here are gathered quite a number, and we have a very good meeting, feeling the presence of our Saviour in our tnidst. So closes one of our days, and wearied in body, but refreshed and strengthened in spirit, we go to rest. SOUTHERN FIELD NOTES. REV. GEORGE W. MOORE. The mission station recently opened at La Pine, in the black belt of Alabama, is a door of hope to that needy people. The people came for miles around to greet the missionary and to hear the Gospel. At another point in Alabama we found a promising field which one of our theological graduates from Talladega had opened. He began the work in a rented hall at his own cost, and after he had gathered a congrega- tion and found it a needy and at the same time a hopeful field he raised the Macedonian cry to the American Missionary Association for help. The Pauline heroism of this brother in preaching the Gospel in his own hired house is shared by our brethren in various parts of our Southern field. The work is so large and the needs of the people are so great

Rev. George W. Moore Moore, George W., Rev. Southern Field Notes 105-107

SOUTHERN FIELD NO TES. 105 Let us call at this old log house as we pass; nestled under a high cliff, with the creek flowing past, it looks like some ugly blot on the face of nature. But it is a schooZ-house. There is no window, no chimney, only a hole in the side of the house, opening into a sort of pen of rocks, in which the fire is built; ~fn admirable arrangement to send all the heat out of doors, and the smoke into the house. Several rough benches (that do not invite to ease or comfort) and an ancient chair complete the furniture of the room. Several boards painted black form the blackboards. Here we find two tattered urchins and three tiny girls, whose faces have evidently not made the acquaintance of soap and water for some days. The teacher is one of the advanced pupils of our academya bright young man, who will attend our school when his is completed. We ask where the rest of the scholars are. Pulling fodder or stripping cane, is the reply. And the children have to work so much in the fields that they seldom have the chance of attending school. Out of fifty or sixty scholars only a very few ever attend these public schools. But it is growing late, and we have a long, rough way before us, so we spur on toward home, reaching it just as the glow of the sunset dies away from the last distant peak and the dusky twilight settles down over the whole land. A hurried supper and then to the church prayer meetiig. Here are gathered quite a number, and we have a very good meeting, feeling the presence of our Saviour in our tnidst. So closes one of our days, and wearied in body, but refreshed and strengthened in spirit, we go to rest. SOUTHERN FIELD NOTES. REV. GEORGE W. MOORE. The mission station recently opened at La Pine, in the black belt of Alabama, is a door of hope to that needy people. The people came for miles around to greet the missionary and to hear the Gospel. At another point in Alabama we found a promising field which one of our theological graduates from Talladega had opened. He began the work in a rented hall at his own cost, and after he had gathered a congrega- tion and found it a needy and at the same time a hopeful field he raised the Macedonian cry to the American Missionary Association for help. The Pauline heroism of this brother in preaching the Gospel in his own hired house is shared by our brethren in various parts of our Southern field. The work is so large and the needs of the people are so great io6 SOUTHERN FIELD NOTES. that this spirit of Christ must be more fully expressed, both in gifts and service, to reach the pressing calls for help. I met three interesting characters in the black belt of Georgia. The first was named Moses. On meeting him he addressed me with You dont knows me, does you? My name is Moses. His friend Uncle Plenty lived in a little cabin by the roadside. He had heard of the Association, and was glad to greet me as one of its missionaries. He told me that he felt so thankful for what the Northern friends had done for his people that he wished his little cabin and half acre lot to be bequeathed to the American Missionary Association. I dined with Uncle Plenty and met Father Joshua, a poor old blind man ninety years of age, in his cabin. They told me the story of their lives in slavery and how they had prayed to see this day of freedom and light. Moses and Joshua and Uncle Plenty are types of the old people and times that are giving place to a new generation and a brighter day. Among the new enterprises reported at the meeting of the Georgia Association at Thomasville, Ga., were two churches and several mis- sions from the vicinity of Columbia, S. C. I spent Thanksgiving Day at Lowell, N.C. Our mission at this point is the only church in that vicinity. It was the first Thanksgiving serv- ice they had ever enjoyed or even heard of. It was held in a log cabin. Lowell is the center of a large negro settlement; the people have had a hard lot, and but little opportunity to improve their condition, They are very grateful tQ hear the Gospel. Forefathers day was observed by the Nashville churches in the theo- logical hall of Fisk University. We spiritual children of the Pilgrims honor the fathers whose descendants have enriched us through the A. M. A. by the schools and churches that have been planted among us. The church at Lexington, Ky., had a season of refreshing in Decem- ber, when several heads of families united with it. Howard church, Nashville, also had an awakening with good results. This church has increased its membership fifty per cent. in fifteen months. Jackson Street Church, Nashville, held a recognition service for its new pastor in January. We were glad to greet the churches and brethren of Louisiana after an absence from them of two years. The Spain Street Church at New Orleans held a series of Gospel meetings in which a number avowed their faith in the Saviour, and the church was strengthened. Straight University is crowded with an earnest class of students. This school is doing a great work for the people of Louisiana and sur- rounding States. In spite of the hard times, which are very severe in the South (laborers in Louisiana and some other States receive only fifty cents a day and board themselves), the people are making great sacri A SCHOOLBOYS COMPOSITION. 107 flees for the education of their children, and our pastors and teachers are making heroic struggles that the work in school and church may go forward. The need of the continuance of the work was never greater and the results of the service of our workers were never better. To retrench further at this time would not only cripple the work among the needy peoples of our field, but shut the door of opportunity in many places, and injure the people in their efforts to rise, and discourage our self- sacrificing missionaries. The people are grateful for these schools and churches and need more of them. We appeal to our Northern friends to come to the rescue of the American Missionary Association at this time. A SCHOOLBOYS COMPOSITION. A little lad six years of age in the primary grade of Knox Institute, Athens, Ga., attended rhetoricals in which several pupils read compo- sitions on the subject of America. He was greatly impressed, went home, and wrote without supervision the composition below. Although he has put the raccoon, lion and tiger among the birds, it is certainly a pretty good composition for the first one written by a child six years of age. Could any of the children six years old to whom THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY may come do better than this little black boy? AMERICA. America is a large country, and it has many large rivers, and it has many animals, and has wild creatures. America is a most important country. And many a people like to go there. And it has many wild birdsmocking birds, nightingale, rac- coon, and also the opossum and lion, tiger, elephant, and the rhinoceros. And in America there are lakes, seas, and the bushes are so thick that you can hardly tell when a human is beside them. The States in America are so large that ten hundred can get in these. But if one of the animals was to seize you once you would never want to go there any more, for if one of them get hold of you you would hol- low like anything. It would settle your hash. It would frighten you so much you never would want to see one of them. HALL JOHNSON, Age 6, December i6, 1894.

A Schoolboy's Composition 107-108

A SCHOOLBOYS COMPOSITION. 107 flees for the education of their children, and our pastors and teachers are making heroic struggles that the work in school and church may go forward. The need of the continuance of the work was never greater and the results of the service of our workers were never better. To retrench further at this time would not only cripple the work among the needy peoples of our field, but shut the door of opportunity in many places, and injure the people in their efforts to rise, and discourage our self- sacrificing missionaries. The people are grateful for these schools and churches and need more of them. We appeal to our Northern friends to come to the rescue of the American Missionary Association at this time. A SCHOOLBOYS COMPOSITION. A little lad six years of age in the primary grade of Knox Institute, Athens, Ga., attended rhetoricals in which several pupils read compo- sitions on the subject of America. He was greatly impressed, went home, and wrote without supervision the composition below. Although he has put the raccoon, lion and tiger among the birds, it is certainly a pretty good composition for the first one written by a child six years of age. Could any of the children six years old to whom THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY may come do better than this little black boy? AMERICA. America is a large country, and it has many large rivers, and it has many animals, and has wild creatures. America is a most important country. And many a people like to go there. And it has many wild birdsmocking birds, nightingale, rac- coon, and also the opossum and lion, tiger, elephant, and the rhinoceros. And in America there are lakes, seas, and the bushes are so thick that you can hardly tell when a human is beside them. The States in America are so large that ten hundred can get in these. But if one of the animals was to seize you once you would never want to go there any more, for if one of them get hold of you you would hol- low like anything. It would settle your hash. It would frighten you so much you never would want to see one of them. HALL JOHNSON, Age 6, December i6, 1894. io8 WOMANS STATE ORGANIZATiONS. WOMANS STATE ORGANIZATIONS. MAINE. WOMANS Am TO A. M. A. S/a/c Comm/I/ceMrs. Ida Vose Woodbury, Woodfords; Mrs. A. T. Burbank, Yarmouth; Mrs. Helen Quimby, Bangor. NEW HAMPSHIRE. FEMALE CENT INSTITUTION ANO HOME Miss. UNION. PresidentMrs. Cyrus Sargeant, Plymouth. SecretaryMrs. John T. Perry, Exeter. TreasurerMiss Annie A. McFarland, Concord. VERMONT. WOMANS HOME MISSIONANY UNION. PresidentMrs. J. H. Babbitt, W. Brattleboro. SecretaryMrs. M. K. Paine, Windsor. TreasurerMrs. Win. P. Fairbanks, St. Johns- bury. MASS ANO R. I. * WOMANS HOME MISSIONANY AssocIATIoN. PresidentMrs. C. L. Goodell, Boston Highlands, Mass. SecretaryMrs. Louise A. Kellogg, 32 Congre- gational House, Boston. TreasurerMiss Annie C. Bridgeman, 32 Congre- gational House, Boston. CONNECTICUT. WoMANs HOME MIssIoNANY UNION. PresideiitMiss Ellen R. Camp, 9 Camp St., New Britain. SecretaryMrs. C. T. Millard, 36 Lewis St., Hartford. TreasurerMrs. W. W. Jacobs, 19 Spring St., Hartford. NEW YORK. WOMANS HOME MIssIoNAEY UNION. PresidentMrs. Win. Kincaid, 483 Green Ave., Brooklyn. SecretaryMrs. Win. Spalding, 511 Orange St., Syracuse. TreasurerMrs. J. J. Pearsall, 230 Macon St., Brooklyn. NEW JERSEY. WoMANs HOME MIssIoNAisy UNION OF THE N. J. AssoCIATIoN. PresidentMrs. A. H. Bradford, Montclair. SecretaryMrs R. J. Hegeman, 32 Forest Street, Montclair. TreasurerMrs. J. H. Dennison, s~o Belleville Ave., Newark. PENNSYLVANIA. WoMANs MISSIONANY UNION. PresidentMrs. A. H. Claflin, 274 Manhattan St., Allegheny. SecretaryMrs. C. F. Jennee, Ridgway. TreasurerMrs. T. W. Jones, 511 Woodland Terrace, Philadelphia. OHIO. WOMANS HOME MIssIoNANY UNION. PresidentMrs. Sidney Strong, Lane Seminary Grounds, Cincinnati. SecretaryMrs. J. W. Moore, 836 Hough Ave., Cleveland. TreasurerMrs. G. B. Brown, 2116 Warren St., Toledo. INDIANA. WOMANS HOME MISsmoNAav UNION. PresidentMrs. W. A. Bell, 221 Christian Ave., Indianapolis. SecretaryMrs. W. E. Mossman, Fort Wayne. TreasurerMrs. F. E. Dewburat, 28 Christian Ave., Indianapolis. ILLINOIS. WOMANS HOME MIssIoNAImv UNION. PresidentMrs. Isaac Claflin, Lombard. SecretaryMrs. C. H. Taintor, 151 Washington St., Chicago. TreasurerMrs. L. A. Field, Wilmette. IOWA. WOMANS HOME MIssIoNAisY UNION. PresidentMrs. T. 0. Douglass, Grinnell. SecretaryMrs. H. H. Robbins, Grinnell. TreasurerMiss Belle L. Bentley, 300 Court Ave. Des Moines. MICHIGAN. WOMANS HOME MIssIoNAEv UNION. PresidentMrs. George M. Lane, i~9 West Alex- andrine Aye, Detroit. SecretaryMrs. J. H. Hatfield, 302 Elm Street, Kalamazoo. TreasurerMrs. E. F. Grabill, Greenville. WISCONSIN. WOMANS HOME MIssIoNAEv UNION. PresidentMrs. E. G. Updike, Madison. SecretaryMrs. A. 0. Wright, Madison. TreasurerMrs. C. M. Blackman, Whitewater. MINNESOTA. WOMANS HOME MIssIoNAEv UNION. PresidentMiss Katherine W. Nichols, 230 East Ninth Street, St, Paul. SecretaryMrs. A P. Lyon, 7 Florence Court, S. E., Minneapolis. TreasurerMrs. M. W. Skinner, Northfield. NORTU DAKOTA. WOMANS HOME MIssIoNAEY UNION. PresidentMrs. W. P. Cleveland, Caledonia. SecretaryMrs. Silas Daggett, Harwood. TreasurerMrs. J. M. Fisher, Fargo. SOUTH DAKOTA. WoMANs HOME MIssIoNAEv UNION. PresidentMrs. A. H. Robbins, Bowdle. SecretaryMrs. W. H. Thrall, Huron. TreasurerMrs. F. H. Wilcox, Huron. BLACK HILLS, SOUTH DAKOTA. WOMANS MIssIoNAEv UNION. PresidentMrs. J. B. Gossage, Rapid City. SecretaryMrs. H. H. Gilebrist, Hot Springs. TreasurerMiss Grace Lyman, Hot Springs. NEBRASKA. WOMANS HOME MlssloNAisv UNION. PresidentMrs. J. T. Duryea, 2402 Cass Street, Omaha. SecretaryMrs. S. C. Dean, 636 pIt Street, Omaha. TreasurerMrs. G. J. Powell, 3oth and Ohio Streets, Omaha.

Woman's State Organizations 108-110

io8 WOMANS STATE ORGANIZATiONS. WOMANS STATE ORGANIZATIONS. MAINE. WOMANS Am TO A. M. A. S/a/c Comm/I/ceMrs. Ida Vose Woodbury, Woodfords; Mrs. A. T. Burbank, Yarmouth; Mrs. Helen Quimby, Bangor. NEW HAMPSHIRE. FEMALE CENT INSTITUTION ANO HOME Miss. UNION. PresidentMrs. Cyrus Sargeant, Plymouth. SecretaryMrs. John T. Perry, Exeter. TreasurerMiss Annie A. McFarland, Concord. VERMONT. WOMANS HOME MISSIONANY UNION. PresidentMrs. J. H. Babbitt, W. Brattleboro. SecretaryMrs. M. K. Paine, Windsor. TreasurerMrs. Win. P. Fairbanks, St. Johns- bury. MASS ANO R. I. * WOMANS HOME MISSIONANY AssocIATIoN. PresidentMrs. C. L. Goodell, Boston Highlands, Mass. SecretaryMrs. Louise A. Kellogg, 32 Congre- gational House, Boston. TreasurerMiss Annie C. Bridgeman, 32 Congre- gational House, Boston. CONNECTICUT. WoMANs HOME MIssIoNANY UNION. PresideiitMiss Ellen R. Camp, 9 Camp St., New Britain. SecretaryMrs. C. T. Millard, 36 Lewis St., Hartford. TreasurerMrs. W. W. Jacobs, 19 Spring St., Hartford. NEW YORK. WOMANS HOME MIssIoNAEY UNION. PresidentMrs. Win. Kincaid, 483 Green Ave., Brooklyn. SecretaryMrs. Win. Spalding, 511 Orange St., Syracuse. TreasurerMrs. J. J. Pearsall, 230 Macon St., Brooklyn. NEW JERSEY. WoMANs HOME MIssIoNAisy UNION OF THE N. J. AssoCIATIoN. PresidentMrs. A. H. Bradford, Montclair. SecretaryMrs R. J. Hegeman, 32 Forest Street, Montclair. TreasurerMrs. J. H. Dennison, s~o Belleville Ave., Newark. PENNSYLVANIA. WoMANs MISSIONANY UNION. PresidentMrs. A. H. Claflin, 274 Manhattan St., Allegheny. SecretaryMrs. C. F. Jennee, Ridgway. TreasurerMrs. T. W. Jones, 511 Woodland Terrace, Philadelphia. OHIO. WOMANS HOME MIssIoNANY UNION. PresidentMrs. Sidney Strong, Lane Seminary Grounds, Cincinnati. SecretaryMrs. J. W. Moore, 836 Hough Ave., Cleveland. TreasurerMrs. G. B. Brown, 2116 Warren St., Toledo. INDIANA. WOMANS HOME MISsmoNAav UNION. PresidentMrs. W. A. Bell, 221 Christian Ave., Indianapolis. SecretaryMrs. W. E. Mossman, Fort Wayne. TreasurerMrs. F. E. Dewburat, 28 Christian Ave., Indianapolis. ILLINOIS. WOMANS HOME MIssIoNAImv UNION. PresidentMrs. Isaac Claflin, Lombard. SecretaryMrs. C. H. Taintor, 151 Washington St., Chicago. TreasurerMrs. L. A. Field, Wilmette. IOWA. WOMANS HOME MIssIoNAisY UNION. PresidentMrs. T. 0. Douglass, Grinnell. SecretaryMrs. H. H. Robbins, Grinnell. TreasurerMiss Belle L. Bentley, 300 Court Ave. Des Moines. MICHIGAN. WOMANS HOME MIssIoNAEv UNION. PresidentMrs. George M. Lane, i~9 West Alex- andrine Aye, Detroit. SecretaryMrs. J. H. Hatfield, 302 Elm Street, Kalamazoo. TreasurerMrs. E. F. Grabill, Greenville. WISCONSIN. WOMANS HOME MIssIoNAEv UNION. PresidentMrs. E. G. Updike, Madison. SecretaryMrs. A. 0. Wright, Madison. TreasurerMrs. C. M. Blackman, Whitewater. MINNESOTA. WOMANS HOME MIssIoNAEv UNION. PresidentMiss Katherine W. Nichols, 230 East Ninth Street, St, Paul. SecretaryMrs. A P. Lyon, 7 Florence Court, S. E., Minneapolis. TreasurerMrs. M. W. Skinner, Northfield. NORTU DAKOTA. WOMANS HOME MIssIoNAEY UNION. PresidentMrs. W. P. Cleveland, Caledonia. SecretaryMrs. Silas Daggett, Harwood. TreasurerMrs. J. M. Fisher, Fargo. SOUTH DAKOTA. WoMANs HOME MIssIoNAEv UNION. PresidentMrs. A. H. Robbins, Bowdle. SecretaryMrs. W. H. Thrall, Huron. TreasurerMrs. F. H. Wilcox, Huron. BLACK HILLS, SOUTH DAKOTA. WOMANS MIssIoNAEv UNION. PresidentMrs. J. B. Gossage, Rapid City. SecretaryMrs. H. H. Gilebrist, Hot Springs. TreasurerMiss Grace Lyman, Hot Springs. NEBRASKA. WOMANS HOME MlssloNAisv UNION. PresidentMrs. J. T. Duryea, 2402 Cass Street, Omaha. SecretaryMrs. S. C. Dean, 636 pIt Street, Omaha. TreasurerMrs. G. J. Powell, 3oth and Ohio Streets, Omaha. WOMANS STATE ORGANIZATIONS. MONTANA. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. 0. C. Clark, Missoula. SecretaryMrs. W. S. Bell, 410 Dearborn Ave. Helena. TreasurerMrs. Herbert E. Jones, Livingston. MISSOURI. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. Henry Hopkins, 916 Holmes Street, Kansas City. SecretaryMrs. E. C. Ellis, 2436 Tracy Ave., Kansas City. K. L. Mills, 2526 Wabasb Ave., TreasurerMrs. Kansas City. KANSAS. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. F. E. Storrs, Topeka. SecretaryMrs. George L. Epps, Topeka. TreasurerMrs. D. D. DeLong, Arkansas City. OREGON. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. Jobn Summerville, io8 Second Street, Portland. SecretaryMrs. George Brownell, Oregon City. TreasurerMrs. W. D. Palmer, 546 Tbird Street, Portland. WASHINGTON. WOMANS MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION. PresidentMrs. A. J. Bailey, 323 Blancbard Street, Seattle. SecretaryMrs. XV. C. Wbeeler,- 424 Soutb K Street, Tacoma. TreasurerMrs. J. XV. George, 620 Fourtb Street, Seattle. CALIFORNIA. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. PresidentMrs. E. S. Williams, 572 iatb Street, Oakland. SecretaryMrs. L. M. Howard, 9 Grove Street, Oakland. TreasurerMrs. J. M. Havens, 1329 Harrison Street, Oakland. SOUTHERN CALL ORNIA. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. W. J. Wasbburn, 550 Downey Ave., Los Angeles. SecretaryMrs. P. J. Colcord, Claremont. TreasurerMrs. Mary M. Smitb, Public Library, Riverside. NEVADA. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. L. J. Flint, Reno. SecretaryMiss Margaret N. Magill, Reno. TreasurerMiss Mary Clow, Reno. INDIAN TERRITORY. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. Jobn McCartby, Vinita. SecretaryMrs. Fayette Hurd, Vinita. TreasurerMrs. R. M. Swain, Vinita. NEW MEXICO. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. C. E. Winslow, Albuquerque. SecretaryMrs. E. W. Lewis, 301 So. Editb Street, Albuquerque. TreasurerMrs. A. W. Jones, Albuquerque. MISSISSIPPI. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. C. L. Harris, 1421 3ist Avenue, Meridian. SecretaryMrs. Editb M. Hall, Tougaloo Univ., Tougalon. TreasurerMrs. L. H. Turner, 3012 I2tb Street, Meridian. LOUISIANA. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMiss Bella W. Hume, corner Gasquet and Liberty Streets, New Orleans. SecretaryMrs. Matilda Cabr~re, New Orleans. TreasurerMrs. C. H. Crawford, Hammond. ALABAMA. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. G. W. Andrews, Talladega. SecretaryMrs. J. S. Jackson, Montgomery. TreasurerMrs. E. C. Silsby, Talladega. FLORIDA. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION. President2-Mrs. S. F. Gale, Jacksonville. SecretaryMrs. Natban Barrows, Winter Park. TreasurerMrs. W. D. Brown, Interlacben. TENNESSEE, KENTUCKY AND ARKANSAS. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION OF THE TENNESSEE ASSOCIATION. PresidentMrs. G. W. Moore, Box 8, Fisk Univ., Nasbville. SecretaryMrs. Jos. E. Smitb, 304 Gilmer Street, Cbattanooga. TreasurerMrs. J. E. Moreland, 216 N. McNairy Street, Nasbville. COLORADO. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. B. C. Valentine, Higblands. SecretaryMrs. Cbas. Westley, Box ~o8, Denver. TreasurerMrs.. Horace Sanderson, 1710 ~6tb Ave., Denver. WYOMING. WoMANs MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. G. S. Ricker, Cbeyenne. SecretaryMrs. W. C. XVbipple, Cbeyenne. TreasurerMrs. H. N. Smitb, Rock Springs. OKLAHOMA. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. J. H. Parker, Kingfisber. SecretaryMrs. L. E. Kimball, Gutbrie. TreasurerMrs. L. S. Cbilds, Cboctaw City. UTAH (Including Soutbern Idabo). WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. Clarence T. Broxvn, Salt Lake City, Utab. SecretaryMrs. XV. S. Hawkes, 135 Sixtb Street, E., Salt Lake City, Utab. TreasurerMrs. Dana XV. Bartlett, Salt Lake City, Utab. Secretary for ldaboMrs. Oscar Sonnenkaib, Pocatello, Idabo. NORTH CAROLINA. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. 3. W. Freeman, Dudley. Secretary and TreasurerMiss A. E. Farrington, Higb Point. TEXAS. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. J. M. Wendelkin, Dallas. SecretaryMrs. H. Burt, Lock Box 563, Dallas. TreasurerMrs. C. I. Scofield, Dallas. GEORGIA. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. H. B. Wey, 253 Forest Avenue, Atlanta. SecretaryMrs. H. A. Kellam, Atlanta. TreasurerMiss Virginia Holmes, Barnesville. S tbe purpose of exact information we note tbat, wbile tbe W. H. M. A. appears in tbis list as a State body for Mass. and R. I., it bas certain auxiliaries elsewbere. 109 RECEIPTS FOR JANUARY, 1895. liHl$ DANIEL HAND FUND For the .1$ducation of Colored People. Income for January $s,is~ 50 Previously acknowledged 17,210 00 $18,322 50 CURRENT RECEIPTS. MAINE, $1,107.42. Andover. Mrs. Haskell Bailey, for Blowing Rock, N. C 00 Auburn. High St. Cong. Ch. ~ o( which from Ladies of the Womans Branch? 50 00 Bath. A Friend,~ for Student A id, Talladega, Ala 10 50 Bath. A Friend 00 00 Bath. Mrs. Mary A. Fiske, Pkg., for Nat, Ala., and Pkg. Goods, for High Point N. C. Bangor~ Indian Rights Asso., by Mrs. Denlo, for Hosj3ital, Standing Rock, N.D 5000 Bangor. Central ~.ong 50 00 Belfast. North Ch., C. E. Soc., for Mountain Work 5 00 Belfast. First Cong. Ch., Junior End. Soc. for Reindeer, Alaska M I 00 Belfast. Miss Cutter, material for Sewing Class, Trinity Sch., Athens, Ala. Bluehill. H. A. Fisher I 50 Brewer. Manly Hardy :o 00 Gardiner. Miss Eleanor Cannard 500 00 Hallowell. Mrs. S. B. Gilman, for Thunderhawk M I 00 Holden. Jun. C. E. Soc., Bbl. C., for High Point, N. C. Kennebunkport. South Ch., ~ First Ch., ~ 5000 Limington. Cong. Ch 12 no Litchfleld Center. Mrs. D. T. Smith,for Blowing Rock, N. C 2 00 Macbias. Box C.,for Marion, Ala. Madison. Freight to Marion, Ala 2 50 Orland. H. T. and S. E. Buck 20 00 Portland. State St. Cong. Ch., i~o; High St. Cong. Ch., ~.5s; St. Lawrence St. Ch., s 272 5 Portland. Wiliiston Cong. Ch. Sab. Seb., for Mission S. S., Lexington, Ky., 2.50; Williston Ch. C. E. S., Box Christmas Goods,for Lexington, K 2 50 Portland. Y. P. 5. C. E., ~Tilliston C h., Bbl. C. and Papers,for High Point, N. C. Portland. Friends, Box Christmas Goods,for Marion, Ala. Saco. Cong. Ch.. 7.20; J. W. Littlefield, 2.50 970 Skowbegan. Mrs. L. W. Weston and her Sab. Seb. Class (Chinese) 2 50 Skowbegan. Mrs. L. W. Weston, Bbl. C. and Pkg. Christmas Gifts, for High Point, N. C. South Berwick. Mrs. K. B. Lewis and Mrs. Haymans S. S. Classes, for Stu- dent Aid, FiskU 55 00 South Gardiner. Jun. C. E. Soc., Box C., for Marion, Ala. Temple. Cong. Ch 6 Si Westbrook. Cumberland Mills Cong. Ch iil 70 Wilton. Cong. Ch 5 75 Winslow. Sab. Seb. Cong. Ch in 00 Yarmouth. Bbl. C., for High Point, N C. Received for Dorchester Acad., Mc Zntosh, Ga.. Bangor. Hammond St. Sab. Seb 1000 Bangor. Miss Hattie Mos- her, Bbl. C. Brewer. V. P. 5. C. E., Bbl. C. Castine. Elsie Storer, Pkg, Christmas Cards. Eastport. Mrs. R. H. Reynolds, Pkg. Christmas Cards. Sandy Point. Mrs. Robert French, Pkg. Handkfs. Wintersport. Mrs. Emma A. Smith, Bbl. C. Maine Womans Aid to A. M. A., by Mrs. Ida S. Woodbury, Treas. , for Womans Work: Deer Isle. L. M. Soc 8 ~5 Woodfords. L. M. S i~ 00 NEW HAMPSHIRE, $901.96. Acworth. W. Thayer Boscawen. Mrs. P. M. Webster, 2 Bbls. C., 2 for Freight. for Pleasant Hill Acad., Tenn Candia. Cong. Ch. and Soc Charlestown. Mrs. Win. M. Holden Chester. Cong. Ch. and Soc., 16.22; A Friend, 2.50 Chester. Miss Isabella Fits, Pkg. of Christmas Cards,for Thomasnille, Ga. Concord. A Friend, ~ A Friend, 5oc Concord. Granite Mission Band,for Stu- dent Aid, Gregory N. Inst., Wilming- ton, N.C Concord. Box Bedding and Table Linen, for Kings Mountain, N. C. Deerfield. First Cong. Ch Dunbarton. Sab. Seb., Cong. Ch., for Gregory Inst East Aistead. Cong. Ch., by W. H. Spal- ter, Co. Treas East Derry. Ladies Soc. Cong. Ch.,for Freight to Wilmington, N. C Exeter. Rev. Jacob Chapman Francestown. Cong. Ch., 7; Dea. M. B. Fisher, s II 75 5 00 is 67 I 50 58 72 5 50 5 00 i6 25 5 25 3 S9

Receipts for January, 1895 110-120

RECEIPTS FOR JANUARY, 1895. liHl$ DANIEL HAND FUND For the .1$ducation of Colored People. Income for January $s,is~ 50 Previously acknowledged 17,210 00 $18,322 50 CURRENT RECEIPTS. MAINE, $1,107.42. Andover. Mrs. Haskell Bailey, for Blowing Rock, N. C 00 Auburn. High St. Cong. Ch. ~ o( which from Ladies of the Womans Branch? 50 00 Bath. A Friend,~ for Student A id, Talladega, Ala 10 50 Bath. A Friend 00 00 Bath. Mrs. Mary A. Fiske, Pkg., for Nat, Ala., and Pkg. Goods, for High Point N. C. Bangor~ Indian Rights Asso., by Mrs. Denlo, for Hosj3ital, Standing Rock, N.D 5000 Bangor. Central ~.ong 50 00 Belfast. North Ch., C. E. Soc., for Mountain Work 5 00 Belfast. First Cong. Ch., Junior End. Soc. for Reindeer, Alaska M I 00 Belfast. Miss Cutter, material for Sewing Class, Trinity Sch., Athens, Ala. Bluehill. H. A. Fisher I 50 Brewer. Manly Hardy :o 00 Gardiner. Miss Eleanor Cannard 500 00 Hallowell. Mrs. S. B. Gilman, for Thunderhawk M I 00 Holden. Jun. C. E. Soc., Bbl. C., for High Point, N. C. Kennebunkport. South Ch., ~ First Ch., ~ 5000 Limington. Cong. Ch 12 no Litchfleld Center. Mrs. D. T. Smith,for Blowing Rock, N. C 2 00 Macbias. Box C.,for Marion, Ala. Madison. Freight to Marion, Ala 2 50 Orland. H. T. and S. E. Buck 20 00 Portland. State St. Cong. Ch., i~o; High St. Cong. Ch., ~.5s; St. Lawrence St. Ch., s 272 5 Portland. Wiliiston Cong. Ch. Sab. Seb., for Mission S. S., Lexington, Ky., 2.50; Williston Ch. C. E. S., Box Christmas Goods,for Lexington, K 2 50 Portland. Y. P. 5. C. E., ~Tilliston C h., Bbl. C. and Papers,for High Point, N. C. Portland. Friends, Box Christmas Goods,for Marion, Ala. Saco. Cong. Ch.. 7.20; J. W. Littlefield, 2.50 970 Skowbegan. Mrs. L. W. Weston and her Sab. Seb. Class (Chinese) 2 50 Skowbegan. Mrs. L. W. Weston, Bbl. C. and Pkg. Christmas Gifts, for High Point, N. C. South Berwick. Mrs. K. B. Lewis and Mrs. Haymans S. S. Classes, for Stu- dent Aid, FiskU 55 00 South Gardiner. Jun. C. E. Soc., Box C., for Marion, Ala. Temple. Cong. Ch 6 Si Westbrook. Cumberland Mills Cong. Ch iil 70 Wilton. Cong. Ch 5 75 Winslow. Sab. Seb. Cong. Ch in 00 Yarmouth. Bbl. C., for High Point, N C. Received for Dorchester Acad., Mc Zntosh, Ga.. Bangor. Hammond St. Sab. Seb 1000 Bangor. Miss Hattie Mos- her, Bbl. C. Brewer. V. P. 5. C. E., Bbl. C. Castine. Elsie Storer, Pkg, Christmas Cards. Eastport. Mrs. R. H. Reynolds, Pkg. Christmas Cards. Sandy Point. Mrs. Robert French, Pkg. Handkfs. Wintersport. Mrs. Emma A. Smith, Bbl. C. Maine Womans Aid to A. M. A., by Mrs. Ida S. Woodbury, Treas. , for Womans Work: Deer Isle. L. M. Soc 8 ~5 Woodfords. L. M. S i~ 00 NEW HAMPSHIRE, $901.96. Acworth. W. Thayer Boscawen. Mrs. P. M. Webster, 2 Bbls. C., 2 for Freight. for Pleasant Hill Acad., Tenn Candia. Cong. Ch. and Soc Charlestown. Mrs. Win. M. Holden Chester. Cong. Ch. and Soc., 16.22; A Friend, 2.50 Chester. Miss Isabella Fits, Pkg. of Christmas Cards,for Thomasnille, Ga. Concord. A Friend, ~ A Friend, 5oc Concord. Granite Mission Band,for Stu- dent Aid, Gregory N. Inst., Wilming- ton, N.C Concord. Box Bedding and Table Linen, for Kings Mountain, N. C. Deerfield. First Cong. Ch Dunbarton. Sab. Seb., Cong. Ch., for Gregory Inst East Aistead. Cong. Ch., by W. H. Spal- ter, Co. Treas East Derry. Ladies Soc. Cong. Ch.,for Freight to Wilmington, N. C Exeter. Rev. Jacob Chapman Francestown. Cong. Ch., 7; Dea. M. B. Fisher, s II 75 5 00 is 67 I 50 58 72 5 50 5 00 i6 25 5 25 3 S9 RECEIPTS. Hanover. Dartmouth Sab. Sch., 20, for Indian M., and I5for Mountain Work. Keene. First Cong. Ch., by W. H. Spal- ter, Co. Treas., 50; Sab. 5db. Second Cong. Ch., 20 Lebanon. Cong. Ch and Soc Lyndeborough. Ladies Sewing Soc..... Manchester. Franklin St. Cb Milford. Ladies Charitable Soc., Cong. Ch. for Student A id, Tougaioo U Newport. Miss Eugenie E. Waite, for McIntosh, Ga Penacook. Cong. Ch Pittsfield. First Cong. Ch Plainfield. S. R. B Portsmouth. Mission Circle of Little Folks, by Miss K. Sweetser, Christmas Box,for Caj5lahosic, Va. Rindge. Cong. Ch., by W. H. Spalter, Co. Tress Rochester. Sab. Sch. of First Cong. Ch. Rye. Cong. Ch. Sanboroton. Cong. Cb.... . Somersworth. Cong. Ch South Barostead. J. 0. Tasker, so; Mrs. J. 0. Tasker, s Temple. Sab. Sch. Cong. Ch Tilton. Cong. Ch Warner. Cong. Ch Webster. Christmas Bbl., for Kings Mountain, N. C.; s.sofor Freight West Manchester. South Main St. Cong. Ch.. New Hampshire Female Cent Inst. and Home Missionary Union, by Miss Annie McFarland, Treas. for Womans Work: Concord. Y. P. 5. C. E. of South Ch.. for a .Pug5ii, Nat, Ala 20 00 Tamworth. Mrs. Amanda M. Davis, for Negro Sck~P 50 00 35 00 70 00 36 00 8o 23 2 50 4 6o 25 25 20 00 22 8o i8 89 25 00 7 55 32 00 4 00 I 50 II 00 6o 00 $702 96 EsTATE. Rindge. Estate Mersylvia Hubbard, by R. A. Hubbard, Executor 200 00 $902 96 ~ 56 42 50 25 00 55 33 VERMONT, $873.37. Barnet. Cong. Ch Bennington. Second Cong. Ch Brattleboro. Mary L. Hadley Burlington College St. Cong Ch Damons Crossing Geo. A. Appleton... East Poultocy. Mrs. Jane G. Wilcox Granby. Infant Class, Mite Boxes, by Mrs. J. L. Wells, Teacherfor Rosebud Indian M Hardwick. Mra. E. F. Strickland, for Indian 211.. Grand River, N. D Lyndon. Mr. Cobb, i; Rev, P. B. Fisk, s,for Student Aid, Tilloison Inst.. Middlebury. Mrs. C. S. Burdett, 4; A Friend, Milton. V. P. 5. C. E. Cong. Ch., for Alaska 211 North Bennington. V. P. 5. C. E., Cong. Ch. for Mountain Work North Bennington. Mrs. and Rev. H. D. Hall, Bbl. C., for Grand View, Tenn. North Craftsbury. Cong Ch Northfield. A Friend, to conat. CHARLES M. DAVIs, GEORGE DENNY and CHARLES P. LEONARD L.Ms North Springfield. Sirs. C. S. Davis North Thetford. Cong. Ch Norwich. Mrs. H. Burton Post Mills. Cong. Ch Rutland. John Howard Saint Albans. Cong. Ch 2 50 3 00 500 3 20 500 5 00 6 25 4 00 78 47 III Saint Johnshury. North Cong. Ch 220 50 South Fairlee. Christian, for Than- derhawk M 2 00 South Newbury. Friends, Bbl. C., for Meridian, Miss. Wcst Brattleboro. Mrs. Elvira Stedman, 30, to const. MARIA L. STEDMAN L.M.; Cong. Ch., 23.29 53 29 West Rutland. Cong. Ch 25 00 Woodstock. Cong. Ch .... 22 6o Received for Dorchester Acad., McIn- tosh Ga.~ Barre. L. M. Soc. Cong. Ch., Bbl. C., 2.68 for Freight .. i 68 Barton Landing and Brown in~tO0 200 Berlln. Cong. Ch., Bbl. C., Freight paid. Brookfield. Cong. Ch i 33 Burlington. V. P. 5. C. E., Box reading matter. Freight laid. Ludlow. L. H. M. Soc.... 2 00 Manchester. H. M. Soc.... Milton. Cong. Ch., Bbl. C., sfor Freight 2 00 Saint Johnsbury. South Ch.,for Freight 2 00 Waitsfield. Home Cir- cle, Bbl. C., 2 for Freight 2 00 West Glover. For Freight 2 00 Westminster. Mrs. Ara- bella G. Thompson, and Pkg. Pictures, etc 2 00 17 59 Womans Home Missionary Union of Vermont, by Mrs. William P. Fair- banks, Tress. ,for Wo,nans Work: Bellows Falls. Jun. C. E., for Indian Sch.g3 2000 Brattleboro West. Jun. C. E.,for Indian Schj5 500 Burlington. First Ch., W. H.M.S 2000 Clarendon. Sab. Sch., for Indian SchI 2 00 Montpelier. Jun. C. E. ,for Ludian SchjS 20 00 Morrisville. United Work- ers 5 00 New Haven. Munger Band,for Indian Schj5 625 North Pownal. Sab. Sch., for Indian Schj5 2 00 Norwich. Sab. Sch.. for Indian SchiS 6 00 Olcott. Sab. Sch., for In- dian Sch15 5 00 Rutland. W. H. M. S 30 00 Saint Albans. W. H. M. 5. 25 00 Saint Johnsbury. North Ch 9322 Saint Johnsbury. North Ch. S. S. Class, for In- dian Schj.S Westminster. W. H. M. S. 2 32 3 00 ______ 222 78 $855 37 ESTATE. Jericho. Estate of Hoses Spaulding, C. M. Spaulding, ~o; A. C. Spaulding. s; E. J. Spaulding, 3 s8 00 $873 37 MASSACHUSETTS, $9,282.93. Amesbury. Union Evan. Ch Amesbury. Main St. Cong. Ch., by Rev. Geo. L. Richmond, for Indian Schj5, Santee Sch., Neb 5 50 6000 112 RECEiPTS. Amherst. South Ch...... . ii 00 Andover. South Cong. Ch., is~.~ West Cong. Ch., 42.95 ; West Cong. Sah. Sch., 52.40; Free Christian Ch., 10.50 243 39 Andover. A New England Aunt, for Thu nderhawk M 5 00 Andover. Young Ladies Soc. Christian Workers, So. Ch. for Straight U 5 00 Arlington. Cong. Ch ~o 6o Athol. Cong. Ch 200 07 Auburodale. Kings Daughters, 2 and Bbl. C.,for Blowing Rock, N. C 2 00 Bedford. Cong. Ch 84 Beverly. North Cong. Ch. for Evans, Ky 38 ~6 Beverly. A Friend, ~ A. Haskell, 50C 5 50 Blandford. Willing Hands Cir ie,for A. G. SeA., Moorhead Miss 20 0o Boston. Union Ch 254 94 W. G. Means 225 00 A Steward of the Master, ~o,for Bible Sch., Grand View, Tenn.; and 30 for La Moyne Inst., h/em- .iihis, Tenn., to const. RALPH A. FIELO and Miss S. ELLEN HOBART L.Ms 6o 00 Benj. F. Dewing 50 00 Sub. Sch. Union Cong. Ch., for Student Aid, Pleas ant HillAcad., Tenn 5ooo Mrs. Frederick Jones, 25.25; and Bbl. Goods,for Glou- cester Sch., Caj5~ahosic, Va 25 25 A Young Friend, for Indian Girl, Santee, Neb 2 ~ The Whatsoever Band, for Student Aid, Gregory N. Inst., Wilmington, N. C. 00 Womans Soc. Central Ch., Bbls. C..for Nat, Ala. Allston. Mrs. R. H. Bird, for Indian M ~ 00 Brighton. Chas. A. Bar- nard 200 00 Dorchester. Second Cong. Ch 22768 Dorchester. Ladies of Pil- grim Ch 50 Dorchester. Second Ch., B. C. Hardwick 75 oo Neponset. Y. P. 5. C. E. Trinity Ch 6 00 Roxbury. Walnut Av.Cong. Ch 231 25 Roxhury. Sab. Sch., Inter- mediate Dept., Highland, Cong. Ch., Birthday gift for Rev.A.A.Myers.... 789 South Boston. Y. L. M. S. of Phillips Ch 5 00 West Roxhury. Helping Hands,for Student Aid, Santee Indian Sch 10 00 2,026 02 Boxhoro. Cong. Ch 10 00 Boxford. Mary A. Peabody, Library books,for Moorhe~ed, Miss. Bridgewater. Central Sq. Cong. Ch 22 87 Brimfield. Second Cong. Ch 8 57 Brockton. Mrs. Thomas C. Perkins i 50 Brookfield. Cong. Ch 6 91 Brookline. Harvard Cong. Ch isi 74 Campridgeport. Sab. Sch, Prospect St. Cong. Ch., 50, for Santee Indian M.; 5o for Fort Berthold Indian M.; ioo for Christian Endeavor Hall, McIn- tosh, Ga 200 00 Cambridgeport. Pilgrim Ch., ~ R. L. 5,. 25 . ~8 94 Cambridgeport. C. E., 2 Bbls. C., for Marion, Ala. Campello. Mrs. A. Leach 50 Chelsea. Soc. of Women Workers, Central Cong. Ch., to coost. MRS. DORA D. WYLLIR L.M., 37 5o; First Ch., s 42 50 Chicopee. Y. P. 5. C. E. of Third Cong. Ch., for Central Ch., New Orleans, La i5 00 Dalton. Mrs. James B. Crane, to coost. MRS. SAMUEL E. GATES, MRS. R. D. GAHAN and GEOROR N. PERKINS L.M s 100 oo Dalton. Mrs. Zenas Crane, to coost. MRS. FRED. PRICE, MRS. LIZZIE L. SMITH and Miss JENNIR E. PIERCE L.Ms ioo 00 Dalton. Sab. Sch.,for School Building, Cumberland Gap, Tenn . 25 00 Deerfield. A Friend in Orthodox Cong. Ch., io; Cong. Ch., adI, 2 12 00 East Douglas. Second Cong. Ch and Soc . 2483 East Somerville. Mrs. Henry Howard 10 00 East Weymouth. Cong. Ch 27 00 Enfield. Cong. Ch i8 03 River. irst Cong. Ch. (is of which for Indian M) 102 72 Fitchburg. Rollstone Cong. Ch., to coost MRS. ARNIE Z. HITCHCOCK, L.M 42 00 Foxhoro. Mrs. M. N. Phelps 50 00 Foxhoro. S. S. Children Prim. Dept. for A. G. Sch., Moorhead, Miss 7 00 Foxboro. Benevolent Circle, Bbl. C., for Moorhead. Miss. Framiogham. Plymouth Ch., 26.25 A Friend in So. Cong. Ch, 5 32 25 FTamingham. A Friend, for Indian M 500 Franklin. First Cong. Soc 8 io Franklin. Ladies Soc., Bbl. C., for Pleasant Hill Acad., Teun. Gardner. First Cong. Ch 25 00 Georgetown. Mem. Cong Ch. 2 Bbls. Books,for Albany, Ga. Gilbertville. Sab. Sch.,for SchoolBuild- ing, CumberlandGajS, Tenn 20 00 Gilbertville. W. H. Caldwell, for Stu- dent A id, Harrow Sch., Cumberland Gal, Tenn ...... ii 00 Gilbertville. Cong. Ch 2 6o Gloucester. Trinity Cong. Ch g~ 97 Hadley. First Cong. Ch., 15.82; Sab. Sch. of First Cong. Co., i6.~6 32 38 Haverhill. North Cong. Ch., 2~ 0.00; West Parish Cong. Ch, 13 213 00 Haverhill. Sab. Sch. West Parish Cong. Ch. (s of which from Class One, for Fish U.) 24 56 Haverhill. V. P. 5. C. E., West Ch. (Extra cent-a-day) 6 9~ Haverhill. S. S. Class, West Cong. Ch, Lesson Picture RoIlfor Thomasville, Ga. Haydenville. Cong. Ch. and Soc 6 i8 Ipswich. South Cong. Ch 40 00 Lancaster. Evan Sab. Sch 8 36 Lawrence. Cong. Ch 10 00 Leicester. First Cong. Ch .., 50 29 Leicester. C. E., for Sch Building Cumberland Gal, Teun 2 CO Leominster. Geo. H. Wheelock s 01 Lexington. Hancock Cong. Ch ii Lowell. Kirk St. Cong. Ch., 83.45; First Cong. Ch., pg.; Mrs. Mary Stetson, 5.15 .. . 247 6o Lowell. Mrs. Frederick Baileys S. S. Class,for Student A id, Ballard Nor mal Inst...... .. 2700 Lowell. A. D. Carter, for Sufferers in Nebraska 25 00 Ludlow. Junior Soc. C. E. Union Ch, ~, for Student Aid, Pleasant Hill Acad., Teun., 5 for Allen Normal Sch., Thomasville, Ga 20 00 Malden. Mrs. E. P. Forster 20 oo RECEIPTS. Maiden. Jun. Soc. C. E. First Cong. Ch., for Indian Al., Standing Rock, N. D.. 5 00 Maiden. Mrs. J. C. K. Ivy and Friends, Bbl. C.; Mrs. R. P. Kemp, and Friends, Bbl. C., etc.,for Caj53akosic, Va. Maplewood. Two Bbls. C. and Box Books,for His-k Point, N. C. Marblehead. First Cong. Ch i~ oo Medford. W. M. Soc. of Union Cong. Ch., ~ Union Cong. Cli., 3.25 8 25 Medway. Village Cong. Ch 25 00 Methuen. Wide Awake Mission Band of First Cong. Ch. for retairs on Church Steeg5le,Abbeville,La ii 00 Methuen. Mrs. S. J. Searle 00 Middleboro. Mrs. A. B. Carleton, for Thunderhawk U I 00 Middleton. Willing Workers, for Stu- dent Aid, Harrow Sch., Camber/and Gaj3, Tenn 3 00 Milford. Cong. Cli., V. P. 5. C. E., Christmas Box,for Grand View, Tenn. Milford. Mrs. Hulda E. Woodbury, Articles for Woodbury and Denison Rooms, Grand Vieto Nor. Inst., Tenn. Milton. for Student Aid, Lin- coln Acad., Kiugs Mt., N. C 2 75 Millbury. M. D. Garfield 25 oo Monson. Miss Sarah E. Bradford, ~ Mrs. C. 0. Chapin, 5 20 00 Monterey. Extra Cent-a-day Band, by Miss Jessie A. Townsend 7 00 Natick. First Cong. Cli 200 00 New Bedford. Mrs. I. E. Jenney, for Mountain Work c~o New Bedford. Miss F. F. Leonard, Toys for Christmas, Thomasville, Ga. New Boston. Ten Endeavorers 6 00 Newburyport. Miss M. W. Tilton 00 Newburyport. Mrs. M. J. Green. 2 Bbls. C.,for Albany, Ga. Newton. Eliot Cli 5i J9 Newton. J. W. Davis, for Indian Al., Grand River, N. P 50 00 Newton Center. First Cong. Cli., 81.20; Miss M. E. Eaton, io 92 20 Newton Highlands. Two Friends, bal. Sckj5,Pleasant Hill, Teun 4200 Northampton. Mrs. Lucy S. Sanderson, for Tkunderkawk Al 50 00 Northampton. Miss F. A. Clark 25 00 Northampton. . Miss Fanny Clark, Box C.,for Lexington, Ky. North Beverly. Mrs. M. A. Baker, Bbl. C. for Students, Grand View, Teun. North Brookfield. First Cong. Cli 35 ~s North Falmouth. Mrs. H. A. Nye 25 North Weymouth. Pilgrim Cong. Cli 25 cw Norton. Mrs. E. B. Wheaton 200 00 Norwood. First Cong. Cli ii~ 05 Oxford. Cong. Cli., to coost. Miss LAURA D. STOcEWELL L.M s~ 45 Pepperell. Cong. Cli., 32.06; Mrs. J. H. Hallfor Orange Park, Fla., 4.50 35 ~6 Pittsfield. Miss Martin, 20; Miss Mary L. Adam, 2for Central Ch., New Or- leans, La 22 00 Quincy. Evan. Cong. Cli., 70, and Sali. Sch., ii (of which from Mr. Wasons Class), Ii; Wonia.ss Miss. Soc., 2 83 00 Reading. Cong. Cli 22 10 Richmond. Kings Daughters,for Stu- dent Aid, Fisk U 30 00 Rockland. Cong. Cli., to coost. MRS. J.S. GRAY L.M 40 00 Rehohoth. Cong. Cli io oo Salem. South Cong. Cli., Primary Class and Teacherfor Student A id, Gregory N. Inst., Wilmington, N. C 3 00 Sharon. Cong. Cli., hal. to coost. RosRior HAMILTON L.M 21 50 Shelliurne. Cong. Cli 45 00 Southampton. Sab. Sch. Cong. Cli., to const. ELLA M. TIFFANY L.M. . . . 33 ii Southampton. Blil. and Box Bedding, etc. ,for Kings Mountain, N. C. 3 South Ashburnham. Blil. C. for Kings Mountain, N. C. Soutliliridge. Cong. Cli., 33.s4; Mrs. Franklin Carter, 50c 34 04 South Deerfield. Lucelia E. Williams 00 South Hadley. Mount Holyoke College, for Student Aid, Fisk U 3500 South Hadley Falls. Cong. Cli. Jun. C. E. S., Bhl. C., etc. for Wilmington, N. C. Spencer, Extra Cent-a-day Band, First Cong. Cli 30 00 Springfield. Park Cong. Cli., 29.15; I 30 25 Springfield. Mrs. C. F. Hobart, for Mountain Work 50 00 Springfield. Sab. 5db. Hope Ch., for Sch. Building, Cumberland Gal, Teun. 5 00 Springfield. Miss Helen M. Towne, Blil. C., for Moorhead, Miss. Stockliridge. Miss Alice Byington, 250 for ChajSel, Rock Creek, N. .0., and 250 for Thu nderhawk Al 500 00 Stockliridge. Miss Brewer,for Thu uder- hawk Al . 20 00 Swampscott. Cong. Cli., to conat. JAMES M. POPE L.M 30 00 Tapleyville. Miss Sarah Richmond, for Camjkton, Ky 3 00 Tapleyville. May P. Grover 00 Taunton. Mrs. David Pollard, for In- dian Al 10 00 Turners Falls. Christmas Offering, Cong. V. P. 5. C. E.,for Central Ch., New Orleans, La. Wakefield. Opportunity Circle, for 6 oo Thu nderhawkM ~ 00 Walpole. Rev. Geo. Langdon i 00 Waltham. Trin. Cong. Cli 9 55 Ware. Sab. 5db. East Cong. Cli., for Mountain Work 40 03 Ware. Primary Dept. Sab. 5db., Cong. Cli. for Children, Rosebud Indian Al.. 7 53 Ware. Sub. Seb., for Christmas Tree, Meridian, Miss 4 00 Ware. Miss Gages S. S. Class, Cong. Cli., Blil. C. br Macon, Ga. Warren. Cong. Ch.,to const. MRS. NEL- LIE F. ADAMS, H. MELvERN UNOER- woon, Miss MINNIE J. WASHBURN, MRS. REBECCA SHAW, FRANK F. GLEASON, MRS. EMMA F. CURTIs and Miss ELLEN F. CUTLER L.Ms 200 00 Wellesley 1-lills. Cong. Cli. and Soc 48 o6 Wendell. Cong. Cli 3 45 Westhoro, Ladies Freedmens Asso. and Friends, 20 for Pleasant Hill. Tenn.; 2ofor Tougaloo U., and to conat. Miss AMELIA HARRINOTON L. M 40 00 Westhoro. Life Member 00 Westhoro. Freedmens Aid Soc., Cong. Cli., Pkg. Christmas Cards,for Thomas- yule, Ga., and Blil. C., for Saluda, N. C. West Boxford. Cong. Cli. Ladies Aid Soc. for Student Aid, Chandler Sch., Lexington, Ky 9 00 West Brookfield. Cong. Cli., bal. to const. MRS. JENNIR K. LIVERMORE L.M 2652 XVest Medford. Mrs. Stebbins i 00 West Medway. Dorcas H. M. Soc., Third Cong. Cli. for Nat, Ala 2 00 Westport. Pacific Union Cong. Cli 12 50 West Springfield. Mrs. E. D. Bliss, S of whiclifor Tougaloo U. and 2for Santee Indian Al 800 Weymouth Heights. V. P. 5. C. E. and Other Friends,for Nat, Ala is 00 Whitinsville. Sub. Seli. of Cong. Cli 101 26 Williamstown. First Cong. Cli 25 07 Winchester. First Cong. Cli. (I of which for IndianAl 13809 Winchester. Friends, ~ Blils. C., etc., for Meridian, Miss. I 14 Woburn. First Cong. Gb Wollaston. Money Order Worcester. Union Ch., 104.34; Piedmont Ch., 50; Mrs. Win. H. Sanford, 2 Worcester. Plymouth Ch. ,for Carniton, Ky A Friend Hampden Benevolent Association, by George R. Bond, Treas.: Sooth Hadley Falls 5 24 West Springfield. Ladies First Cong. Ch., for Central Ch., New Or leans, La 20 00 Received for Dorchester Academy, Mc- intosh, Ga.: Athol. W. C. T. U., Bhl. C. Curtisville. Bhl. C, 75c.for Freight 75 Dorchester. Rev. Hiram Houston 2 Bhls. C. Great Barrington. Y. P. 5. C. E.,for Stadent Aid... 54 00 Maplewood. Mrs. Frank Parker, Bbl. C. North Brookfield. Miss Laura Miller, Bbl. C. Womans Home Missionary Association of Mass, and R. I., Annie C. Bridg- man, Treas. for Womans Worh: W. H. M. A., for Salarzes of Teachers 338 47 Melrose Highlands. Au 6 50 Roxhury. Walnut Av. Ch. Aux 58 50 Roxbury. Walnut Av. Ch 20 RECEIPTS. 57 75 50 556 34 200 00 55 24 4 75 424 03 $6,941 ~8 ESTATES. Enfield. Estate of Mrs. Sarah H. Blod- gett, by Daniel B. Gillett, Executor... s,ooo 00 Enfield. Estate of J. B. Woods, by Robert M. Woods, Trustee So no Greenfield. Estate R. W. Cook 62 50 Greenfield. Estate of Hon. William B. Washburn, Win. N. Washburn and Franklin G. Fessenden, Executors 22 93 Holliston. Estate of George Batchelder, by 3. M. Batchelder, Agent 26 12 North Brookfield. Estate of Mrs. Eliza W. Johnson, by Abbie W. Whiting, Executrix 50 00 Topsfield. Estate of Charles Herrick, by Robert Lake, Executor. soo 00 $9,152 93 CLOTHING, BooEs, ETC., RECEIVED AT BOSTON OFFICE: Lyndeboro, N. H. Cong. Ch., Commun- ion Servicefor Big Creeh Gal, Ky Lynn, Mass. Geo. H. Martin, Box Sch. Books,for Pleasant Hill, Tenn. Northboro. i\Siss A. M. Small, Picture Rolls,for Pleas nt Hill, Tenn. Weymouth. Rev. John M. Lord, 2 Boxes Books,for Straight U. RHODE ISLAND, $178.99. Chepachet. Cong. Ch 30 CO East Providence. Childrens Band of Newman Cong. Ch 2 50 Little Compton. United Cong. Ch 24 64 Newport. United Cong. Ch 14 54 Pawtucket. Cong. Ch 52 ~6 Providence. Pilgrim Cong. Ch., 34.2; Womans F. H. M. Union, 8; Free Evan. Cong. Ch., so; Y. P. 5. C. E., North Cong. Ch., s.~s; Union Cong. Cli., adl, s ~ CONNECTICUT, $5,579~84. Berlin. Second Cong. Ch 27 00 Bethel. First Cong. Ch., 50.87; A Friend, s 55 87 Bloomfield. Cong. Ch s 84 Bridgeport. Olivet Ch., Mizpah Circle, K. D., Bbl. Christmas Goods,for Mar- ion, Ala. Bristol. Cong. Ch 50 00 Brooklyn. Young Mission Workers, by Philip Trumbull White, Treas., for AlaskaM 200 Chester. G. M. Turnerfor Christmas, Kings Mountain, AT. C 5 rc Cornwall. First Cong. Ch ~6 ~6 Cornwall. Sab. Seb. of First Gb., for Allen Normal Sch., Thomasville, Ga ~ o6 Danbury. First Cong. Ch 27 24 Danielsonville. Westfield Cong. Ch. and Soc 3345 Deep River. Cong. Ch. and Soc 25 28 East Hartford. First Cong. Cli 114 05 East Hartford. Benev. Soc., by Mrs. M. A. Street, Sec., Blil. C., for Grand View, Tenn East Windsor. First Cong. Cli 52 39 Enfield. First Cong. Cli 27 8o Farmington. First Cong. Ch., Henry D. Hawleyto const. PAUL WALENBUEG and JAMES PATTEESON L.Ms 500 00 Goshen. Cong. Ch., Blil. C., for Grand View, Tenn. Guilford. First Cong. Cli., to coust. SAMUELD.BLATCHLEY L.M 3000 Haddam. Cong. Y. P. 5. C. E., for Cen- tral Ch. New Orleans, La 2 25 Hamden. Mrs. E. D. Swift 2 00 Hartford. Asylum Hill Cong. Cli., 353.94; First Cong. Cli., Io9.c8; Fourth Cong. Cli., 25.23 444 25 Hartford. Sab. Seli., Pearl St. Cong. Cli., for Industrial Work, Fish U 40 00 Hartford. Mrs. E. R. Rexford,for Stu- A id, Saluda Sem. N C tient 2500 Hartford. Sab. Seli., Central Cli., for Central Ch., New Orleans, L s8 00 1-lebron. Ladies Benev. Soc. First Cong. Cli., Bhl. C. for Thomasville, Ga. Kensington. Cong. Cli., 26.08; Wifliam Upson, so; Miss Mary H. Upson, 5 45 o8 Kent. Mrs. Randolph Frishie, Box C., for Thomasville, Ga. Lakeville. Mrs. S. P. Rolihins, for Mountain Work 4 50 Ledyard. Cong. Cli., 25; Sali. 5db. Cong. Cli., 2.10 27 20 Lyme. First Cong. Cli., 5o; A Friend, S 5500 Meriden. First Cong. Cli., for Student Aid, Fish U 5000 Meriden. Member First Cong Ch.,for Indian M ~ 00 Meriden. A Friend 50 00 Middletown. Sab. Sch. First Cli 35 00 Montville Center. Cong. Cli 7 50 Morris. Cong. Cli 20 00 Mount Carmel. Cong. Cli 24 22 Mount Carmel. Cong. Ch.,for IndianM 6 6o Mystic. Cong. Cli 20 45 Nepaug. Cong. Cli 7 00 New Britain. South Cong. Cli., i~~.79; First Cli. of Christ, to coost. Miss ELLEN N. TEACX and JOHN NOETHENO L.Ms, 67.67 245 46 New Britain. Sab. 5db., South Cli., for Mountain Work 25 00 New Britain. First Cli. Mission Helpers, Box C. for Saluda, N. C. New Canaan. Sab. Seli., Cong. Cli. for a Teacher, Santee Indian Sch 500 00 New Canaan. F. H. Gleason i0 00 New Haven. Mrs. H. Farnum, for Thunderhawh M 50 00 New Haven. Second Cong. Cli., 41.95; Sab. 5db., College St. Cong. Cli., I5.... ~6 gs RECEIPTS. New Haven. Friends in Y. P. 5. C. E., United Ch. for Central Ch., New Or leans, La 3 00 New Haven. Y. P. S. C. E., Ch. of the Redeemer, adi for Central Ck., New Orleans, La.... I 00 New Haven. Children of Orphan Asylum, 2 Pkgs. Cards,for McIntosh, Ga. New London. First Church of Christ 45 76 New London. A Friend in First Ch. of Christ 25 00 New London. Chinese and Teachers First Ch. of Christ, hy Mary G. Brain- ard,for Cal. ChineseM 10 00 New Preston. Mrs. E. C. Williams 2 00 Newtown. Cong. Ch 7 00 Norfolk. Cong. Ch. and Soc 523 85 North Granhy. First Cong. Ch ~ 51 Norwalk. First Cong. Ch., to const. MRS. GEORGE R. HENoRIcEsoN, L.M 52 35 Norwich. Second Cong. Ch., 71.50; First Cong. Ch., 55.27; Greenville Cong. Ch., 20 146 77 Norwich. Sah. Sch.. Broadway Cong. Ch.,for Mountain Work in Tenn. ... 25 00 Norwich. Sah. Sch., Greenville Cong. Ch.,for Mountain Work 9 00 Norwich. Park Ch. Y. P. 5. C. E., Bhl. C., for Grand View, Tenn. Norwich. Second Cong. Ch., Christmas Box, for Athens, Ala. Norwich. L. H. M. S., Greenville Ch., 2 Bhls. C. for McIntosh, Ga. Old Lyme. Cong. Ch 64 20 Orange. Mrs. E. C. Russells S. S. Class, for Indian M 3 25 Orange. Ladies Soc., 2.50 and Dining Room Carpet/or Knoxville, Ten..... Plainfield. Miss S. E. Francis, Bhl C., for Students, Grand View, Normal Inst., Teun. Pomfret. Cong. Ch 45 67 Preston City. Con g. Ch 24 6o Ridgefield. First Cong. Ch 30 00 Roxhury. Cong. Ch 5 20 Salishury. Cong. Ch 57 g5 Scitico. A Friend,for Indian M.... 3 00 Somers. A Frieno ... 20 us Sound Beach. Pilgrim Cong. Ch., Jun. Y. P. 5; C. E.,for Kings Mountain, NC. 2 00 South Hartford. Cong. Ch. Ladies Sew, Soc., Bhl. C/or Wilmington, N. C. Southington. for ed. of Little Mary, Gregory Inst cc Southington. First Cong. Ch, Bhl. C., for Grand Vie~zo, Tenn. Southport. A Friend,for Mountain Work 50 ~ South Windsor. First Cong. Ch ~ Suffield. Mission Band, First Ch., Bhl. C., for Grand View, Tenn. Talcottville. Mrs. Rose J. Talcott, Christmas Cards, for Grand View, Tenn. Thomaston. First Cong. Ch ii 28 Thomaston. Primary Dept. Sah. Sch. First Cong. Ch., for the Children of Rosebud Indian M II 00 Torrington. Junior End. Soc. Third Cong. Ch.,for Central Ch., New Or- leans, La 2 00 Unionville. First Church of Christ, 30; Mrs. James A. Smith, 25 ~5 00 Wallingford. S. H. B 20 00 Warrenville. A Friend s 00 Westhrook. A Lady Westchester. Christian Bees (H. W. S.), Bhl. C.,for Moorhead Miss. West Hartford. Anson Chappell 12 oo West Hartford. Mrs. M. L. Whitman, for Saluda, N. C I 72 West Hartford. Christian Workers Assn., H. M. Dept., Box C.,for Saluda, N. C. West Haven. Cong. Ch., and Soc . i8 75 Westport. Saugatuck Cong. Ch 25 58 115 Winsted. Sah. Sch. First Cong. Ch. for Industrial Work, Fish U West Winsted. Mrs. C. J. Camp, for furnishing New Hall, Tillotson Inst.. Windsor. First Cong. Ch., to const. MRS. WM. 0. HAYDEN and MRS. WALTER LOOMIS L.Ms Woodhridge. Cong. Ch Woodhury. First Cong. Ch Womans Cong. Home Missionary Union of Coon., Mrs. W. W. Jacohs, Treas., for Womans Work. Hartford. A Friend, First Ch., Jun. Aux 30 00 Kent. Sah. Sch. Cong. Ch 10 00 Manchester. First Ch. L. B. Soc 22 00 New Haven. United Ch Ladies Aid Soc., for Cen- tral Church, Neqo Or- leans 27 50 Norwalk. S. S Circles Aux. to L. B. Assn. of First Ch for Student Aid, Grand View, Nor- mal Sch 35 00 Suffield. Y. L. M. Circle 12 50 Thompson. Aux i8 00 26 66 70 00 II 24 5 00 255 00 $3,154 09 ESTATES. Cornwall. Estate of S. C. Beers io6 ~s Groton. Estate of Mrs. B. N. Hurlhutt.. 319 20 Simshury. Estate of Cordelia E. Wil- cox, hy C. H. Eno, Executor 500 00 West Hartford. Estate of Nancy S. Gay- lord, Francis H. Parker, Executor 1,500 00 $5,579 84 NEW YORK, $6,236.78. Alhany. Miss A. Van Vrankin,Ior Glou cester Sch., Cati5ahosic, Va Batavia. Miss F. P. RiceforA. G. Sch., Moorhead, Miss Bayshore, L. I. Sah. Sch. Cong. Ch Berkshire. Y. P. 5. C. E. of Cong. Ch.. Binghamton. Mrs. J. E. Bean, for Indian M Brockport. Normal Sch., for Lincoln Normal Sch., Marion, Ala Brooklyn. Clinton Ave. Cong. Ch. Brooklyn. Clinton Ave. Cong. Sah. Sch., for Student Aid, Pleasant Hill Acad., Tenn Brooklyn. Miss Ellen Thurston, for Santee Indian .S~ch Brooklyn. Sah. Sch. C9ntral Cong. Ch., for Teacher, Santee Indian Sch Brooklyn. Evangel. Circle of Lewis Av. Cong. .......... Ladies Guild Clinton Brooklyn. Young Ave. Cong. Ch.,Box,for & e HomeLex- ington, Ky.; New Eng. Ch., Christmas Box, for Athens, Ala.; New Eng. Ch. Ladies Soc., Bhl. C. and Christmas Goods, for Marion, Ala.; Lee Av. Cong. Ch., 2 Boxes C., for Kings Moun- tain, N. C. Buffalo. Peoples Ch Camhridge. H. Cornelia Gilhert Camden. Cong. Ch., Large Box C., for Hillsboro, N. C. Canandaigua. First Cong. Ch., of which 5o.4sfor Santee Indian M Chittenango. Mrs. Amelia L. Brown.... Clifton Springs. A Friend Cohoes. Special Meeting, First Baptist Ch., for Gloucester Sch., Ca/i.g5ahosic, Va Coventry. Mrs. S. A. Beardslee Elizahethtown. Cong. Ch 2 75 500 6 ~ 4 98 300 00 50 00 50 00 37 50 8o9 6 00 64 09 5 00 800 40 83 7 35 ii6 Fairport. Sab. 5db. Cong. Ch Fillmore. L. L. Nourse Franklin. Cong. Ch Gloversville. Mrs. Catherine Van Voast, by Rev. W. E. Park Granby Center. Mrs. 3. C. Harrington.. Haverstraw. Rev. A. S. Freeman, for Student Aid, Fisk U Jamestown. , for Student Aid, TrinitySck.. Athens Ala Lebanon. Sab. Sch. Cong. Cli Le Roy. Miss D. A. Pbillips Little Falls. Mrs. F. D. Emerson, for Gloucester ScA., Ca515ahosic, Va Lockport. First Cong. Ch., W. H. M. S. and Sab. Scb., Box Christmas Goods, for Marion, Alo. Millers Place. S. B. Jones Moravia. For Freight Morrisania. Fourth Ave. Cong. Ch., C. E. Soc Mount Morris. Cypress Band, Blil. C., for Moorhead, IJdiss. Mount Vernon. Cong. Ch., sisa Sab. Sch. Cong. Cli., ss.88 New York. Sab. 5db. B issionary Asso., Broome St. Tab., a~ for One Shore; His Willing Circle of Kings Daughters, Broome St. Tab., ~.sa, by Miss C. A. Freeman New York. Mrs. L. H. Spelman, for Central Ch., New Orleans, La., and to coost. MRS. Jassia TAyLOR L.M New York. Miss D. E. Emersonfor A. G. Sch.. Moorhead, Miss., and to coost. MRs. MARY CORA BaNNER L.M New York. Mrs. M. D. Wicker New York. M. M. Snowdenfor Glouces- ter Sch., CaHahosic, Va New York. Mrs. Fred. Billings, a doz. pieces Practice Cloth,for Macon, Ga. New York. B. Van Wagenen, Box Candy, for Marion, Ala. North Walton. Union Miss. Soc Ogdensburg. Soc., Box Bedding, Freight paid,for Knoxville, Teon. Orient. Cong. (li Oswego Falls. First Cong. Cli Port Chester. Sab. 5db. tong. Cli Pouglikeepsie. First Cong. Cli Rusliville. Cong. Cli., Bbl. C., for Green- wood, S. C. Sayville. Sab. Sch. Cong. Cli Sidney. Cong. Cli Sherburn. Mrs. Tucker, Christmas Gifts, for Jonesboro. Teon. Spencerport. Miss Mary E. Dyer Syracuse. Plym. Cong. Cli Tiny. Mrs. S. Tappins, a; Mrs. D. Baldwin and Friends, Bbl.for Gafl5o- hosic, V Vernon Center. Rev. G. C. Judson Verona. E. Day Warsaw. Sab. Scli. Cong. Cli., Inter- mediate Dept., for Student A Id, Big Creek Got, Tenn West Bloomfield. ~ab Scli Cong. Cli... West Winfield. Cong. Cli Woodliaven. Junior C. E. Soc., Blil. C., for Moorhead, Miss. Womans Home Missionary Union of N. Y., by Mrs. 3. 3. Pearsall, Treas., for Wonsa s Work. Albany. First Cong. Cli., C. E 50 00 Aquebogue. H. M. U i8 00 Barryville. W. M. S 2 00 Brooklyn. Park Cli., L. M. S 6oo Churcliville. Sub. Scli. Mission Circle 5 00 Flushing. S. S. of First Cong. Cli 36 00 Ithaca. W.H.M.S 2000 New York. Broadway Tab. Ch. Soc 93 25 RECEIPTS. 4 00 sI 85 5 00 5 00 5 00 25 00 23 on 34 iS 30 00 30 00 25 00 25 90 7 6o 4 50 5 00 23 28 12 97 9 75 500 23 84 5 00 9 .00 5 25 7 75 Syracuse. Geddes Cli., W. M. S 54 00 Warsaw. C. E 10 50 204 75 $1,236 78 ESTATE. Lockport. Estate of Edward Simmons.. 4,900 00 $6,136 78 NEW JERSEY, $239.50. Cliatham. Sub. 5db. Stanley Cong. Cli in 00 Colts Neck. Reformed Cli 3 43 Hammonton. Miss Carrie E. Aldenfor Student Aid, Dorchester A cad., McIn- tosh, Ga 4 00 Monroe. Temperance Legion, Pkg. Papers and Cards, for Beach Inst., Savannah, Ga. Roselle. A Friend (so of which for Pleasant Hzll Acad., Teun., Girls Deti.) 250 00 Trenton. Mrs. 0. 5. Fuller . 00 Upper Montclair. Sub. Sch. Christian Union Cong. Cli Westfield. Ministering ~ 87 League, Box Gifts,for McIntosh, Ga. M.N.E. 2000 Womans Home Missionary Union of the N. J. Asso., by Mrs. J. H. Denison, Tress., for Womans Work. Bound Brook. Sunbeam Mission Circle 6 04 Philadelphia, Pa. Central Cong. Cli., W. H. M. S.. is s6 Washington, D. C. Mission- ary Circle and Juniors, Plymouth Cong. Cli 5 00 PENNSYLVANIA, ~ Coudersport. John S. and Mary W. Mann Edwardsdale. Welsh Cong. Cli Germantown. Mrs. B. R. Smith, for Gloucester Sch., Cattahosic, Va Germantown, Mrs. B. R. Smith and Friends, Bbl.,for Gattahosic, Va. Guys Mills. Mrs. F. M. Guy Philadelphia. Mrs. Rebecca White, for Gloucester Sch., Cattahosic, Va Scranton. Providence Welsh Cong. Cli. Scranton. F. K. Tracy, for Blacksmith Shot, Selma, Ala South Bethlehem. Charles E. Webster.. Tarentum. Ref. Presli. Ch., L. M. S., Blil. C.,for Marion, Ala. Wilkesbarre. Puritan Cong. Cli 5 00 5 00 2 34 5 00 5 00 4 00 5 00 OHIO, $1,120.46. Akron. First Cong. Cli 6 no Akron. Sub. 5db. West Cong. Cli ~ 00 Bellevue. Jun. C. E. S., by Mrs. Rev. C. K. Swartz, Box Dolls, etc. for Grand View, Tenn. Cincinnati. Lawrence St. Cong. Cli., Columbia Cong. Cli., 20.52 41 ~ Cincinnati. Storrs Cong. Cli., for Canot- ton, Ky 4 4S Claridon. Mrs. Bruce, for Thunder- hawkM on Cleveland. Lewis Ford, so; Pilgrim Cli., soo.8~ Sub. Sch. First Cong Cli., 20.30; Lorain St. Mission, s; Olivet Cong. Cli., 2.01; Mrs. Fanny W. Low, 5 333 i6 Cleveland. L. H. M. Soc. Euclid Av. Ch., Bhl. C., for HillsSoro, N. C. Cleveland. Mrs. A. 3. Smith, Box C.; Mothers Meeting, Pkg. C for Gum- berland Got, Tenn. Conneaut. Sub. Sch. Cong. Cli., for Stu dent Aid, Fisk U 25 00 Dover. Junior Soc., Christmas Gifts; Other Friends, Clothing, forlonesboro. Teun. RECEIPTS. Elyria. Sab. Scli. Cong. Ch 20 00 Gustavus. First Con g.Ch adi 200 Huntsburg. Cong. Cli. Sali. Sch., ~ C. E., s 6oo Kingsville. A Friend, 30; Miss Eliza S. Comings, so 40 00 Lyme. Cong. Cli s6 8s Mansfield. First Cong. Cli. (i of which for Indian Al, Santee, Neb.) and to coost. Mas. LEWIS BOWERS, Mas. V. M. DIcKSON, PROF. A. J. SCHANCE and DR. J. LILLIAN MCBRIDE L Ms 140 27 Marysville. Bhl. C., for Freight, for Maraon, Ala S CO Mesopotamia. Cong. Cli., Bhl. C. and Bedding,forCumberland Gag3, Tean. North IFalrfield. G. M. Keeler 00 North Fairfield. Ladies Soc., Blil. C., for Pleasant HillAcad., Tenn. Oak Hill. Kings Daughters, Patchwork, for Macon, Ga. Olierlin. First Cong. Cli., 71.43 Dr. Dudley Allen, 30, to const. REV. R. HICKS L.M . 101 43 Olierlin. Miss L. C. Wattles, for Stu- dent Aid, Fisk U ... 20 00 Olierlin. Win. M. Mead, so; Mrs Maria Goodale Frost, 5 .. 25 00 Olierlin. Mrs. H. P. Kennedy, Bhl. C., for Moorhead, Miss. Olierlin. Second Cong. Cli., Bhl. C.,for Wilmington N. C. Olierlin. First Cli. Ladies Soc., Bhl. C., for Tougaloo U. Painesville. First Cong. Cli., ~ En- terprise Mission Circle hy Mabel Cur tiss, 5 39 73 Plain. Cong. Cli., 3.19; Sali. Sch. Cong. Cli., 5.30 8 49 Saylirook. Mission Band, hy Louise Hilkert, Treas . 4 90 Shawnee. First Cong. Cli 3 50 Toledo. First Cong. Cli III 50 Wauseon. Cong. Cli., V. P.S. C. E., for Student Aid, Williamsburg Acad., Ky 890 Wellington. First Cong. Cli., to coost. MIss CLARA SMITH L.M 45 So Wooster. Mrs. James Mullinsfor Then derkawk Al 50 cxi Ohio Womans Home Missionary Union, hy Mrs. G. B. Brown, Treas., for Wo- mans Work: Andover. W. M. S oo Akron. Y.P.S.C.E 700 Chatham Center. W. M. S 500 Cleveland. Euclid. V. P. S.C. E sooo Columlius. P. 5. A 20 00 Hudson. W. M. S 9 00 Jefferson. W. M. S 6 00 Oherlin. First L. A. 5.... 14 00 W~~yne ~ ____ Sioo INDIANA, $17.oo. Michigan City. Bhl. C. for Kings Moun- tam, N. C. Terre Haute. First Cong. Cli Valparaiso. A Friend, for Christ mas, McIntosh, Ga ILLINOIS, $504.34. Alhion. V. P. 5. C. E Chicago. V. P. 5. C. E., Union Park Cli., ~ Clarence S. Pellet, so Coliden. Cong. Cli., 9.12; Cong. C. E. Soc.,88c Delavan. R. Hogliton Elgin. First Cong. Cli Evanston. Mrs. E. C. Reed 15 00 2 50 44 00 50 00 50 00 7 Galesliurg. First Cong. Cli., 18.78; Old First Cli., 8.41 27 19 Geneseo. Cong. Cli 41 25 Geneseo. W. M. U. of Cong. Cli., Mrs. P. Huntington, hy Mrs. P. H. Taylor, Treas 9 50 Hyde Park. Mrs. M. A. Gould 50 Joy Prairie. Sali. Sch. Cong. Cli s6 o6 La Grange. First Cong. Cli 35 69 La Salle. Cong. Cli., Bhl. C.,for Tougalco U. Lowell. A Friend 00 Malden. Cong. Cli 4 8o Moline. First Cong. Cli 29 50 Morrison. William Wallace 20 00 Ontario. Cong. Cli 9 47 Peoria. Womens Miss. Soc. First Cong. Ch.,for Beach Inst 19 20 Poplar Gr ye. Cong. Cli o 53 Seward. Cong. Cli 8 00 Shalihona. Cong. Cli 35 50 Shalihona. B. M. L., for Tuition, Moorhead, Miss 3 00 . Mrs. Stacy, Paper and Worsted, for Trinity Sch., Athens, Ala. Illinois Womans Home Missionary Union, Mrs. L. A. Field, Treas., for Womans Work. Chica~o. New ng. W. 50 Chicago. Lincoln Park, V. P.M.S 250 Jacksonville. Young L. Soc 50 00 Oak Park. W. M. S 21 00 La Salle. V. P. 5. C. E 00 Port Byron. W. M. S ii is Princeton. V. P. 5. C. E 5 00 Rockford. Second Cli. W. M.S 300 Waverly. W. M. S i 50 66 6~ MICHIGAN, $235.46. Allendale. Box Papers and Toys, for Athens, Ala. Bendon. Mrs. S. A. B. Carrier s n~ Clinton. V P. 5. C. E., of Cong. Cli., 6; Sali. Sch. Cong. Cli., ~ 10 00 Detroit. Sali. Sch. First Cong. Cli.. 26.56; Fort St. Cong. Ch.,3 29 56 Detroit. Blil. C.,forAthe s, Al Grand Rapids. V. L. M. Soc. of Park Cong. Cli., for Girls, Santee Indian Sch 2500 Jackson. Mrs. Rachel M. Bennett 2 00 Joneaville. R. D. Nichols 50 Kalamazoo. First Cong. Cli II 00 Kalamazoo. First Pres. Cli., 50 copies Songs for Social Worship, for Thoneasville, Ga. Lansing. Plymouth Cli 00 Milford. Mrs. Win. A. Arms, ~ Mrs. T. 0. Bennett, 2; Collected at Family Re- union, 3 10 00 Muskegon. Christmas Box,for Athens, Ala. Olds. E. P. Gates 00 Olivet. Sali. Sch. Cong. Cli., Box Christ- mas Gifts, for Lexington Ky. Port Huron. First Cong. Cli., to const. REV. THOMAS CHALMERS L.M 36 00 Tecuinseli. James Vincent 50 00 Traverse City. Christmas Box, for Athens, Ala. Union City. Mrs. L. L. Lee,for Indian Al. and to coost. Mas. HATTIE S. Mc- CLELLAN L.M 30 00 Watevliet. W. E. Syms, for Student, Fisk U 25 00 Womans Home Missionary Union of Michigan, hy Mrs. E. F. Grahill, Treas., for Womans Work. Ann Arbor. W. H. M. S.. 25 00 i i8 RECEIPTS. Ann Arbor. Mrs. Clara Peck (Memorial) Churches Corners. W. H. M. S Covert. L. M. S Greenville. Y. P. C. E. S., for Indian Boy, Sanlee Sch Irving. W. H. M. S Otsego. W. H. M. S Ovid. W. M. S 500 3 50 5 00 25 50 25 IOWA, $220.52. Ames. Cong. Cli. Jun. C. E. Soc., Box Cards, Toys, etc., for Beach Inst., Savannah, Ga. Anita. Cong. Ch., 7.40; Henry T. Chapin, 4 Cedar Rapids. Busy Bees, for Student Aid, Beach Inst., Savannah, Ga Coldwater. Rudolph Landes Creston. Cong. Cli Des Moines. North Park Cong. Ch., A Friend Goiddeld. C. Phillirook Grinnell. Sab. Sch. Cong Ch., to coost. Miss MARY C. LOMBARD L.M Grinnell. Mrs. Julia D. Brainard. Bhl. C. for Kings Mountain, N. C. Iowa Falls. Mrs. Robert Wright, Pkg. Pictures, for Beach Inst., Savannah, Ga. Manson. Cong. Cli Mitchell. Cong. Cli Monticello. Ladies Soc, Bhl. C., for Pleasant HillAcad., Tenn. Nashua. First Cong. Ch., C. E. Soc., 29 Second-hand Singing Books,for Beach Inst., Savannah, Ga. Newell. Sab. Sch New Hampton. Jun. C. E. Soc., by Arthur Butlerfor Student A id, Beach Inst., Savannah, Ga. Rockford. Cong. Cli Salem. Sab. Scli. Cong. Cli Spencer. C. E. Soc. of First Cong. Cli., for Pleasant Hill Acad., Tena Waterloo. Jun. Endeavors, for Student A id, Harrow Sch., Cumberland Gaj5, Teun Waterloo. J. Leavitt, Single Carriage and Twenty-five Chairs, for Camber- land Gal, Tenn. Iowa Womans Home Missionary Union, Miss Belle L Bentley, Treas., for Womans Worh: Alpha. W.M.S 500 Blairsburg. W. M. S 2 00 Cherokee. W. M. S 20 00 V. P. 5. C. E., 9.83; Jun. V. P. 5. C. E.,3 Grinnell. W. H. M. U Independence. W. H. M. U Independence. Summer Township. W. M. S Lewis. L. M. S MasonCity. L.M.S Postville. Willing Work- ers Storm Lake. L. M. S Toledo. L. M. S Undesignated Funds 39 40 22 40 2 50 5 00 i8 32 9 50 5 00 30 00 7 25 5 25 2 43 4 50 9 z8 3 00 25 00 3 00 25 83 8 70 500 4 6~ 7 00 24 5 77 8o 29 WISCONSIN, $238.13. Baraboo. Jun. C. E. Soc., Box Christmas Goods,for Lexington, Ky. Beloit. Second Cong. Cli Boscobel. Mrs. K. M. Jenney, from her Fathers Estate Columbus. The Juniors, by Mrs. H. J. Ferris,for Indian Student Aid 9 33 20 32 Janesville. Friends, by Miss Susie A. Jeifries, Bhl. Books, etc., for Freight, for Helena, Arh Lake Geneva. First Cong. Cli Madison. Friends, Blil. C. and Christ- mas Goods, for Marion, Al Menomonie. Sub. 5db. Cong. Cli Milwaukee. Plymouth Cli Roberts. Cong. Cli, s; L. B. Osgood, 5 Waukesha. First Cong. Cli Wauwatosa. Cong. Cli Watertown. Cong. Cli Whitewater. Cong. Cli Wisconsin Womans Home Missionary Union, Mrs. C. M. Blackman, Treas., for Womans Worh. Beloit. First Cli., W. M. S. Fort Atkinson. W. M. S.. Milwaukee. Pilgrim Cli., W. M. S Waukesha. W. M. S Whitewater. W. M. S 5 50 2 50 MINNESOTA, $292.08. Alexander. Cong. Cli Austin. First Cong. Cli Glyndon. The Church at Glyndon Minneapolis. S. S. of First Cong. Cli., 24.48; Lyndale Cong. Sab. 5db., 2.32 ... Osawatomie. Cong. Cli Red Wing. D. C. Hill Rochester. Cong. Cli., 29 ?5~ Sali. 5db. Cong. Cli., 3.82; A. Gooding, 20 Saint Anthony Park. C. E., ~: Friend, 2.50,for Lincoln Normal Sch,,Marion, Ala St. Paul. Pacific . Wadena. Young Ladies Miss. Band,for Student Aid, Allen Normal Sch., Thomasville, Ga Winona. First Cong. Cli Worthington. Union Cong. Cli., ~ and Sali. Sch.,~lc Zumbrota. Sab. 5db., Box Christmas Goods,for Marion, Ala. KANSAS, $246.26 Alma. Cong. Cli. Alton. Cong. Cli Leavenworth. First Cong. Cli Manhattan. Win. E. Castle, 25; 5. D. Moses, io. Stockton. Cong. Cli. and Soc Topeka. Mrs. Ralph Gaw, Pkg. C., for Meridian, Miss. Topeka. Central Cli., Ladies, Bhl. C. ,for Saluda, N. C. Womans Home Missionary Union of Kansas, by Mrs. E. K. De Long, Treas., for Womans Worh: Carson Emporia. Highland Kansas City Pilgrim Kirwin Leavenworth Louisville Oneida St. Marys Sterling Twelve Mile Wellington Western Park 500 5 00 5 00 2 25 6 50 3 00 500 2 45 5 00 52 30 MISSOURI, $240.80. Ironton. Jesse Markham 2 50 Lebanon. Cong. Cli., Junior C. E. S., Box Toys,for Nat, Ala. St. Joseph. V. P. 5. C. E. of Cong. Cli 500 Saint Louis. Pilgrim Cli., 48.65; First Cong. Cli., ~ 234 30 27 77 20 96 29 87 20 00 3 32 49 54 36 00 22 o6 5 co 4 20 s6 79 42 87 9 50 s 68 9 00 52 9t 4 07 3 00 2 6o 57 00 25 00 6 26 RECEIPTS. NEBRASKA, $31.63. Franklin. Sab. 5db. Cong. Ch 63 Nehawka 5 00 Verdon. Cong. Ch 6 on A Friend in Nebraska 20 00 NORTH DAKOTA, $8.oo. Dwight. First Cong. Cli., for Indian M 300 Wogansport. Miss M. Cooper, ~ Miss M. 0. Osgood, 2 5 00 SOUTH DAKOTA, $i8.6i. Alcester. Con g. Ch 2 75 HotSprings. Cong. Cli 8 50 Ree Heights. Mr. and Mrs. Geo. L. Helms 2 00 Spearfish. Sab. 5db. Cong. Ch., Birthday Box Off 6 36 COLORADO, $58.09. Colorado Springs. First Cong. Cli ~6 09 Pueblo. First Cong. Ch 2 00 IDAHO, $6.45. Boise City. Cong. Cli 6 ~5 CALIFORNIA, $677.58. Campbell. Cong. Cli., ~ V. P. 5. C. E., 3.30 830 Elsmore. Tlie Geo. M. Day Memorial 5 00 Nordboff. Cong. Cli 5 oo Ontario. Cong. Cli., to coost. MAR- OUERETACRAWFOROL.M 6240 Pacific Grove. Mayflower Cli., by Miss M. L. Holman, Treas 2 38 Pomona. A Friend 22 50 San Francisco. Receipts of the California Chinese Mission. (See items below)... 558 00 San Francisco. A Friend 20 CO Womans Home Missionary Society of California, by Mrs. J. M. Haven, Treas., for Womans Work: Oakland. Mrs. Wirt 4 00 OREGON, $8.69. Eugene. A Friend, for Mountain Work 50 Portland. First Coiig. Cli 8 i9 DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, $8.i5. Takoma Park. Mrs. Rosa D. Sprague, for Gloucester Sch., Caji~t5ahosic, V.... 8 i~ MARYLAND, $io8.oo. Baltimore. First Cong. Cli 207 00 Baltimore. Mrs. F. Byrd,for Gloucester Sch., Ca.g5j5ahosic, Va i 00 VIRGINIA, $i4.56. Recez~t5ts for Gloucester School, Ca.Ai5a- kosic, Va.: Cappaliosic. Ella Asliby.. 2 25 Cliurcliland. Miss S. E. ~ 2 00 Mathews. Miss Sada Harris, 2.20; Ed. Thompson, ~ Miss C. Smith, ~ in Norfolk Miss A. V. Bag- well z no Richmond Mrs. Sarah Bailey 00 Tappaliannock. Mrs. J. Hall 250 Walkerton. Miss Rebecca Page 50 Wareneck. Public School. 2 22 24 ~6 DELAWARE, $i.oo. Wilmington. Miss N. P. Goins, for Gloucester Sck., CaA5ahosic, Va 2 00 I 19 KENTUCKY, $275.92. Berea. Cli. at Berea Campton. Friends,for Cam.g5ton Lexington. Friends, for Mission S. S. New Salem. Cong. Cli., for Camjt3ton, Ky North New Salem. Cong. Cli., for Cam~4ton, Ky TENNESSEE, $24.00. Harriman. Pilgrim Cong. Cli Pleasant Hill. V. P.S. C. E., for Blowing Rock, N. C NORTH CAROLINA, $25.45. High Point. Cong. Cli Oaks. Cong. Cli Raleigh. Cong. Cli Saluda. Rev. E. W. Hollies Strieby. Cong. Cli Tryon. Rev. A. Winter, for Saluda, N. C Womans Home Missionary Uuion of N. C., Miss A. E. Farrin ton Treas.: W. H. M. U., Six Coin- fortables, for Kings Mountain, N. C. GEORGIA, $20.46. Atlanta Mary L. Gaines, for Student Aid, Fisk U Columbus. Rev. J. W. Roberts McIntosh. Prof. Fred. W. Foster, for Student Aid, i;for School Books, 22.67; Unknown Source, Bhl. C Woodville. Pilgrim Cli., i.o5; Rev. J. Loyd, 25c.; Rev. J. H. H. Sengstacke, 24c FLORIDA, $i8.on. Avon Park. Union Evan. Cli Macdenny. Rev. A. A. Stevens Orange Park. Rev. T. S. Perry ALABAMA, $28.42. Athens. Cong. Cli., by Rev. M. S. Jones. Kymulga. Cong. Cli., adi Alabama Womans Missionary Union, by Mrs. E. C. Silsby, Treas.,for Indian M.: 243 00 4 50 7 90 4 50 400 2 00 2 50 5 45 50 500 500 25 23 67 2 54 500 3 00 Marion 3 50 Talladega 6 50 Talladega Little Help- ers 500 25 00 MISSISSIPPI, $si.on. Tougaloo. A. H. Stone 50 00 Westside. Rev. B. F. Ousley 00 LOUISIANA, $32.02. New Orleans. University Cong. Cli 22 02 Louisiana Womans Missionary Union, by Mrs. C. S. Shattuck, Treas., for Womans Work: Lake Charles. Aux 00 New Orleans. University Cli.,Aux 2000 II 00 TEXAS, $16.20. Austin. Tradesmen of Austin, for Blacksmith Shoj5, Tillotson Inst Ii ~ci Waco. F. B. Hoisengton s on ,$~o.oo. G. F. Harvey, for Thunder- hawk M 50 00 Oneida. Presb. Cli., Jun. C. E. Soc., Box Christmas Goods, for Lexington, Ky. CANADA. Toronto. Western Cong. Cli., Blil. and Box of Books,for Hills6oro, N. C. 120 RECEIPTS. BULGARIA, $8.oo. Samokov. Mrs. Isabella G. D. Clarke... 8 oo BOHEMIA, $~.oo. Prague. Rev. John S. Porter 500 SOUTH AFRICA, $io.oo. Groutville, Natal. Miss Agnes M Bige low 20 00 Donations $i8,759 00 Estates 9,715 30 $28,544 30 INCOME, $1,302.50. Avery Fund,for Mendi M 865 00 De Forest Fund, for Presidents Chair, Taliadega C i8~ 62 C. F. Dike Fund, for Straight U 5000 Graves Library Fund, for At- lanta U 212 50 General Endowment Fund . 50 00 Gen. C. B. Fisk Schp Fund,for Fisk U II 25 Haley Schp Fund,for Fisk U... 22 50 Rice Memorial Fund,for Talla- dega C . ~ 63 2,302 50 TUITION, $3,370.17. Cappahosic, Va. Tuition Lexington, Ky. Tuition Grand View, Tenn. Tuition.... Jonesboro, Tenn. Tuition Nashville, Tenn. Tuition Knoxville, Tenn. Tuition Pleasant Hill, Teon. Tuition... Beaufort, N. C. Tuition Blowing Rock, N. C. Tuition... Hilisboro, N. C. Tuition Kings Mountain, N. C. Tuition. Saluda, N. C. Tuition Troy, N. C. Tuition . Whittier, N. C. Tuition Wilmington, N C Tuition. Charleston, S. C. Tuition Greenwood, S. C. Tuition Albany, Ga. Tuition At!anta, Ga. Storrs Sch., Tui- tion Macon, Ga. Tuition McIntosh, Ga. Tuition Savannah, Ga. Tuition Thomasville, Ga. Tuition Woodville, Ga. Tuition Athens, Ala. Tuition Marion, Ala. Tuition Nat, Ala. Tuition Selma, Ala. Tuition Orange Park, Fla. Tuition Jackson, Miss. Tuition Meridian, Miss. Tuition Moorhead, Miss. Tuition Tougaloo, Miss.. Tuition New Orleans, La. Tuition Helena, Ark. Tuition Austin, Tex. Tuition 3 72 57 45 49 00 4 5 479 70 29 23 23 50 14 50 23 20 29 35 27 50 25 6~ 3 91 7 55 171 00 330 20 62 i6 103 30 153 41 522 42 136 57 i64 04 57 12 3 70 37 90 43 8~ 57 90 202 20 ~8 25 200 00 8i oo 24 00 52 75 238 53 90 45 51 90 ..--3,370 27 Total for January $33,216 97 SUMMARY. Donations $62,375 32 Estates . ~ 96 $85,276 27 Income 4,370 co Tuition 22,655 02 Total from Oct. s to Jan. 31... $102,302 28 FOR THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY. Subscriptions for January $i6~ 92 Previously acknowledged io~ oS Total $275 00 REcEIPTS OF THE CALIFORNIA CHINESE MISSION. William Johnstone, Treas., from November i6 to December. 20, 2894: Fresno. Mon. Offs., 4.25; Rent of Rooms, I 5 25 Los Angeles. Mon. Offs 2 70 Marysville. Mon. Offs., 3; Rent of Rooms, 8 00 Oroville. Mon. Offs., ~.os; Rent of Rooms, 24.65 26 70 Petaluma. Mon. Offs., 2.25; Rent of Rooms, 75c 2 00 Riverside. Mon. Offs 20 Sacramento. Mon. Offs., aso; Rent of Rooms, 7.50 20 00 San Bernardino. Mon. Offs 3 00 San Diego. Mon. Offs., Rent of Rooms, 4 40 San Francisco. Central Mis- sions Mon. Offs 7 85 San Francisco. West Mission Mon. Offs 2 00 Santa Barbara. Mon. Offs., 4.05; Rent of Rooms, 2.50.... Santa Cruz. Mon. Offs., 2; Rent of Rooms, 5 7 co Stockton. Mon. Offs., 2.25; Rentof Rooms, 2 4 25 Ventura. Mon. Offs., 2.50; Rent of Rooms, 2.50 4 00 Vernondale. Mon. Offs 50 Watsonville. Mon. Offs 8 8o Albany, N. Y. Friends of Chinese, for Mat hers and Children REcEIFTI FOE THE EXPENSES OF FISCAL ENDED AuousT 32, 2894: Fresno. Anniversary Pledges, ~ Teacher and Helper, 52.50 6i 50 Hanford. A nniversary Pledges 2 00 Los Angeles. Teacher 25 70 Marysville. Annual Member, ~ Teacher, ~ .. 22 75 Oakland. ~iipBow.... 25 00 Sacramento. Teacher and Helper 75 20 San Bernandino. Helper~~ a6 40 San Francisco. Supt., Teachers and Helpers 238 30 San Francisco. Central. Annual Members, 7.50; Top Sing, i; West Pin Dun, 2 20 50 Santa Barbara. Teacher, 29.25; Anniversary Pledge, 2.50 20 75 Ventura. Teacher 8 8~ Watsonville. Annual Mem- ber, 2.5o; Helper, 3.95 6 45 San Diego. Anniversary Pledges 2 50 Oroville. Wang Hing 2 50 Woodland. Yep Lee Pen 3 00 FROM EASTERN FRIENDS: Portland, Me. Second Cong. Ch., Chinese S. S 3 50 New Boston, N. H Levi Hooper 25 00 2850 Total $558 00 H. W. HUBBARD, Treas., Isible House, N. Y. 27 00 YEAR 420 40

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The American missionary. / Volume 49, Issue 4 Congregational work Pilgrim missionary Congregationalist and herald of gospel liberty American Missionary Association. New York Apr 1895 0049 004
The American missionary. / Volume 49, Issue 4, miscellaneous front pages 120A-120B

APRIL, 1895 A ~ 4Y~. __ ~=-~- bimiri; I CONTENTS EDITORIAL. OUR FINANCIAL OUTLOOKDEATH OF FREDERICK DOUGLASS, . 121 ITEMS 122 THE PROSPERITY OF THE SOUTH, . . 123 NOTES-BY-THE-WAY, SEC. A. F. BEARD, 124 THE SOUTH. IOIJGALOO UNIVERSITY, MISSISSIPPI (Ii lustrated LINCOLN MEMORIAL, SPECIAL METHOD, LINCOLN MEMORIAL DAY IN TIlE SOUTH, THE LOUISIANA ASSOCIATION, FIELD ITEMS MISS AMY WiLLIAMS, 125 138 134 135 186 137 THE INDIANS. COLLECTION FOR THE DEBT AT SANTEE AGENCY LETTER FROM AN INDIAN, 138 139 THE CHINESE. GLEANINGS FROM ANNUAL REPORT OF CALIFORNIA CHINESE MISSION, . . 139 BUREAU OF WOMANS THANK-OFFERING DAy, RECEIPTS WORK. 141 142 NEW YORK PUBLISHED BY THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION, Bible House, Ninth St. and Fourth Ave., New York, Price, 50 Cents a Year in advance. Entered at the Post Office at New York, N. V., as second-class matter. VOL. XLIX No.4 ~tmerican (~is~iouar~ ~tssociation. PRESIDENT. MERRILL E. GATES, LL.D., MASS. Vice-Presidents. Rev. F. A. NOBLE, D.D., Ill. REV. HENRY HOPKINS, D.D., Mo. Rev. ALEX. MCKENZIE, D.D., Mass. REV. HENRY A. STIMSON, D.D., N. Y. REV. WASHINGTON GLADDEN, D.D. Ohio. Corresponding Secretaries. Rev. M. E. STRIEBY, D. D., Bible House, N. 1. Rev. A~ F. BEARD, D.D., Bible House, N. V. Rev. F. P. WOODBURY, D.D., Bible House, N. V. Assistant Corre.~j5onding Secretary. Rev. C. J. RYDER, D.D., Bible House, N. V. Recording Secretary. Rev. M. E. STRIEBY, D.D., Bible House, N. V. Treasurer. HENRY W. HUBBARD, Esq., Bible House, N. I. Auditors. PETER MCCARTEE. JAMES MITCHELL Executive Committee. CHARLES L. MEAD, Chairman. CHARLES A. HULL, Secretary. For Three Years. Fr Two Years. For One Year. WILLIAM HAYES WARD, CHARLES A. HULL, SAMUEL HOLMES, JAMES W. COOPER, ADDISON P. FOSTER, SAMUEL S. MARPLES, LOCIEN C. WARNER, ALBERT J. LYMAN, CHARLES L. MEAD, JOSEPH H. TWICHELL, NEHEM1AH BOYNTON, WILLIAM H. STRONG, CHARLES P. PEIRCE. A. J. F. BERRENDS. ELIJAH Hoaa. District Secretaries. Rev. GEo. H. GUTTERSON, 21 Cong? House, Boston, Mass. Rev. Jos. E. ROY, D.D., 151 Washington Street, chicago, Ill. Rev. W. E. C. WRIGHT, D.D., Cong? Rooms, Y.M. C~ A. Buildin?, Cleveland~ Ohio. Secretary of Womans Bureau. Miss D. E. EMERSON, Bible House, N. V. COMMUNICATIONS Relating to the work of the Association may be addressed io the Corresponding Secretaries; letters for THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY, to the Editor, at the New York Office; letters relating to the finances, to the Treasurer; letters relating to woman s work, to the Secretary of the Womans Bureau. DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS In drafts, checks, registered letters, or post-office orders, may be sent to H. W. Hubbard, Treasurer, Bible House, New York, or, when more convenient, to either of the Branch Offices, 2! Congregational House, Boston, Mass., 151 Washington Street, Chicago, Ill., or Congregational Rooms, Y. M. C. A. Building, Cleveland, Ohio. A payment of thirty dollars constitutes a Life Member. NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS.The date on the address label indicates the time to which the subscription is paid. Changes are made in date on label to the ioth of each month. If payment of subscription be made afterward the change on the label will appear a month later. Please send early notice of change in post-office address, giving the former address and the new address, in order that our periodi- cals and occasional papers may be correctly mailed. FORM OF A BEQUEST. I GIVE AND BEQUEATH the sum of dollars to the American Mission- ary Association, incorporated by act of the Legislature of the State of New York. Tha will should be attested by three witnesses.

Our Financial Outlook Editorial 121

THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY VOL. XLIX. APRIL, 1895. No. 4. OUR FINANCIAL OUTLOOK. Our debt is large, but we rejoice to say that during the last three months it has been slowly diminishing. It reached its highest point November 30$82,425.58. December 31 it was $82,032.07; January 31, $79,502.77; February 28, $76,431.49. The cause of this decrease varies in the different months. Sometimes the legacies are in advance, and sometimes the donations. The expenses have been largely reduced in all departments. While these figures are somewhat encouraging, yet the size of the debt is ominous. The winter months, usually most fruitful in collec- tions, have passed away, and the time for the annual appropriations is near at hand. Unless the debt can be greatly reduced, the cutting down of the appropriations for the next year must be disastrous to this great work. ~Te do not lose our trust in God, nor our hope that the friends of these ignorant and yet struggling people will not suffer the work to be seriously hindered. We respectfully invoke pastors to secure for us as liberal contributions as possible, and we ask individual donors to remember the work with special gifts. DEATH OF FREDERICK DOUGLASS. The unexpected and sudden death of Mr. Douglass has awakened a sense of profound sympathy never before expressed toward a person identified with the negro race, and seldom toward one of the white race. We are not surprised at the manifestations of profound respect and sorrow of the colored people, and we rejoice, too, that the white race has shown almost equal regard for his memory, by their attendance when he lay in state in Washington, and when his body was interred in Rochester. The press has voiced the sentiment of the nation in the full

Death of Frederick Douglass Editorial 121-122

THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY VOL. XLIX. APRIL, 1895. No. 4. OUR FINANCIAL OUTLOOK. Our debt is large, but we rejoice to say that during the last three months it has been slowly diminishing. It reached its highest point November 30$82,425.58. December 31 it was $82,032.07; January 31, $79,502.77; February 28, $76,431.49. The cause of this decrease varies in the different months. Sometimes the legacies are in advance, and sometimes the donations. The expenses have been largely reduced in all departments. While these figures are somewhat encouraging, yet the size of the debt is ominous. The winter months, usually most fruitful in collec- tions, have passed away, and the time for the annual appropriations is near at hand. Unless the debt can be greatly reduced, the cutting down of the appropriations for the next year must be disastrous to this great work. ~Te do not lose our trust in God, nor our hope that the friends of these ignorant and yet struggling people will not suffer the work to be seriously hindered. We respectfully invoke pastors to secure for us as liberal contributions as possible, and we ask individual donors to remember the work with special gifts. DEATH OF FREDERICK DOUGLASS. The unexpected and sudden death of Mr. Douglass has awakened a sense of profound sympathy never before expressed toward a person identified with the negro race, and seldom toward one of the white race. We are not surprised at the manifestations of profound respect and sorrow of the colored people, and we rejoice, too, that the white race has shown almost equal regard for his memory, by their attendance when he lay in state in Washington, and when his body was interred in Rochester. The press has voiced the sentiment of the nation in the full 122 DEATH OF MR. DO UGLASS.ITEMS. and eulogistic notices of his life. Frederick Douglass deserved it all. No man, perhaps, in this country has broken through so heavy a crust of ignorance, poverty and race prejudice as was done by this boy born on a slave plantation, stealing his education, fleeing from his slave home and then achieving for himself a rank among the foremost men of the nation in intelligence, eloquence and of personal influence in the great anti-slavery struggle of this country. He has achieved honors in the public service of the nation, and has faithfully and honorably fulfilled every trust laid upon him. Mr. Douglass is among the last survivors of that band of Abolition- ists that were so potent in their influence in arousing the nation to ~he evils of slavery. The recent death of Theodore D. Weld, in his ninety- first year, recalls a name now almost forgotten, but that two genera- tions ago indicated the foremost orator in the anti-slavery ranks. The poet of anti-slavery, Whittier, has gone recently, and now the most conspicuous name left of that noble band is that of Mrs. Harriet Beecher Stowe. The American Missionary Association has reason to congratulate itself that its last annual meeting was made memorable by the presence of Mr. Douglass, and its vast audience stirred most deeply by his elo- quent address. In that address he expressed his gratitude for himself and his people for the work done by the Association in their behalf. And in a letter subsequently addressed to the senior secretary of the Association, he says, in speaking of that address: I am very glad to have been able thus publicly to record my sense of the value of the great work of the Association in saving my people. I am a friend of free thought and free inquiry, but I find them to be no substitute for the work of educating the ignorant and lifting up the lowly. Time and toil have nearly taken me from the lecture field, but I still have a good word to say in the cause to which the American Missionary Association is devoted. ITEMS. Of the twelve millions of families now in the United States, it is said that one million cannot secure the needed work to procure the luxu- ries and comforts of life. On this basis the one and a half millions of colored families are at a special disadvantage. They have to contend not only against the hard times, but against the immense disadvantages of race prejudice. The appointment of Bishop Whipple, of Minnesota, to be a member of the Board of Indian Commissioners was an appointment eminently fit to be made. Few men in this country stand higher in their knowledge

Items Editorial 122-123

122 DEATH OF MR. DO UGLASS.ITEMS. and eulogistic notices of his life. Frederick Douglass deserved it all. No man, perhaps, in this country has broken through so heavy a crust of ignorance, poverty and race prejudice as was done by this boy born on a slave plantation, stealing his education, fleeing from his slave home and then achieving for himself a rank among the foremost men of the nation in intelligence, eloquence and of personal influence in the great anti-slavery struggle of this country. He has achieved honors in the public service of the nation, and has faithfully and honorably fulfilled every trust laid upon him. Mr. Douglass is among the last survivors of that band of Abolition- ists that were so potent in their influence in arousing the nation to ~he evils of slavery. The recent death of Theodore D. Weld, in his ninety- first year, recalls a name now almost forgotten, but that two genera- tions ago indicated the foremost orator in the anti-slavery ranks. The poet of anti-slavery, Whittier, has gone recently, and now the most conspicuous name left of that noble band is that of Mrs. Harriet Beecher Stowe. The American Missionary Association has reason to congratulate itself that its last annual meeting was made memorable by the presence of Mr. Douglass, and its vast audience stirred most deeply by his elo- quent address. In that address he expressed his gratitude for himself and his people for the work done by the Association in their behalf. And in a letter subsequently addressed to the senior secretary of the Association, he says, in speaking of that address: I am very glad to have been able thus publicly to record my sense of the value of the great work of the Association in saving my people. I am a friend of free thought and free inquiry, but I find them to be no substitute for the work of educating the ignorant and lifting up the lowly. Time and toil have nearly taken me from the lecture field, but I still have a good word to say in the cause to which the American Missionary Association is devoted. ITEMS. Of the twelve millions of families now in the United States, it is said that one million cannot secure the needed work to procure the luxu- ries and comforts of life. On this basis the one and a half millions of colored families are at a special disadvantage. They have to contend not only against the hard times, but against the immense disadvantages of race prejudice. The appointment of Bishop Whipple, of Minnesota, to be a member of the Board of Indian Commissioners was an appointment eminently fit to be made. Few men in this country stand higher in their knowledge PROSPERITY OF THE SOUTH. 123 of the Indians and their wants, or have shown a more intelligent and self-sacrificing interest in their behalf. The Indian Territory, occupied by what has been regarded as the Civ- ilized Tribes, is in a precarious position. The recent investigation by the Committee under ex-Senator Dawes has brought out the facts in startling distinctness. The recommendations of the Senator are very clear and radical, but it is feared that delay in the settlement of the question will only protract and aggravate the difficulty. The Missing Link has been discovered. It was found, we are told, in some fragments of skeletons dug up somewhere in Java. What an attraction this will be to lead scientific doctors to neglect living beings and wrangle over these old bones. In this country the real Missing Link is that charity on the part of the white people that recognizes the colored man as a fellow-citizen and a fellow Christian. L& t that link be found and burnished up and a good many serious problems will be solved. THE PROSPERITY OF THE SOUTH. From time to time there loom up prospects of great advancement in the Southern States. Iron and coal are found in close proximity and in unlimited quantity. At once the boom starts and great cities spring into existence with busy foundries and added railway facilities. But somehow or other the boom loses its fervor and the bright hopes are delayed. Yet the South has vast resources, though they can only be developed gradually, and as capital shall become assured that the labor problem in the South is satisfactorily adjusted. We are told again that cotton mills are to be transferred from the North to the South. Hitherto cheap cottons have been the product of these Southern cotton mills. But now the promise is that the finest grades of cotton will be produced. Labor is cheap in the South, but skilled labor is very scarce, and no cheaper than at the North, and to transfer such labor from the North will be at the additional cost of transportation. Great efforts are made from time to time to induce immigrants to settle in the South, and high hopes have been built on such endeavors. But immigrants continue to go to the North and West, and do not go South. This is not because the South is not rich in minerals, in a pro- ductive soil and a beautiful climate. Why is it? Capital in the hands of the whites in the South continues to crush labor in the person of the black man under the heel of prejudice. Perhaps the laborer from Europe may dread the same thing. In spite of all drawbacks, the South is improving, and will continue

The Prosperity of the South Editorial 123-124

PROSPERITY OF THE SOUTH. 123 of the Indians and their wants, or have shown a more intelligent and self-sacrificing interest in their behalf. The Indian Territory, occupied by what has been regarded as the Civ- ilized Tribes, is in a precarious position. The recent investigation by the Committee under ex-Senator Dawes has brought out the facts in startling distinctness. The recommendations of the Senator are very clear and radical, but it is feared that delay in the settlement of the question will only protract and aggravate the difficulty. The Missing Link has been discovered. It was found, we are told, in some fragments of skeletons dug up somewhere in Java. What an attraction this will be to lead scientific doctors to neglect living beings and wrangle over these old bones. In this country the real Missing Link is that charity on the part of the white people that recognizes the colored man as a fellow-citizen and a fellow Christian. L& t that link be found and burnished up and a good many serious problems will be solved. THE PROSPERITY OF THE SOUTH. From time to time there loom up prospects of great advancement in the Southern States. Iron and coal are found in close proximity and in unlimited quantity. At once the boom starts and great cities spring into existence with busy foundries and added railway facilities. But somehow or other the boom loses its fervor and the bright hopes are delayed. Yet the South has vast resources, though they can only be developed gradually, and as capital shall become assured that the labor problem in the South is satisfactorily adjusted. We are told again that cotton mills are to be transferred from the North to the South. Hitherto cheap cottons have been the product of these Southern cotton mills. But now the promise is that the finest grades of cotton will be produced. Labor is cheap in the South, but skilled labor is very scarce, and no cheaper than at the North, and to transfer such labor from the North will be at the additional cost of transportation. Great efforts are made from time to time to induce immigrants to settle in the South, and high hopes have been built on such endeavors. But immigrants continue to go to the North and West, and do not go South. This is not because the South is not rich in minerals, in a pro- ductive soil and a beautiful climate. Why is it? Capital in the hands of the whites in the South continues to crush labor in the person of the black man under the heel of prejudice. Perhaps the laborer from Europe may dread the same thing. In spite of all drawbacks, the South is improving, and will continue 124 NOTES-BY-THE- WA Y. to improve, and the process will be hastened as the white man lays aside his race prejudice and the black man lifts himself above it by acquiring property, intelligence and character. Whatever helps this consummation does more for the future good of the South than can be done in any other way. NOTES-BY-THE-WAY. SECRETARY A. F. BEARD. Among places of greatest interest which I visited in my late Southern tour one was Tougaloo University. Its location is unique, and its work is also. In the very heart of the black belt of Mississippi, it is sending out its light among thousands who are in darkness. It would quite repay one who would study the problem of saving these children of the rural districts of the black belt to go far out of his way to visit Tougaloo. He should take time for it, to ride over its broad acres of cultivated land, its cotton fields, its fields of sugar cane and corn, its hay fields, all under the care of those who are being educated. They should see its shops for iron working, for wood working, and its varied other industries. They should see those who work by day, diligent students at the books all the long evenings until late. They should see the self help of all. They should go through the grades and notice the quality of the work done and its character, its classes in mathematics and in languages, and its work in the physical sciences. It is a great schoolTougalooand if people could see it, they would quote it more for its economy and efficiency. Not always are efficiency and economy found pulling equally in the same harness. A little incident in Tougaloo interested me. A discussion of the topic, How can we improve our homes, called from one student these words: I find the negro lacks race pride. He despises his own make- up. Who of you ever heard any negro say that he thought the general characteristics of his race were as becoming as those of other races? Nor are they. The Anglo-Saxon is proud of his race characteristics. The Indian is, also, but the negro despises himself and would be anything else than what God has made him. But how can we escape hell if we hate ourselves because we are negroes, when this is the divine wisdom of a just God? We may talk about improving our homes by getting an education as much as we please, but we will never be anything until we have a race pride and try to carry out the great plan of God who made us and knew what is best for us. Let us be genuine negroes, pure and good, and not desire a drop of other blood in our veins. This seems to be the spirit of Tougaloo. Its graduates whom I have met are manly and womanly, self-respecting and self-helping.

A. F. Beard, Secretary Beard, A. F., Secretary Notes-by-the-Way Editorial 124-125

124 NOTES-BY-THE- WA Y. to improve, and the process will be hastened as the white man lays aside his race prejudice and the black man lifts himself above it by acquiring property, intelligence and character. Whatever helps this consummation does more for the future good of the South than can be done in any other way. NOTES-BY-THE-WAY. SECRETARY A. F. BEARD. Among places of greatest interest which I visited in my late Southern tour one was Tougaloo University. Its location is unique, and its work is also. In the very heart of the black belt of Mississippi, it is sending out its light among thousands who are in darkness. It would quite repay one who would study the problem of saving these children of the rural districts of the black belt to go far out of his way to visit Tougaloo. He should take time for it, to ride over its broad acres of cultivated land, its cotton fields, its fields of sugar cane and corn, its hay fields, all under the care of those who are being educated. They should see its shops for iron working, for wood working, and its varied other industries. They should see those who work by day, diligent students at the books all the long evenings until late. They should see the self help of all. They should go through the grades and notice the quality of the work done and its character, its classes in mathematics and in languages, and its work in the physical sciences. It is a great schoolTougalooand if people could see it, they would quote it more for its economy and efficiency. Not always are efficiency and economy found pulling equally in the same harness. A little incident in Tougaloo interested me. A discussion of the topic, How can we improve our homes, called from one student these words: I find the negro lacks race pride. He despises his own make- up. Who of you ever heard any negro say that he thought the general characteristics of his race were as becoming as those of other races? Nor are they. The Anglo-Saxon is proud of his race characteristics. The Indian is, also, but the negro despises himself and would be anything else than what God has made him. But how can we escape hell if we hate ourselves because we are negroes, when this is the divine wisdom of a just God? We may talk about improving our homes by getting an education as much as we please, but we will never be anything until we have a race pride and try to carry out the great plan of God who made us and knew what is best for us. Let us be genuine negroes, pure and good, and not desire a drop of other blood in our veins. This seems to be the spirit of Tougaloo. Its graduates whom I have met are manly and womanly, self-respecting and self-helping. TOUGALOO UNIVERSITY. 125 TOUGALOQ UNIVERSITY, MISSISSIPPI. BY PRES. F. G. WOODW0RTH, P.1). The chartered schools of the American Missionary Association,. though doing an essentially similar work, are yet strongly individualized. Tougaloo LTniversity is emphatically the black belt plantation school of the Association, located in the country, in the midst of Americas dark- est Africa, touching that by far most numerous and important class on which the future of the negroes mainly reststhe plantation negroes. MANSION. Forming the bulk of the colored population, least tinged with white blood, they are at once the most ignorant and the most hopeful class. Within seven miles of Jackson, the State capital, on the Jllinois Central road, easily accessible, not only from Mississippi, but from large regions of Louisiana and Arkansas, it draws pupils from a wide area and sends its trained teachers and graduates to a region still wider. Its location is healthful and one of beauty, and, removed from town distractions and temptations, it is admirably situated for efficient work. The school was established in the autumn of 1869, and the early reports show a surrounding region which in its drunkenness, fighting and iniquity, is

Pres. F. G. Woodworth, D.D. Woodworth, F. G., Pres., D.D. Tougaloo University, Mississippi The South 125-133

TOUGALOO UNIVERSITY. 125 TOUGALOQ UNIVERSITY, MISSISSIPPI. BY PRES. F. G. WOODW0RTH, P.1). The chartered schools of the American Missionary Association,. though doing an essentially similar work, are yet strongly individualized. Tougaloo LTniversity is emphatically the black belt plantation school of the Association, located in the country, in the midst of Americas dark- est Africa, touching that by far most numerous and important class on which the future of the negroes mainly reststhe plantation negroes. MANSION. Forming the bulk of the colored population, least tinged with white blood, they are at once the most ignorant and the most hopeful class. Within seven miles of Jackson, the State capital, on the Jllinois Central road, easily accessible, not only from Mississippi, but from large regions of Louisiana and Arkansas, it draws pupils from a wide area and sends its trained teachers and graduates to a region still wider. Its location is healthful and one of beauty, and, removed from town distractions and temptations, it is admirably situated for efficient work. The school was established in the autumn of 1869, and the early reports show a surrounding region which in its drunkenness, fighting and iniquity, is 126 TO UGAL 00 UNIVERSITY. quite in contrast with the present condition of af- fairs. Five hun- dred acres of land were pur- chased and with them a fine man- sion (page 125), then not many years old, in- tended for the finest plantation house of the State and built for a bride who came not. As the illustration shows, it is a handsome struc- turethe only one with any decided archi- tectural pre- tensions in the place. It served at first for school rooms and dorm~ itory purposes, and has been thus used during most of the life of the school. Now it contains the offices of president a n d treasurer, t h e main library-- which greatly needs more books m us i c rooms, the doc tors office, BALLARD HALL GIRLS DORMITORY. TO UGALOO UNIVERSITY. 127 teachers rooms, and the presidents home. There are now nine large buildings for school use, with several smaller ones. The next oldest of the large buildings is the girls dormitory, just south of the mansion, where is the common dining room, with the necessary kitchen, laundry and bake house appliances, and dormitory room for several teachers and eighty to ninety girls. Washington Hall, built just north of the mansion about the time of the girls dormitory, was burned some years ago, and now on its site stands the Ballard Building, containing the study and recitation rooms of the grammar and intermediate departments, which lead up to the normal and the chapel, where all general exercises and Sabbath services are held. One of the greatest needs of the school is a church building, that can be specially devoted to religious purposes. There is a grand chance for a memorial building. A little northeast of Ballard is the BOYS DORMITORY, STRIEBY HALL. 128 TO UGAL 00 UNIVERSITy. boys dormitory, Strieby Hall, erected in 1882, a brick structure 112 x 40 feet, and three stories high, with a basement which has a laundry and bathrooms. In this building the normal and higher work is carried on, with a faitly good physical and chemical laboratory and reference library, but needing great enlargement and additional facilities. The normal work is of chief importance, for the future of the race lies largely with the trained teachers of the common schools. Those who have gone from Tougaloo have won golden opinions from both races and do a work which in its scope and missionary character multiplies greatly the influence of the supporters of the school. Strieby has, by crowding, dormitory room for seventy to eighty boys. A separate build- ing for normal work is greatly needed, one having a library, reading room, recitation room, museums and laboratories. Just northwest of Strieby is the large barn, which, with the picture of the cattle, will sug THE PLANTATION BARN. TO UGAL 00 UNiVERSITY. 129 gest the large agricultural department of the school with its stock, garden, fruit raising, etc. Here, too, a building is greatly needed for the farm boys and a foreman, where a special course of instruction can be given in fitting out good farmers. Not a few graduates and former students have been successful in the conduct of farms and market gar- dens, some of them in connection with teaching. Back of the mansion is a little and not at all beautiful building that has been a slave pen, day nursery for slave children; then, under the American Missionary Association, a dormitory known as Boston Hall, then a carpentry class room, then girls Industrial Cottage and is now dignified as Bible BIBLE HALL Hall, and houses the theological department, which was established two years ago. This department has the beginning of a library, but needs books and maps very greatly, and has two courses based on the English Bible, one of two and one of four years. Though having this year but few pupils in the regular course, it is doing very thorough work. The evening class for outside preachers has been for some years a power for good. A glance at the picture will convince anyone that theology should have better quarters. Who will give them? Berkshire Cottage, of which a picture is given, accommodates the industrial training 130 TO UGAL 00 UNJ VERSITIK work of the girls. Here are class- rooms for need- lework and cook- ery, with courses extending over four years, and which all girls in the grammar grades are as much obliged to take as they are the English branches. To the normal girls special instruc- tion in dressmak- BERKSHiRE COTTAGE ing is given. Berkshire, besides accommodating several teachers, has a kitchen, dining and sitting room, and several bedrooms, devoted to practical housekeeping, where, at present, four girls at a time keep house practically for six weeks at a time, so becoming competent for ho me makers. Not far from this cottage is t h e Ballard shop building, where the manual train- ing of the boys is carried on. Here to the small boys of the Hand school instruc- tion in knife work is given, and to the boys of all higher grades careful instruc- tion, in accord- ance with the best manual training meth- ods, in wood- BALLARD MANUAL TRAINING SHOP~ TO UGAL 00 UNIVERSITY 3 working, with excellent accommodations f o r more than, twenty boys at a time. Forging, at which eight at a time can work, and mechani- cal and architectural drawing, with tables and tools for two dozen. The outcome of this work and of the girls industries, teachers of which are supported by the Slater CARPENTRY. Fund, which has done, and is doing, so grand a work, has been most satisfactory and encouraging in the skill mani- fested, the increased earning capacity imparted, the greater ability to gain and maintain homes, and the development of character. One other picture, the Hand Primary building, suggests the practical work of the Normal department, for here the Normal students have practice during the two closing years of their course, gathei-ing pupils from surrounding cabins. Underneath all the work of the school is the dominating thought of the development of Christia. character, rhe preaching, the Sabbath school, with its class prayer meetings directed by the Sabbath school teachers, the religious societies, the Covenant for Christian service, the personal influence of teachers and older pupils, all tend i that direc FORGING, 132 TO UGAL 00 UNIVERSiTY. tion with most blessed results. Upon the surrounding region growing influence is exerted through the four Sabbath schools from two to four miles away, in which teachers and students from the University assist. A picture of one of the schools, McCharity, is given here. Mention should also be made of the Tougalon University Addition to Touga- loo. One hundred and twenty acres of land have been divided into five-acre house lots, which are being sold at $ioo each to former students and those who wish to educate children at the University. In a few years it is expected that a fine community will be there. Around three great fundamental ideas the work of Tougaloo, with its nearly 400 students and 23 instructors, with its theological, college preparatory, normal, agricultural, industrial, musical, and nurse train- ng departments, its religions work, is grouped and carried on with notable success. These are the development of the family and home, leadership, and pure religious life. Who will endow a chair? Who will endow the University, and perpetuate ones influence in a most fruitful way? Successful as Tougaloo has been, its largest, widest work is yet to come. DANIEL HAND KINDERGARTEN AND PRIMARY SCHOOL. LINCOLN EMORIAL, 33 MRS. G. W. ANPREWS, TALLAPEGA, ALA. There has been much enthusiasm here since Sabbath morning in start~ ing an Abraham Lincoln Cent Association, in order to give the joorest among our people an opportunity to do something toward helping to lift the debt of the American Missionary Association. There will be four departments of giving, one cent per day, one per week, one per month, and five dollars will constitute one a memorial member of the Association. The collection from those who pay a cent a day will be taken at the time of devotional exercise in the schools in the morning; the cent per week every Tuesday morning, the cent per month on the twelfth day. of each month. Every quarter the treasurer will gather the different sums and send to the American Missionary Association treasury. The twelfth day of February each ye r will be a rallying day, when we trust much more MoCHARITY SUNDAY-SCHOOL MISSION. LINCOLN MEMORIALSPECIAL METHOD.

Mrs. G. W. Andrews Andrews, G. W., Mrs. Lincoln Memorial--Special Method The South 133-134

LINCOLN EMORIAL, 33 MRS. G. W. ANPREWS, TALLAPEGA, ALA. There has been much enthusiasm here since Sabbath morning in start~ ing an Abraham Lincoln Cent Association, in order to give the joorest among our people an opportunity to do something toward helping to lift the debt of the American Missionary Association. There will be four departments of giving, one cent per day, one per week, one per month, and five dollars will constitute one a memorial member of the Association. The collection from those who pay a cent a day will be taken at the time of devotional exercise in the schools in the morning; the cent per week every Tuesday morning, the cent per month on the twelfth day. of each month. Every quarter the treasurer will gather the different sums and send to the American Missionary Association treasury. The twelfth day of February each ye r will be a rallying day, when we trust much more MoCHARITY SUNDAY-SCHOOL MISSION. LINCOLN MEMORIALSPECIAL METHOD. 134 LINCOLN MEMORIAL DA 1. will be realized. It is hoped by those who have this plan in hand, and we are all working in unison here in it, to extend it throughout all of our schools and churches in the South, that the present debt of the Ameri- can Missionary Association may be brought close to their hearts, and kept there, as the proposition is that this association shall continue until the debt is lifted. LINCOLN MEMORIAL DAY IN THE SOUTH. BY REV. W. J. LARKIN. On Lincolns birthday most of the churches connected with the Amcrican Missionary Association in the South took occasion to make a contribution to it, and many gifts not large in themselves, but repre- senting a great deal of sacrifice, have been received by our treasurer in New York. The pastor of our church in Marion, Alabama, sends a contribution of over $~6 from his church, which amount represents more sacrifices than thousands of dollars would represent from many of our more favored churches. He writes: We had a Lincolns exercise on Lords day, ioth, by the school at the church. It was a very cold, dark night, but our offering was $16.09. You will consider the hard times hereand they are hard, indeed, this yearwe have had intense cold now nearly two months with the mercury nearly to zero. When ice is six inches thick in this part of Alabama it means intense suffer- ing for the half-clad and half-fed negroes. We add to this $16.09, $11. 26, which we have collected at our missionary prayer meetings, making in all $27.35. I called on a few of the old ex-slaves for some experiences of bygone days. Among others here is one: When I was a boy about twelve years of age there were several boys together telling what we would do when we became men. I said, I am going to be free and keep a store, and perhaps employ some of you boys as my clerks. Among these boys standing there was a white boy, who, when he went home, told his father what I had been saying. Shortly after a lady, when I was passing her house one day called me in and said, Steve, is that you? Yes, marm. I want to see you; I hear you have been talking some bad talk with other boys. I said, What is it, marm? You said that you were going to be free some day. Now let me tell you, if you do not stop talking such talk you will be hung and nobody can possibly save you. Let me tell you, you were ordained from the foundation of the world to be a slave; that is your destiny. He continued, Although I never employed any of those boys as clerks, yet from that white boy, who reported my conver~ation, I have bought thousands of dollars worth of goods since. I began by selling cakes on the railway cars. [

Rev. W. J. Larkin Larkin, W. J., Rev. Lincoln Memorial Day in the South The South 134-135

134 LINCOLN MEMORIAL DA 1. will be realized. It is hoped by those who have this plan in hand, and we are all working in unison here in it, to extend it throughout all of our schools and churches in the South, that the present debt of the Ameri- can Missionary Association may be brought close to their hearts, and kept there, as the proposition is that this association shall continue until the debt is lifted. LINCOLN MEMORIAL DAY IN THE SOUTH. BY REV. W. J. LARKIN. On Lincolns birthday most of the churches connected with the Amcrican Missionary Association in the South took occasion to make a contribution to it, and many gifts not large in themselves, but repre- senting a great deal of sacrifice, have been received by our treasurer in New York. The pastor of our church in Marion, Alabama, sends a contribution of over $~6 from his church, which amount represents more sacrifices than thousands of dollars would represent from many of our more favored churches. He writes: We had a Lincolns exercise on Lords day, ioth, by the school at the church. It was a very cold, dark night, but our offering was $16.09. You will consider the hard times hereand they are hard, indeed, this yearwe have had intense cold now nearly two months with the mercury nearly to zero. When ice is six inches thick in this part of Alabama it means intense suffer- ing for the half-clad and half-fed negroes. We add to this $16.09, $11. 26, which we have collected at our missionary prayer meetings, making in all $27.35. I called on a few of the old ex-slaves for some experiences of bygone days. Among others here is one: When I was a boy about twelve years of age there were several boys together telling what we would do when we became men. I said, I am going to be free and keep a store, and perhaps employ some of you boys as my clerks. Among these boys standing there was a white boy, who, when he went home, told his father what I had been saying. Shortly after a lady, when I was passing her house one day called me in and said, Steve, is that you? Yes, marm. I want to see you; I hear you have been talking some bad talk with other boys. I said, What is it, marm? You said that you were going to be free some day. Now let me tell you, if you do not stop talking such talk you will be hung and nobody can possibly save you. Let me tell you, you were ordained from the foundation of the world to be a slave; that is your destiny. He continued, Although I never employed any of those boys as clerks, yet from that white boy, who reported my conver~ation, I have bought thousands of dollars worth of goods since. I began by selling cakes on the railway cars. [ LOUISIANA ASSO CIA TZOIV. .35 remember down in Tennessee about the year 1852 a man came and preached, and was said to have abolition ideas. The white people took him and hung him. Oh! children, if I only had had the privileges you now have! I thank God for the American Missionary Association. It took my children and made men of them. When I was a boy a good Christian man taught me to read a little. The white people discovered it and said, You stop teaching niggers, and cut off his forefinger for teaching us to write. THE LOUISIANA ASSOCIATION. BY REV. G. W. MOORE, FIELD MISSIONARY. The Louisiana State Association held its twenty-sixth annual meeting with the church at Thibodeaux, February ii. It was one of the best meetings in interest and attendance in the history of the associgttion. The reports from the churches showed a steady growth and hopeful outlook, in spite of the hard times. These churches of Southern Louis- iana are in the black belt of the State on plantations and in towns adjacent to the large sugar plantations. Many of the planters have become bankrupt by the changed conditions of giving up the sugar bounty, while the poor colored laborers have been the greatest sufferers. The stories of their hardships and struggles in their efforts to live and carry forward their church work are full of pathos, heroism and self-sacrifice. Laborers have had to take fifty cents a day and board themselves, to keep the wolf of starvation from their door, and many of them are unable to get work at any price. It was a revelation to the brethren to hear the report of Rev. James Herod, of the American Missionary Association meeting at Lowell, Mass., and of Mr. E. H. Phillips, of the Cleveland Christian Endeavor meet- ing. It was the first time these colored men had been North or East, and had come in contact with Northern civilization. First-class trains, hotels and Christian hospitality from our brother in white were all new to them. Mr. Herod is a graduate of Straight University, and is our pastor at Abbeville, La. His face beamed with grateful joy as he told the story of the meeting and the wonders of the North, and of the warm welcome of Northern friends, while the brethren of the Association were held spell-bound by his graphic recital. It is hard to tell which was the happier, the speaker or the audience. Mr. Phillips, of Morris-Brown Church, New Orleans, is a zealous Christian Endeavor worker. The State of Louisiana was represented at the Cleveland Christian Endeavor Convention by two colored dele- gates, Mr. Phillips and Dr. Nelson. The reception these colored

Rev. G. W. Moore Moore, G. W., Rev. The Louisiana Association The South 135-136

LOUISIANA ASSO CIA TZOIV. .35 remember down in Tennessee about the year 1852 a man came and preached, and was said to have abolition ideas. The white people took him and hung him. Oh! children, if I only had had the privileges you now have! I thank God for the American Missionary Association. It took my children and made men of them. When I was a boy a good Christian man taught me to read a little. The white people discovered it and said, You stop teaching niggers, and cut off his forefinger for teaching us to write. THE LOUISIANA ASSOCIATION. BY REV. G. W. MOORE, FIELD MISSIONARY. The Louisiana State Association held its twenty-sixth annual meeting with the church at Thibodeaux, February ii. It was one of the best meetings in interest and attendance in the history of the associgttion. The reports from the churches showed a steady growth and hopeful outlook, in spite of the hard times. These churches of Southern Louis- iana are in the black belt of the State on plantations and in towns adjacent to the large sugar plantations. Many of the planters have become bankrupt by the changed conditions of giving up the sugar bounty, while the poor colored laborers have been the greatest sufferers. The stories of their hardships and struggles in their efforts to live and carry forward their church work are full of pathos, heroism and self-sacrifice. Laborers have had to take fifty cents a day and board themselves, to keep the wolf of starvation from their door, and many of them are unable to get work at any price. It was a revelation to the brethren to hear the report of Rev. James Herod, of the American Missionary Association meeting at Lowell, Mass., and of Mr. E. H. Phillips, of the Cleveland Christian Endeavor meet- ing. It was the first time these colored men had been North or East, and had come in contact with Northern civilization. First-class trains, hotels and Christian hospitality from our brother in white were all new to them. Mr. Herod is a graduate of Straight University, and is our pastor at Abbeville, La. His face beamed with grateful joy as he told the story of the meeting and the wonders of the North, and of the warm welcome of Northern friends, while the brethren of the Association were held spell-bound by his graphic recital. It is hard to tell which was the happier, the speaker or the audience. Mr. Phillips, of Morris-Brown Church, New Orleans, is a zealous Christian Endeavor worker. The State of Louisiana was represented at the Cleveland Christian Endeavor Convention by two colored dele- gates, Mr. Phillips and Dr. Nelson. The reception these colored 136 FIELD ITEMS. Endeavorers received at Cleveland made all of our hearts glad. It was so refreshing to see this star of hope rising in the hearts of our long oppressed brethren, and to have them realize somewhere in the land the meaning and sweetness of the words of our Lord, and the Christian Endeavor motto: One is your Master, even Christ, and all ye are brethren. The report made by our field missionary of the Sunday-school Con- vention held in London, Eng., also inspired the brethren with the hope that the good time coming will come ere long, when they will be measured by their worth and work, and not always be despised and oppressed because of the accident of birth and condition. The Woman s Missionary State Union, with Miss Bella Hume as president, held an interesting meeting. They are assisting in the support of a missionary at our Indian Mission at Santee, Neb. The Sunday-school State Associ- ation, Rev. J. W. Whittaker, moderator, also held an inspiring meeting. Mr. Alfred Lawless, Jr., was appointed general Sunday-school superin- tendent to visit needy Sunday-schools in the State, and especially to assist in organizing Sunday-schools on the sugar plantations. The neat little chapel built a year ago by the American Missionary Association at ThiboJeaux was dedicated Sunday, February 3. An impressive and helpful sermon was pre~iched by Rev. Prof. G. W. Henderson, of Straight University, followed by addresses by the pastor, Rev. J. E. Smith, Trustee Matthew Dickerson and the field missionary. As the train left the little town the delegates sang, God be with you till we meet again. The coach was curtained off, to separate the white and colored passengers, but as this song of benediction rang out on the train the curtain was lifted by the white passengers, and for a season we were all one company. May the angelic song of the Nativity of peace on earth and good will toward men so abound that the curtains that separate men will be raised and its refrain of peace and good will extend to our common humanity, that we may all be bound together and united to Christ. FIELD ITEMS. The organization of Young Peoples Societies of Christian Endeavor among the young people in the mountains is being carried on very suc- cessfully by the missionaries and superintendents of the American Mis- sionary Association in that region. A recent report from one of the superintendents gives a list of nine places at which Endeavor Societies have been recently organized. The American Missionary Association has been especially active in this work of spreading the Endeavor move- ment among our young Highlanders of the South. The Endeavor

Field Items The South 136-137

136 FIELD ITEMS. Endeavorers received at Cleveland made all of our hearts glad. It was so refreshing to see this star of hope rising in the hearts of our long oppressed brethren, and to have them realize somewhere in the land the meaning and sweetness of the words of our Lord, and the Christian Endeavor motto: One is your Master, even Christ, and all ye are brethren. The report made by our field missionary of the Sunday-school Con- vention held in London, Eng., also inspired the brethren with the hope that the good time coming will come ere long, when they will be measured by their worth and work, and not always be despised and oppressed because of the accident of birth and condition. The Woman s Missionary State Union, with Miss Bella Hume as president, held an interesting meeting. They are assisting in the support of a missionary at our Indian Mission at Santee, Neb. The Sunday-school State Associ- ation, Rev. J. W. Whittaker, moderator, also held an inspiring meeting. Mr. Alfred Lawless, Jr., was appointed general Sunday-school superin- tendent to visit needy Sunday-schools in the State, and especially to assist in organizing Sunday-schools on the sugar plantations. The neat little chapel built a year ago by the American Missionary Association at ThiboJeaux was dedicated Sunday, February 3. An impressive and helpful sermon was pre~iched by Rev. Prof. G. W. Henderson, of Straight University, followed by addresses by the pastor, Rev. J. E. Smith, Trustee Matthew Dickerson and the field missionary. As the train left the little town the delegates sang, God be with you till we meet again. The coach was curtained off, to separate the white and colored passengers, but as this song of benediction rang out on the train the curtain was lifted by the white passengers, and for a season we were all one company. May the angelic song of the Nativity of peace on earth and good will toward men so abound that the curtains that separate men will be raised and its refrain of peace and good will extend to our common humanity, that we may all be bound together and united to Christ. FIELD ITEMS. The organization of Young Peoples Societies of Christian Endeavor among the young people in the mountains is being carried on very suc- cessfully by the missionaries and superintendents of the American Mis- sionary Association in that region. A recent report from one of the superintendents gives a list of nine places at which Endeavor Societies have been recently organized. The American Missionary Association has been especially active in this work of spreading the Endeavor move- ment among our young Highlanders of the South. The Endeavor MISS AMY WILLIAMS. 37 Society meets just their need, and furnishes opportunities for develop- ment and growth which are greatly appreciated. Extract from a letter, Andersonville, Ga. It is pitiful to see the children come so regularly four or five miles to school, their feet pro- truding from their broken shoes, bringing their baskets of tuition in the way of chickens, eggs, etc., to pay their school bills. One longs to cook up the things brought and give food to the poor children and wrap them in warm clothing, but I know the only way to make them self-reliant and keep them from the spirit of mendicancy is to require them to pay. NEW ORLEANS, LARev. Geo. W. Moore writes: About thirty of the boarding students and fifty of the day students have avowed their faith in Christ since Friday evening, when I first began the Gospel exer- cises in their behalf. All of the boarders of Straight University are now in the Christian household of faith. MISS AMY WILLIAMS. On Sunday, February 24, af Rochester, N. Y., another of our valued missionaries passed on beyond the work and opportunities of this life to her blessed reward. Miss Amy Williams entered the service of the Association in i868 as missionary teacher at Augusta, Ga. The next year she was trans- ferred to Atlanta, Ga., where she was for many years the principal of the Storrs School. Retiring from this principalship in 1885, she spent a few years North, but her heart continually turned to her loved people, and in 1893 she accepted appointment as principal of the Slater Normal School, at Knoxville, Tenn., where her work was characterized by the same thoroughness and ability as that at Atlanta. Finding that her health would not permit her to return the second year, she wrote in December: My heart just aches to go back South. Every other work seems insignificant. Mrs. T. N. Chase, of Atlanta, Ga., writes as follows: Nearly twenty-five years ago, in the beauty of her young woman- hood, she took charge of Storrs School, shaping it through those plastic years, and leaving the impress of her grand life upon it. At supper table to-night I ventured to ask one of the older girls who sits beside me if she remembered Miss Williams. How her face lighted up as she said: Oh yes; she gave me my first Bible. Hundreds of boys and girls have entered the college preparatory class at Atlanta University who, but for her, would never have gone beyond the grammar school. In the early days, before electric cars, she often walked out here,

Miss Amy Williams The South 137-138

MISS AMY WILLIAMS. 37 Society meets just their need, and furnishes opportunities for develop- ment and growth which are greatly appreciated. Extract from a letter, Andersonville, Ga. It is pitiful to see the children come so regularly four or five miles to school, their feet pro- truding from their broken shoes, bringing their baskets of tuition in the way of chickens, eggs, etc., to pay their school bills. One longs to cook up the things brought and give food to the poor children and wrap them in warm clothing, but I know the only way to make them self-reliant and keep them from the spirit of mendicancy is to require them to pay. NEW ORLEANS, LARev. Geo. W. Moore writes: About thirty of the boarding students and fifty of the day students have avowed their faith in Christ since Friday evening, when I first began the Gospel exer- cises in their behalf. All of the boarders of Straight University are now in the Christian household of faith. MISS AMY WILLIAMS. On Sunday, February 24, af Rochester, N. Y., another of our valued missionaries passed on beyond the work and opportunities of this life to her blessed reward. Miss Amy Williams entered the service of the Association in i868 as missionary teacher at Augusta, Ga. The next year she was trans- ferred to Atlanta, Ga., where she was for many years the principal of the Storrs School. Retiring from this principalship in 1885, she spent a few years North, but her heart continually turned to her loved people, and in 1893 she accepted appointment as principal of the Slater Normal School, at Knoxville, Tenn., where her work was characterized by the same thoroughness and ability as that at Atlanta. Finding that her health would not permit her to return the second year, she wrote in December: My heart just aches to go back South. Every other work seems insignificant. Mrs. T. N. Chase, of Atlanta, Ga., writes as follows: Nearly twenty-five years ago, in the beauty of her young woman- hood, she took charge of Storrs School, shaping it through those plastic years, and leaving the impress of her grand life upon it. At supper table to-night I ventured to ask one of the older girls who sits beside me if she remembered Miss Williams. How her face lighted up as she said: Oh yes; she gave me my first Bible. Hundreds of boys and girls have entered the college preparatory class at Atlanta University who, but for her, would never have gone beyond the grammar school. In the early days, before electric cars, she often walked out here, THE INDIANS. 138 nearly two miles, to see how her Storrs children were getting on. One day I wanted to walk back with her a little way, but she said: I must go on a mile further to the home of a poor boy who ran away and has been sleeping in my schoolroom two nights, because his father beats him so he does not dare to go home. That boy is now Rev. John W. Whittaker, class of 84, and pastor of First Congregational Church, New Orleans, La. I think of hosts of others who will rise up to call her blessed. So, as much as I loved her, I cannot grieve for her, but only sit and wonder how that one crown can contain all the stars that must be circling round her brow. The Indians. COLLECTION FOR THE DEBT AT SANTEE AGENCY. The response of an Indian church to the appeal for help in view of the financial distress upon the Association, is certainly worthy of any Christian church anywhere. In reporting their collection, Dr. A. L. Riggs writes as follows: On February io, our mission people and Pilgrim Church responded to the call of the American Missionary Association, and made a sub- scription of two hundred and sixteen dollars. This subscription will be paid in before the first of April, and it will likely be increased some. Of course the larger part is the gift of the missionaries, but the Indi- ans did well, a number contributing five dollars apiece. In giving an account of a service the day this large collection was taken at this Indian church, Mr. F. B. Riggs writes: Two of the mission people started the pledge with twenty dollars each. That rather startled the people, but several soon ventured ten dollars each. Then one pledged ten dollars on condition that nine others pledged the same. The nine were found. One Indian woman pledged ten dollars. Several Indians put down four, five, six and seven dollars each. We would sing and then call for pledges; speak and sing again, and then pledges again. The committee was instructed to canvass the matter farther immediately. The work is now going on outside. In the meanwhile the pledges are being paid very fast, and I expect to be able to remit to you soon. This contribution from Pilgrim Church means much from the hearts of our members. They have gone right down to the suffering point in this giving. The pupils in the school have done well in helping, too. I have been astonished that many members of Americas great churches think that missionaries and people in our mission fields are only recipients. I wonder if the good people in all our large churches did as much to lift the debt of the American Missionary Association on Lincoln Memorial Sabbath as did

Collection for the Debt at Santee Agency The Indians 138-139

THE INDIANS. 138 nearly two miles, to see how her Storrs children were getting on. One day I wanted to walk back with her a little way, but she said: I must go on a mile further to the home of a poor boy who ran away and has been sleeping in my schoolroom two nights, because his father beats him so he does not dare to go home. That boy is now Rev. John W. Whittaker, class of 84, and pastor of First Congregational Church, New Orleans, La. I think of hosts of others who will rise up to call her blessed. So, as much as I loved her, I cannot grieve for her, but only sit and wonder how that one crown can contain all the stars that must be circling round her brow. The Indians. COLLECTION FOR THE DEBT AT SANTEE AGENCY. The response of an Indian church to the appeal for help in view of the financial distress upon the Association, is certainly worthy of any Christian church anywhere. In reporting their collection, Dr. A. L. Riggs writes as follows: On February io, our mission people and Pilgrim Church responded to the call of the American Missionary Association, and made a sub- scription of two hundred and sixteen dollars. This subscription will be paid in before the first of April, and it will likely be increased some. Of course the larger part is the gift of the missionaries, but the Indi- ans did well, a number contributing five dollars apiece. In giving an account of a service the day this large collection was taken at this Indian church, Mr. F. B. Riggs writes: Two of the mission people started the pledge with twenty dollars each. That rather startled the people, but several soon ventured ten dollars each. Then one pledged ten dollars on condition that nine others pledged the same. The nine were found. One Indian woman pledged ten dollars. Several Indians put down four, five, six and seven dollars each. We would sing and then call for pledges; speak and sing again, and then pledges again. The committee was instructed to canvass the matter farther immediately. The work is now going on outside. In the meanwhile the pledges are being paid very fast, and I expect to be able to remit to you soon. This contribution from Pilgrim Church means much from the hearts of our members. They have gone right down to the suffering point in this giving. The pupils in the school have done well in helping, too. I have been astonished that many members of Americas great churches think that missionaries and people in our mission fields are only recipients. I wonder if the good people in all our large churches did as much to lift the debt of the American Missionary Association on Lincoln Memorial Sabbath as did THE CHINESE. 139 the members of this Indian Mission Church on the prairie. If so, the debt is wiped out. LETTER FROM AN INDIAN. David Tatankaota recently wrote the following letter to Miss M. C. Collins. David is the missionary in Thunder Hawks village, a new mission recently opened by the American Missionary Association. Miss Collins writes that David sent his report together with this letter and a collection of $5.5o from the Indians in his mission: January 26, 1895. WINONA, Mv FRIEND: I will give you a letter. My children arbd wife we are all well. Every Sunday brings praying. Some are beginning to understand the Bible. At the second service on Sunday I ask some to pray and some to talk. Also at the Wednesday prayer meeting these are ready to respond. Chasinghorse, Flyinghorse and Whiteagle. Thunderhawk is growing a little stronger (spiritually). He and his family are always at church. I have said enough. Your friend, DAVID TATANKAOTA. This is written with my own hand. Amen. Translated by Miss Collins. The Chinese. GLEANINGS FROM THE ANNUAL REPORT OF THE CALIFORNIA CHINESE MISSION FOR THE YEAR ENDING AUGUST 31, 1894. BV REV. W. c. POND, D.D. This is old news. But the report has been delayed in order that the treasurer might keep his books open till the very last offering pledged to us in aid of the work for that year could be collected, and thus, as much as possible be paid of the salaries which remained unpaid at the end of the year. We had no deficit. The mission does not run in debt. It never uses the resources of a new year to pay the arrears of the one preceding. Consequently there was only one thing to do when it became apparent that our resources would not be equal to our needs, viz., to authorize our workers to cease work and close the schools, and to say that should they continue in the work, we could promise them only this, that we would do for them all that was possible to us. The final result was that our workerssteadfast and faithfulafter having given their usual donations, squared accounts in January by extra gifts amounting to $374. 90. And while we are on this matter of the finances, we will give an

Letter from an Indian The Indians 139

THE CHINESE. 139 the members of this Indian Mission Church on the prairie. If so, the debt is wiped out. LETTER FROM AN INDIAN. David Tatankaota recently wrote the following letter to Miss M. C. Collins. David is the missionary in Thunder Hawks village, a new mission recently opened by the American Missionary Association. Miss Collins writes that David sent his report together with this letter and a collection of $5.5o from the Indians in his mission: January 26, 1895. WINONA, Mv FRIEND: I will give you a letter. My children arbd wife we are all well. Every Sunday brings praying. Some are beginning to understand the Bible. At the second service on Sunday I ask some to pray and some to talk. Also at the Wednesday prayer meeting these are ready to respond. Chasinghorse, Flyinghorse and Whiteagle. Thunderhawk is growing a little stronger (spiritually). He and his family are always at church. I have said enough. Your friend, DAVID TATANKAOTA. This is written with my own hand. Amen. Translated by Miss Collins. The Chinese. GLEANINGS FROM THE ANNUAL REPORT OF THE CALIFORNIA CHINESE MISSION FOR THE YEAR ENDING AUGUST 31, 1894. BV REV. W. c. POND, D.D. This is old news. But the report has been delayed in order that the treasurer might keep his books open till the very last offering pledged to us in aid of the work for that year could be collected, and thus, as much as possible be paid of the salaries which remained unpaid at the end of the year. We had no deficit. The mission does not run in debt. It never uses the resources of a new year to pay the arrears of the one preceding. Consequently there was only one thing to do when it became apparent that our resources would not be equal to our needs, viz., to authorize our workers to cease work and close the schools, and to say that should they continue in the work, we could promise them only this, that we would do for them all that was possible to us. The final result was that our workerssteadfast and faithfulafter having given their usual donations, squared accounts in January by extra gifts amounting to $374. 90. And while we are on this matter of the finances, we will give an

Rev. W. C. Pond, D.D. Pond, W. C., Rev., D.D. Gleanings from the Annual Report of the California Chinese Mission for the Year Ending August 31, 1894 The Chinese 139-141

THE CHINESE. 139 the members of this Indian Mission Church on the prairie. If so, the debt is wiped out. LETTER FROM AN INDIAN. David Tatankaota recently wrote the following letter to Miss M. C. Collins. David is the missionary in Thunder Hawks village, a new mission recently opened by the American Missionary Association. Miss Collins writes that David sent his report together with this letter and a collection of $5.5o from the Indians in his mission: January 26, 1895. WINONA, Mv FRIEND: I will give you a letter. My children arbd wife we are all well. Every Sunday brings praying. Some are beginning to understand the Bible. At the second service on Sunday I ask some to pray and some to talk. Also at the Wednesday prayer meeting these are ready to respond. Chasinghorse, Flyinghorse and Whiteagle. Thunderhawk is growing a little stronger (spiritually). He and his family are always at church. I have said enough. Your friend, DAVID TATANKAOTA. This is written with my own hand. Amen. Translated by Miss Collins. The Chinese. GLEANINGS FROM THE ANNUAL REPORT OF THE CALIFORNIA CHINESE MISSION FOR THE YEAR ENDING AUGUST 31, 1894. BV REV. W. c. POND, D.D. This is old news. But the report has been delayed in order that the treasurer might keep his books open till the very last offering pledged to us in aid of the work for that year could be collected, and thus, as much as possible be paid of the salaries which remained unpaid at the end of the year. We had no deficit. The mission does not run in debt. It never uses the resources of a new year to pay the arrears of the one preceding. Consequently there was only one thing to do when it became apparent that our resources would not be equal to our needs, viz., to authorize our workers to cease work and close the schools, and to say that should they continue in the work, we could promise them only this, that we would do for them all that was possible to us. The final result was that our workerssteadfast and faithfulafter having given their usual donations, squared accounts in January by extra gifts amounting to $374. 90. And while we are on this matter of the finances, we will give an 140 TALE CHiNESE. abstract of the treasurers final statement respecting current expenses in our general work: I. RESOURCES: On hand last Report $ 49 95 Appropriation American Missionary Association 7,499 90 Receipts at Treasury California Chinese Mission 4,973 8o Transferred from Permanent Prop. Account 24 55 Sale of Tracts and Books 4 40 II. DISBURSEMENTS: Salaries of Superintendent, Teachers and Help- ers $8,480 25 Rents of Mission Houses 3,013 85 Incidental Expenses 1,058 50 $12,552 6o $12,552 6o In addition to this, the work for Chinese mothers and children cost us $557.70, a little less than one-half of what we could have used with rigid economy and good results. The statistics of the work show twenty-one missions in which schools have been maintained, as follows: Fourteen during the entire year, except as recesses were taken at Chinese and American holidays; four with but one months vacation; two during the four months that the fruit men have comparative leisure, and onethat at Watsonvillea new mission which commenced work four months before the fiscal year closed. The total number of months of labor was 431. The aggregate enrollment of Christian Chinese connected with our missions, so far as reported, is 596. The number concerning whom we may hope that they have been led to Christ during the past year is 6o, making the total number of whom this hope has been cherished, and who have given credible evidence of faith in Christ from the first more than i,ioo. How many of these will appear in the church of the first-born clothed in white robes it is not for human judgment to decide. Sometimes the human, the frail, we may almost say the devil/s/i crops out in a way to put hope and courage to a test that is terribly severe, but never anything to compare with that which Paul had to con- front in those at Corinth, whom he nevertheless denominates the sancti- fied in Christ Jesus, called saints. The Good Shepherd knows his sheep, and those thus given to him by the Father shall never tens/i, neither shall anyone pluck them out of his Fathers hands. The limits of our space forbid that we follow the report into its accounts of the years work in each one of these missions. Two points deserve special notice. One of these has been referred to in a previ BUREAU OF WOMANS WORK, 14[ ous number of THE MISSIONARY. More attention must be given to preaching in the street and in our schoolrooms, which make very com- fortable little chapels. The other is that many Chinese childrennative- born Americansare growing up not only in the great centers, but also in interior villages, and we must open the doors of our schools to these; make such arrangements as will secure their attendance, and so bring it about by the grace of God that they grow up not in darkness, but under the healing beams of Him who said, I am the light of the world. OFFERINGS OF OUR BRETHREN. It is not possible to segregate their gifts to our treasury with perfect accuracy, but we are within the truth when we place them at $1,905.40. In addition to this they have given for the local expenses of their several Associations $i, 134. 10, for Mis- sionary Work in China $675.65, for their Worldwide Missionary Society (through the American Board) $63.60, and for relief to needy brethren and others $358, making an aggregate of $~, 136.75 as their offerings for the year; and this, be it understood when the pressure of the times cannot but be felt by them, on the average, more severely than by any others. The goods a Chinaman has to sell are likely to be those that in hard times we dispense with. If wages are to be reduced, the reduc- tion begins with the Chinaman. It is no great sin in the view of many to steer clear of paying a Chinaman. If anybody is to be dismissed from service when economy begins it is the Chinaman. We cannot but think that under the circumstances the financial showing at this point is highly creditable. Bureau of Womans Work. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNIONS. THANK-OFFERING DAY, APRIL 12. It is heart cheering that the Womens Unions have planned for thought, prayer and special offerings on Friday, April 12, or Easter Sunday, the ~4th, the day which, in the words of the resolution adopted by the State organizations at their annual meeting, commemorates Christs gift of Himself to the world. Surely liberal offerings must follow sober thought and earnest prayer for the redemption of ihose whom God seems to have given into our special charge here in our own country. Our Lord Himself said, Ye have done it unto Me. What if it does cost self-denial? Shall we not plan more liberally for Christ than for self? How much owest thou my Lord? That is the question which the giver has to face. Sometimes in commercial circles a man will assign

Thank-Offering Day, April 12 Bureau of Woman's Work 141-142

BUREAU OF WOMANS WORK, 14[ ous number of THE MISSIONARY. More attention must be given to preaching in the street and in our schoolrooms, which make very com- fortable little chapels. The other is that many Chinese childrennative- born Americansare growing up not only in the great centers, but also in interior villages, and we must open the doors of our schools to these; make such arrangements as will secure their attendance, and so bring it about by the grace of God that they grow up not in darkness, but under the healing beams of Him who said, I am the light of the world. OFFERINGS OF OUR BRETHREN. It is not possible to segregate their gifts to our treasury with perfect accuracy, but we are within the truth when we place them at $1,905.40. In addition to this they have given for the local expenses of their several Associations $i, 134. 10, for Mis- sionary Work in China $675.65, for their Worldwide Missionary Society (through the American Board) $63.60, and for relief to needy brethren and others $358, making an aggregate of $~, 136.75 as their offerings for the year; and this, be it understood when the pressure of the times cannot but be felt by them, on the average, more severely than by any others. The goods a Chinaman has to sell are likely to be those that in hard times we dispense with. If wages are to be reduced, the reduc- tion begins with the Chinaman. It is no great sin in the view of many to steer clear of paying a Chinaman. If anybody is to be dismissed from service when economy begins it is the Chinaman. We cannot but think that under the circumstances the financial showing at this point is highly creditable. Bureau of Womans Work. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNIONS. THANK-OFFERING DAY, APRIL 12. It is heart cheering that the Womens Unions have planned for thought, prayer and special offerings on Friday, April 12, or Easter Sunday, the ~4th, the day which, in the words of the resolution adopted by the State organizations at their annual meeting, commemorates Christs gift of Himself to the world. Surely liberal offerings must follow sober thought and earnest prayer for the redemption of ihose whom God seems to have given into our special charge here in our own country. Our Lord Himself said, Ye have done it unto Me. What if it does cost self-denial? Shall we not plan more liberally for Christ than for self? How much owest thou my Lord? That is the question which the giver has to face. Sometimes in commercial circles a man will assign 142 RECEIPTS. a debt that is owing to him to someone else out of friendship that he may take it when he has collected and use it for himself. Much in the same way, I think, the Lord Jesus has assigned a large portion of the debt which we owe to Him to those who are around us, to the unconverted at our doors, to these races among whom we labor. Let us see in those for whom appeal is made to us through this Association the representa tives of Christ. DR. WILLIAM M. TAYLOR. When men know the grace of Christ they will never feel that they have given Him enough. Until they know it they will never give Him anything. They may contribute to keep up appearances so as to be like other people or to gain a reputation, but they will never give to Him until they know His grace. Before men give to Christ they must receive from Him, and when they have received Christ Himself into their hearts they will be impelled to give, impelled not compelled; for the delight and the duty will co-exist, or rather the duty will be merged in the delight. DR. WILLIAM M. TAYLOR. WANTED, to supply demands for libraries, copies of MISSIONARY for January, February, March and April, i866, January, 1867, and January and August, 1875. The Annual Report for i86o, i86i, 1862, 1863. THE AMERICAN 1862, January, Also, copies of RECEIPTS FOR FEBRUARY, 1895. 1H13.~ DANIEL HAND FUND For the .Education of Colored People. Income for February Previously acknowledged $4,197 35 28,322 50 $22,519 8~ CURRENT RECEIPTS. MAINE, $524.20. Alfred. cong. rh., zo.~o; Y. P. 5. C. E. of cong. ~ 2.22 Andover. cong c~ Auburn. Samuel 3. M. Perkins Augusta. A Friend Bangor. Hammond St. cong. Ch Biddeford. Second cong. cb., L. M. cir- cle, Bbl. C. for Biowin~g Rock, N C. Boothbay Harbor. Mrs. M. Alice Beal, for Gosj5e/ Work 8 no Brewer. Jun. c. E. 5., 2 boxes christmas 12 72 Gifts/or Mcfntosk, Ga. 00 Freeport. Miss G. B. Lewis 00 10 00 Gardiner. Cong. ch., for Student A Id, 30 CO Pleasant HillAcad., Tenn 24 00 ioo no Gorham. First cong. Cli. and Soc zi8 29 Gorham. H. H. Soc., for Student Aid, Talladega C 20 00

Receipts for February, 1895 142-152B

142 RECEIPTS. a debt that is owing to him to someone else out of friendship that he may take it when he has collected and use it for himself. Much in the same way, I think, the Lord Jesus has assigned a large portion of the debt which we owe to Him to those who are around us, to the unconverted at our doors, to these races among whom we labor. Let us see in those for whom appeal is made to us through this Association the representa tives of Christ. DR. WILLIAM M. TAYLOR. When men know the grace of Christ they will never feel that they have given Him enough. Until they know it they will never give Him anything. They may contribute to keep up appearances so as to be like other people or to gain a reputation, but they will never give to Him until they know His grace. Before men give to Christ they must receive from Him, and when they have received Christ Himself into their hearts they will be impelled to give, impelled not compelled; for the delight and the duty will co-exist, or rather the duty will be merged in the delight. DR. WILLIAM M. TAYLOR. WANTED, to supply demands for libraries, copies of MISSIONARY for January, February, March and April, i866, January, 1867, and January and August, 1875. The Annual Report for i86o, i86i, 1862, 1863. THE AMERICAN 1862, January, Also, copies of RECEIPTS FOR FEBRUARY, 1895. 1H13.~ DANIEL HAND FUND For the .Education of Colored People. Income for February Previously acknowledged $4,197 35 28,322 50 $22,519 8~ CURRENT RECEIPTS. MAINE, $524.20. Alfred. cong. rh., zo.~o; Y. P. 5. C. E. of cong. ~ 2.22 Andover. cong c~ Auburn. Samuel 3. M. Perkins Augusta. A Friend Bangor. Hammond St. cong. Ch Biddeford. Second cong. cb., L. M. cir- cle, Bbl. C. for Biowin~g Rock, N C. Boothbay Harbor. Mrs. M. Alice Beal, for Gosj5e/ Work 8 no Brewer. Jun. c. E. 5., 2 boxes christmas 12 72 Gifts/or Mcfntosk, Ga. 00 Freeport. Miss G. B. Lewis 00 10 00 Gardiner. Cong. ch., for Student A Id, 30 CO Pleasant HillAcad., Tenn 24 00 ioo no Gorham. First cong. Cli. and Soc zi8 29 Gorham. H. H. Soc., for Student Aid, Talladega C 20 00 RECEIPTS. Harpswell Center. Bhl. C., by Mrs. E. R. Morsefor Blowing Rock, N. C. Harrison. Cong. Ch Litchfield Corners. V. P. 5. C. E., by Walter T. Earle, Treas Litchfieki Corners. Bbl. C., by Mrs. D. F. Smitlifor Blowing Rock, N. C. North Bridgton. Cong. Ch Phippsburg. Cong. Cli. and Soc Portland. A Friend/or Student Aid, Talladega C Portland. W. M. Soc. for Student Aid, Gregory Inst Portland. Second Parish Cong. Ch., LadiesSoc.,Bbl.C., for Greenwood, S.C. Robinston. Ladies Aid Soc., of Cong. Ch., Bbl. Bedding, Freight 1.85, for Talladega, Ala Rockland. Womans Aid Soc., of Cong. Ch., Blil. Bedding, etc., Freight 2, br Talladega, Ala Searsport. Sab. Sch., Cong. Cli., 5; Jun. C. E. 5., 4, for Dorchester Acad., Mc- Intosh Ga Wells. Barak Maxwell, 2o; ~ A Friend West Cor~nvi1le. Addie Bicknell West Paris. Miss Mary L. Dana, Youths Companion for one year, for Macon, Ga. Woodfords. Carl Coffin, S. S. Class, for Student Aid, Talladega C Woodfords. Blil. C. and Bedding, for Lincoln Acad, N. C. Woodfords. 2 Bhls. C., by Mrs. Ida V. Woodhury, Sec.,for Blowing Rock, N. C. Woodfords. Blil. C., for Marion, Ala. Yarmouth. First Cong. Ch. (~ of which from Mrs. E. D. Freeman, Memorial Miss Sophia Carleton) Maine Womans Aid to A. M. A., by Mrs. Ida V. Woodhury, Treasfor Woman.e Work: Cumberland Center 22 no Lewiston. Pine St. Ch 25 00 Turner. Mrs. S. L. Bird... 00 Pownal s 00 3 37 2 50 5 50 6 27 40 no 8no 2 no 9 no 50 40 no 53 no NEW HAMPSHIRE, $1,098.04. Amherst. Edward D. Boylaton, ino; Cong. Cli., 8o; Sab. Sch., Cong. Cli., ~I.46 191 46 Boscawen. Mrs. Mattie P. Webster, Freight, to Pleasant Hill, Tenn 00 Claremont. V. W. Soc., Bhl. C., etc.,for Wilmington, N. C. East Brentwood. Rev. H. H. Colburn in no East Jaifrey. Cong. Ch., i~.sn; Christian Endeavor Soc., 5.42 29 92 Farmington. First Cong. Cli. (30 of which from Y. P. 5. C. E.),for Student Aid, Nat Ala 3540 Greenville. Cong. Cli. (of which F. W. Ely 25) .. 40 00 Jaifrey. Lilies of the Field; by Miss L. S. Adams,for Storr.e Sck 20 00 Littleton. First Cong. Cli 24 83 Londonderry. Clias. S. Pillsbury 00 Manchester. First Cong. Ch. and Soc., to coost. REV. L. GoonRicH, Mrs. J. B. ESTEY and MRS. J. G. JONES L.M.s 102 22 Merrimac. Geo. S. Parkhurst, for Stu- dent Aid, TalladegaC in 00 Nashua. First Cong. Cli. and Soc 6o on New Castle. Willing Workers, for Straight U In 00 Pembroke. Sab. 5db., Cong. Cli 5 34 Peterboro. Union Cong. Cli., Y. P. 5. C. E in on South New Market. Miss H. L. Fitts, for Student Aid Gregory Inst 32 40 Stratliam. Cong. dli. and Soc is no 43 South New Market. Miss H. L. Fitts, for Freight, i.~i ;- Ladies of Cong. Cli., Blil. C., for Wilmington, AT. C 71 Troy. Trio. Cong. Cli in 86 $598 04 ESTATES. Lyndeboro. Estate of Jotham Hildreth, for benevolent and charitable tar- loses of the A. 11ff. A., among the Colored Peolle of the South, by William R. Putnam, Trustee 500 no $I,o98 04 VERMONT, $388.00. Barnet. Sab. Scli, Cong Cli 4 83 Barre. Cong. Soc., Bhl. C. for Williams- burg, Ky. Burlington. Mary C. Wheeler, for Straight U 20 00 Cambridge. M. and C. Safford is no Damons Crossing. Gen. A. Appleton,.. 10 CO Dorset. V. P. 5. C. E., by Marcia K. Gray, Cli. M. C., for Student Aid, Blowing Rock, N. C .. in no Dorset. Mrs. H. M. Johnson 2 00 Essex. A. A. Slater, Box and Bhl. C., for Columbia, S. C Greensboro. Cong. Cli Jeffersonville. Second Cong. Cli. of Cambridge Johnson. A. J. Grant, for Straight U. Milton. Y. P. 5. C. E., Cong. Cli., for C. E. Hall, Mcintosh, Ga Monepelier. Bethany Sub. 5db., by D. S. Wheatley, Treas Newfane. Cong. Cli. and Soc New Haven. Cong. Cli., V. L. Working Club, Blil. C.,for Grand View, Tenn. North Bennington. Cong. Cli., Ladies, Bhl. C. for Grand View, Tenn. Rupert. Cong. Cli Saint Jolinsliury. South Cong., Cli. Y P. S. C. E., for Central Ch., New Or- leans, La Sheldon. Cong. Cli Strafford. Cong. Cli., ~: V. P. 5. C. E. of Cong. Cli. for Mountain Work, 8... Westford. A Friend Westminster. Cong. Cli., Y. P. 5. C. E., End-Day Off., for Central Ch., New Orleans, La 5 ~0 Whiting. Cong. Cli 631 Woodstock.W. H. M. 5., 25; Mrs. Fred. Merrill, 3, for Ballard Sch., Macon, Ga 28 no Received for Dorchester Acad., McIn- tush, Ga.~ Barton Landing and Brown- ington. Bhl. C. Chelsea. By Mrs. C. D. Comatock, 4; Mis. Sarah W.Slierman, Freight, 2.65 6 6~ Coventry. Busy Bees, Bbl. C., Freight, 2 2 00 Essex Junction. By Mrs. F. D. Bacon, Bbl: C., Freight, 2 2 00 North Craftsbury. Vermont H. M.S 500 Montpelier. Betliany Cli., L.M. S., 2BhlSC. Saint Jolinshury. Ladies of South Cli., Box C. West Glover. Ladies. Bbl. B. __ i~35 Womans Home Missionary Union of Vermont, by Mrs. William P. Fair- banks, Treasfor Woonans Work: Berlin. L.H.M.S 500 Brattleboro West. Jun. C. E.,for IndianSchjS ~ no 4 20 5 50 5 Co i 8s i6 78 5 55 24 40 40 00 25 00 5 00 44 RECEIPTS. Bur1in~ton. First Cli., W. Hivi. S 2000 Nortlifield. W. H. M. 5 5 no Norwich. Sab. Sch., for Indian Schj~ 6 oo Saint Johnsbury So. Cli. W. H. lvi. 5., 26.93; So. Cli. Sab. Sch., 30; Center Ch.,W.H.M.S.,5 6193 Waterbury. Jun. C. E. Soc/or Indian SchI.... s co __ 10793 MASSACHUSETTS, $8,422.71. Amesbury. Ladies H. M. Soc. of Main St. Cli. for Student Aid, Talladega C. 6 50 Amherst. First Cong. Cli 90 no Amherst. North Cli., 7.50; T. S. Cooley, Box S. S. Papers, for Lincoln Acad., N.C 750 Amherst. Colored Bible Class, Blil. C., for Wilmington, N. C. Andover. Rev. C. C. Starbuck, for Student Aid, Talladega C 3 00 Andover. Theo. Sem., for Mountain Work 2 25 Aslifield. Cong. Cli 24 no Bedford. Cong. Ch 9 51 Berlin. Cong. Cli 24 25 Beverly. Wash. St. Cong Cli 50 37 Beverly Farms. A Day 00 Billerica. Mrs. Daniel W. Hardy, Blil. C. for Moorhead, Miss. Blue Hill. A Friend, for Student Aid, Pleasant Hill Acad., Tenn 20 00 Blue Hill. Mrs. Lizzie K Tucker, 30, to coost. herself L.M. Incorrectly ack. in February number, from Blue Hill, Maine. Brimfield. Union Cong. Cli. Ladies, Blil. C., for Greenwood, S. C. Brookline. Geo. P. Davis,for Tuition, Litle Mary, Gregory Inst 5 00 Buckland. Life Member 2 no Blanford. Miss H. M. Hinsdale,for Stu- dent Aid, Straight U 50 no Boston. Ladies Aux., for Stu- dent Aid, Pleasant Hill Acad., Tenn 75 no Old South Cli. Mrs. Clapp, for Sch5, Pleasant Hill Acad., Tenn 40 no Miss E. S. Fiske, for Marshallville, Ga 25 no Whatsoever Band,for Stu- dent Aid, Gregory Inst. 6 no Union Cli. Y. P. Miss. Soc ... 5no Girls Refuge, for Stu- dent Aid, Pleasant Hill Acad., Tenn ~ no Perry, Mason & Co., Youths Companion, one year, for Macon, Ga. Mrs. M. H. Hitchcock, Blil. C.for Columbia, S. C. Mrs. T. H. Kendall, 2 Blils. C., etc., for Marshall- ville, Ga. Dorchester. Mrs. N. P. Liver- more, 35; Mrs. Win. Jenks, 8,for Student Aid, Pleasant Hill Acad., Tenn 43~O Second Cong. Cli., by B. C. Hardwick . 25 no Rev. H. Houston, for Stu- dent Aid. 5.33; Freight, 2.67; Friends, by Mrs. Mary Houston, Blil. C., for Dorchester A cad., Mcintosh, Ga 7 no Jamaica Plain. Ivirs. Clieney, for Le Moyne Inst 25 no Indian Association, by Miss Manning, Treas., for Indian M.,Fort Berthold, N. D., Out-station Work for Women Roxbury. Eliot Cong. Cli A Friend, for Tuition, Little Mary, Gregory Jost L. H. M. S. Blil. C.. for Blowing Rock, N. C. 50 no 8no 324 00 Brookfield. Mrs. R. B. Montague. ~ 00 Cambridge. Henry White, for Student Aid, Fisk U 25 00 Cambridgeport. Pilgrim Cong. Cli., Stereopticon Coll 29 48 Cambridgeport. Pilgrim Cli. Womans Miss. Soc., for Work Among Chinese Women in Cal 20 no Carlisle. Y. P. 5. C. E., for Saluda Sem., N. C 25 00 Centreville. Cong. Cli 3 no Cliarlton. Cong. Cli 22 97 Chester. 2 Bbls. C.,for Meridian, Miss. Concord. Trin. Cong. Cli 44 50 Cummington. Mrs. H. M. Porter, for Mountain Work 20 CO Curtisville. Y. P. 5. C. E., by Minnie Ford, Tress/or Santee Indian Sch... 20 00 Dalton. First Cong. Cli., to const. LILLIAN F. MITCHELL, CAMILLA B. PER- REv, WILLIAM D. VEATS, WALTER H. SEARS and LILLIAN TOOLEY L.M.s .... 165 25 Dalton. W. M. Crane, io; Mrs. Z. M. Crane, ino; Miss Clara L. Crane, 200; to const. MRS. GEORGE MAYNARO, MRS. M. D. PELTON, MISS LILLIAN E. Sisi- MONS, JAMES BARDIN, HERBERT R. MES- SENGER and CHARLES SLATEE L.M S... 300 no Dalton. Mrs. Z. M. Crane, i~ Mrs. Zenas Crane, i~ Mrs. J. B. Crane, 12; Miss Clara L. Crane, 22, and Miss Mary Crane, 22.for Student A id, Tallade~a, C fiono Douglass: A Friend, s; Friends, 3 for Student Aid, Talladega C 8 no Dunstable. V. P. 5. C. E, Thank Off 500 Everett. Mrs. G. W. Fitz, Blil. C., for Albany, Ga. Fall River. Mrs. R. K. Remington, for Wilmington, N C 20 no Fall River. Miss Robertson, for Indian M., Fort Berthold, N. D no Framingliam. Plym. Cli .... ~5 75 Framingliam. P1 yin. Cli, Ladies, for Williamsburg Acad. Ky 22 no Franklin. Ladies Soc., Bbl. C., for Pleasant Hill, Tenn. Gill. Cong. Cli., V. P. 5. C. E., for Cen tral Church, New Orleans. La 6 30 Greenfield. Mrs. Dwight R. Tyler 22 no Halifax. C. E. Day, Off., by Nellie T. Bain, Tress 2 Hamilton. E. M. Knowlton 2 no Hatfield. Sab. 5db. Classes and Friends, by David Billings, Treas 22 12 Haverhill. Algernon P. Nichols, for Theo. Student A id, Talladega C 50 no Haverhill. , ~ V. P. 5. C. E., Union Cong. Cli., 2.62 27 62 Holyoke. Second Cong. Cli., V. P. 5. C. E., for Central Ch., New Orleans, La. sono Hopkinton. Mrs. A. M. Crooks, for Little Mary, Wilmington, N. C 10 no Hyde Park. Infant S. S., of Cong. Cli., for Student Aid, Talladega C 8 no Lancaster. Evan. Cong. Cli....... 9 28 Leominster. Ortho. Cong. Cli 40 00 Lee. Cong. Cli., V. P. 5. C. E., ~~ Mrs. Klbbon, i; Miss Ames, s, for Avery Home, Charleston, S. C 21 00 Lowell. John St. Sab. 5db., 4; John St. Primary S.S., is,for Central Ch., New Orleans, La 29 no Lowell. G. H. Candee, for Library, Straight U 20 no RECEIPTS. Luncnburg. Evan. Cong. Ch 3 00 Marlboro. Washburn C. E. Union 2 5o Medfield. Second Cong. Ch Ifi oo Milton. Hon. Edward L. Pierce, i~ Vols. Memoirs and Works of Charles Sum- ner,./or Straight U. Millord. Rev. W. Woodbury, Pkgs. S. S. Literature; Mrs. Woodhury, 2 fine Lamps for Students Rooms,for Grand View, Tenn. Monson. E. F. Morris, soo; Cong. CL, 22.74 222 74 Montvale. Mrs. S. T. Greenough 5 oo New Bedford. V.P. S.C. EforA. N. and!. Sch., Thomasnille, Ga 5 00 Neponset. Mrs. S. L. Winsor, for Library, Straight U 5 00 Newburyport. Mrs. S. Kimball, for Le Moyne Inst., Memthis, Tenn 3 00 Newton. Mrs. George S. Trowbridges S. S. Class, Elliot (ih., for Little In- dian Girl, Santee, Neb 5 00 Northampton. Miss Bates and Miss Fisk, for Student Aid Lincoln Acad.. NC. 44 N~orth Amherst. Ladies M. S., Bbl. C., for Lincoln Acad, N. C. North Chelmsford. A Friend 5 00 North Falmouth. Cong. Ch. and Soc.... in oo North Leominster. Cong. Ch. of Christ 23 07 North Weymouth. Cong. Ch., Wide Awakes, for Indian M., Fort Ber- thold, N. .1) 5 00 Oakham. Cong. Ch 20 00 Palmer. Second Cong. Ch., for Then. Student Aid, TalladegaC 7500 Pittsfield. Mary A. Bissell, Copies of Amorican Teacher, for Talladega. Ala. Plymouth. Church of the Pilgrimage 36 42 Randolph. Miss Abbie Turner, for In- dian M., Fort Berthold, N. D 5 00 Reading. A Friend Royalaton. D. P. Foster, for Mountain Work 5 00 Salem. V. L. M. S.,for Indian M., Fort Berthold, N. .9 5 c Sharon. Cong. Ch. S. S. Class,for Will- iamnsburg Acad., Ky ~ 33 Sharon. Cong. Ch., 2 Bbls. C.,for Will- iamsburg, Ky. Somerville. Winter Hill Cong Ch., 3i.fii; Franklin St. 0. C. Sab. Sch., o.. 41 6i Somerville. Proapect Hill Cong. Ch., 2 Bbls. C. for Macon, Ga. South Framingham. Grace Cong. Ch... 270 42 South Framiogham. R. L. Day, for ~j5ecial Mountain Work 200 00 South Framingham. Grace Cong. Ch. Sab. Seb. for Mountain Work 29 6~ South Hadley Falls. Friends 20 00 Spencer. First Cong. Ch. and Soc, to conat. REV. SHERMAN W. BROWN L.M.. 287 32 Spencer. Three S. S. Classes, by C. E. Green, i~ Through Miss Fitts, 22.50, for Student Aid, Gregory Inst 25 50 Springfield. Robert H. Clizbe, by Mrs. E. B. Merriam 25 00 Springfield. Kings Daughters, Circle of Ruth,for Gloucester Sck., Ca~6j2ahosic, Va 300 Springfield. By Mrs. Thompson, Bbl. C., Freight, 2.30, for Blowing Rock, N. C 2 30 Springfield. L. M. SocIor A. G. Sch., Moorhead, Miss 2 20 Sterling. Cong. Ch in 00 Sturbridge. Firs. Cong. Ch. and Soc.... 7 36 Turners Falls. Cong. Ch., V. P. 5. C. E., 8; Mrs. Mayos S. S. Class, 5.5o, for Central Church, New Orleans La.... 2350 Wakefield. Cong. Ch 02 Ware. Miss Sage, ~ Mrs. Cutler, 5; Jun. V. P. 5. C. E, 5,for Meridian, Miss.. 25 oo Warren. V. P. 5. C. E., for Student Aid, 8: Bbl. C., by Miss Ellen L. Pix- leyfor Dorchester Acad., Mcintosh, Ga 45 Wellesley. A Friend 20 00 Wellesley, Wellesley College, Indian Assn 3 00 Westhoro. V. L. B. Soc., Evan, Cong. Ch., for Saluda, N C. 25 00 Westhoro. Miss Kate Harrington, for Student Aid, A. N and I. Sch., Thomasville, Ga 20 00 Westfield. , 2 Bbls. C.; Mrs. 0. W. Sanford, Bbl. C.,forJonesboro, Tcnn. West Hatfield. Aid Soc, Bbl. C., for Moorhead, Miss. West Medway. Second Cong. Ch., for .Evarts, Ky., and to const. RRv. FRRD. HovEv ALLEN L.M 30 00 West Medway: Third Cong. Ch 30 00 West Newton. Pax 2 00 Weymouth. Rev. J. M. Lord. 2 Boxes Books, for Straight U. Libr ry. Wilbraham. Mrs. P. 5. Homer 2 00 Williamstown. Church of Christ, White Oaks, by Rev. W. Morse 3 00 Williamstown. Mrs. L. D. White, Bbl. C.,for Williamsburg, Ky. Winchester. Cong. Ch., Children, for Student Aid, Pleasant Hill Acad., Tenn 40 00 Whitinsville. A. F. Whitin, Books, for Library, Talladega C. Worcester. Old South Ch., 200.25; Central Cong. Ch., 96.74; Park Cong. Ch., Ladies Missy Soc., hal. to const REV. INMAN L. WILCOX L.M 23; A. L. Smith, 224 99 Worcester. F. D. and D. N. Dixon Memorial Fund, for Student A id, Pleasant HillAcad., Tenn 20 00 Hampden Benevolent Association, by George R. Bond, Treas.: Chicopee. First 6 20 North Wilbraham. Grace Union 7 8o Palmer. Second 25 00 Springfield. First 20 43 Springfield. South 6~ 6o Westfield. Second ~6 98 Westfield. Second Sab. Sch., for Indian M ... 37 76 A Friend 20 00 ____ 229 77 Womans Home Missionary Association of Mass. and R. I., Annie C. Bridgman, Treas. for Womans Work: W. H. M. A., for Salaries of Teachers 338 47 Roxbury. Walnut Av. Ch., Ladies Aux., adl., to coost. Miss HELEN M. AT- woon L.M 2 94 34242 $3,672 72 ESTATE. Walpole. Estate Mary B. Johnson, 5,ooo, less State Tax, 250, by Frederic Guild, Executor 4,750 00 $8,422 72 CLOTHING, BooRs, ETC., RECEIVED AT BOSTON OFFICE: South Berwick, Me. Mrs. K. B. Lewis, Bbl. Mdse. for High Point, N. C. Billerica, Mass. H. A. King, Overcoat, for Nat, Ala. Lanesville, Mass. W. L. Saunders, Pkg. Mens C.,for Nat, Ala. Westford, Mass. Mrs. A. S. Wright, Bbl. and Box C., etc., for Pleasant Hill, Teun. West Newton, Mass. Miss Alice Willis- ton, Bbl. C. for Nat, Al~. RHODE ISLAND, $90.80. Newport. Mrs. T. Thayer, so; Win. An. 8 00 drews, 4.50 24 50 846 RECEIPTS. Providence. Centre Cong. Ch., 5o; Min- istering Children, Ilfor Student A id, Talladega C Providence. Centre Cong. Ch. for Tal- ladega C Providence. Cong. Ch., Jun. C. E. Union, for Student A Id, Pleasant Hill A cad., Teen Providence. V. P. 5. C. E., North Cong. Ch Providence. Win. H. Waite, Bbl. C/or Tkomasville, Ga. 62 00 3 00 I 30 CONNECTICUT, $2,905.29. Branford. Cong. Ch. and V. P. S. C. E., for Central Cit., New Orleans, La.. 25 no Bridgeport. First Cong. Ch is6 i8 Bristol. Miss E. J. Peck, Bbl. C., etc., for Talladega, Ala. Chaplin. Cong. Ch., hal. to const. REV. EUGENE M. FEARY L.M . 20 00 Collinsville. Friends,for Titeo. Stu- dent Aid, Talladega C 30 00 Cornwall Hollow. Union End. Soc., by Mrs. Katherine M. Sudgwick, for Mountain Work 2 00 Cromwell. Cong. Ch 97 1~ Cromwell. Cong. Ch., Bbl. C., for Grand View, Tenn. Danbury. V. P. 5. C. E. of First Cong. Ch 666 East Haddam. A Friend 5 00 East Hampton. Dea. Samuel Skinner, ~ Mrs. Joo. Star, ~ E. C. Barton, 3; A. Conklin, ~ L. S. Carpenter, 2~ for Thea. Student Aid, Talladega C 50 00 East Hartford. Miss Gilmans S. S. Class,for Central Cit., New Orleans, La . 750 East Hartford. S. S. Class, for Student Aid, Talladega C . 4 00 Essex. First Cong. Ch 25 00 Farmington. Sab. Seb., First Cong. Ch., s6.~6 for Central Cit., New Orleans, La., 52.35/or Indian M 28 91 Glastonbury. A Friend, by Rev. John Barstow, for Central Cit., New Orleans, La 5 00 Greenfield. C. A. Blakeman, for Wil- mington, N. C 8 00 Greenwich. Cong. Ch., Mrs. Geo. P. Sheldon, ~ Miriam F. and Helen A. Choate, by Rev. W. Choate, D.D., ~ Miss Agnes W. Hubbard, s 25 00 Guilford. Miss Seward, Bbl. C. and Lit- erature,for Storrs Scit. Guilford. First Cong. Ch., 2 Bbls. C., for Williamsburg, Ky. Hartford. Second Ch. of Christ 100 00 Hartford. Mrs. W. P. Williams, for In- dustrial Work, Fisk U 25 00 Hartford. I. J. Steane, for Central Cit., New Orleans, La 20 00 Hartford. Fourth Cong. Ch.,Ladies Aid Soc., Bbl. C., Freight paid; South Ch. Sewing Soc., Box C.,for Grand View, Tenn. Harwinton. Cong. Ch., 20.72; Mrs. Milo Watson, 5 25 72 Lebanon. First Cong. Ch., 52.6, to coost. LUTHER H. RANOALL L.M.; C. E. Soc. of First Cong. Ch., s~ i6 Littleton. Ortho. Cong. Ch s8 00 Lyme. L. M. S., Bbl. C., for Jonesboro, Tenn. Mansfield Centre. Mrs. L. M. Swift, for Student Aid, Talladega C 2 00 Middletown. First Ch 27 40 Miliington. Cong. Ch i 00 Montville Center. C. E. Soc. of Cong. Ch 400 New Britain. First Ch. of Christ, A Friend; to coost. Miss JENNIE M. BUENHAM L.M 30 00 New Britain. Cong. Ch., Ladies Benev. Soc., Bbl. C., for Grand View, Tenn. New Canoan. Kings Daughters, Box C. for Williamsburg, Ky. New Canaan. Cong. Ch., Box C., for Grand View, Tenn. New Hartford. Ladies Aid Soc. of Cong. Ch., Bbl. C., for Tall dega, Ala. New Haven. Edwin B. Bowditch, s~ Samuel A. Stevens, s,for Student Aid, Talladega C New Haven. United Ch.. V. P. 5. C. E., for Central Cit., New Orleans, La.... New London. Mrs. B. P. MeEwen Newlown. Cong. Ch. Norwalk. First Cong. Ch Norwalk. Cong. Ch., Kings Daughters, 2 Bbls. C. ,for Grand View, Tenn. North Woodatock. Cong. Ch, Sab. School,for Student Aid, Talladega C. Norwich. Mrs. Lucy A. Forbes S. S. Class, Second Cong. Ch. for Columbia, S. C Norwich. L. H. M. S , Greeneville Ch., Freight, 2.30,for McIntosh, Ga Norwich. V. P. 5. C. E. of Park Cong. Ch., Bbl. C., for Talladega, Ala. Plainfield. V. P. 5. C. E.. by Albert Phillips, See Plainville. A Friend Pomfret. Cong. S. S.,for Student Aid, Fisk U .. Prospect. B. B. Brown Putnam. Friends for StudentA id, Talladega C Salisbury. S. S. Class, Cong. Ch., for Grand View, Tenn Salisbury. S. S. Class, Mrs. M. Clark, Bbl. C., for Tho;nasville, Ga. Somers. A Friend, for Litt4 Mary, WiLmington, N. C Someraville. Cong. Ch Sound Beach Pilgrim Cong. Ch. and V. P. 5. C. IL, for Talladega C., 6; Op- portunity Seekers of Pilgrim Cong. Ch., 2.30 South Glastonbury. Sub. Seb., Cong. Ch Southport, Miss Eliza A. B121k1e5 and Miss Georgie A. Bulkley Stamford. First Cong. Ch., V. P. 5. C. E., Bbl. C/or Grand View, Tenn. Stratford, Sab. Seb., Cong. Ch., for Mountain Work Suffield. Mr. and Mrs. A. R. Pierce/or Meridian, Miss Suffield. ,/or Student A id, Skyland Ins., Blowing Rock, N. C Suffield. First Cong. Ch.,for Mountain Work Taftville. Cong. Ch Taleottville. V. P. 5. C. E., Cong. Ch... Terryville. Friends, for Student Aid, Talladega C Thomaston. First Cong. Ch. Thomson. Cong. Ch.. Ladies Soc., Bbl., C.,/or Grand View, Tenn. Torrington. Two Sab. Seb. Classes, by Mrs. Burr Lyon, for Indian Scitji, Santee, Neb Trumbull. Cong. Ch. and Soc Wapping. Sub. Seb., Second Cong. Ch., for Central Cit., New Orleans, La... Waterbury. First Cong Ch Waterbury. Infant Class, Sub. Seb., Second Cong. Ch., s., for Colored Children; so for Indian Childrens Scit ... . Watertown. Alert Boys Class, of Cong. Sub. Seb., for Indian M., Fort Berthold, N. D Watertown. Cong. Ch., Ladies Benev. Soc., Bbl. C., Freight paid/or Grand View, Tenn. 6 20 30 48 400 2 30 5 54 25 00 3,00 3 00 2.00 9 57 7 30. 6 ~6 20 00 40 00 6 23 20 78 33 25 17 00 6 57 25 00 90 25 3 00 NEW YORK, $6,259.28. Alhany. A Friend Albany. W. H. M. Soc. of First Cong. Ch., Box Bedding, etc for Talladega, Ala. Angola. Miss A. H. Ames,for Chinese M Batavia. F. E. Rice, for A. G. Sek., Moor/lead, Miss...... Brooklyn. Park Cong. Ch Brooklyn. Bethany Sab. Sch., Prim. Class, for Student Aid, Williamsburg Acad., Ky Brooklyn. W. H. M. Soc. of Pilgrim Ch., Box Bedding, Freight, 1.41, for Talladega, Ala Brooklyn. Ladies Miss. Soc., T. T. Circle of Kings Daughters, Bundle TaKe Covers,for Talladega, Ala. Bro lyn. Violet A. Johnson/or Stu- dent A id, Gregory Inst Brooklyn. Park Cong. Ch., Bbl. C., for Lincoln Acad., N. C. Buffalo. Peoples Cong. Ch., Box Bedding and Towels,for Talladega, Ala. Canandaigrla. Ladies of First Cong. Ch., Box Bedding and Towels, for Talla- dega, Ala. Cazenovia. Ladies Christian Asso., for Black Mt. Acad., Ky Clayton. Church Soclety, Box Bedding and Towels, Freight, for Talladega, Ala - Clifton Springs. Ned and Roy Merritt, by Rev. C. P. W. Merritt.... Corona. Rev. W. J. Peck, Freight to Savannah, Ga Derhy. Birthday Box Offering, by Mrs. Fanny C. Squier Eagle Harhor. M. P. Lyman Ellington. Cong. Ch.,W. H. M. S., Mrs. H.B.Rice,for Womans Work.. Elmira. Gibes Miss. Soc., Box C., for Williamsburg, Ky. RECEiPTS. Westchester. Christian Bees. Freight, for A. G. Sch.. Moorhead, Miss Westminster. Cong. Ch West Torrington. Ladies Miss. Circle, 4.25,for AL. Sek., Tho,ncisville, Ga., and 4.25, for Grand View Acad., Tenn West Winsted. A Friend, for [ndian M Winthrop. A Friend... Friends, for Theo. Student A Id, Talladega C Womans Cong. Home Missionary Union of Cono. Mrs. W. W. Jacohs, Treas., for Womans Work. Bridgeport. Ladies Union, Park St. Ch. (s5 of which for Student A idEish U.), 30, to const. MRS. LOUISA LINCOLN L.M.; V. P.S. C. E., Park St. Ch., 6 Fairfield. Miss E. A. Lyon Hartford. First Ch., Prim. Dept. of Sah. Sch Poquonock. Aux Torringford. L. H. M. S.. Wallingford. qong. Ch., L. B. S. West Winsted. Second Ch., Mrs. Henry Gay I 31 3 00 8 50 50 00 3 00 43 00 35 00 5 00 4 00 I 41 35 00 5 00 5 00 50 500 47 Flushing. Cong. Ch 26 69 Hamilton. Cong. Ch 32 00 Himrods. Mrs. Helen B. Ayres 5 00 Ithaca. Rev. 0. B. Hitchcock. 20 00 Ithaca. Ladies of First Cong. Ch., Bbl. Bedding, etc., Freight 2, for Talla- dega, Ala 2 co Jamesport. Cong. Ch., Box C., for Will- iamsburg, Ky. Le Roy. Mrs. Margaret McEwen, s; A Friend to the Cause, s; Mrs. Mar- garet McEwen, for Student A id, FiskU3 2300 Le Roy. W. H. M. S. of Presb. Ch., Bhl. C., Freighl i,for Fisk U 00 Little Valley. W. H. M. Soc. of Cong. Ch., Bedding/or Talladega. Ala. Lockport. Ladles of First Cong. Ch., Box Bedding, etc.,for Talladega, Ala. Lysander. V. P. 5. C. E., Cong. Ch s 75 Middletown. W. H. M. S. of Con g. Ch., Box Bedding and Towels, for Tolla- dega, Ala. Morristown. First Cong. Ch 8 63 Mount Morris. Sab. Sch. Presb. Ch. for A. G. Sch., Moorhead, Miss so75 MounL Vernon. Mrs. L. F. Buell, 2 Bbls. C., etc.,for Columbia, S. C. Newburg. W. M. Circle, Bbl. C., for Lincoln Acad., N. C. New York. W. E. Dodge, Educational Fund, 25o; Bleeker Van Wagenen, so, for Student Aid, Talladega, Ala 300 00 New York. Broadway Tab. Ch., A Friend, Stamford. Coon. (25 of which for Thomasville, Ga.) . 50 00 New York. Miss D. E. Emerson, to coost. MRs. A. ELIZABETH DAVENPORT L.M.,forA. G. Sch., Moorhead, Miss 35 00 New York. C. Irving Fisher, M.D., 20; Friend, II 00 New York. Broadway Tab. Ch., C. E. Soc., for C. E. Hall, McIntosh, Ga ... 8 40 New York. C. T. Dlllingham & Co., Harper Bros., Fords, Howard & Hul- bert, A. S. Barnes & Co., Books for Library; Gino & Co., Books and Maps, for Talladega C. New York. Mrs. A. C. Hlckok, Box Papers, etc., for Greenwood, S. C. New York. American Bible Soc., Grant of Scriptures, Val. 205. New~ York. Forest Av., Morrisania, Cong. Ch., C. E., Soc., 25. Incorrectly ack. in March number from Fourth Av., Morrisania. Norwood. Miss. Soc., Box Bedding, etc.,for TaUadega,Ala. Ogdensburg. First Cong. Ch 23 ~o Ogdensburg. Home Land Circle of Cong. Ch., Box Aprons and Towels, for Talladega, Ala. Orient. Cong. Ch 22 38 Owego. First Cong. Ch io 00 Owego. Ladies Miss. Soc. of Cong. Ch., 2 Bbls. C.,for Talladega, All. Paris. Cong. Ch 20 00 Philadelphia. Cong. Ch 3 75 Philadelphia. Bbl. C., by Mrs. D. H. Sco- fleld,for Blowing Rock, N. C. Pleasantville. G. L. Perry, for Indian M, Fort Berthold, N. 13 2 00 Port Leyden. Junior C. H. Soc., Cong. Ch.,for Mountain Work 200 Phtenix. Ladies Miss. Soc., Box Bed- ding and Sundries, Freight 2.39, for Talladega, Ala 2 39 Phtunix. Mrs. Carter and S. S. Class, S. S. Papersfor Marion, Ala. Rlver Head. Bbl. C., for Williamsburg, Ky. Rochester. Plymouth Cong. Ch 23 75 Rochester. Mrs. E. M. Sayne, Bbl. Books, etc., Freight Pd.,for Thlladega, Ala. Rushville. Cong. Cb., Bbl. C., Freight ifor Greenwood, S. C 00 36 00 5 20 5 00 30 00 500 25 00 23 00 229 20 $s,469 19 ESTATES. Cornwall. Estate of Silas C. Beers 68o 35 Groton. Estate of Mrs. B. N. Hurlhutt.. 119 10 New Haven. Estate Lorinda M. Hall, by A. M. Blakesley, Executor 6~6 ss $2,905 29 148 RECEIPTS. Saratoga. G. F. Harvey. Bhl. and Box Hardware, etc.,for Talladega, Ala. Schenectady. Ladies Miss. Soc., Cong. Ch. for Evarts, Ky 25 00 Schenectady. Ladies Miss. Soc. of Cong. Ch., Box and Bbl. Bedding, etc., for Tallaaega, Ala. Seneca Falls. W. H. M. S. of Cong. Ch., Box Bedding,for Talladega, Ala. Sherhurne. Mrs. C. S. Gorton, 25, for Cooking- School; Little Lights, so, for Student Aid, Talladega C 35 oo Tarrytown. Mrs. Elhert B. Monroe (io of which for Little Mary, Wilmington, N. C.) 110 00 Utica. D. H. Williams 00 Walton. Sab. Sch., First Cong. Ch., for Mountain Work s~ s8 Walton. Ladies Miss. Soc. of Cong. Ch., Bhl. Bedding,for Talladega, Ala. Walworth. Mrs. J. C. Cobb 5 00 Westmoreland. First Cong. Ch 5 00 West Winfield. George C. Wadell s 00 Woodhaven. Mrs. Catharine McNicol, 5; Womans Miss. Soc. of Cong. Ch., i 20 00 Woodville. W. H. M. S., Box Bedding, for Talladega, Ala. Yaphank. Mrs. Hannah M. Overtonfor ZndianM 500 Friends 10 00 Womans Home Missionary Union of N. V., hy Mrs. J. J. Pearsall, Treas., for Womans Work. Albany. Home Circle s 00 Bristol Center. H. M. 5... 5 50 Corning 57 00 Hancock. M.B 500 Homer. Miss Ellen Phillips 00 New Haven Willing Workers 20 00 New York. Broadway Tah. Ch., Soc. for Womans Work 250 00 New York. Silver Circle, Mrs. H. S. Caswell s 00 298 50 $2,259 i8 ESTATE. Warsaw. Estate of Silas B. Sturdevant, Memorial Milton Whipple, late of Riga, N. V., by Mrs. Louise A. Sturdevant, Executrix 5,ooo 00 $6,259 8 NEW JERSEY, $229.76. Bridgeton. Friends,for Student Aid, Lincoln A cad., N. C East Orange. Mrs. Lucy H. Everest.... Glen Ridge. Cong. Ch Plainfield. Trinity Ref. Ch., hy Miss Mabel A. Woodruff, BbL C. and Toys, for Selma, Ala. Westfield. Ladies Benev. Assn., Bbl. C., for Greenwood, S. C. Woodhridge. Y. P. 5. C. E. of Cong. Ch. Womans Home Missionary Union of the N. J. Assn., hy Mrs. J. H. Denison, Tress for Womans Work: Paterson Helping Hand Soc. of Auhurn St. Cong. Ch., for Student Aid, Santee Indian Sck PENNSYLVANIA, $41.15. Allegheny City. Mrs. Claflin, for Le Moyne Inst., Memphis, Tean Camhridgeboro. Cong. Ch Germantown. Mrs. E. B. Stork, for Gloucester Sch., Cag5~ahosic, Va. Lander. First Cong. Ch 7 50 5 00 6o 66 6 6o 40 00 3 50 6 ~ 5 00 2 50 Le Raysville. Cong. Ch Ogontz. Box C., hy Miss M. J. Gates, for Blowing- Rock, N. C. Philadelphia. Rehecca White West Mill Creek. Presh. Ch., Y. P. 5. C. E., Bbl. Papers, for Lincoln Acad., N. C. OHIO, $458.29. Breckaville. V. P. 5. C. E. of Cong. Ch.. Burton. Cong. Ch., for Student Aid, Talladega C Claridon. Cong. Ch. S. S Class,for Stu- dent Aid, Pleasant Hill A cad., Tenn.. Cleveland. Lake View Cong. Ch Cleveland. Mrs. L. V. Tolvert, for Stu- dent Aid; Albany, Ga . Columbus. Plymouth Ch Cuyahoga Falls. J. L. Longshore Hudson. Cong. Ch. L. B. Soc ,Bbl. C., Mrs. C. S. Drake, Freight 2.40, for Macon, Ga Huntsburg. Cong. Ch. for Sludent Aid, Talladega C Monroe. First Cong. Ch Newton Falls. Cong. Ch North Fairfield. Cong. Ch. Ladies, for Student Aid, Pleasant Hill Acad., Tenn Norwalk. Cong. Ch Oberlin. Sab. Sch. First Ch., s6; Mrs. E. B. Clark, so Oberlin. Chauncey Pond,for A. G. Sch., Moorhead, Miss Paineaville. Junior Soc. of C. E., First Cong. Ch. for Indian M Portsmouth. J. Q. Weaver, for Glouces- ter Sch ,Cag5gsahosic, Va . Saybrook. Cong. Ch. and Soc South Newbury. Cong. Ch. for Student Aid, Talludega C South Salem. Daniel S. Pricer Sylvania. Cong. Ch Wakeman. Sab. Sch., Cong. Ch Walnut Hills. Cong. Ch., for Grand View, Tenn West Andover. Cong. Ch Willoughby. F. A. Page Youngstown. Plym. Cong Ch Ohio Womans Home Missionary Union, by Mrs. G. B. Brown, Treas., for Wo- mans Work: Coolville. Mrs. M. B. Bart lett 200 00 Oberlin. First, L. A. 5 00 Springfield. W. M. S 6 on 4 00 7 67 12 24 s6 00 7 50 is 6o 2 50 I 40 5 00 2 45 7 86 Ion 8 23 26 00 5on 14 48 2 76 5 00 4 50 5 00 i5 on 7 10 ~on 8 00 $406 29 ESTATE. Oberlin. Estate of Amanda Porter 52 00 458 29 INDIANA, 5oc. Brimfield. Miss Huston, Bbl. C., Freight soc.,for Blowing Rock, N. C 50 ILLINOIS, $950.55. Abingdon. Busy Bees,for Student Aid, Talladega C ~ on Albion. Mrs. J05. Green, s; Cong Ch., Colored, s.6o 4 6o Aurora. First Cong. Ch., V. P. 5. C E., for Lincoln Acad., N. C 17 on Batavia. Cong. Ch 6s 29 Champaign. Cong. Ch 42 62 Champaign. V. P. 5. C. E.,for Student Aid, Fisk U ,~ 00 Chicago. Hapland. ion; Sab Sch., N. E. Cong. Ch., s~ Tabernacle C E., io; Mary R. Blackburn, ~ Mrs. M W. Mabbs, ~ ~ 00 Chicago. Mrs. Ben Frees,for Le Moyne Inst 25 00 RECEIPTS. Chicago. Friends, Box C. and Sundsies,for Talladega, Ala. Dallas City. Mrs. M. H. Smith 2 00 Dwight. Cong. Ch 5 50 Englewood. Plym. Ch., Y. P. S. C. E., for Student A id, Williamsburg A cad., Ky 1000 Elgin. Sah. Sch., First Cong. Ch., for Student Aid, Straight U 22 oo Elgin. Sah. Sch., First Cong. Ch., for Native Teacher, Indian .111., Grand River, N.D 00 Elmhurst. Cong. Ch 6 72 Englewood. Pilgrim Ch., Pkg. Books, for Pleasant HillAcad., Tenn. Galena. Mrs. A. Bean 2 50 Galeshurg. C. E. Soc., hy Mrs E. E. Day/or Indian M.... 4 50 Geneseo. A Birthday Memoria so 00 Geneva. Y.P.S.C. E 324 Greenville. Cong. Ch., Bhl. Books and C., Freight 1.20, for Talladega, Ala... 20 Hampton. Cong. Ch. .. . Manteno. Box S. S. Papers, for Lincoln Acad., N C. Melvin. First Cong. Ch . 3 00 Moline. Alfred Williams so oo Nora. Cong. Ch II 00 Ottawa. Mrs. Ruth P. Bascom 50 00 Peoria. Mrs. John L. Griswold/or Stu- dent Aid, Fisk U 500 00 Peoria. Mrs. Sarah P. Howe, S. S. Class, so; Miss Anna Kinney, S. S. Class, s.~o; Miss Nora Mankers, S. S. Class, s; Howe Y. P. 5. C. E., ~, and Individual Memhers, 2.50, for Student A id, Fisk U 20 00 Plano. Cong. Ch., for McIntosh, Ga.... Providence. Cong. Ch 5 00 Roseville. Cong. Ch 27 71 Shahhona. First Cong. Ch., 2 Bhls C., for Williamsburg, Ky. Sheridan. Mrs. C. J. 0. Heavenhill 50 Somonauk. Y. P. 5. C. E 3 o6 Toulon. Miss A. M. SmithS. S Class, s, for Student Aid; V. P. 5. C E. of Cong. Ch., Box Bedding, for Talla- dega, Ala I CO Winnehago. Cong. Ch., Miss. Soc., Bhl. C., for Pleasant Hill, Teun. Woodstock. Cong. Ch so s8 Illinois Womans Home Missionary Union, Mrs. L. A. Field, Treas, for Womans Work. Chicago. New Eng. W. M.S s86o Chicago. Covenant, W. M. S 120 McLean. W. M. S 5 00 Oak Park. Y. L. M 5 50 00 Odell. S. S .... I 70 Rockford. W. M. S 52 00 Winnetka. W. M. S ~ 54 g6 04 $686 6~. ESTATE. Galeshurg. Estate of Miss Mary J. Browning, hy Win. H. Browning, Executor .. 263 90 $950 55 MICHIGAN, $5,275.25. Adrian. A. J. Hood Agricultural College. Prof. R. C. Kedzie, to coost. MRs. ELLA M. KEoZIE L.M... Detroit. Westminster Pres. Ch., J00. V. P. 5. C. E., Box Papers, etc.; Plymouth Cong. Ch., Ladies Soc., Bhl. C. for Greenwood, S. C. Grand Rapids. Plymouth Cong. Ch., 6.75; Smith Memorial Ch., 2 Kalamazoo. Mrs. 3. A. Kent 30 00 8 75 5 00 849 Lansing. Ch. at Trout Creek Manistee. First Cong. Ch Marshall. Mrs. J S. Stout Richmond. Cong. Ch Romeo. Miss E. B. Dickinson Saugatuck. C. E. Asso., Christmas Box, for Lexington, Ky. Traverse City. C. A. Hammond, for Student Aid, Pleasant Hill Acad., Tenn s 00 West Bay City. John Bourn/or Alaska M 200 00 Ypsilanti. Cong. Ch., Box C., for Williamsburg, Ky. Womans Home Missionary Union of Michigan, Mrs. E. F. Grahill, Treas., for Womans Work. Grand Blanc. Willing Workers, for Indian Student Aid, Santee, Neb .. 52 20 Grand Rapids. W. H. M. S.,ParkCh .. 1320 Grass Lake. W. H. M. 5 3 00 Saint Johns. Women s Asso 75 South Haven. V. P. 5. C. E., for Student Aid, Pleasant Hill Acad., Tenn ~ 00 Stockhridge. Mrs. E. W. Woodward, for Student Aid, A. G. Sch., Moor- head, Miss so 00 4415 $275 55 ESTATE. Ann Arhor. Estate of Dr. C. L. Ford, hy Bryant Walker, Admr 2,000 00 IOWA, $485.76. $1,275 15 Algona. A. Zahlten Alton. First Cong. Ch Belmond. S. S. Cong. Ch., for Student Aid, Talladega C Blencoc. Cong. Ch Charles City. Miss Clara Luinheck/or Student Aid, Talladega C Decorah. Cong. Ch Des Moines. Plymouth Ch., 258.47; North Park Cong., V. P. 5. C. E., s... Eagle Grove. S. S. of Cong. Ch. ,for Talladega Ala Eagle Grove. Cong. Ch Eldora. Cong. Ch., 24. i~ Japan, 5... Fairfax. Cong. Ch Forest City. Miss Grace Mason, Box Literature/or Beach Inst., Savannah, Ga. Glenwood. Cong. S. S., hy Mrs. John Hanson, Box Toys, etc. for Beach Inst. Grand View. Cong. Ch., Miss. Soc., Box C. for Grand View, Teun. Grinnell. First Cong. Ch., for Grand View, Teun Grinnell. Mrs. J. B. Grinnell, for Stu- dent Aid, Talladega C Grinnell. Miss E. H. Brewer, for Glou- cester Sch., Cai5i5ahosic, Va Harlan. Mission Band, for Talladega, Ala Hawarden. Cong. Ch Independence. Mrs. E. M. Potwin, Pkg. Cards and Papers/or Beach Inst. Lakeside. Cong. Ch Lewis. Cong. Ch Manchester. Ladies Soc., Bhl. C., for Pleasant Hill Acad., Tenn. Marshalltown. L. M. Soc., hy Mrs. Anna M. Brown, Box Literature, etc. , for Beach Inst. Maquoketa. Miss Mary C. Shaw 400 25 00 3 70 5 00 35 00 223 47 500 4 00 29 15 600 10 00 3 00 4 00 3 47 8 69 9 00 500 4 25 7 00 5 00 50 00 150 RECEIPTS. McGregor. Kings Daughters, St. Nicholas for one year, for Pleasant Hill Acad., Tenn. Muscatine. Junior C. E. Soc. of Cong. Ch.,for Student Aid, Talladega C 50 00 Newton. Wittemherg Cong. Sah. Sch 6 3~ Newell. Cong. Ch 5 no Osage. Cong. Ch., 18.38; Cong. Y. P. 5. 2348 Osceola. Miss Jennie M. Baird 5 00 Red Oak. W. H. M. U., is. Incorrectly ack. in Fehruary numher from Mrs. M. A. Clark, Afton, Iowa. Rockford. Cong. Ch., Y. P. 5. C. E. for Student Aid. A. N. and I. Sch., Thomasnille, Ga 9 50 Salem. Cong. Ch 4 00 Iowa Womans Home Missionary Union, Miss Belle L. Bentley, Treas., for Womans Work: Algona. L. M. S 2 14 Bear Grove. L. M. S 5 Chester Center. L. M. 5 50 Creston. L.M.S 500 Des Moines. Plymouth, L. M.S 1204 Grinnell. L. M. S 6 90 Keokuk. L. M. S s5 00 Le Mars. L. M. S i 00 McGregor. L. M. S 8 70 Marion. V. P. M. S s~ no Muscatine. S. S., First Cong. Ch 20 00 Newell. L. M.S 500 Newton. L.M.S 3no Old Mans Creek. H and F.M.S s8a 20325 470 o8 ESTATE. Fontanelle. Estate, A. M. Gow, Colored s~ 68 485 76 WISCONSIN, $392.57. Clear Lake. Swedish Cong. Ch 24 Eau Claire. First Cong. Ch 25 o6 Hayward. Cong. Ch 20 00 Ironton. 0. C. Blanchard 5 0~ Koshkonong. Cong. Ch 7 85 Lake Geneva. V. P. 5. C. E., for Stu- dent Aid, Fisk U 22 no La Grange. Miss Greening, for Le Mo~yne Inst 50 00 Madison. Cong. C. E., 22 Cop. No. s Hymn Books,for Marion, Ala. Milwaukee. Grand Av. Cong. Ch., hal. to coost. CHARLES C. DIMOCE and JOSEPH J. HOLDER L. Ms 42 00 Platteville. Cong. Ch 6 no Ripon. First Cong. Ch., 4~ Sah. Sch., Cong. Ch, io.86 53 86 Spring Green. L. M. Soc. of Cong. Ch no Springvale. Cong. Ch.,for Student Aid, Nat Ala 3 30 Whitewater. Cong. Ch., Special 20 26 Whitewater. Faculty and Students, State Normal College, 5o; Mrs. Cran- dalls S. S.., Cong. Ch., so; C. M. Black- man, so; Geo. S. Marsh, so; The Home- land Circle, s; Frank W. Trott, ~ T. W. Denison, s; Other Citizens, 55, for Le Moyne Inst iso no Wisconsin Womans Home Missionary Union, Mrs. C. M. Blackman, Treas., for Womans Work: Beloit. First Cong. Ch., W.M.U 2000 Eau Claire. W.M.U 500 Green Bay. W. M. U 20 00 Milwaukee. Grand Av. W. MU 2500 Milwaukee. Hanover St. W.M.S 5000 a Prairie du Chien. Mrs. F.P.B. sooo Wauwatosa. W. M. S is 00 9500 MINNESOTA, $129.25. Anoka. Christmas Box, for Lincoln A cad., N. C. Barnesville. Cong. Ch Chowen. Rev. E. E. Rogers, for Storrs Sch., 2.64: Box Sch. Supplies, Freight s.40,for Macon, Ga. ; Box Ed. Material, Freight s.34,for Cabin Teachers, Beach Inst Crookston. Cong. Ch Farihault. Sah. Sch. ~f Cong. Ch., hy Rev. A. Willey, for Thea. Student Aid, Talladega C Fairmont. Bhl. C., for Jonesboro, Tenn. Graceville. Cong. Ch Madison. Cong. Ch . Mankato. Cong. Ch Minneapolis. Gentlemen of Park Av. Cong. Ch Minneapolis. Saint Louis Park. Union Ch., for Wilmington, N. C Montevideo. L. M. S., Bhl. C., for Blowing Rock, N. C. Northfield. S. S. Cong. Ch., 35.22; Other Friends, 24.78, hy Rev. A. Willey; Mrs. Skinner, Bhl. C.,for Student A id, Tel- ladega C Northfield. First Con . Ch Northfield. Prof.G.Thuntington, Anti- Slavery History. hy Rev. A. Willey (Price 1.50), for Talladega, Ala, Rochester. L. M. S., Bhl. C., for Jones- boro, Tenn. Saint Paul. Miss Brooks and Miss Miller, Saint Nicholas one year, (or Macon, Ga. Spring Valley. L. M. S.~ 2 Bhls. C., for Jonesboro, Teun. Tivoli. Lyman Humiston West Duluth. Cong. Ch MISSOURI, $79.05. Clyde. Cong. Ch Dawn. Cong. Ch Eldon. Henry Phillips St. Louis. L. A. Soc. of First Cong. Ch., hy Mrs. G. S. Anderson, 2 Boxes C.,Val. is,for Fort Berthold, N. 13. Womans Home Missionary Union of Mo., hy Mrs. K. L. Mills, Treas., for Wo- mans Work. Kansas City. So. West Tah. L.M.S 1325 Kansas City. Olivet Ch., L.M.S 250 Lamar. L.H. M.S 500 Springfield. First Ch., V. P.S.C.E 500 St. Louis. Plym. Ch., L.M. 5., 27.70; Campton Hill, V. P. 5. C. E., 6; Auhurt Place, L. M. S., sb; First Ch.,L.H.M.S.,s 3450 KANSAS, $s8.13. Burlingame. A Friend Hiawatha. S. S. of First Cong. Ch., for Student A Id, Talladega C Kensington. Cong. Ch Linwood. Cong. C h Topeka. Mrs. R. Gaw, First Cong. Ch., Bhl. C., for Meridian, Miss ARKANSAS, 5oc. Little Rock. Cong. Ch NEBRASKA. $so.oo. Beatrice. Mrs. B. F. Hotchkiss 2 50 4 38 3 00 15 00 3 00 3 00 7 5 50 00 24 50 3 20 25 00 5 30 2 50 60 25 5 00 5 3 3 00 500 50 10 00 1?ECEJPTS. NEVADA, $5.50. Reno. Cong. Ch 5 50 NORTH DAKOTA, $72.53. Cando. Sab. Sch., Cong. Ch I 05 Dwight. Cong. Ch 3 ~5 Fort Berthold. Miss Elizabeth Kehoe, for Indian M., Fort B 33 33 Fort Berthold. Cong. Ch 20 00 Mayville. First Cong. Ch 22 50 Womans Home Missionary Union of N. D., by Mrs. J. M. Fisher, Treas., for Womans Work: Cummings. Christian Sol diers 2 50 SOUTH DAKOTA, $13.04. Mission Hill. Cong. Ch 3 27 Red field. Cong. Sab. Sch 2 77 Sioux Falls. First Cong. Ch ~ 70 Wessin~on Springs. Cong. Ch., Y. P. 130 COLORADO, $12.72. Denver. Caroline Danielson/or Indian M 100 Montrose. Cong. Ch 3 oo Otis. Cong. Ch 3 50 Pueblo. Pilgrim Cong. Ch 4 07 Pueblo. Womans Aux. Soc., Pilgrim Cong. Ch., Mrs. E B. Coleman, Tress. 5 CALIFORNIA, $502.89. Campbell. Mrs. E. E. White, S. S. Class, for Student A Id, Talladega C 7 00 East Highlands. Sab. Sch., Cong. Ch... San Francisco. Receipts of the Cali- fornia Chinese Mission (see items be low) 485 30 Cong. Womans State Home Misssonary Society of California, by Mrs. J. M. Haven, Treas. Campbell. Ladies, for Indian Al.. ~ OREGON, $8.5o. Portland. V. M. Bible Class of Cong. S. S., for Student A id, Talladega C 8 50 WASHINGTON, $54.90. Port Angeles. Cong. Ch 2 90 Poyallup. Plymouth Cong. Ch 2 00 New Whatcom. Rev, and Mrs. J. W. Savage, A Thank Offering, for Talladega, Ala 10 00 OKLAHOMA, $I.oo. Alva. Cong. Ch i 00 DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, $20.00. Washington. Rev. I. G. Craighead, for Mountain Work 20 00 KENTUCKY, ~ Lexington. Chandler Sab. Sch. for Lex- ington, Ky Red Ash. Cong. Ch 4 oo VIRGINIA, $56.54. Rece,zSts for Gloucester School, CajSj5a. hosic, Va.. Cappahosic. Students Con- cert, ~ H. P. Smith, 50c 4 45 Hampton. Miss C. W. Fields 00 Mathews Co. J. R. Brooks 2 00 Middlesex. Miss M. A. Burrill 2 00 Morning Glory. Sab. Sch.. Wareneck. Public School. 6 s~ 2654 I 51 TENNESSEE, $so6.oo. Deer Lodge. Cong. Ch ii 50 Grand View. From Unknown Sources, 2 Bbls. C. Memphis. Friends, for Le Moyne Inst 79 50 Nashville. Friend 10 00 Nashville. Mrs. M. M. Somers,for Stu- dentAid,FiskU soo NORTH CAROLINA, $40.05. Carters Mills. S. A. Stanford s oo Dry Creek., W. D. Newkirk. ~ oo High Point. Rev. Z. Simmons 3 oo Oaks. Cong. Ch I 05 Tiny. Hon. E. A. Morse 20 oo Wilmington. Mrs. V. C. Logiefor Stu- dent A id, Talladega C .. 20 no GEORGIA, $42.37. Atlanta. Miss A. Clarke, for Storrs Sch 700 Marietta. Cong. Ch 5 25 McIntosh. Cong. Ch., 9.75, and Sab. Seb., 3.25; Medway Ch., 3.32 .... s6 32 McIntosh. C. E. Soc., by Carrie E. Leadbetter, for C. E. Hall, McIntosh.. 7 15 McIntosh. Emma J. Rosecrans, for Stu- dent A Id, Dorchester A cad s no Savannah. Pkg. Cards and Pkg. Mate- rial for Sewing Dept., from Unknown Sources, for Beach Inst. Woodville. Rev. J. H. H. Sengstacke, 75c.; Rev. J. Loyd, 25c.; Pilgrim Ch., 6~c . i 65 FLORIDA, ~ Daytona. First Cong. Ch 22 14 Fernandina. A Friend 500 00 Jacksonville. Chas. H. Smith, for Stu- dent Aid, Wilmington. N. C Orange Park. C. E. Soc. and Sab. Sch., by Carrie Parrott, Pres 4 30 534 44 aITATE. Tangerine. Estate of Thomas Jewett, by Alfred Williams, Administrator 213 27 747 7 ALABAMA, $85.20. Anniston. Rev. James Brown, for Theo. Dett., s; Student A id, s. for Talladega C Athens, Cong. Ch Montgomery. Cong. Ch., for Student Aid, Beaufort, N. C..... Selma. H. N., for Blacksmith Shoj$, Selma Selma. Cong. Ch Shelby. Covenant Cong. Ch Talladega. Pres. H. S. De Forest, for Bej3airs, Talladega, Ala MISSISSIPPI, $20.00. Moorhead. Miss S. L. Emerson, fos- A. G. Sch LOUISIANA, ~ Womans Missionary Union of Louisiana, by Mrs. C. M. Crawford, Treas., for Indian M.: Belle Place. Aux 48 Hammond. Aux 2 25 New Iberia. Aux i 8o New Orleans. Central Ch., Aux., 1.32; Morris Brown Ch., Aux., i.o8 2 40 Roseland. Aux 25 Welsh. Aux 2 53 4 29 4 0I 25 00 6 05 3 10 32 75 20 00 9 75 152 RECEIPTS. TEXAS, $32.oo. Austin. Miss E. Meek, i~ Miss M. Por- tune, in, for Student A Id, Tillotson Inst.; Tillotson Church of Christ, s; Tillotson C. E. Soc., for Indian M., A Doctor, Drugs, Val. 6, for Ti/lot- son Inst 32 00 FROM UNKNOWN SOURCES, $s7.oo. Miss Emily Hartwell, for Stu- dent A id, Indian M., Fort Berthold, N. 13 A Friend, for Thiladega, Ala A Friend 700 5 00 5 00 CANADA, $13.00. Montreal. Chas. Alexander Ottawa. Mrs. Livingstone, for Ballard Sck., Macon, Ga Sherbrooke. Mrs. H. J. Moray ENGLAND, $200.00. London. Mrs. Allen, for Le Moyne Inst 200 00 Donations $12,414 30 Estates . ~ 85 $25,645 25 TUITION, $6,675.69. Cappahosic, Va. Tuition Evarts, Ky. Tuition Lexington, Ky. Tuition Williamsburg, Ky. Tuition Big Creek Gap, Teno. Tuition.. Jonesboro, Tenn. Tuition Knoxville, Teon. Tuition. Grand View, Teon. Tuition.... Memphis, Tenn. Tuition Nashville, Teon. Tuition Pleasant Hill, Teno. Tuition... Beaufort, N. C. Tuition Blowing Rock, N. C. Tuition... Kings Mountain, N. C. Tuition. Hilisboro, N. C. Tuition Troy, N. C. Tuition . ... Whittier, N. C. Tuition Wilmington, N C. Tuition. Saluda, N. C. Tuition Charleston, S. C. Tuition Greenwood, S. C. Tuition Albany, Ga. Tuition Atlanta, Ga. Storrs Sch., Tui- tion Macon, Ga. Tuition McIntosh, Ga. Tuition Marshallville, Ga. Tuition Savannah, Ga. Tuition Thomasville, Ga. Tuition Woodville, Ga. Tuition Orange Park, Fla. Tuition Athens, Ala. Tuition Florence, Ala. Tuition Marion, Ala. Tuition Nat, Ala. Tuition Selma, Ala. Tuition Talladega, Ala. Tuition. Meridian, Miss. Tuition Moorbead, Miss. Tuition....... rougalon, Miss. Tuition New Orleans, La. Tuition Helena, Ark. Tuition Austin, Tex. Tuition 3 00 io6 i~ 85 73 265 35 25 20 7 33 35 23 i,~o8 ~o 797 10 io8 49 i6 6o 23 10 32 00 30 20 13 6o 195 50 22 15 324 00 100 6r 126 95 154 90 246 01 8o 66 4 00 i8s 28 ~6 is 4 6o 122 50 50 55 7 50 50 22 83 75 113 8o 684 34 6o 75 17 00 72 75 550 29 39 35 212 75 500 3 00 5 (.0 6,675 69 Total for February $32,320 84 SUMMARY. Donations ~74,789 6s Estates 36,31 8s $110,921 42 Income 4,370 00 Tuition ..... i8,~~o 70 Total from Oct. to Feb. i8... $133,622 12 FOR THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY. Subscriptions for February $83 95 Previously sekoowledged 275 oo Total $358 95 RECEIPTS OF THE C~LIFORNIA CHINESE MISsIoN. William Johnstone, Treas., from December 2 2894, to February. 21 2895: Fresno. (Chinese.) N. Y. Gifts to Jesus, i8.6o; Mon. Offs., 3 21 6o Hanford. Annual Member- ships 6oo Los Angeles. Mon. Offs., N. Y. Gifts to Jesus, 33.10.... 39 6~ Maryaville. Mon. Offs., 11.75; N. Y. Gifts to Jesus, 9 20 75 Oakland. Mon. Offs. ... 40 Oakland. Pilgrim Ch., Y. P. 5. C.E 465 Oroville. Mon. Offs., ~ N. Y. Gifts to Jesus, 10 (of which Miss Chase, ~ Miss Leg- gctt, I) 13 00 Petaluma. Mon. Offs., 2.25; N. Y. Gifts to Jesus, 9 . II 25 Sacramento. Mon. Offs., N. Y. Gifts to Jesus, 17.45 31 45 San Bernardino. Mon Offs., 6.95; Gin Koo King,i 7 95 San Diego. Mon. Offs, N.Y. Gi ftsto Jesus, 2 2675 San Francisco. Central Ch., Mon. Offs., 10.90; Annual Membership, 6 16 90 San Francisco. West Ch., Mon. Offs 6 50 San Francisco. N. Y. Gifts to Jesus (of which Jee Gain, ii Mrs. Jee Gain, ~ Children, 2.60; Supt., 9) 24 6o San Francisco. Charles Hanna. 50 Santa Barbara. Mon. Offs, 7.60; N. Y. Gifts to Jesus (of which American Friends, by Mrs. M. J. Southwick, 6.6~), 10.65 i8 25 Santa Cruz. Mon. Offs., i.8s; N. Y. Gifts to Jesus, 4 i~ Stockton. Mon. Offs., 5.40; N. Y. Gifts to Jesus, 15.25.... 20 Ventura. Mon. Offs., 3.25; N. Y. Gifts to Jesus, ii 14 25 Vernondale. N. Y. Gifts to Jesus 3 00 Watsonville. Mon. Offs., ~ Pastoral Union, 4 7 75 342 30 FOE CHINESE MOTHEES AND CHILDEEN: Bangor, Me. Prof. J. S. Sewalls 5. 5. Class 25 00 Belfast; Me. Miss E. M. Pond 5 CO Boston, Mass. Mount Vernon Ch., Chinese S. S 20 00 New Haven, Conn. Mrs. J. E. Pond 00 Albany, N. Y. Friends 75 00 Oakland, Cal. A Friend, hy Mrs. L. C. Agard, i~ Womans H. M. Soc., 3 i8 00 California Womans State Home Miss. Soc., by Mrs. J. M. Haven 6 00 244 00 Total $485 30 H. W. HUBBARD, Tress., Bible House, N. Y. EXTRACT FROPI AN ADDRESS DELIVERED AT TITlE ANNUAL flEETING OF THE AMERI CAN fIISSIONARY ASSOCIATION, BY 1-ION. FREDERICK DOUGLASS. I esteem it an honor to have been invited to speak a word in this presence upon this very interesting occasion. I am here, how- ever, not so much to deliver an address, or to make a speech, as to put myself on record. 1 am here to pay a debt long due. I have wished, by my presence here, to emphasize my gratitude to the members and friends of this Association for the beneficent work which they have done, and which they are still doing, for the people with whom I am iden- tified. I would not disparage the labors of any other organization in this direction inside of the church. I am thankful to all such, but I know of none to which the colored people of the Southern States are more indebted for effective service than to this American Missionary Association. Long before the abolition of slavery, this organization bore a consistent and faithful testimony against that stupendous wrong. When it was abolished this Association did not disband nor discontinue its work, but went forward as earnestly as ever to advance, enlighten aud elevate the colored people of the South. There is a beautiful story told about a little child in the orphanage of John Falk at Weimar. They were having supper in the dining hall, and the teacher gave thanks in the ordinary way before the children began their meals, saying, Come, Lord Jesus, and be our guest to-night, and bless the mercies which Thou hast provided. One little boy looked up and said, Teacher, you always ask the Lord Jesus to come, but He never comes. Will He ever ccme? Oh, yes, if you will only hold on in faith, He will be sure to come. Very well, said the little boy, I will set a chair beside me here to-night to be ready when He comes. And so the meal proceeded. By-and-by there came a rap at the door, and there was ushered in a poor, half-frozen apprentice. He was taken to the fire and his hands warmed. Then he was asked to partake of the meal, and where should he go but to the chair which the little boy had provided? As he sat down there the little boy looked up with a light in his eye and said, Teacher, I see it now. The Lord Jesus was not able to come Himself, and He sent the pooi- man in His place. Isnt that it? Aye, that is just it. And so, brethren, the Lord Jesus isnt able, according to hi~ plans for this world, to come personally yet among us, but He has sent thcse colored people, Chinese, Indians and heathen, to make appeal in His behalf to us, and who among us will set a chair for Him? There are many friends with whom I hardly agree who are very anxiously waiting for the appear- ance of the personal Christ among us, and they are wondering what they shall do to welcome Him. Would that the eyes of these brethren, and our own too, were opened to the perception of the Christ that is already here, in the persons of those needing to be helped and educated and elevated, and that their ears could hear His words, Inasmuch as ye do it unto one of the least of these his brethren ye do it unto Christ. That is the Christian philosophy of giving, and if a man does not feel the force of these considerations, I should be disposed to say he has not yet begun to be a Christian. REV. WILLIAM M, TAYLOR, D.D.

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The American missionary. / Volume 49, Issue 5 Congregational work Pilgrim missionary Congregationalist and herald of gospel liberty American Missionary Association. New York May 1895 0049 005
The American missionary. / Volume 49, Issue 5, miscellaneous front pages 152C-152D

EL) ITO RIAL. FINANCESLET IT EL R aIFMI3ERED, ~ XV EiK~ IRIGIIT xl ,X CAMERA --Ri: XIV XL SwEvIoI.s IN TIlE Moux rAIN; PASSAGE AT ENISSlIS( EIITION LIsT TIlL ,CIUTII. IN Nov iii ( xi oi IN x (Illustrated), 5 NOX\ XI T~i AOL-A, IIOoL XII XN1X, OX, 1)1 1) lii 164 165 166 THE INDIANS. I ELMS FROM INDIAN MIssIoNs 167 OLA II 01- Miss. F, B. RIGGS 169 As INDIAN HELPING NEEDY WHITES . 170 THE CHINESE. STREET PEE XCIIING iN CITINATOW? (Illustratedi, , . . . 170 BUREAU OF XOMANS W~ORK. CI-IRIsTI\N ENDEAVOR IN TIlE BLACK BELT 173 XXOM. s STATE ORGANIZATIONS, 174 RECEIPTS 176 NEW YORK vti~t SHFD F3Y THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION, iziihle lIOIIX Ninth St md Fourth xe., New Yr~rk. PrI7o liii C ILls a Xcii ii advance. 1-r~Dtcd it tie I I (Iii iii Nc~ irk N V., - as U -las: mailer. MAY, 1895 VOL. XLIX No. 5 CONTFiNT5 ktutcrican & 11M~iOflatX2 ~t~sociatioU PRESIDENT, MERRILL E. GATES, LL.D., MASS. Vice-Presidents. Rev. F. A. NoBLE, D.D., Ill. Rev. hENRY HOPKINS, D.D., Mo. Rev. ALEX. MCKENZIE, D.D., Mass. Rev. HENRY A. SFIMsoN, D.D., N. V. Rev. WASHINGTON GLADDEN, D.D., Ohio. Corresponding Secretaries. Rev. M. E. STRIEBY, D.D., Bible house, N. Y. Rev. A. F. BEARD, D.D., Bible House, N. Y. Rev. F. P. WOODBURY, D.D., Bible House, N. Y. Assistant corresponding Secretary. Rev. C. J. RYDER, D.D., Bible House, N. Y. Recording Secretary. Rev. M. E. STRIEBY, D.D., Bible House, N. 1K Treasurer. HENRY XV. HUBBARI), Esq., Bible House, N. 1K A uditors. PETER MCCARTEE. JAMES MITChELL. Executive com,nittee. CHARLES L. MEAo, Chairman. CHARLES A. Iii~u., Secretary. For Three Years. For Two Years. For One Year. WILLIAM HAYES WARD, CHARLES A. HULL, SAMUEL HOLMES, JAMES W. COOPER, ADDISON P. FOSTER, SAMtJEL S. MARPLES, LUCIEN C. WARNER, ALBERT J. LYMAN, CHARLES L. MEAD, JOSEPH H. TWICHELL, NEHEMIAN BOYNTON, WILLIAM H. STRONG, CHARLES P. PEIRCE, A. J. F. BEHRENDS, ELIJAH HOaR. District Secretaries. Rev. GEo. H. GUTTERSON, 21 Con6 1 House, Boston, Mass. Rev. Jos. E. ROY, D.D., 151 Washington Street, Chicago, Ill. Rev. W. E. C. WRIGHT, D.D., conglRooms, Y. M. C. A. Building, cleveland, Ohio. Secretary of Womans Bureau. Miss D. E. EMERSON, Bible House, N. Y. COMMUNICATIONS Relating to the work of the Association may he addressed to the Corresponding Secretaries; letters for THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY, to the Editor, at the New York Office ; letters relating to the finances, to the Treasurer; letters relating to womans work, to the Secretary of the Womans Bureau. DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS In drafts, checks, registered letters, or post-office orders, may be sent to H. XV. hubbard, Treasurer, Bible House, New York, or, when more convenient, to either of the Branch Offices, 21 Congregational House, Boston, Mass., 151 Washington Street, Chicago, Iii., or Congregational Rooms, V. M. C. A. Building, Cleveland, Ohio. A payment of thirty dollars constitutes a Life Member. NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERSThe date on the address label indicates the time to which the subscription is paid. Changes are made in date on label to the soth of each month. If payment of subscription be made afterward the change on the label will appear a month later. Please send early notice of change in post-office address, giving the former address and the new address, in order that our periodi- cals and occasional papers may be correctly mailed. FORM OF A BEQUEST. I GIVE AND BEQUEATH the sum of dollars to the American Missionary Association, incorporated by act of the Legislature of the State of New York. The will should be attested by three witnesses.

Finances Editorial 153

THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY VOL. XLIX. MAY, 1895. No. 5. FINANCES. The outlook is not bright. The receipts for March from both dona- tions and estates have fallen off so that in spite of retrenchments the total indebtedness is somewhat increased. We have now reached the close of the first six months of the fiscal year, and, with a decrease of $11,246.73 in all items of expenditure. the debt is $79,696.61. In the last (April) number of THE MISSIONARY it~ was shown that there had been during the previous three months a small but actual reduction of the debt. The present showing brings the figures back to what they were substantially in January last. We hope this falling off is but temporary. We know the pressure of the times and the difficulty of obtaining money. We are fully aware, too, that many of our friends make their contributions with self-denial, but, standing as we do, with the responsibility for the great work entrusted to this Association, and knowing how vital it is to the welfare and uplifting of the impoverished and ignorant races of our land, we feel constrained to press the call still farther upon both rich and poor for the means to continue the assistance to these needy peoples. LET IT BE REMEMBERED: i. That the American Missionary Association was the first to enter the work of educating and uplifting the Freedmen of the South, and the first to introduce industrial training into the schools. 2. That it has done the largest work in that field, having spent more money and educated more pupils than any other society. 3. That it has extended its work among the mountaineers of the South, the Indians of the West, the Chinese on the Pacific Coast and the Eskimos in Alaskaits field extending thus from the Atlantic to the Pacific, and from the Gulf of Mexico to the Arctic Circle.

Let it be Remembered Editorial 153-154

THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY VOL. XLIX. MAY, 1895. No. 5. FINANCES. The outlook is not bright. The receipts for March from both dona- tions and estates have fallen off so that in spite of retrenchments the total indebtedness is somewhat increased. We have now reached the close of the first six months of the fiscal year, and, with a decrease of $11,246.73 in all items of expenditure. the debt is $79,696.61. In the last (April) number of THE MISSIONARY it~ was shown that there had been during the previous three months a small but actual reduction of the debt. The present showing brings the figures back to what they were substantially in January last. We hope this falling off is but temporary. We know the pressure of the times and the difficulty of obtaining money. We are fully aware, too, that many of our friends make their contributions with self-denial, but, standing as we do, with the responsibility for the great work entrusted to this Association, and knowing how vital it is to the welfare and uplifting of the impoverished and ignorant races of our land, we feel constrained to press the call still farther upon both rich and poor for the means to continue the assistance to these needy peoples. LET IT BE REMEMBERED: i. That the American Missionary Association was the first to enter the work of educating and uplifting the Freedmen of the South, and the first to introduce industrial training into the schools. 2. That it has done the largest work in that field, having spent more money and educated more pupils than any other society. 3. That it has extended its work among the mountaineers of the South, the Indians of the West, the Chinese on the Pacific Coast and the Eskimos in Alaskaits field extending thus from the Atlantic to the Pacific, and from the Gulf of Mexico to the Arctic Circle. 54 CHURCH WORKPARAGRAPHS. 4. That it has been chosen by National Councils, State Associations, and local organizations to do the work in these fields and among these peoples for the Congregational churches of the United States. 5. That its expanding and important work is restricted by the want of adequate funds, and that while Congregationalistschurches and individualshave the undoubted right to exercise their own choice in aiding institutions in these particular fields, outside of the work of the Association, yet they ought to bear in mind their responsibility to sustain the Association in the work which they assign to it. CHURCH WORK IN THE SOUTH. We invite the attention of our readers to the illustrated article In North Carolina. This sketch covers but a limited portion of our great work, but it shows the relations it bears to its surroundings in the public life of the South. Our churches in this district are prosperous, and we are gratified to say that the promise of church extension over our wider districts is very encouraging. Eight new churches will be added to our list immediately among the colored people, and others still are expected soon to be added. In the mountain work, also, five new churches will be added to our enrollment. The next number of THE AMERICAN MIssIONARY will contain an ex- tended article, with illustrations, on our mountain work, hence nothing appears in this number regarding this field. FRIGHT AT A CAMERA. Our readers will find in the account given on another page, of street preaching in Chinatown, the statement that a large crowd was gathered in the street, but when the picture is examined the crowd seems very small. Loo Quong gives this account of the matter A big crowd was gathered to us soon after we sang some hymns, but as soon as the photographer on sight they all ran away. Chinese do not want their pictures to be taken on the street. They all ran to the other side of the street and I told the man to take them there, but they all ran away, too. Still some of them are taken. REVIVAL SERVICES IN THE MouNTAINs.Revival movements have been very general in our mountain churches and missions this year and many hundreds have been hopefully converted. Seven persons made application for membership in our church last

Church Work in the South Editorial 154

54 CHURCH WORKPARAGRAPHS. 4. That it has been chosen by National Councils, State Associations, and local organizations to do the work in these fields and among these peoples for the Congregational churches of the United States. 5. That its expanding and important work is restricted by the want of adequate funds, and that while Congregationalistschurches and individualshave the undoubted right to exercise their own choice in aiding institutions in these particular fields, outside of the work of the Association, yet they ought to bear in mind their responsibility to sustain the Association in the work which they assign to it. CHURCH WORK IN THE SOUTH. We invite the attention of our readers to the illustrated article In North Carolina. This sketch covers but a limited portion of our great work, but it shows the relations it bears to its surroundings in the public life of the South. Our churches in this district are prosperous, and we are gratified to say that the promise of church extension over our wider districts is very encouraging. Eight new churches will be added to our list immediately among the colored people, and others still are expected soon to be added. In the mountain work, also, five new churches will be added to our enrollment. The next number of THE AMERICAN MIssIONARY will contain an ex- tended article, with illustrations, on our mountain work, hence nothing appears in this number regarding this field. FRIGHT AT A CAMERA. Our readers will find in the account given on another page, of street preaching in Chinatown, the statement that a large crowd was gathered in the street, but when the picture is examined the crowd seems very small. Loo Quong gives this account of the matter A big crowd was gathered to us soon after we sang some hymns, but as soon as the photographer on sight they all ran away. Chinese do not want their pictures to be taken on the street. They all ran to the other side of the street and I told the man to take them there, but they all ran away, too. Still some of them are taken. REVIVAL SERVICES IN THE MouNTAINs.Revival movements have been very general in our mountain churches and missions this year and many hundreds have been hopefully converted. Seven persons made application for membership in our church last

Fright at a Camera Editorial 154

54 CHURCH WORKPARAGRAPHS. 4. That it has been chosen by National Councils, State Associations, and local organizations to do the work in these fields and among these peoples for the Congregational churches of the United States. 5. That its expanding and important work is restricted by the want of adequate funds, and that while Congregationalistschurches and individualshave the undoubted right to exercise their own choice in aiding institutions in these particular fields, outside of the work of the Association, yet they ought to bear in mind their responsibility to sustain the Association in the work which they assign to it. CHURCH WORK IN THE SOUTH. We invite the attention of our readers to the illustrated article In North Carolina. This sketch covers but a limited portion of our great work, but it shows the relations it bears to its surroundings in the public life of the South. Our churches in this district are prosperous, and we are gratified to say that the promise of church extension over our wider districts is very encouraging. Eight new churches will be added to our list immediately among the colored people, and others still are expected soon to be added. In the mountain work, also, five new churches will be added to our enrollment. The next number of THE AMERICAN MIssIONARY will contain an ex- tended article, with illustrations, on our mountain work, hence nothing appears in this number regarding this field. FRIGHT AT A CAMERA. Our readers will find in the account given on another page, of street preaching in Chinatown, the statement that a large crowd was gathered in the street, but when the picture is examined the crowd seems very small. Loo Quong gives this account of the matter A big crowd was gathered to us soon after we sang some hymns, but as soon as the photographer on sight they all ran away. Chinese do not want their pictures to be taken on the street. They all ran to the other side of the street and I told the man to take them there, but they all ran away, too. Still some of them are taken. REVIVAL SERVICES IN THE MouNTAINs.Revival movements have been very general in our mountain churches and missions this year and many hundreds have been hopefully converted. Seven persons made application for membership in our church last

Revival Services in the Mountains Editorial 154-155

54 CHURCH WORKPARAGRAPHS. 4. That it has been chosen by National Councils, State Associations, and local organizations to do the work in these fields and among these peoples for the Congregational churches of the United States. 5. That its expanding and important work is restricted by the want of adequate funds, and that while Congregationalistschurches and individualshave the undoubted right to exercise their own choice in aiding institutions in these particular fields, outside of the work of the Association, yet they ought to bear in mind their responsibility to sustain the Association in the work which they assign to it. CHURCH WORK IN THE SOUTH. We invite the attention of our readers to the illustrated article In North Carolina. This sketch covers but a limited portion of our great work, but it shows the relations it bears to its surroundings in the public life of the South. Our churches in this district are prosperous, and we are gratified to say that the promise of church extension over our wider districts is very encouraging. Eight new churches will be added to our list immediately among the colored people, and others still are expected soon to be added. In the mountain work, also, five new churches will be added to our enrollment. The next number of THE AMERICAN MIssIONARY will contain an ex- tended article, with illustrations, on our mountain work, hence nothing appears in this number regarding this field. FRIGHT AT A CAMERA. Our readers will find in the account given on another page, of street preaching in Chinatown, the statement that a large crowd was gathered in the street, but when the picture is examined the crowd seems very small. Loo Quong gives this account of the matter A big crowd was gathered to us soon after we sang some hymns, but as soon as the photographer on sight they all ran away. Chinese do not want their pictures to be taken on the street. They all ran to the other side of the street and I told the man to take them there, but they all ran away, too. Still some of them are taken. REVIVAL SERVICES IN THE MouNTAINs.Revival movements have been very general in our mountain churches and missions this year and many hundreds have been hopefully converted. Seven persons made application for membership in our church last PARA GRAPHS. 55 Sabbath. They are all converted people. If they are received it will make a membership of thirty-three, including Mrs. Doane and myself. I have been holding revival services at a school-house where they have slabs for benches without backs to them. Part of a log was taken out to make a window. People come seven and eight miles to the services. They seem anxious to hear the Gospel preached. They do not seem to care for mud or rain. I hope this will find the American Missionary Association getting out of debt. My people are ready and anxious to contribute to the support of the church. They have sold eggs and saved money, and it is often slow work. A PASSAGE AT ARMSWhite children whose parents are laboring in colored schools are sometimes taunted by the unkind remarks of ill- mannered youth with whom they come in contact. For example, the little daughter of one of our teachers was told, Your papa teaches niggers. The reply came quick as a flash: Well, your papa sells them whiskey, and that is worse. Another threatened to beat her at recess. She promptly said: You cant do it. My grandpa beat yours in the war. A SUBSCRIPTION LIST. BY A GEORGIA TEACHER. I inclose something I thought might interest you. The idea of cir- culating the paper originated with the girls and the money was nearly all raised without our knowledge. We added enough to buy a service- able pair of shoes. The poor girl to whom they were given was almost barefooted and stayed at home Saturday afternoon when the others went for their walk. The thoughtfulness and generosity of the girls touched us, for what they gave was to most of them a real sacrifice. THE APPEAL or THE GIRLS. While sitting in church to-day my heart was made to feel sad as I sat by one of the girls. I noticed that she was almost barefooted and has been for quite a while. Miss C. and I, feeling ourselves unable to purchase a pair of shoes, concluded we would ask all who will help us to please assist us, not for our sake, but for the Lords sake. Miss E. II., 5 cts., pd. Miss C. D., i~ cts., pd. ; Miss C. M., i ct., pd. ; Miss A. G., 5 cts., pd. ; Miss M. G., io cts. ; Miss H. G., 5 cts., pd. ; Miss R. W., 5 cts., pd. ; Miss M. D. G., 5 cts., pd. Miss L. B., ~ cts., pd. ; Miss A. S., 5 cts., pd. ; Miss L. B., 5 cts., pd. Miss S. L., 5 cts., pd. ; Miss G., i~ cts.

A Passage at Arms Editorial 155

PARA GRAPHS. 55 Sabbath. They are all converted people. If they are received it will make a membership of thirty-three, including Mrs. Doane and myself. I have been holding revival services at a school-house where they have slabs for benches without backs to them. Part of a log was taken out to make a window. People come seven and eight miles to the services. They seem anxious to hear the Gospel preached. They do not seem to care for mud or rain. I hope this will find the American Missionary Association getting out of debt. My people are ready and anxious to contribute to the support of the church. They have sold eggs and saved money, and it is often slow work. A PASSAGE AT ARMSWhite children whose parents are laboring in colored schools are sometimes taunted by the unkind remarks of ill- mannered youth with whom they come in contact. For example, the little daughter of one of our teachers was told, Your papa teaches niggers. The reply came quick as a flash: Well, your papa sells them whiskey, and that is worse. Another threatened to beat her at recess. She promptly said: You cant do it. My grandpa beat yours in the war. A SUBSCRIPTION LIST. BY A GEORGIA TEACHER. I inclose something I thought might interest you. The idea of cir- culating the paper originated with the girls and the money was nearly all raised without our knowledge. We added enough to buy a service- able pair of shoes. The poor girl to whom they were given was almost barefooted and stayed at home Saturday afternoon when the others went for their walk. The thoughtfulness and generosity of the girls touched us, for what they gave was to most of them a real sacrifice. THE APPEAL or THE GIRLS. While sitting in church to-day my heart was made to feel sad as I sat by one of the girls. I noticed that she was almost barefooted and has been for quite a while. Miss C. and I, feeling ourselves unable to purchase a pair of shoes, concluded we would ask all who will help us to please assist us, not for our sake, but for the Lords sake. Miss E. II., 5 cts., pd. Miss C. D., i~ cts., pd. ; Miss C. M., i ct., pd. ; Miss A. G., 5 cts., pd. ; Miss M. G., io cts. ; Miss H. G., 5 cts., pd. ; Miss R. W., 5 cts., pd. ; Miss M. D. G., 5 cts., pd. Miss L. B., ~ cts., pd. ; Miss A. S., 5 cts., pd. ; Miss L. B., 5 cts., pd. Miss S. L., 5 cts., pd. ; Miss G., i~ cts.

A Georgia Teacher A Georgia Teacher A Subscription List Editorial 155-156

PARA GRAPHS. 55 Sabbath. They are all converted people. If they are received it will make a membership of thirty-three, including Mrs. Doane and myself. I have been holding revival services at a school-house where they have slabs for benches without backs to them. Part of a log was taken out to make a window. People come seven and eight miles to the services. They seem anxious to hear the Gospel preached. They do not seem to care for mud or rain. I hope this will find the American Missionary Association getting out of debt. My people are ready and anxious to contribute to the support of the church. They have sold eggs and saved money, and it is often slow work. A PASSAGE AT ARMSWhite children whose parents are laboring in colored schools are sometimes taunted by the unkind remarks of ill- mannered youth with whom they come in contact. For example, the little daughter of one of our teachers was told, Your papa teaches niggers. The reply came quick as a flash: Well, your papa sells them whiskey, and that is worse. Another threatened to beat her at recess. She promptly said: You cant do it. My grandpa beat yours in the war. A SUBSCRIPTION LIST. BY A GEORGIA TEACHER. I inclose something I thought might interest you. The idea of cir- culating the paper originated with the girls and the money was nearly all raised without our knowledge. We added enough to buy a service- able pair of shoes. The poor girl to whom they were given was almost barefooted and stayed at home Saturday afternoon when the others went for their walk. The thoughtfulness and generosity of the girls touched us, for what they gave was to most of them a real sacrifice. THE APPEAL or THE GIRLS. While sitting in church to-day my heart was made to feel sad as I sat by one of the girls. I noticed that she was almost barefooted and has been for quite a while. Miss C. and I, feeling ourselves unable to purchase a pair of shoes, concluded we would ask all who will help us to please assist us, not for our sake, but for the Lords sake. Miss E. II., 5 cts., pd. Miss C. D., i~ cts., pd. ; Miss C. M., i ct., pd. ; Miss A. G., 5 cts., pd. ; Miss M. G., io cts. ; Miss H. G., 5 cts., pd. ; Miss R. W., 5 cts., pd. ; Miss M. D. G., 5 cts., pd. Miss L. B., ~ cts., pd. ; Miss A. S., 5 cts., pd. ; Miss L. B., 5 cts., pd. Miss S. L., 5 cts., pd. ; Miss G., i~ cts. 156 IN NORTH CAROLINA. The South. IN NORTH CAROLINA. BY SECRETARY WOODJ3URY. The Carolinas comprise a territory of eighty-two thousand square miles, a little more than the combined territory of New York and all New England, excepting Maine. North Carolina has a population of abo t a million white and half a million colored people; while of the million inhabitants of South Carolina a large majority are colored. In the two States thereare a million and a quarter of colored people. The length of North Carolina, east and west, is considerably greater than the distance between Boston and Washington. The western part of the State is mountainous. From its heights the state slopes into the vast Piedmont Plateau, a sub-mountain terrace, and thence into the low country or the Atlantic plain. In western North Carolina the Appalachian Mountains reach the greatest height in the United States eastward of the Rocky Mountains. The eye of an observer from the heights near Blowing Rock descries in one view mountain summits in Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee and South Carolina. The people of western North Carolina are white by a vast majority, while in the east- ern part of the State the black population predominates. In twenty- five of the western counties 88 per cent. of the people are white. In the same number of the farthest eastern counties there is a majority of ten thousand black people. In accordance with this fundamental fact, MOUNTAIN VIEW, BLOWING ROCK, N. C.

Secretary Woodbury Woodbury, Secretary In North Carolina The South 156-164

156 IN NORTH CAROLINA. The South. IN NORTH CAROLINA. BY SECRETARY WOODJ3URY. The Carolinas comprise a territory of eighty-two thousand square miles, a little more than the combined territory of New York and all New England, excepting Maine. North Carolina has a population of abo t a million white and half a million colored people; while of the million inhabitants of South Carolina a large majority are colored. In the two States thereare a million and a quarter of colored people. The length of North Carolina, east and west, is considerably greater than the distance between Boston and Washington. The western part of the State is mountainous. From its heights the state slopes into the vast Piedmont Plateau, a sub-mountain terrace, and thence into the low country or the Atlantic plain. In western North Carolina the Appalachian Mountains reach the greatest height in the United States eastward of the Rocky Mountains. The eye of an observer from the heights near Blowing Rock descries in one view mountain summits in Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee and South Carolina. The people of western North Carolina are white by a vast majority, while in the east- ern part of the State the black population predominates. In twenty- five of the western counties 88 per cent. of the people are white. In the same number of the farthest eastern counties there is a majority of ten thousand black people. In accordance with this fundamental fact, MOUNTAIN VIEW, BLOWING ROCK, N. C. IN NORTH CAROLINA. 57 the work of the American Missionary Association in the western part of the State is chiefly among the white, and in the eastern part of the State, among the black people. In both Carolinas the vast majority of the population is rural. Ac- cording to the last census there was only one city in each State with more than twenty thousand people, and only six places with more than ten thousand. In Wilmington, the largest city of North Carolina, the American Mis- sionary Association began work as the war was closing. Of the twenty- four thousand people in the county, fourteen thousand are black. Four- teen years ago Mr. J. J. H. Gregory, of Massachusetts, became much interested in this field and erected a fine brick church and commodious school buildings. The combined church and school work have gone on with continued efficiency and prosperity. There is a strong desire on the part of the people for the development of an industrial department in the school. The ele- vating influence of the church is felt not only in Wihnington, but through- out the surrounding com- munities. A great many of the school students have become teachers in the city schools and in different parts of the State. While Wilmington and Beaufort are both sea- side places, the former is chiefly a commercial town while the latter is de- voted to the fishing and oyster industries. The island is swept by re- freshing sea hreezes, and a great maey of its in- habitants are boatmen and fishermen. The Beaufort fisheries extend over a large area in which immense schools of fish are found. In deep sea fishing the nets are CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, WILMINGTON, N. C. 158 IN NORTH CAROLINA. dropped to a depth of one hundred feet and drawn up often filled to bursting. Not infrequently whales are captured off the coast. Not long ago both the church and school buildings in Beaufort were swept away by fire, but they have recently been restored, as seen in the illustration. The church is making good progress under its young colored pastor. The school is crowded. Industrial work is being carried on to. a limited extent, and it is hoped that in the coming year an industrial building can be erected. Nothing can contribute more to the progress and welfare of the young people than a well-equipped in- dustrial department where knowledge of trades can be imparted. XVith their immense preponderance of a country population, naturally the largest part of the Associations mission work in the Carolinas is in the country. in the North Carolina Congregational Association most of the churches are country churches. The Association meetings are well attended. The accompanying illustration is from a photograph taken at on.e of the recent meetings in McLeansville, where there are two churches not far apart. Besides these in this part of the State, there are country churches at High Point, Salem, Strieby, Melville, Oaks, Pekin, Dry Creek, Carters Mills, Dudley, Malee, Nalls, T roy, Snow Hill, and other points. The annual meetings of the Association are most interesting occasions. Pastors and people of these little churches gather from near and far for fellowship, mutual comfort, and inspiration. With some of these churches schools are associated, which afford to the young the opportunities of a Christian education, and con- tribute from their elder pupils many students for our higher institu- tions of learning. With the multiplication and development of these THE WILMINGTON A. M. A. SCHOOL. IN NORTH CAROLiNA. 59 churches these higher schools will have a steady constituency of great importance. Thus the Association, so far from confining its work to the cities, is doing a very large share of its work in the country and among country people. Some of this work has been long-continued and has achieved a wide- spread and beneficial in- fluence in the neighboring communities. The self- denying devotion of many years is reaching a most blessed fruitage, and those Tho have given the strength and vigor of a lifetime to the poor and SCENE IN BEAUFORT, N. C despised now find their closing years brightened with the sight of what has been wrought by their long labors for the advancement of the Kingdom of Christ. The picture of the Oaks congregation at their church door is an illustration. There, among the plantations, are two sisters who have given their lives, until the shadows of age have fallen upon them, to missionary work in behalf of the poor colored people. One of them is growing blind and the other has al- ready become so. While the former feels constrained by her failing sight soon to give up her school work, her more aged sister has an intense desire to continue, while life lasts, her labors in behalf of those whom she has come to love, while bringing blessings to them. Well versed in the Scriptures, she continues to gather classes of young men and plantation teachers and teach them from the Bible to prepare them to instruct better those still more ignorant than they. Although urged by her friends to give up 0 NORTH CAROLINA FISHERIES. i6o IN NORTH CAROLINA. this ministration, she cannot bring herself to any other course than that of doing all she can until the night cometh when no man can work. It is at once a pathetic, an inspiring and a joyful picture to see this aged blind woman, surrounded by her students, opening to them the Scriptures and instructing them in the religion of their common Master. In contrast with the quiet home and school work carried on by these two women and yet to the same end are the labors of such a country pastor as Mr. Collins. For a number of years, while carrying on regu- lar church work at Troy, he has also had charge of several other churches riding scores of miles every week, fording the streams and facing the storms in all kinds of weather. At Dry Creek and Nalls, Pekin, Carters Mills and Malee, he has preached regularly or occa- sionally and has watched with incessant care and labor the development of missions throughout a wide tract of country. The influence of these churches has pervaded many communities. Calls have come to him to develop new church work simply because the poor people of other churches have seen and felt the higher standards 6f piety and purer lives among many in the Congregational churches and have desired that they too might have the advantage of such ministers. Indeed, this long care of our churches and schools is awakening many new movements among the colored people of the South. Our churches are generally small and poor, but they have stood steadfastly for human rights, for Christian equality and freedom of church membership, and for moral and religious education. While their work has been slow, CHURCH AND SCHOOL, BEAUFORT, N. C. IN NORTH CAROLINA. their influence has been deep and pervasive, as has been that of oui schools, small and great. It is an interesting and important fact that the great work of Christian education in behalf of the colored people which has been carried on by the Asso- ciation is now pro- ducing results in a new direction. Our former students and pupils, grown into manhood and womanhood, find the church life of their communities greatly inferior to that in which they were trained in our schools. They are reaching after something more pure, free and spiritual. The leaven of their intelligence and higher standard of morality is taking hold of many families about them. From many centers the call reaches us for the organization of Congregational churches, churches which shall stand for morality, equal mem- bership rights and a moie rational type of piety. At the same time there is an upris- ingin various churches against the centralized forms of church gov- eminent, which they feel to be oppressive. They refuse longer to be bound to systems which, as they believe, invade individual Christian rights. From these and other causes appeals are coming to us from different quarters for the recognition of churches which have become independent. A number of these churches have already been received by council into NORTH CAROLINA STATE ASSOCIATION, McLEANSVILLE. AT THE CHURCH DOOR, OAKS, N. C. IN NORTH CAROLINA. Congregational associations, and the indications are that this number will be largely increased during the year to come. Of these popular movements toward the Congregational way, that at Lowell is a typical illustration. Some of the colored people near this little hamlet desired to build for themselves a church. With in- finite pains and self-denial and labor they gathered the material for a small, wooden building and put up the frame with their own hands. I3eing refused the official encouragement they felt they had a right to expect from their own denomination, they began to con- sider the whole question of church relations and polity, and made up THE SPRINGS CABIN AT LOWELL. their minds to become a free church. They held their services in the cabin depicted in the accompanying illustration, and sought to push forward the completion of their little and rude church building. A furious storm blew the frame down. With sore hearts they piled up the lumber neatly around the foundation frame and felt that they must give up their cherished hope of having a church edi- fice. Having learned of the Congre ga- tional way, which super- imposes no centralized church gov- ernment over the people and seeks to aid the poor rather than to oppress them, they organized themselves into a Congregational church, and were recognized in our fellowship by a council. Afterward they were visited by a representative of the Association, whose form is seen in the foreground of the picture of their ruined church. A cheering THE LOWELL CHURCH RUINS. IN NORTH CAROLINA. 163 conference was held with them. In this conversation a single fact came out which shows something of the labor and self-denial in the movement. It was found that the young minister of this, and a similar body of colored people several miles away, although he was afflicted with an ulcerated ankle, which might well have laid him up in his house, had repeatedly walked seventeen miles over the heavy roads in order to keep faithfully his preaching appoint- ments. The people were willing to do their very utmost. It is hoped, with the aid of our Church Building Society, that they will now be able to put up their little church building and prosper in their Christian endeavor of hav- ing a free Congregational church for their religious home. In Raleigh, the State capital, the colored people form a little over half of the population. Our church work here for a number of years has been iu the charge of Rev. A. W. Curtis, D. D., who is most highly esteemed everywhere. The conven- ient, comfortable, and tasteful church building was erected in 1891. It has a seating capacity of 250. In the political trans- formations of the State the race question keeps its prominence. It was a significant fact that the Legislature voted a few weeks ago to adjourn in respect to the memory of Fred. Douglass. About the same time the legisla- ture also voted that the national standard should be raised on the State STATE CAPITOL AT RALEIGH. house; and, for the first time since the reconstruction days, our countrys flag streamed above the old granite capitol of North Carolina. REV. A. W. CURTIS, D.C. 164 SUNDAY AT TALLADECA. A SUNDAY AT TALLADEGA, ALA. BY PRESIDLNT DEFOREST. Our different religious services begin early in the day. At 7.30, soon after breakfast and prayers in the dining hall, the Young Mens Chris- tian Association holds its meeting for an hour. The Sunday-school, with a large attendance and many classes occupying different school rooms, convenes at 9.15, with the regular church service following at 10.30. We are never through with this without feeling keenly the need of a larger, better and better ventilated house of worship. A new chapel is longed for each Sabbath, often through the week, and especially at commencement season when our varied anniversary exercises are all crowded into one small inadequate and inappropriate room. Soon after dinner more than a score of students, mainly young men, with a few of our teachers, go out to seven different mission Sunday- schools, two of which are in our own tasteful chapels, others in country churches, and one in a private house, where they meet about 300 dif- ferent pupils of all sorts, garbs and ages, but for the most part atten- tive listeners eager for instruction, as well as for the papers which Northern benevolence, through sundry boxes and barrels, enable us to supply. This mission Sunday-school work began with the first year of the College Church and has accomplished a large and growing good. Through these schools the college multiplies itself, carrying the Gospel, with opposition to tobacco and intoxicants, into needy places. These mission schools are a cordon of outposts surrounding the citadel. The most remote is five and a half miles away, and incidentally a good share of pluck is developed by those who, through cold or heat, mud or dust, regularly make their Sabbath day rounds. Comparatively few are regularly in these mission enterprises. For those at home there is the quiet hour and prayer meetings, a gathering in the interests of purity or temperanceenough to employ the time to the early supper hour. After that comes the last public meeting of the day in the chapel, which for some time has been conducted by our Society of Christian Endeavor. The day is a full one, with large oppor- tunities for personal growth and usefulness. From a recent visit, I am able to write more fully of one of the meet- ings of the Young Mens Christian Association. The hour was early, but the room was well filled. The leader took but little time and used it well. Prayers followed, with volunteer singing; other prayers, brief and earnest, and then a quartet sang a touching evangelical hymn. Seldom have I spoken to more attentive hearers than were furnished by these fifty young men. It was an inspiration to look into their faces and to feel that in a few years they would all be scattered, if they live, to the four quarters of the world and wielding a large influence among

President Deforest Deforest, President A Sunday at Talladega, Ala. The South 164-165

164 SUNDAY AT TALLADECA. A SUNDAY AT TALLADEGA, ALA. BY PRESIDLNT DEFOREST. Our different religious services begin early in the day. At 7.30, soon after breakfast and prayers in the dining hall, the Young Mens Chris- tian Association holds its meeting for an hour. The Sunday-school, with a large attendance and many classes occupying different school rooms, convenes at 9.15, with the regular church service following at 10.30. We are never through with this without feeling keenly the need of a larger, better and better ventilated house of worship. A new chapel is longed for each Sabbath, often through the week, and especially at commencement season when our varied anniversary exercises are all crowded into one small inadequate and inappropriate room. Soon after dinner more than a score of students, mainly young men, with a few of our teachers, go out to seven different mission Sunday- schools, two of which are in our own tasteful chapels, others in country churches, and one in a private house, where they meet about 300 dif- ferent pupils of all sorts, garbs and ages, but for the most part atten- tive listeners eager for instruction, as well as for the papers which Northern benevolence, through sundry boxes and barrels, enable us to supply. This mission Sunday-school work began with the first year of the College Church and has accomplished a large and growing good. Through these schools the college multiplies itself, carrying the Gospel, with opposition to tobacco and intoxicants, into needy places. These mission schools are a cordon of outposts surrounding the citadel. The most remote is five and a half miles away, and incidentally a good share of pluck is developed by those who, through cold or heat, mud or dust, regularly make their Sabbath day rounds. Comparatively few are regularly in these mission enterprises. For those at home there is the quiet hour and prayer meetings, a gathering in the interests of purity or temperanceenough to employ the time to the early supper hour. After that comes the last public meeting of the day in the chapel, which for some time has been conducted by our Society of Christian Endeavor. The day is a full one, with large oppor- tunities for personal growth and usefulness. From a recent visit, I am able to write more fully of one of the meet- ings of the Young Mens Christian Association. The hour was early, but the room was well filled. The leader took but little time and used it well. Prayers followed, with volunteer singing; other prayers, brief and earnest, and then a quartet sang a touching evangelical hymn. Seldom have I spoken to more attentive hearers than were furnished by these fifty young men. It was an inspiration to look into their faces and to feel that in a few years they would all be scattered, if they live, to the four quarters of the world and wielding a large influence among STORRS SCHOOL, ATLANTA, GA. men. I could but hope that that influence would be for good. Many earnest prayers followed, and when an opportunity was offered three young men requested prayers. They were tenderly remembered. It seemed to me that some of these petitions had in them the fervor of Pentecost. Two young men were received into the Association, and when the hour was through I felt that we had been sitting together in heavenly places in Christ. And now as a Roman could not end his speech without adding Delenda est Carthago, so I cannot close without saying that if this part of the world needs Christian schools, if Christian education is the hope of these regions, then Talladega College ought to be enlarged and en- dowed. Some who are giving themselves to this most blessed recon- struction wish that they had money to add also. May those who cannot come themselves send on supplies. STORRS SCHOOL, ATLANTA, GA. BY MISS ELLA E. ROPER. We are so sure of your sympathy in our spiritual prosperity that I write you informally in relation to it. - Sunday, February To, was a peculiarly happy one for us. In the morn- ing we had studied together how the Saviour had set the little child in the midst. At the communion service following there was a large group of candidates for admission to the church, and then again were the chil- dren in the midst. Eight were our present pupils; another, a last years graduate. Still another was a young man who came to renew his allegiance to the church of Christ. We wished that all interested in their welfare in years gone by could look upon them. Several of the younger people admitted became interested under the preaching of Mr. Moore over a year ago, and have stood to their post manfully ever since. The present severe weather causes much acute distress. A recent case had its humorous, as well as pathetic side. In the bitter zero weather of Fridays blizzard a microscopic male beggar unfolded a doleful tale, as he basked in the warmth of the kitchen fire. He gave very unsatis- factory directions to his home, and we were unsuccessful that night in locating it. Early next morning he appeared again, and we made immediate preparations for running him to cover. As we started into the street he said hesitatingly, Mothers better now. Thats good; run along. Presently, Shes up and dressed now. Run along, we admonished, and took care to keep our eyes upon him lest he vanish, since he was evidently frying to patch up a peace with his conscience. He presently darted within a cabin, and there we found a state of things to which he had hardly done justice, notwithstanding his remorse that his mother wasnt exactly as he had represented her. A single stick

Miss Ella E. Roper Roper, Ella E., Miss Storrs School, Atlanta, Ga. The South 165-166

STORRS SCHOOL, ATLANTA, GA. men. I could but hope that that influence would be for good. Many earnest prayers followed, and when an opportunity was offered three young men requested prayers. They were tenderly remembered. It seemed to me that some of these petitions had in them the fervor of Pentecost. Two young men were received into the Association, and when the hour was through I felt that we had been sitting together in heavenly places in Christ. And now as a Roman could not end his speech without adding Delenda est Carthago, so I cannot close without saying that if this part of the world needs Christian schools, if Christian education is the hope of these regions, then Talladega College ought to be enlarged and en- dowed. Some who are giving themselves to this most blessed recon- struction wish that they had money to add also. May those who cannot come themselves send on supplies. STORRS SCHOOL, ATLANTA, GA. BY MISS ELLA E. ROPER. We are so sure of your sympathy in our spiritual prosperity that I write you informally in relation to it. - Sunday, February To, was a peculiarly happy one for us. In the morn- ing we had studied together how the Saviour had set the little child in the midst. At the communion service following there was a large group of candidates for admission to the church, and then again were the chil- dren in the midst. Eight were our present pupils; another, a last years graduate. Still another was a young man who came to renew his allegiance to the church of Christ. We wished that all interested in their welfare in years gone by could look upon them. Several of the younger people admitted became interested under the preaching of Mr. Moore over a year ago, and have stood to their post manfully ever since. The present severe weather causes much acute distress. A recent case had its humorous, as well as pathetic side. In the bitter zero weather of Fridays blizzard a microscopic male beggar unfolded a doleful tale, as he basked in the warmth of the kitchen fire. He gave very unsatis- factory directions to his home, and we were unsuccessful that night in locating it. Early next morning he appeared again, and we made immediate preparations for running him to cover. As we started into the street he said hesitatingly, Mothers better now. Thats good; run along. Presently, Shes up and dressed now. Run along, we admonished, and took care to keep our eyes upon him lest he vanish, since he was evidently frying to patch up a peace with his conscience. He presently darted within a cabin, and there we found a state of things to which he had hardly done justice, notwithstanding his remorse that his mother wasnt exactly as he had represented her. A single stick i66 ANDERSON VILLE, GA. of wood was wasting in the fireplace. Four children, smaller than the mite, were as near it as possible without being on it, eagerly scraping a tin dish with a spoon. A fifth, who had recently made the acquaint- ance of this world and its woes, was vigorously proclaiming his unfavor- able opinion of it from the bed. I cannot take him up in this cold, the mother explained. I left them to see what could be done. On my return the last spark of fire had died upon the hearth. It was zero without and within. Our family of teachers had made up a sum sufficient for the present needs, however, and the family were soon made comfortable. At our last visit that day the room was warm, the baby was up, and evidently had changed his mind. As we were endeavoring to sort out and fit some garments, the mite (ten years of age, but apparently about eight) came to me, and, looking up with great solemnity, said, If you want any work done, Ill do it for you for nothin. So you see there will be a man of business in that house as long as the mite lives. We have our usual experience of pleasant classes in Storrs this year. The same families continuing with us, year after year, seem like our own. Our Junior Christian Endeavor Society, already quite large, received nine new members at the last business meeting, and is reaching out for more. Our industrial department is slowly working in the direction of a modest exhibit at the coming Atlanta Exposition, and doing considerable toward clothing the needy with plain garments. ANDERSONVILLE, GA. MISS M. E. WILCOX. Thank you ever so much for the Hand Fund, I feel quite rich with it. These children are willing to work and the parents are glad to have them do so. They know very little about doing things properly, and the teaching which they have in industrial work may do them as much good as their books, but if you count that, then I am teaching from eight oclock to five. You may wish to ask if we feel isolated and lonely. No, we are too busy for that. The scholars begin to come on the grounds before we are through breakfast, and we dont have time to wish for other com- pany. You ask how I find things. One cant find out everything in two months, but as far as I can judge it is as needy a field as we have heard about. Of course the best work cannot be done in school until we can have another room, but now scholars come four or five miles, cross creeks on logs, or, when the water is too high, their folks bring them across the water and they walk the rest of the way.

Miss M. E. Wilcox Wilcox, M. E., Miss Andersonville, Ga. The South 166-167

i66 ANDERSON VILLE, GA. of wood was wasting in the fireplace. Four children, smaller than the mite, were as near it as possible without being on it, eagerly scraping a tin dish with a spoon. A fifth, who had recently made the acquaint- ance of this world and its woes, was vigorously proclaiming his unfavor- able opinion of it from the bed. I cannot take him up in this cold, the mother explained. I left them to see what could be done. On my return the last spark of fire had died upon the hearth. It was zero without and within. Our family of teachers had made up a sum sufficient for the present needs, however, and the family were soon made comfortable. At our last visit that day the room was warm, the baby was up, and evidently had changed his mind. As we were endeavoring to sort out and fit some garments, the mite (ten years of age, but apparently about eight) came to me, and, looking up with great solemnity, said, If you want any work done, Ill do it for you for nothin. So you see there will be a man of business in that house as long as the mite lives. We have our usual experience of pleasant classes in Storrs this year. The same families continuing with us, year after year, seem like our own. Our Junior Christian Endeavor Society, already quite large, received nine new members at the last business meeting, and is reaching out for more. Our industrial department is slowly working in the direction of a modest exhibit at the coming Atlanta Exposition, and doing considerable toward clothing the needy with plain garments. ANDERSONVILLE, GA. MISS M. E. WILCOX. Thank you ever so much for the Hand Fund, I feel quite rich with it. These children are willing to work and the parents are glad to have them do so. They know very little about doing things properly, and the teaching which they have in industrial work may do them as much good as their books, but if you count that, then I am teaching from eight oclock to five. You may wish to ask if we feel isolated and lonely. No, we are too busy for that. The scholars begin to come on the grounds before we are through breakfast, and we dont have time to wish for other com- pany. You ask how I find things. One cant find out everything in two months, but as far as I can judge it is as needy a field as we have heard about. Of course the best work cannot be done in school until we can have another room, but now scholars come four or five miles, cross creeks on logs, or, when the water is too high, their folks bring them across the water and they walk the rest of the way. ITEMS FROM INDIAN MISSIONS. 167 So far, the parents find no fault with the governing at school. One girl had troubled me by laughing and playing, and I told her at noon if she couldnt study more she would better stay at home and work. Somebody told her mother what was said, and the stepfather came down and begged me to keep her, said that they couldnt read and write and needed to have her know how, that they would attend stricter to her, that she would behave better when they were through with her, etc. I consented to keep her and she confided to Jennie, when she came to school, that she had had four switches wore out on her that morning. Everybody is very poor, of all races, and what is more discouraging they dont know how to improve their condition. This year the Christ- mas freeze spoiled almost all their vegetables, and they lost all their melon crop last year, and the cold two or three weeks ago froze what garden things were started; what they are to live on till crops grow is not visible. The children evidently think our washbasins and soap and towels a great luxury, for they scrub and rub at every opportunity. We are putting out flowers and trees and planting grass in the yard to make it more comfortable looking, the grass, partly to prevent the water from washing off so much. The church lot is higher than that of the house and in a heavy rain the water pours down on our lot, but I think we can stop it in part at least. Our home is an unmixed blessing. I dont know how we could get on here without a pleasant resting place, and the people watch everything we do and everything we have. The Indians. ITEMS FROM INDIAN MISSIONS. SECRETARY c. j. RYDER. At Santee Industrial School and Mission in Nebraska they have suf- fered a sad bereavement. The place left vacant by Mrs. Frederick B. Riggs, who has just been taken away from the loving circle of mission- ary workers at this station cannot be filled. Her absence will be much more than the loss of one faithful missionary. She was the life, the light and the inspiration of any circle in which she moved. The brief tribute in another column to her memory calls attention to her wide usefulness. When we met in the Mission Council last year at Oahe, S. D., Mrs. Riggss bright and confident faith lifted up all our hearts bowed down as they were by discouragement in view of the vast work to be accomplished and the retrenchment in funds. All who were present at this Council will remember how sure she was that light would come after the darkness, and that joy would come in the morning. There

C. J. Ryder, Secretary Ryder, C. J., Secretary Items from Indian Missions The Indians 167-169

ITEMS FROM INDIAN MISSIONS. 167 So far, the parents find no fault with the governing at school. One girl had troubled me by laughing and playing, and I told her at noon if she couldnt study more she would better stay at home and work. Somebody told her mother what was said, and the stepfather came down and begged me to keep her, said that they couldnt read and write and needed to have her know how, that they would attend stricter to her, that she would behave better when they were through with her, etc. I consented to keep her and she confided to Jennie, when she came to school, that she had had four switches wore out on her that morning. Everybody is very poor, of all races, and what is more discouraging they dont know how to improve their condition. This year the Christ- mas freeze spoiled almost all their vegetables, and they lost all their melon crop last year, and the cold two or three weeks ago froze what garden things were started; what they are to live on till crops grow is not visible. The children evidently think our washbasins and soap and towels a great luxury, for they scrub and rub at every opportunity. We are putting out flowers and trees and planting grass in the yard to make it more comfortable looking, the grass, partly to prevent the water from washing off so much. The church lot is higher than that of the house and in a heavy rain the water pours down on our lot, but I think we can stop it in part at least. Our home is an unmixed blessing. I dont know how we could get on here without a pleasant resting place, and the people watch everything we do and everything we have. The Indians. ITEMS FROM INDIAN MISSIONS. SECRETARY c. j. RYDER. At Santee Industrial School and Mission in Nebraska they have suf- fered a sad bereavement. The place left vacant by Mrs. Frederick B. Riggs, who has just been taken away from the loving circle of mission- ary workers at this station cannot be filled. Her absence will be much more than the loss of one faithful missionary. She was the life, the light and the inspiration of any circle in which she moved. The brief tribute in another column to her memory calls attention to her wide usefulness. When we met in the Mission Council last year at Oahe, S. D., Mrs. Riggss bright and confident faith lifted up all our hearts bowed down as they were by discouragement in view of the vast work to be accomplished and the retrenchment in funds. All who were present at this Council will remember how sure she was that light would come after the darkness, and that joy would come in the morning. There i68 iTEMS FROM INDIAN MISSIONS. has come to her the richest, fullest light and joy of the better country. When we meet at the Council this year we shall be the richer for her strong faith and the abiding presence of her self-sacrificing love. Santee Industrial School, through the rigid economy of Dr. Riggs and his faithful assistants, has enrolled more pupils than the appropria- tion permitted. Notwithstanding this, hundreds have been turned from the school because the funds were not sufficient to furnish them Chris tian instruction. From Oahe comes the report that Rev. T. L. Riggs is gradually re- covering the use of his eyes. Rev. James F. Cross, of Rosebud, has been assisting Brother Riggs during his sore affliction. We are sometimes asked whether the hospital at Fort Yates is now in operation. It is not. Last year, by special solicitation, additional funds were gathered sufficient to conduct the hospital for one year. This was done. A hospital plant is always expensive, as it involves the salary of a trained physician and an assistant, together with medicines and other supplies. This year the funds have not come in outside of current receipts sufficient to provide for the expenses of the hospital, and it is, therefore, closed. This is to the serious loss of the religious work. Word comes from the prairie that the Indians, women and children especially, mourn sorely the loss of this hospital and the considerate and skillful care of our faithful physician. Miss M. P. Lord, whose address at the annual meeting in Lowell attracted so general interest, remained in the East for some weeks presenting the Indian work to the churches, Christian Endeavor Societies and womens missionary societies. Her work was confined to New England. She remained as long as it seemed wise for her to be absent from the pressing duties of her mission, to which she has now returned. The following letter was recently received from her. IN THE LAND OF THE DAKOTAS LITTLE EAGLES VILLAGE, March 25, 1895. During the past week I have been twice down the river to Flying Bys Village to attend their mid-week prayer meeting and Sunday morn- ing service, and also to the Agency. My people seem to be active and earnest. Some of them are thinking they had better enlarge the little building they put up last year. A number of the people there are learning, teaching each other to read; and they are asking for a womens missionary society to be formed there. Catch-the-Enemy, who is active in the young mens society, said to me the other day that there were fifteen members at Flying Bys Village. Their quarterly dues are ten cents, but the others have nothing with which to pays and so he paid them all. DEATH OF MRS. E B. RIGGS. 169 David, dear, good, gentle David, was here to-day from Thunder Hawks. I judge that he is getting on well there. As a teacher, I think he can not but be a success, he is so gentle, patient and good, and bright, too. A week ago we had a pleasant little visit from Mr. Reed over Sunday. From this letter it will be seen that large opportunities are opening at this Indian mission, and most hopeful results are already being gathered. The Christian Indians are more and more realizing their own responsibility for carrying on Christian work, and are meeting it bravely. They are also responding to appeals for gifts to missionary work outside of their own tribes with self-sacrificing devotion. The collection of the Pilgrim Church at Santee, mentioned in the April magazine, increased to $241. This was to meet the debt on the treasury of the American Missionary Association. Miss Collins, so well known to our readers, is now in the East in be- half of these needy Indian missions. Before leaving the prairies, she visited Oahe and Santee, and various missions aside from her own, that she might have the most recent information of the whole field. The object of her coming is to give the information, which she possesses so thoroughly, to the people and so stir them up adequately to support this field of Indian missions which is suffering so painfully for the lack of funds. There can not be any further retrenchment of the Indian work if it lives at all. It has been cut down two years in succession, and greatly suffered. Further curtailment would mean crucifixion. MRS. ADELAIDE RIDEOUT RIGGS. A beautiful life has gone out from our work, taking from it one who was loved and admired by the Indian people as well ~s by her fellow- workers. Mrs. Riggs was born in 1867 in Dorset, Vt., graduating in 1887 from the Western Reserve Seminary, and after spending two years in Brad- ford Academy, Mass., she came as a teacher to the Santee School, Nebraska, where she made herself exceedingly useful and was after- ward employed by Dr. Riggs as his secretary. In 1893 she was mar- ried to Mr. Frederick B. Riggs and took a trip with him upon the Rosebud and Pine Ridge Reservations, camping out and sharing the hardship of such travel. Failing health led to the employment of the best medical advice, andin November, 1894, she went to New Mexico to escape the rigors of the climate of Nebraska, where it seemed impossible that she could live through the winter. But in spite of all that could be done, Mrs. Riggs passed away March 12, 1895. She was admirably fitted for her work and full of enthusiasu~ for it. It seeme~~1

Mrs. Adelaide Rideout Riggs The Indians 169-170

DEATH OF MRS. E B. RIGGS. 169 David, dear, good, gentle David, was here to-day from Thunder Hawks. I judge that he is getting on well there. As a teacher, I think he can not but be a success, he is so gentle, patient and good, and bright, too. A week ago we had a pleasant little visit from Mr. Reed over Sunday. From this letter it will be seen that large opportunities are opening at this Indian mission, and most hopeful results are already being gathered. The Christian Indians are more and more realizing their own responsibility for carrying on Christian work, and are meeting it bravely. They are also responding to appeals for gifts to missionary work outside of their own tribes with self-sacrificing devotion. The collection of the Pilgrim Church at Santee, mentioned in the April magazine, increased to $241. This was to meet the debt on the treasury of the American Missionary Association. Miss Collins, so well known to our readers, is now in the East in be- half of these needy Indian missions. Before leaving the prairies, she visited Oahe and Santee, and various missions aside from her own, that she might have the most recent information of the whole field. The object of her coming is to give the information, which she possesses so thoroughly, to the people and so stir them up adequately to support this field of Indian missions which is suffering so painfully for the lack of funds. There can not be any further retrenchment of the Indian work if it lives at all. It has been cut down two years in succession, and greatly suffered. Further curtailment would mean crucifixion. MRS. ADELAIDE RIDEOUT RIGGS. A beautiful life has gone out from our work, taking from it one who was loved and admired by the Indian people as well ~s by her fellow- workers. Mrs. Riggs was born in 1867 in Dorset, Vt., graduating in 1887 from the Western Reserve Seminary, and after spending two years in Brad- ford Academy, Mass., she came as a teacher to the Santee School, Nebraska, where she made herself exceedingly useful and was after- ward employed by Dr. Riggs as his secretary. In 1893 she was mar- ried to Mr. Frederick B. Riggs and took a trip with him upon the Rosebud and Pine Ridge Reservations, camping out and sharing the hardship of such travel. Failing health led to the employment of the best medical advice, andin November, 1894, she went to New Mexico to escape the rigors of the climate of Nebraska, where it seemed impossible that she could live through the winter. But in spite of all that could be done, Mrs. Riggs passed away March 12, 1895. She was admirably fitted for her work and full of enthusiasu~ for it. It seeme~~1 170 FARA GRAPH THE CHINESE. as if her usefulness had just begun, but God had prepared her for another and more glorious field. The funeral service of Mrs. Riggs was held on Sunday afternoon, March 24, at Santee, Neb. The simple exercises were conducted by Rev. Mr. Dwin, Superintendent of the Government School, and Pastor Ehnamani. The latter is the venerable Indian pastor of the church at Santee. He referred feelingly to Mrs. Riggs giving her life to the work among his people and of her desire to be buried among those whom she loved. AN INDIAN HELPING NEEDY WHITES. The Indians have shown themselves full of sympathy, giving what they could spare of their annual issue of flannel, cloth, etc., from the Government. One of the native pastors, Mr. Francis Frazier, told that on his way here from his home at the Rosebud Reservation, he found at ~he homes of all the white families great need of food. He started with a good supply for the trip, but he left some at each white mans home that he passed on the way. We have no conception of this sufferinv. The weather has been very mild compared with last year, which has been a great blessing to these poor people. What trust in God it needs to live through such extremities! The Chinese. STREET PREACHING IN CHINATOWN. REV. w. c. POND, D.D. Our brother Loo Quong writes from Fresno as follows: I cannot help telling you about the interest we have taken in the street preaching here in Chinatowh, and the interest of the Chinese who have attended our meetings from Sunday to Sunday. It was a beautiful sight to see the great big crowd of interesting faces, to hear us sing the songs of praise to the Almighty God, and to hear the preaching of the sweet gos- pel of our Lord Jesus Christ, who loves the Chinese as well as all man- kind. I have taken more interest in my preaching on the streets in this city than anywhere else, because I could get more help to sing with us. Besides, our people here seem to be more interested in such meetings than anywhere else. We begin at 12.30 P.M. After a few hymns were sung a loud prayer was offered to our God and Master by XVong Gow. Then I mounted the chair and peached for half an hour. Then a hymn was sung, and Brother Wong Gow took the chair and preached another twenty minutes to the big and interested crowd. After this another hymn was sung. A young American boy who was a true Chris-

An Indian Helping Needy Whites The Indians 170

170 FARA GRAPH THE CHINESE. as if her usefulness had just begun, but God had prepared her for another and more glorious field. The funeral service of Mrs. Riggs was held on Sunday afternoon, March 24, at Santee, Neb. The simple exercises were conducted by Rev. Mr. Dwin, Superintendent of the Government School, and Pastor Ehnamani. The latter is the venerable Indian pastor of the church at Santee. He referred feelingly to Mrs. Riggs giving her life to the work among his people and of her desire to be buried among those whom she loved. AN INDIAN HELPING NEEDY WHITES. The Indians have shown themselves full of sympathy, giving what they could spare of their annual issue of flannel, cloth, etc., from the Government. One of the native pastors, Mr. Francis Frazier, told that on his way here from his home at the Rosebud Reservation, he found at ~he homes of all the white families great need of food. He started with a good supply for the trip, but he left some at each white mans home that he passed on the way. We have no conception of this sufferinv. The weather has been very mild compared with last year, which has been a great blessing to these poor people. What trust in God it needs to live through such extremities! The Chinese. STREET PREACHING IN CHINATOWN. REV. w. c. POND, D.D. Our brother Loo Quong writes from Fresno as follows: I cannot help telling you about the interest we have taken in the street preaching here in Chinatowh, and the interest of the Chinese who have attended our meetings from Sunday to Sunday. It was a beautiful sight to see the great big crowd of interesting faces, to hear us sing the songs of praise to the Almighty God, and to hear the preaching of the sweet gos- pel of our Lord Jesus Christ, who loves the Chinese as well as all man- kind. I have taken more interest in my preaching on the streets in this city than anywhere else, because I could get more help to sing with us. Besides, our people here seem to be more interested in such meetings than anywhere else. We begin at 12.30 P.M. After a few hymns were sung a loud prayer was offered to our God and Master by XVong Gow. Then I mounted the chair and peached for half an hour. Then a hymn was sung, and Brother Wong Gow took the chair and preached another twenty minutes to the big and interested crowd. After this another hymn was sung. A young American boy who was a true Chris-

Rev. W. C. Pond, D.D. Pond, W. C., Rev., D.D. Street Preaching in Chinatown The Chinese 170-173

170 FARA GRAPH THE CHINESE. as if her usefulness had just begun, but God had prepared her for another and more glorious field. The funeral service of Mrs. Riggs was held on Sunday afternoon, March 24, at Santee, Neb. The simple exercises were conducted by Rev. Mr. Dwin, Superintendent of the Government School, and Pastor Ehnamani. The latter is the venerable Indian pastor of the church at Santee. He referred feelingly to Mrs. Riggs giving her life to the work among his people and of her desire to be buried among those whom she loved. AN INDIAN HELPING NEEDY WHITES. The Indians have shown themselves full of sympathy, giving what they could spare of their annual issue of flannel, cloth, etc., from the Government. One of the native pastors, Mr. Francis Frazier, told that on his way here from his home at the Rosebud Reservation, he found at ~he homes of all the white families great need of food. He started with a good supply for the trip, but he left some at each white mans home that he passed on the way. We have no conception of this sufferinv. The weather has been very mild compared with last year, which has been a great blessing to these poor people. What trust in God it needs to live through such extremities! The Chinese. STREET PREACHING IN CHINATOWN. REV. w. c. POND, D.D. Our brother Loo Quong writes from Fresno as follows: I cannot help telling you about the interest we have taken in the street preaching here in Chinatowh, and the interest of the Chinese who have attended our meetings from Sunday to Sunday. It was a beautiful sight to see the great big crowd of interesting faces, to hear us sing the songs of praise to the Almighty God, and to hear the preaching of the sweet gos- pel of our Lord Jesus Christ, who loves the Chinese as well as all man- kind. I have taken more interest in my preaching on the streets in this city than anywhere else, because I could get more help to sing with us. Besides, our people here seem to be more interested in such meetings than anywhere else. We begin at 12.30 P.M. After a few hymns were sung a loud prayer was offered to our God and Master by XVong Gow. Then I mounted the chair and peached for half an hour. Then a hymn was sung, and Brother Wong Gow took the chair and preached another twenty minutes to the big and interested crowd. After this another hymn was sung. A young American boy who was a true Chris- STREET PREA CHING IN CHINA TO WN. 17[ tian happened to pass along there, and made a stop to see what was going on. After he found out he too mounted the chair and gave the crowd a few cheerful words. Then we closed with the song: Are you Washed in the Blood, (in Chinese I suppose: W. C. P.) following this with the Lords Prayer in Chinese. During all this time there was not one ever did move away from the big crowd, but rather new-comers swelled it larger and larger. There were a great many Americans in it too, and they all seemed to be interested. I am sure that a great many of the Chinese hearts, at least, were touched by the preaching of the Gospel to-day. May the Lord, help them to understand it more clearly! I believe that the street preaching has become the most important part of the missionary work in this State. For nowadays, with the Chinese, things are not like those of ten or fifteen years ago, when we could get a great many Chinese into our schools to be taught English, and so the Gospel times are getting harder for them in this country every day, and they are growing old, and therefore they have more STREET PREACHING IN FRESNO. 172 STREET PREA CHING ZN CHINA TO WN. cares in their hearts and so lose interest in study. I have tried this manytimes. When I succeeded to get them in for one, two, three, or four nights, they are not interested and do not come again, and when urged to do so, they offer some kind of excuse. So we must take the street meetings as the main point to fight sins, to sow the seeds, and use the schools as our reapers. And so Loo Quong goes on to urge me to stir up the street preaching at all our missions, which thing I was and have been forward to do, even without urging. I believe he is right in saying that while we cannot dispense th the schoolsindeed the whole work without these would be unorganized and fruitlessyet for sowing the seed, for reaching those who are far off, we must depend on street preaching. The English primer has largely lost its power as a bait for the gospel hook. We must do our fishing for men on other lines. Accordingly I am pressing our Chinese Christians into this work, and am providing them with cards printed in Chinese, on which they can sign their names to the simple statement: I like the Jesus doctrine. I would be glad to study it. The preacher may call to see me at The reverse side of the card contains the location of the mission house, names of teacher, helper, etc. The intent is that no one will- ing to listen to the word of life as uttered in private and personal con- versation, should fail to be found and to be urged to take his stand with the followers of Christ. We wish to follow up the public service with effective private and personal preaching. Two of our Chinese brethren at Fresno are to be baptized and wel- comed to the Church to-morrow. Let no one imagine that street-preaching is a new feature of our work. We have practiced it on all our fields, and ever since we had Chinese Christians capable of doing it. But it has not been attended to as regularly and with as careful preparation: it has not been made a constant and prominent element of our missionary service, as with Gods help I mean to make it hereafter. A friend writing from Sa nta Barbara says of Yong Kay: For some time God has been laying the b~irden of Chinatown upon his mind and heart. He said that he ought to be like Paulgo to those who have not heard the Gospel. So, with some singers from the church, he has gone into their street on Sunday afternoons and held open-air services. A crowd has gathered, attracted by the singing, and Yong Kay has preached to them in Chinese. Those who were interested the first time came again yesterday, and one could tell by their earnest faces that they were taking in the thought of the speaker. It was a touching scene; and not less touching, perhaps, that little group at the mission house BUREA U OF WOMANS WORK 73 about to start for the preaching place, as Yong Kay gathered us about him and said: We will have a short prayer. He went in the strength of the Lord, and he will doubtless come again, bringing his sheaves with him. Mrs. Davis, our teacher at San Bernardino, writes likewise: We had a song and preaching service ,in Chinatown last Sabbath, and the effort was most gratifying. About forty Chinese gathered and listened with the utmost interest, as you could see by their very earnest faces and close attention. We plan to have these services regularly-if Gin Foo King can be continued with us. The longer I work with these people the more my heart goes out to them in their sad condition, out of Christ. Bureau of Womans Work. MISS D. E. EMERSON, SECRETARY. CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR IN THE BLACK BELT. BY c. E. L. One hundred and twenty-five happy black faces with eager eyes and glistening white teeth; one hundred and twenty-five little boys and girls marching into the schoolroom to go forth as Junior Endeavorers; thus began our society this morning. How anxious we were to have the very best one of our number for president, and to choose wisely the lookout committee and the prayer- meeting committee! For a whole week we had been thinking just whom we would choose. The neatest and most careful writer wa~ chosen secretary, the best singers were placed on the music committee, those whose mothers have beautiful gardens were placed on the flower committee; five of the very cheeriest of all these cheerful boys and girls make up the sunshine committee. Perhaps these children do not yet understand clearly the duties of the various officers, but the organiza- tion means something to them, and they are very careful not to do things unworthy of Christian Endeavorers. This society is the outgrowth of the Wednesday morning prayer- meeting. The meeting this morning was unusually interesting. Our topic, For what are you thankful? we took from the GOLDEN RULE. We did find many things to be thankful for, so many, in fact, that the privileges we do not enjoy seemed to sink into insignificance. Do you think you would be thankful if you had to share a home no larger than a small bedroom with eleven or twelve brothers and sisters? Could you give thanks if you had only one suit of clothes and that very ragged; or if you had to walk four or five miles to school and carry

C. E. L. L., C. E. Christian Endeavor in the Black Belt Bureau of Woman's Work 173-174

BUREA U OF WOMANS WORK 73 about to start for the preaching place, as Yong Kay gathered us about him and said: We will have a short prayer. He went in the strength of the Lord, and he will doubtless come again, bringing his sheaves with him. Mrs. Davis, our teacher at San Bernardino, writes likewise: We had a song and preaching service ,in Chinatown last Sabbath, and the effort was most gratifying. About forty Chinese gathered and listened with the utmost interest, as you could see by their very earnest faces and close attention. We plan to have these services regularly-if Gin Foo King can be continued with us. The longer I work with these people the more my heart goes out to them in their sad condition, out of Christ. Bureau of Womans Work. MISS D. E. EMERSON, SECRETARY. CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR IN THE BLACK BELT. BY c. E. L. One hundred and twenty-five happy black faces with eager eyes and glistening white teeth; one hundred and twenty-five little boys and girls marching into the schoolroom to go forth as Junior Endeavorers; thus began our society this morning. How anxious we were to have the very best one of our number for president, and to choose wisely the lookout committee and the prayer- meeting committee! For a whole week we had been thinking just whom we would choose. The neatest and most careful writer wa~ chosen secretary, the best singers were placed on the music committee, those whose mothers have beautiful gardens were placed on the flower committee; five of the very cheeriest of all these cheerful boys and girls make up the sunshine committee. Perhaps these children do not yet understand clearly the duties of the various officers, but the organiza- tion means something to them, and they are very careful not to do things unworthy of Christian Endeavorers. This society is the outgrowth of the Wednesday morning prayer- meeting. The meeting this morning was unusually interesting. Our topic, For what are you thankful? we took from the GOLDEN RULE. We did find many things to be thankful for, so many, in fact, that the privileges we do not enjoy seemed to sink into insignificance. Do you think you would be thankful if you had to share a home no larger than a small bedroom with eleven or twelve brothers and sisters? Could you give thanks if you had only one suit of clothes and that very ragged; or if you had to walk four or five miles to school and carry 74 WOMANS STATE ORGANIZATIONS. your pockets full of sweet potatoes to roast in the ashes for your dinner? Yet we can thank God for health and sunshine and flowers and school and Junior Endeavor meetings. Indeed, I cannot remember all the things we did thank Him for this morning. One thing I do remember; we thanked Him for our voices and the many beautiful hymns we have learned to sing. Oh, how we do ping It seems as if we should almost raise the roof sometimes with our old favorites, He Arose and The Old Ship of Zion. We have had some very cold mornings. One day Sandy said, Please, maam, do they send shoes? cause I has far to come. I needs ebery ting, but I wants dem shoes. Poor little boy, he does indeed need ebery ting. And there are many others that would fare very badly were it not for the barrels. There are more than four hundred boys and girls in this school. I think the heartfelt thanks of these people will call down showers of blessings on the friends that have provided this school and have been so prompt in supplying our needs. WOMANS STATE ORGANIZATIONS. MAINE. WOMANS AID TO A. M. A. Stale CommitteeMrs. Ida Vose Woodhury, Woodfords; Mrs. A. T. Burbank, Yarmouth; Mrs. Helen Quimby. Bangor. NEW HAMPSHIRE. FEMALE CENT INSTITUTION AND HOME Miss. UNION. PresidentMrs. Cyrus Sargeant, Plymouth. SecretaryMrs. John T. Perry, Exeter. TreasurerMiss Annie A. McFarland, Concord. VERMONT. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. J. H. Babbitt, W. urattleboro. SecretaryMrs. M. K. Paine, Windsor. TreasurerMrs. Win. P. Fairbanks, St. Johns- bury. MASS AND R. I. * WOMANS HOME MIsSIoNANY ASSOCIATION. PresidentMrs. C. L. Goodell, Boston Highlands, Mass. SecretaryMrs. Louise A. Kellogg, 32 Congre- gational House, Boston. TreasurerMiss Annie C. Bridgman, 32 Congre- gational House, Boston. CONNECTICUT. WOMANS HOME MIssIoNAEx- UNION. PresidentMiss Ellen R. Camp, 9 Camp St., New Britain. SecretaryMrs. C. T. Millard, 36 Lewis St., Hartford. TreasurerMrs. W. W. Jacobs, 59 Spring St., Hartford. NEW YORK. WOMANS HOME MISSIONANY UNION. PresidentMrs Win. Kincaid, 483 Green Ave., Brooklyn. SecretaryMrs. Win. Spalding, ~us Orange St., Syracuse. TreasurerMrs. J. J. Pearsall, 230 Macon St., Brooklyn. NEW JERSEY. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION OF TIlE N. J. ASSOCIATION. PresidentMrs. A. H. Bradford, Montclair. SecretaryMrs R. J. Hegoman, 32 Forest Street, Montclair TreasurerMrs. J. H. Dennison, 150 Belleville Ave., Newark. PENNSYLVANIA. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. A. H. Claflin, 274 Manhattan St., Allegheny. SecretaryMrs. C. F. Jennee, Ridgway. TreasurerMrs. T. W. Jones, 511 Woodland Terrace, Philadelphia. OHIO. WOMANS HOME MISSIONANY UNION. PresidentMrs. Sydney Strong, Lane Seminary Grounds, Cincinnati. SecretaryMrs. J. W. Moore, 836 Hough Ave., Cleveland. TreasurerMrs. G. B. Brown, 2116 Warren St., Toledo.

Woman's State Organizations Bureau of Woman's Work 174-176

74 WOMANS STATE ORGANIZATIONS. your pockets full of sweet potatoes to roast in the ashes for your dinner? Yet we can thank God for health and sunshine and flowers and school and Junior Endeavor meetings. Indeed, I cannot remember all the things we did thank Him for this morning. One thing I do remember; we thanked Him for our voices and the many beautiful hymns we have learned to sing. Oh, how we do ping It seems as if we should almost raise the roof sometimes with our old favorites, He Arose and The Old Ship of Zion. We have had some very cold mornings. One day Sandy said, Please, maam, do they send shoes? cause I has far to come. I needs ebery ting, but I wants dem shoes. Poor little boy, he does indeed need ebery ting. And there are many others that would fare very badly were it not for the barrels. There are more than four hundred boys and girls in this school. I think the heartfelt thanks of these people will call down showers of blessings on the friends that have provided this school and have been so prompt in supplying our needs. WOMANS STATE ORGANIZATIONS. MAINE. WOMANS AID TO A. M. A. Stale CommitteeMrs. Ida Vose Woodhury, Woodfords; Mrs. A. T. Burbank, Yarmouth; Mrs. Helen Quimby. Bangor. NEW HAMPSHIRE. FEMALE CENT INSTITUTION AND HOME Miss. UNION. PresidentMrs. Cyrus Sargeant, Plymouth. SecretaryMrs. John T. Perry, Exeter. TreasurerMiss Annie A. McFarland, Concord. VERMONT. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. J. H. Babbitt, W. urattleboro. SecretaryMrs. M. K. Paine, Windsor. TreasurerMrs. Win. P. Fairbanks, St. Johns- bury. MASS AND R. I. * WOMANS HOME MIsSIoNANY ASSOCIATION. PresidentMrs. C. L. Goodell, Boston Highlands, Mass. SecretaryMrs. Louise A. Kellogg, 32 Congre- gational House, Boston. TreasurerMiss Annie C. Bridgman, 32 Congre- gational House, Boston. CONNECTICUT. WOMANS HOME MIssIoNAEx- UNION. PresidentMiss Ellen R. Camp, 9 Camp St., New Britain. SecretaryMrs. C. T. Millard, 36 Lewis St., Hartford. TreasurerMrs. W. W. Jacobs, 59 Spring St., Hartford. NEW YORK. WOMANS HOME MISSIONANY UNION. PresidentMrs Win. Kincaid, 483 Green Ave., Brooklyn. SecretaryMrs. Win. Spalding, ~us Orange St., Syracuse. TreasurerMrs. J. J. Pearsall, 230 Macon St., Brooklyn. NEW JERSEY. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION OF TIlE N. J. ASSOCIATION. PresidentMrs. A. H. Bradford, Montclair. SecretaryMrs R. J. Hegoman, 32 Forest Street, Montclair TreasurerMrs. J. H. Dennison, 150 Belleville Ave., Newark. PENNSYLVANIA. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. A. H. Claflin, 274 Manhattan St., Allegheny. SecretaryMrs. C. F. Jennee, Ridgway. TreasurerMrs. T. W. Jones, 511 Woodland Terrace, Philadelphia. OHIO. WOMANS HOME MISSIONANY UNION. PresidentMrs. Sydney Strong, Lane Seminary Grounds, Cincinnati. SecretaryMrs. J. W. Moore, 836 Hough Ave., Cleveland. TreasurerMrs. G. B. Brown, 2116 Warren St., Toledo. WOMANS STATE ORGANIZATIONS. 175 INDIANA, WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. W. A. Bell, 221 Chrisitan Ave., Indianapolis. SecretaryMrs. W. F. Mossman, Fort Wayne. TreasurerMrs. F. E. Dewhurst, 28 Christian Ave., Indianapolis. ILLINOIS. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. Isaac Claflin, Lombard. SecretaryMrs. C. H. Taintor, 151 Washington St., Chicago. TreasurerMrs. L. A. Field, Wilmette. IOWA. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNioN. PresidentMrs. T. 0. Douglass, Grinnell. SecretaryMrs. H. H. Robbins, Grinnell. TreasurerMiss Belle L. Bentley, 300 Court Ave. Des Moines. MICHIGAN. WOMANS Hosia MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. George M. Lane, 179 West Alex- andrine Aye, Detroit. SecretaryMrs. J. H. Hatfield, 301 Elm Street, Kalamazoo. TreasurerMrs. E. F. Grabill, Greenville. WISCONSIN. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. E. G. Updike, Madison. SecretaryMrs. A. 0. Wright, Madison. TreasurerMrs. C. M. Blackman, Whitewater. MINNESOTA. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMiss Katherine W. Nichols, 230 East Ninth Street, St Paul. SecretaryMrs. A P. Lyon, 17 Florence Court, S. E., Minneapolis. TreasurerMrs. M. W. Skinner, Northfield. NORTH DAKOTA. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. W. P. Cleveland, Caledonia. SecretaryMrs. Silas Daggett~Harwood. TreasurerMrs. 3. M. Fisher, Fargo. SOUTH DAKOTA. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. A. H. Robbins, Bowdle. SecretaryMrs. W. H. Thrall, Huron. TreasurerMrs. F. H. Wilcox, Huron. BLACK HILLS, SOUTH DAKOTA. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. 3. B. Gossage, Rapid City. SecretaryMrs. H. H. Gilchrist, Hot Springs. TreasurerMiss Grace Lyman, Hot Springs. NEBRASKA. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. 3. T. Duryea, 2402 Cass Street, Omaha. SecretaryMrs. S. C. Dean, 636 315t Street, Omaha. TreasurerMrs. G. J. Powell, 3oth and Ohio Streets, Omaha. MONTANA. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. 0. C. Clark, Missoula. SecretaryMrs. W. S. Bell, 410 Dearborn Ave. Helena. TreasurerMrs. Herbert E. Jones, Livingston. MISSOURI. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. Henry Hopkins, 916 Holmes Street, Kansas City. SecretaryMrs. E. C. Ellis, 2456 Tracy Ave., Kansas City,. TreasurerMrs. K. L. Mills, 1526 Wabash Ave., Kansas City. KANSAS. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. F. E. Storrs, Topeka. SecretaryMrs. George L. Epps, Topeka. TreasurerMrs. D. D. DeLong, Arkansas City. OREGON. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. John Summerville, 101 Second Street, Portland. SecretaryMrs. George Brownell, Oregon City. TreasurerMrs. W. D. Palmer, 546 Third Street, Portland. WASHINGTON. WOMANS MISSIONARY AssocIATIoN. PresidentMrs. A. 3. Bailey, 323 Blanchard Street, Seattle. SecretaryMrs. W. C. Wheeler, 424 South K Street, Tacoma. TreasurerMrs. J. XV. George, 620 Fourth Street, Seattle. CALIFORNIA. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. PresidentMrs. E. S. Williams, 572 12th Street, Oakland. SecretaryMrs. L. M. Howard, 911 Grove Street, Oakland. TreasurerMrs. J. M. Havens, 1329 Harrison Street, Oakland. SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. W. J. Washburn, 510 Downey Ave., Los Angeles. SecretaryMrs. P. 3. Colcord, Claremont. TreasurerMrs. Mary M. Smith, Public Library, Riverside. NEVADA. WOMANS MIssIoNARY UNION. PresidentMrs. L. J. Flint, Reno. SecretaryMiss Margaret N. Magill, Reno. TreasurerMiss Mary Clow, Reno. INDIAN TERRITORY. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. John McCarthy, Vinita. SecretaryMrs. Fayette Hurd, Vinita. TreasurerMrs. R. M. Swain, Vinita. NEW MEXICO. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. C. F. Winslow, Albuquerque. SecretaryMrs. F. W. Lewis, 301 So. Edith Street, Albuquerque. TreasurerMrs. H. W. Bullock, Albuquerque. 176 RECEIPTS. MISSISSIPPI. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. C. L. Harris, 5425 3ISt Avenue, Meridian. SecretaryMrs. Edith M. Hall, Tougaloo Univ., Tougaloo. Treasurer-Mrs. L. H. Turner, 3052 12th Street, Meridian. LOUISIANA. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMiss Bella W. Home, corner Gasquet and Liberty Streets, New Orleans. SecretaryMrs. Matilda Cabrisre, New Orleans. TreasurerMrs. C. H. Crawford, Hammond. ALABAMA. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. G. W. Andrews, Talladega. SecretaryMrs 3. 5. Jackson, Montgomery. TreasurerMrs E. C. Silaby, Talladega. FLORIDA. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. S. F. Gale, Jacksonville. SecretaryMrs Nathan Barrows, Winter Park. TreasurerMrs W. D. Brown, Interlachen. TENNESSEE, KENTUCKY AND ARKANSAS. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION OF THE TENNESSEE ASSocIATION PresidentMrs. G. W. Moore, Box 8, Fisk Univ., Nashville. SecretaryMrs. Jos. E. Smith, 304 Gilmer Street, Chattanooga. TreasurerMrs. 3. E. Moreland, 256 N. McNairy Street, Nashville. COLORADO. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. B. C. Valentine, Highlands. SecretaryMrs. Chas. Westley, Box 508, Denver. TreasurerMrs. Horace Sanderson, 1710 s6th Ave., Denver. WYOMING. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. G. S. Ricker, Cheyenne. SecretaryMrs. W. C. Whipple, Cheyenne. TreasurerMrs. H. N. Smith, Rock Springs. OKLAHOMA. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs 3. H. Parker, Kingfisher. SecretaryMrs. L. E. Kimball, Guthrie. TreasurerMrs. L S. Childs, Choctaw City. UTAH (Including Southern Idaho). WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. Clarence T. Brown, Salt Lake City, Utah. SecretaryMrs. W. S. Hawkes, 135 Sixth Street, E., Salt Lake City, Utah, TreasurcrMrs. Dana xv. Bartlett, Salt Lake City, Utah. Secretary for idahoMrs. Oscar Sonnenkaib, Pocatello, Idaho. NORTH CAROLINA. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. 3. W. Freeman, Dudley. Secretary and TreasurerMiss A. E. Farrington, High Point. TEXAS. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. 3. M. Wendelkin, Dallas. SecretaryMrs. H. Burt, Lock Box 563, Dallas. TreasurerMrs. C. I. Scofield, Dallas. GEORGIA. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. H. B. Wey, 253 Forest Avenue Atlanta. SecretaryMrs H. A. Kellam, Atlanta. TreasurerMiss Virginia Holmes, l3arnesville. *For the purpose of exact information we note that, while the W. H. M. A appears in this list as a State body for Mass, and R. I., it has certain auxiliaries elsewhere. RECEIPTS FOR MARCH, 1895. THJ$ DANIJ$L HAND FUND For the .7$ducation of Colored People. Income for March $38 79 Previously acknowledged 22,519 85 $22,558 64 CURRENT RECEIPTS. MAINE, $319.52. Alfred. Ladies Missionary Circle, by Emeline L. Jordan,for Pleasant Hill, Tenn Auburn. Sixth St. Cong. Ch., 12.50; Miss L. E. WASHBURN, ~ hal. to const. herself L. M Bucksport. Sab. Sch., Cong. Ch., for Pleasant Hill Acad., Tenn 8 oo Camden. Elm St. Cong. Ch i8 oo Cornish. Cong. Ch 5 oo so 00 Eastport. Miss A. Bibbers S. S. Class, for Student Aid, Dorchester A cad.1 Tenn a oo 55 83 Fairfield. Y. P. 5. C. E., by Miss B.

Receipts for March, 1895 176-184

176 RECEIPTS. MISSISSIPPI. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. C. L. Harris, 5425 3ISt Avenue, Meridian. SecretaryMrs. Edith M. Hall, Tougaloo Univ., Tougaloo. Treasurer-Mrs. L. H. Turner, 3052 12th Street, Meridian. LOUISIANA. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMiss Bella W. Home, corner Gasquet and Liberty Streets, New Orleans. SecretaryMrs. Matilda Cabrisre, New Orleans. TreasurerMrs. C. H. Crawford, Hammond. ALABAMA. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. G. W. Andrews, Talladega. SecretaryMrs 3. 5. Jackson, Montgomery. TreasurerMrs E. C. Silaby, Talladega. FLORIDA. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. S. F. Gale, Jacksonville. SecretaryMrs Nathan Barrows, Winter Park. TreasurerMrs W. D. Brown, Interlachen. TENNESSEE, KENTUCKY AND ARKANSAS. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION OF THE TENNESSEE ASSocIATION PresidentMrs. G. W. Moore, Box 8, Fisk Univ., Nashville. SecretaryMrs. Jos. E. Smith, 304 Gilmer Street, Chattanooga. TreasurerMrs. 3. E. Moreland, 256 N. McNairy Street, Nashville. COLORADO. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. B. C. Valentine, Highlands. SecretaryMrs. Chas. Westley, Box 508, Denver. TreasurerMrs. Horace Sanderson, 1710 s6th Ave., Denver. WYOMING. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. G. S. Ricker, Cheyenne. SecretaryMrs. W. C. Whipple, Cheyenne. TreasurerMrs. H. N. Smith, Rock Springs. OKLAHOMA. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs 3. H. Parker, Kingfisher. SecretaryMrs. L. E. Kimball, Guthrie. TreasurerMrs. L S. Childs, Choctaw City. UTAH (Including Southern Idaho). WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. Clarence T. Brown, Salt Lake City, Utah. SecretaryMrs. W. S. Hawkes, 135 Sixth Street, E., Salt Lake City, Utah, TreasurcrMrs. Dana xv. Bartlett, Salt Lake City, Utah. Secretary for idahoMrs. Oscar Sonnenkaib, Pocatello, Idaho. NORTH CAROLINA. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. 3. W. Freeman, Dudley. Secretary and TreasurerMiss A. E. Farrington, High Point. TEXAS. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. 3. M. Wendelkin, Dallas. SecretaryMrs. H. Burt, Lock Box 563, Dallas. TreasurerMrs. C. I. Scofield, Dallas. GEORGIA. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. H. B. Wey, 253 Forest Avenue Atlanta. SecretaryMrs H. A. Kellam, Atlanta. TreasurerMiss Virginia Holmes, l3arnesville. *For the purpose of exact information we note that, while the W. H. M. A appears in this list as a State body for Mass, and R. I., it has certain auxiliaries elsewhere. RECEIPTS FOR MARCH, 1895. THJ$ DANIJ$L HAND FUND For the .7$ducation of Colored People. Income for March $38 79 Previously acknowledged 22,519 85 $22,558 64 CURRENT RECEIPTS. MAINE, $319.52. Alfred. Ladies Missionary Circle, by Emeline L. Jordan,for Pleasant Hill, Tenn Auburn. Sixth St. Cong. Ch., 12.50; Miss L. E. WASHBURN, ~ hal. to const. herself L. M Bucksport. Sab. Sch., Cong. Ch., for Pleasant Hill Acad., Tenn 8 oo Camden. Elm St. Cong. Ch i8 oo Cornish. Cong. Ch 5 oo so 00 Eastport. Miss A. Bibbers S. S. Class, for Student Aid, Dorchester A cad.1 Tenn a oo 55 83 Fairfield. Y. P. 5. C. E., by Miss B. RECEIPTS. Paul, for Student Aid, Skyland Inst., N.C 500 Farmington. First Cong. Ch., 20.43; A Friend, i.5o 21 93 Farmington. A Friend,for Thunder- hawk Al in on Garland. Cong. Ch. and Soc 50 Hampden. Cong. Cli 4 00 Harpswell Center. Cong. Ch 6 00 Lamoine. Mrs. F. L. Hodgkins,for Stu- dent Aid, Dorchester Aced 4 00 Limerick. Miss E. P. Hayes, Pkg. C., for Sky/and [nst., N. C. Machias Sab. Sch., Centre St. Cong. Ch.. 20 Minot Centre. Cong. Cli. (of which 14.22 hal. to const. Miss L. E. WASHBURN, L.M) 2500 New Vineyard. Cong. Ch 3 05 Portland. Primary S. S. Class, St. Law. St. Cong. Cli. for Student A Id, Gregory Inst 2 86 Rockland. Cong. Ch., W. M. Soc., 2o; Y.P.S.E.,~, for Student Aid, Talla- dega C 25 00 Rockland. Y.P.S.C.E.,byMissA.M. Moffitt, for Student Aid, Blowing Rock, N. C 5 00 Skowliegan. Island Av. Cong. Cli i~ Searsport. Mrs. James Pendleton, for Student Aid, Dorchester Acad 00 Strong. Cong. Cli 5 23 Westlirook. Cong. Cli 32 27 Westlirook. Esther Jones, for Student Aid, Talladega C I 00 York. Second Cong. Cli 4 50 Maine Womans Aid to A. M. A., hy Mrs. Ida V. Woodhury, Treas. for Woman s Work. Bethel. Cli 25 00 South Berwick. A Friend ~o 00 Woodfords. L. M. S 7 25 A Friend. Thank Offering 2 00 NEW HAMPSHIRE, $527.28. Alstead. Third Cong. Cli Alton. Cong. Cli., Stereopticon Lecture, for Mountain Work Amherst. L. F. B. Amherst. Cong. Cli., adi Berlin. Cong. Cli Bethlehem. Cong. Cli., 2.55; C. E. Soc. of Cong. Cli., 3.76 Campton. Cong. Ch.,for Alaska M.... Colebrook. Y. P. 5. C. E., hy John A. Hodge, Pres East Barrington. Cong. Cli., Stereopticon Lecture,for Mountain Work East Derry. Cong. Cli. (Special), 7.5o; Cong. Cli., L. M. S.~ 2 Bhls. C., br Wilmington, N. C Epping. Cong. Cli Exeter. Second Cong. Cli Hanover. Mary A. Fletcher, for I-Los- ~3ital, Fort Yates, N. D Hanover Centre. A Friend,for Glou- cester Sch., Gaj5~~ahosic, Va Hooksett. Cong. Cli Keene. Mrs. H. J. Buckminster,for Stu- dent Aid, Gregory Inst Langdon. Cong. Cli Meriden. First Cong. Cli., 25 copies Gospel Hymn Books, for Skyland Inst., N. C. Milton. Cong. Cli., Stereopticon Lec- turefor Mountain Work New Ipswich. Sali. Sch., Cong. Cli New Market. Thomas H. Wiswall North Ham p ton. Cong. Cli Walpole. Cong. Cli. and Soc Wiodham. Horace Berry New Hampshire Female Cent. Inst. and Home Missionary Union, by Miss 74 25 20 00 3 Is 270 00 29 15 6 32 6 30 2 73 7 50 in 6o 125 00 7 00 5 00 25 50 2 00 4 6o 3 36 20 00 20 00 27 00 27 oS 2 00 Annie McFarland, Treas. for Womans Work. Exeter. Legacy iu part, Miss Elizaheth A. Chad wick 40 00 Concord. Mrs. Alice M. Nims S. S. Class, South Cli 200 VERMONT, $504.46. Barton. W. H. M. S., Blil. C., for Mc- Intosh, Ga Benson. Cong. Cli Burlington. Class in College St. Sub. Seli. for ,nqintenance ofan Indian and Ne ro Boy, ii ea Burlington. First Cli., from Tithe... Camliridge. W. H. M. S., by Mrs. L. E. Wheelock, Blil. C , Freight ~,for Mc- Intosh, Ga Dorset. Cong. Cli Georgia. Cong. Cli. and Soc Guildhall. Cong. Cli Hartland Two Classes, Cong. Sali. Seli., hy Mrs. John P. Webster Huhhardton. V. P. 5. C. E., by Miss M. I. St. John, Cor. Sec Jericho. Second Cong. Cli. and Soc Lowell. Cong. Cli Middlebury. Mrs. S. S. Shattuck Milton. Cong. Cli. and Soc Montpelier. Bethany Cong. Cli Newport. S. S. Tinkham, s; M. B. Hall, 2 Newport. Ladies Aux., Blil. C. ,for Mc- Intosh, Ga. North Bennington. Cong. Cli. (of which 25.88 hal. to coost. PERcEY HALL JRN- RINGS WILLIAM CARROLL HALL CUSH- MAN and NORMAN JULIUS SHRLOON L.Ms North Craftsbury. Miss. Soc., Bhl. C., Freight i,for McIntosh, Ga Nortlifleld. Cong. Cli. and Soc., adi.... Norwich. Mrs. B. B. Newton Peacham. Cong. Cli. Rochester. Mrs. L. E. Martinfor Stu- dent Aid, Gregory Inst Rutland. Sub. Seli., Cong. Cli. for Stu- dent Aid Fisk U Rutland, H. M. Soc. of Cong. Cli., Bhl. Bedding, etc., for Tougaloo U. South Duxhury. Cong. Cli Stockliridge. Rev. T. S. Hubliard WallingfolO. Senior and Junior C. E. and Friends,for Pleasant Hill Acad., Tenn Washington Co. A Friend West Charleston. Chas. Carpenter, for Student A id, Gregory inst West Fairlee. E. G. May, for Indian Sch., Fort Berthold, N. D Westfield. Cong. Cli. (i of which from Lella A. Farman for Colored Work), ~ V. P. 5. C. E. of Cong. Cli., 6.03.. Westminster, West. Blil. C for McIn- tosh, Ga. Weston. Mrs. C. W. Sprague Williamstown. Cong. Cli Williston. Cong. Cli Windliam. Sab. Seli., Cong. Cli 177 42 00 6 in 22 00 6o 7 00 5 22 9 50 2 75 5 39 4 00 ~ n6 6 50 7 00 45 88 29 31 5 00 28 70 25 00 3 00 5 39 20 00 5 00 II 38 2 00 10 50 8 95 7 23 $304 46 RSTATR. Derby. Estate of 0. B. Hamilton, E. A. Stewart, Admr 200 00 $504 46 MASSACHUSETTS, $4,948.32. Amherst. Amherst College Cli., by W. E. Esty, Treas 247 36 Amherst. Colored Bible Class, Blil. C., for Wilmington, N. C. Andover. Miss Grace M. Whittemore, for Pleasant Hill Acad., Teun 8 on 178 Andover. West Cong. Ch., Osgood Dist. Arlington. Mrs. E. S. Hillard,for Stu- dent Aid, Dorchester A cad., ~ Friends, by Mrs L. E. Wheelock, Bbl. C.,for Mcintosh, Ga Ashby. Ortho Cong. Ch Ashfield. Henry Taylor, 5; Cong. Ch., 2 Auburodale. Cong. Y. P. S. C. E. for C. F. 1-Jail, Mcintosh, Ga Bedford. Miss Emily Davis, for Studcnt Aid, Gregory Inst . -. Beichertown. Cong. Ch., to const. MAR- TIN W. BARDWRLL L. M Beechwood. Rev. John Sharp Billerica. Mrs. H. B. Stanton Boston. Union Cong. Ch 373 64 Old South Ch. in part 255 90 Mrs. Charlotte Fiske, for Lamson Sch., Marshall yule, Ga.... ....... 50 00 William Shaw 25 00 Maverick Cong. Ch 32 66 Berkeley Temple 12 00 Z. A. Norrisfor Mountain U7orh . . . i~ on Friends in Central Ch., for Indian Sch., Qahe, So. Dah 6 00 Central Ch., Dbl. C.. for Nat, Ala. Phillips Ch., 2isterhood of Service, Bbl. reading matter, for Lincoln Acad., Kings Moe tam, N. C. Allston. Sab. Sch., Cong. Cli. 7 44 Brighton. Two Friends in Cong. Ch., s; Ladies Aux.,i,forlndianM... 200 Dorchester. Second Cong. Ch., by Mrs. Win. Wales, ~o; to const. Miss MARY ALICE LITTLR L. M., and ifor Hos.~z5ital, Fort Yates, N.D 3100 Mrs. Jacob Fullerton, for Hosj5ital, Fort Yates, N.D 2500 Mrs. E. Torrey, io; Miss E. Tolman, 8, for Pleasant HulA cad., Teen i8 00 Central Cong. Ch 10 40 Extra Cent a Day Band. Second Cong. Ch. for In- dian M 20 00 West Roxhury. Mrs. N. S. French for Student Aid, 4; Freight, i . s 00 Braintree. First Cong. Ch Brockton. Thomas A. Baxendale, br Student A Id, Wilmington, N. C Cambridge. Rev. J. Henry Thayer, D.D.,for Student A id, Talladega C... Cambridge. Helping Hand Soc., Kings Daughters, for Pleasant Hill Acad., Tenn Cambridge. Shepherd Mem. Ch., Rev. L. S. Parkers Bible Class,for Nat, Ala. Cambridgeport. Prospect St., Ch (hatham. Cong. Ch Chelsea. Central Cong. Ch Chester Centre. Cong. Ch Cohasset. Mrs. A. Williams, Jr. for In- dian M., Fort Yates, N. D .. Dalton. W. M. Cranefor Student A id, Tougaloo U Dedham. Sab. Sch., First Cong. Cb East Charlemont. Cong. Ch East Douglas. Dea. Luther Hill Enfield. Cong. Ch Fall River. V P.S. C. E. of Central Ch., for Student Aid, Fish U Farmington. A Friend, for Indian Sch/i Fitchburg. C. S. Tolman (8 of whichfr RECEIPTS. 4 00 5 00 24 20 7 00 32 35 36 43 8 00 873 04 4 8x 25 00 8 00 5 00 io8 26 29 55 4 59 5 00 200 00 15 00 8 48 25 00 25 00 27 50 Wilmington, N. C ) Foxhoro. Beth. Ortho. Cong. Ch Greenfield. Mrs. Ellen M. Russeli Greenwich. Cong. Ch Groton. A Friend, i~, for Zodiac io for Mountain Worh, 5 tar California Chinese M., and to coust. WILLIAM HENIIY HUNT L. M Groton. Cong. Ch. Senior Y. P. 5. C. E., io; Junior Y P. 5. C. E., /or Central Ch., New Orleans, La Harvard. Rev. C. C. Torrey Holyoke. Second Cong. Ch., Ladies Prayer Circle for Central Ch., Nelo Orleans, Lu.. and to const. MRS. C. V. HeiR L. M Hopkinton. Mrs. Mary E. Putnam, Bhl. C.,for Selina, Ala. Housantonic. Primary Sab. Sch. Class, for Student Aid, Dorchester Acad. Hyde Park. First Cong. Ch Indian Orchard. Christian Endeavor Soc., by Geo. G. Bass, Treas Lancaster A Friend, for Student Aid, Gregory Inst... .t Linden. V. P. 5. C. E. of Cong. Ch Lowell. A Friend,for Student Aid, Evarts, Ky Lowell. First Cong. Ch., ~ A K., 2. Lynn. Mrs. M. C. Bean Maiden. Miss M. F. Aiken Maplewood. Primary S. S. Class, for Student Aid, Gre~ory Inst Marlborough. Union Cong. Ch. and Soc . .. . Medway. Bbl. of C.,f~r Nat, Ala Meirose. Ortho. Cong. Ch Meirose. Altruist, for Indian Sch.. Qahe, So. D h . Meirose Highlands. Cong. Ch Mount Hermon. Miss. Soc. Mt. Hermon Sch. for Student A id, Fish U Newton Highlands. A Friend, for Tougalno U North Andover. Christian End. Soc..... North Beverly. V. P. 5. C. E. of Second Cong. Ch.,far Alasha M North Rochester. Cong. Ch Norton. Trio. Cong. Ch Norwich. Ladies Soc., by Mrs. H. Cook, Bbl. C.,for Shyland Inst.. N. C. Oakham. Dna. Packard, 8; Mrs. M. S. F. Rugg, 8, for Pleasant Hill Acad, Tenn Oxford. Mrs. B. F. Whitefor Freight. Peabody. H. M. S., for Marshall- yule, Ga. Phillipston. Mary P. Estey, Memorial Daniel Parker, s and i,for Indian M. Pittsfield. Mrs. Mary E. Sears, Thank offering Randolph. Ladies Benev. Assn, by Mrs. M. J. Graham Reading. Cong. Ch.... Reading. V. P. 5. C. E., Cong. Ch. for Central Ch., New Orleans, La Rockville. Cong. Ch., Miss M. E. Jones, for Student Aid, Gregory Inst Salem. Tabernacle Ch., and Soc. (2 of which for Indian M.) Saugus. A Kings Daughter, Touga- lao U Shelburne Falls. Cong. Ch., Stereopticon Lecture Springfield. V. P. 5. C. E., South Ch., for Central Ch., New Orleans, La Springfield. Mrs. E. W. Southworth,for Gloucester Sch., Cat/ahosic, Va Springfield. Mission Reserves, by Mrs. B. F. Thompson,for Student Aid, Blowing Roch, N. C South Amherst. Sab. Sch., Cong. Ch. Southbridge. Ladies Social Circle Cong. Ch., 21; Joy. Dept. Cong. Sab. Sch., Birthday offerings, ~ E. S. Swift, 2,for Student Aid, Talladega C... i8 00 26 32 50 00 6 00 30 00 15 00 5 00 30 00 82 22 72 - 36 30 50 I 38 25 00 7 00 5 00 5 00 75 00 84 78 40 62 25 00 s 3 6~ 3 00 4 84 26 00 8 00 6 00 5 00 25 00 15 00 5 00 140 42 5 00 8 45 25 00 15 00 14 00 5 67 28 on RECEiPTS. South Framingham. Cong. Ch., by Mrs. F. E. Emrick, Bbl. C., for Skyland Inst. MG. South Hadley. A Friend in Mt. Holyoke College South Hadley Falls. G Somerville. Broadway Cong. Ch South Natick. John Eliot, V. P. 5. C. F., for C. E. Hell, Mcintosh, Ga Springfield. Sab. Sch. Children, 2 Bbls., Sundries, for S. S. Children, Thila- dega, Ala. Sterling. Cong. Ch Taunton. V. P. 5. C. E., of Winslow Ch. Waltham. Miss Hope Foster, i, and Box Sundries, for Student A id, Gregory Inst Ware. :~ j~~; p ~j~y~ j ~ Gregory Inst Ware. Junior C. E., 5, for Buggy, and Bbl. C.,for McIntosh, Ga Ware. Miss Sagefor Meridian, Miss... Ware. Rev. L. E. Rivard Westhoro. A Servant Westhoro. Miss Amelia Harrington, 2 and Pkg. Papers, for Student A id, Gregory Inst West Boylaton. Cong. Ch Westfield. Primary S. S. Class, Second Cong. Ch. for Student A id, Gregory Inst West Hawley. V. P. 5. C. E., by Rev. A. G. Beebee West Medway. Second Cong. Ch., for Student Aid, Nat. Ala., Bbl. of C., for Nat, Ala., in West Newton. Dr. H. M. Paine Weston. By Mrs. E. M. Knox, for Glou- cester Selo., Caj5~3ahosic, Va Weymouth and Braintree. Union Cong. Ch Weymouth Heights. Bbl. of C.,for Nat, Ala. Weatminister. Westminster Williamsburg. Cong. Ch Wilmington. Cong. Ch Winchester. Miss C. C. Varney, ~ Two Ladies, i, for Student Aid, Gregory Inst Woburn. Intermediate Dept., Cong. Sab. Seb ,for Student Aid, Nat, Ala.. Worcester. Plymouth Cong. Ch., 37.42; Salem St. Ch., 36.42; Dr. Lamson Allen, Thank Offering, 20 Hampden Benevolent Association, by George R. Bond, Treas.: Chicopee. Second Ch ~5 95 East Longmeadow 20 23 Longmeadow 71 73 Ludlow. First Ch i~ no Southwick 2 00 Springfield. North Ch., hal. to const. EuwARo E. THAYER, CLINTON W. STEumNs, CHARLES H. RUST and CHARLES W. POLLNER L. Ms 8g i~ Springfield. Hope Ch., Special 27 52 Springfield. Emmanuel Ch. 4 no 50 00 23 20 6no 26 28 17 no 5 00 5 00 5 00 4 00 3no 5no 25 no 30 no 5no 4 3 3 no 8no 83 84 254 49 Womans Home Missionary Association of Mass. and R. I., Annie C. Bridgman, Treas. for Worn ns Work: W. H. M. A., for Salaries 338 47 Boston. Ladies Aux. Old South Ch. forAlash M 50 no Milton. Ladies Aux 25 28 Keene, N. H. Second Ch, Mrs. Dr. Bevoises S. S. Class 20 no 433 75 $3,448 35 179 ESTATES. Beverly. Estate of Harriet W. Smith, by F. H. Morgan, Admr 6oo 00 Boston. Estate of Frederick D. Allen, by Frederick B. Allen, B. Preston Clark and Eliho G. Loomis, Executors 400 00 Watertown. Estate of Jennette T. Kim- ball, by John E. Abbott 500 no $4,948 31 CLOTHING, BooEs, ETC., RECEIvEO AT BOSTON OFFICE: Cambridgeport, Mass. A Friend in Prospect St. Ch., Box S. S. Booksfor Tkornasville, Ga. Oxford, Mass. Mrs. B. F. White, Box Books. RHODE ISLAND, $95.70. Central Falls. Cong. Ch Providence. N. W. Williams, i~ North Cong. Ch., V. P. 5. C. E., 1.70 Providence. No. 4 Bell St., One large Humans Calendarfor Beach Inst., Ga. Slateraville. V. P. 5. C. E. of Cong. Ch.. Woonsocket. Globe Cong. Ch CONNECTICUT, $7090.25. Abington. V. P. 5. C. F., by Anna F. Bird, Sec., for Pleasant Hill Acad., Tenn Berlin. Member Second Cong. Ch Branford. H. G. Harrison.... Branford. Unknown Friend, Lowell, N. C Dranford. Cong. V. P. 5. C. E.,for Cen- traiCh., New Orleans, La Bridgeport. Lena J. Upson, for Student Aid, Tougaloo U Bridgeport. Mem. Mission Circle, First Cong. Ch., for Share, Pleasant Hill, Teun Bridgeport. Olivet Ch., Ladies M. Soc. Bristol. Sab. Sch., Cong. Ch Canaan. Pilgrim Cong. Ch Deep River. Middlesex Conference, by Rev. Win. H. Knouse East Hartford. Cong. Sab. Sch., Mrs. Kilbournes Class, for Central Ch., New Orleans, La East Lyme. Cong. Ch., ~ C. E. Soc., i.5o, by Rev. E. G. Stone. East Wallingford. Mrs. Benjamin Hall.. East Woodstock. Cong. Ch Enfield. Sab. Seb., Cong. Ch., for Stu- dent Aid, Tallidega C Farmington. First Cong. Ch Glastonbury. Sab. Sch., by S. H. Will- iams, for Student A Id, Blowing Rock, N. C Greenwich. Second Cong. Ch Hartford. J. B. Williams, for Student Aid, Tougaloo U Hartford. Pearl St. Cong. Ch. Sab. Sch., for Student Aid, Fisk U. Huntington. Cong. Ch Ivoryton. Mrs. J. E. Northrup,for Stu- dent Aid, Gregory Inst Jewett City. L. H. M. S., Bbl. C., for A. N. and L Inst., Thornaszille, Ga. Meriden. A Friend, s; Mrs. Merriam, s,for Tougaloo U Meriden. Members First Cong. Ch... Meriden. First Cong. Ch., I. H. N., for Mountain Work New Hartford. North Cong. Ch New Haven. Howard Av., V. P. 5. C. E., for Central Ch., New Orleans, La. New Haven. Dwight Place Ch., Bbl. C, for Nat, Ala. Norfolk. L. H. M. S., Box of C., for A. N. andL Inst., Thornasville, Ga. North Stamford. Junior and Senior C. E. Societies by Winifred Swinnerton. Sec 43 50 i6 70 3 00 28 50 5no 42 00 25 00 300 27 86 29 75 6 i~ 3 50 4 50 40 42 25 00 sis 67 50 no 36 20 8no 8 00 Ino 500 35 63 25 00 3 30 I So RECEIPTS. Norwich V. P. 5. C. B. of Second Cong. Ch., for Central Ch., New Orleans, La 52 00 Norwich. Broadway Sab. Sch. for mdl. Shol, Mcintosh, Ga so 00 Norwich. Sab. Sch., Second Cong. Ch., for Athens, Ala 6 5~ Norwich. Miss M. T. Norton, for Stu- dent Aid, Gregory Lost 8 00 Norwich. Ladies of Cong. Ch., by Mrs. E. R. Huntington 6 30 Norwich Town. A Friend in First Ch 100 oo Old Saybrook. Cong. Ch 41 46 Oxford. Cong. Ch II 70 Plainville. Cong. Ch., 32.33; Friends, 5 47 33 Plymouth. Mr. and Mrs. John M. Ward- well, for Student A id, Tougaloo U.... 40 00 Saybrook. Mrs. Geo. Dibble ... ... .. 5 00 Scitico. Mrs. C. E. Stone, S. S. Papers, for A. N. and I. Inst., Thonoasnille Ga. Sharon. First Cong. Ch 9 8s Somers. Sab. Seb. Class, for Wil;ning ton, N. C oo Sound Beach. Pilgrim Cong. Ch., Box Paperafor Talladega C. South Canaan. V. P. 5. C. E., by Miss Jennie D. Chase 4 ~c South Coventry. V. P. 5. C. E., by Mrs. A. K. Avery, Treas ~ South Glastonbury. Sab. Sch., Cong. Ch 6 ~6 Stamford. V. P. 5. C. E. of Cong. Ch.. forAlashaM 1035 Stonington. First Cong. Ch II 50 Suffield. First Cong. Ch., to coost. Miss HELEN V. MASON L. M 30 00 Terryville. Lois Gridley 00 Thomaston. First Cong. Ch ii 09 Tolland. Y. P. 5. C. E., by W. A. Agard 6 00 Warren. Cong. Ch 20 00 Waterbury. A Friend, sin; Second Watertown, 63.94 563 94 Sab. Sch., Cong. Ch.. 22; Primary Dept. of Cong. Sab. Sch., for Wilmi gton, N. C., 8 20 00 West Hartford. Two Friends 5 00 Westminster. Mrs. S. B. Carter 5 00 West Suffield. Cong. Ch .. .... s~ o6 West Torrington. Cong.Ch., L. M. S., Bbl. C., for Wilmington, N~ C. Wilton. Cong. Ch 20 00 Wiodham. Cong. Ch., and Soc ~ Winsted. David Strong, 3o; Other Friends. 7, for Thea. Student Aid, Talladega C 37 00 AFriend 2500 Womans Cong. Home Missionary Union of Conn., by Mrs. W. W. Jacobs, Tress., for Womans Work. Abington. R. F. A. Will iams lo Danbury. Young Ladies Mission Circle, West St. Ch 20 00 Enfield. Mrs. Horace Pat- ten, by L. B. Soc., to const. Mss. HENRY B. PATTEN L.M 3000 Higganum. L. H. M. Soc is 50 New Haven. United Ch, L. A. Soc., for Central Ch., New Orleans, La ~o 00 Norwich. Broadway Ch 250 00 Norwich. Park Ch., Aux 25 00 Norwich Town 17 83 Plainville. Aux 5 00 Stonington. Agreement Hill, H. M. S 20 00 Terryville. L. B. Soc ii 00 Trumbull. W. H. M. Union 25 00 Woodhury. First Ch. Aux. is xs 35253 $1,746 53 ESTATES. Cornwall. Estate of Silas C. Beers. by John C. Calhoun, Executor ..... 2,000 00 Norfolk. Estate of Mrs. Mary Langdon Porter, F. E. Porter, Ex 5,544 00 West Hartford. Estate Nancy S. Gay- lord, Francis H. Parker, Executor i,8oo 00 $7,090 23 NEW YORK, $2,188.96. Albany. First Cong. Ch 29 6i Albany. Cong. Ch., Bbl. C. ,for Skyland Inst. N. C. Bridgewater. Y. P. 5. C. E. of Cong. Ch.,for C. E. Hall, McIntosh, Ga 6 00 Bronxville. A Friend 200 Brooklyn. Church of the Pilgrims, 860.63; South Cong. Ch., 545.95; Roches ter Ave. Cong. Ch., 6.54 1,053 s~ Brooklyn. Miss Ellen Thurston, 25; Miss Grace D. Davis, i, for Gloucester Sch., Catpahosic, Va ... s6 00 Brooklyn. Mrs. B. M. Hodge,for Stu- dent Aid, Gregory Inst 50 00 Brooklyn. Clinton Ave., Young Ladies Guild, Box C. for Saluda, N. C. Brooklyn. Park Ch., ~ Bbls. C. for Big Creek Ga~zS, Tenn. Brooklyn. Evangel. Circle of Kings Daughters, Box and Bbl. C., for So- luda, N. C. Brooklyn. Plymouth Cong. Ch., Young Womens Guild, Bbl. Household Sup- pliesfor Lincoln Acad., Kings Moun- tam, N. C. Berkshire. A Friend, for Student Aid. Gregory Inst 00 Canaan Four Corners. Cong. Ch 6o Canandaigus. First Cong. Ch. ~8 i8 Clear Creek. Cong. Ch. Clifton Springs. Two ~ 3 25 Two Members Cong. Ch., Epping, N. H., io 20 00 Honcoyc. Cong. Ch 30 35 Kiantone. Lewis H. Cheney s 66 Lewis. Friends, for Talladega C.... ~ Lisle. Sab. Sch Cong. Ch., Bbl. C., Freight Paid,for McIntosh, Ga. Little Falls. Loomis Burrill, so; Miss A. Loomis, s,for Student Aid, A. N and L School, Thomasnille, Ga is 00 Little Valley. MRS. RACHEL CHAPMAN to const. herself, REV. EMILY C. Wooo- 50FF, WILLIAM HALL, Mss. B. WEiOMAN, DE HAET AMES, HENEY HELSH, Miss EMMA WILLIAMS, MES. bA EOMUNDS and MEs. A. W. ROBEETS L. Ms 350 00 Lynbrook. Junior C. B. Soc., 6.s~ V. P.S. C. E., 4, by Mrs. R. D. Jacques, for Student Aid, A. G. Sch., Moorhead, Miss 50 13 Maine. Womans Union of Cong Ch., Box of Bedding, etc., for Talladega C. Middle Island. Mrs. Hannah M Overton for Mountain Work 50 00 Morrisville. Cong. Ch s~ in New Haven. Willing Workers, Pkg. Flower Seeds, for Lincoln Acad., Kings Mt., N C. New Haven. Mrs. R. B. Johnson, Box of Sch. Apparatus, for Big Creek Gat, Tenn. New York. Bethany Sab. Sch., by W. R. Robinson, Tress., for Fort Berthold, Indian M 100 00 New York. Miss D. B. Emerson, for A. G. Sch., Moorhead, Miss. ... 25 00 New York. Samuel B. Schiefellin, Case of Books, for Talladega C. New York. REV. JOHN B. DEvINs to const. himself L. M., 3o; Puritan Ch., 54; Forest Av., Cong. Sab. Seb., 8.ss ... 52 52 North Walton. Misses Lucy and Alice Weed, for Student Aid, Dorchester Acesd 500 RECEIPTS. Nunda. Mrs. Mary Cosnett, proceeds sale of a beautiful silk quilt made by ber own bands for tbe Lords work Olean. W. H. M. S., Bbl. C., for Hills- boro, N. C. Oxford. Cong. Cb Perry Center. Bbl. C., Freigbt, s.96,for Tougaloo U Pbrunix. Sab. Scb., Cong. Cb., for Stu- dent A id, Tougaloo U Rocbester. Miss Clara .I. Janes Saratoga. C. M. Blodgett,for Indian M. Saratoga. Bbl. C., for Lincoln Acad., Kings Mt., N. C. Sberburne. Mrs. C. S. Gorton, 4.50; Miss Carrie Gorton, 50C., for Student A id, Talladga C Syracuse. E. W. Parmelee Syracuse. C. A. 1-lamlin, Bbl. Papers/or Beau/on, N. C.; DArs. C. A. Hamlin, Pkg. Literature, for Bench Inst., Ga. Syracuse. Pansy Circle, Kings Daugb- ters, Pkg. S. S. Papers, etc., for A. G. Sch. Moorhead, Mzss. Syracuse. Mrs. Spaulding, Box Papers and Books,for Big Creek Gag5, Tenn. Walton. First Cong. Cb Watertown. Cong. Cb. L.M.Soc., 2 Bbls. C. (including s doz. Napkins and 4 Table Clotbs), for Williamsburg A cad., Ky. Wellsville. First Cong. Cb West Bloomdeld. Cong. Cb Woodbaven. S. S. Class,for Saluda, N. C Woodside. Y. P. 5. C. E., by Fannie Jones, Sec Womens Home Missionary Union of N. V., by Mrs. 3. J. Pearsall, Treas., for Womans Work: Baiting Hollow. C. E 3 oo Buffalo. First Cb., H. M. 5 2500 New York. Broadway Tab. Cb. Soc., for Womans Work 50 00 Pougbkeepsie. L. H. M. 5 2500 25 00 i8 00 2 96 20 50 3 3 5 00 30 00 77 27 42 25 33 35 203 00 $2,138 96 ESTATE. Jefferson. Estate of Susanna Ruliffson in memory of Betsey Hubbard. by Mrs. C. Nicools 50 00 $2,288 96 NEW JERSEY, $527.50. Belvidere. Ladies Miss. Soc., Oxford Pres. Cb.,for Student A id, Tollodega C 300 East Orange. First Cong. Cb., 54.07; Sab. Scb. First Cong. Cb, 12.43 66 50 Elizabetb. Mission Band First Cong. Sab. Sch.,for Share, McIntosh, Ga.... io 00 Moorstown. J. W. Waltonfor Glouces- ter Sch., CaA,Sahosic, Va ~ 00 Newark. Beliville Ave. Cong. Cb., 40; C. S. Haines, 50 190 00 Newark. Frank Blancbard, for Student Aid, Tillotsos Inst 22 00 Orange. Mrs. Sarab Spottiswood 00 Orange Valley. Cong. Cb 66 00 Womans Home Missionary Union of tbe N. 3. Assn., by Mrs. J. H. Denison, Treas/or Womans Work: W.H.M.U 25000 Montclair. W. H. M. S., First Cong. Cb., for Stu- dent Aid, Talladega C.. 20 00 $170 00 PENNSYLVANIA, $86.90 Germantown. E. I. H. Howelifor Glou- cester Sch., CoAbohosic, Va Neatb. Cong. Cb Pbiladelpbia. Mrs. E. H. Farnum, 5o; Mrs. Win. H. Kimball, ~ E. F. Part- ridge, ~ A Friend, i; Miss M. Elsy, s/or Gloucester Sch , CohiA2hosic, Va. Pbiladelpbia. Mrs. M. V. Morris, io; Mrs. A. E. Baker, 8, for Student Aid, Gregory Inst OHIO, $642.67. Asbiand. 3. 0. Jennings Asbtabula. L. J. Deming, to coost. Lucius DEMING L. M Castalia. First Cong. (ib Cbester Cross Roads. Cong. Cb Cincinnati. Miss Pappenbeimer/or Stu- dent Aid, Tillotson Inst Clarksdeld. Cong. Cb Cleveland. Horace Ford, is; T. M. Bates, s/or Theo. Student A id, Tallo- dega C Cleveland. Pilgrim Cb., lot. C. E. ,for Santee Indian M Cleveland. Mrs. C. A. Garlick, for Warner Inst., Jonesboro, Tenn Cleveland. Miss (nra Bean, Box of Domestic Goods, for Albany, Ga. Coolville. Miss Margaret B. Bartlett... Cortland. First Cong. Cb East Liverpool. Rev. H. D. Kitchel Fredericksburg. Cong. Cb., Y. P. 5. C. E. Geneva. W. A. Hudson. Cong. Cb Jewell. T. B. Goddard Medina. Sab. Seb., Cong Cb., 23.30; Junior Endeavor Soc., i/or Mounta in Work Nortb Amberst. V. P. 5. C. E., 6.75; Junior Y. P. 5. E.,for Indian M., 2.... Oberlin. Second Cong. Cb., 46.40; Sab. Seb. First Cb., 5 Oberlin. Mrs. Geo. Clark and Friends, for Student Aid, Gregory Inst Oberlin. Mary Williams, Bbl. C., for Albany, Ga. Parkman. S. R. Dole, for Ballard Sek., Macon, Ga Rootstown. Lloyd Hinman Salem. Mrs. B. W. Allen Toledo. Central Cb., W. M. U., for Standing Rock, Indian M Wellington. Y. P. 5. C. E., by F. W. Andrus, Sec Wooster. Lizzie D. Mullins/or Teacher, Thund.erhawkM INDIANA, $i.oo. Butler. Mrs. Ida E. Hose ILLINOIS, $628.87. Alton. Mrs. I. D. Giliman, for Student A Id, Gregory Inst Anna. Cong.Cb Aurora. First Cong. Cb Bowmanville. Cong. Ch Champaign. Jr. C. E. Soc Chandlerville. Cong. Cb Chicago. First Cong. Ch., 250.73; South Cb., W. H. M. U., 39.83 Cbicago. Lincoln Park Cong. S. S., Mrs. Boyce, Class No. 8,/or New Hall, Til- lotson Inst Chicago. Mrs. Harriet Blake, for Stu- dent Aid, Gregory Inst Chicago. ,for Indian M Chicano. Cong. Ch., Jr. C. E.,Box Books and Papers, for Williamsburg Acad., Ky. Cobden. Sab. Scis., Birtbday Box, 2.25; Y.P.S. CE., 75c Elmwood. Cong. Cb Evanston. Mrs. J. H. Huribut 181 2 00 8 90 59 00 30 00 32 40 2 50 500 500 2 00 200 00 2 32 50 00 6 00 5 00 20 00 24 30 8 75 6s 40 22 00 500 25 00 400 20 00 2 00 20 00 4 44 52 57 290 53 800 500 700 500 182 Geneseo. Mrs. P. Huntington, for Stu- dent Aid, Gregory Inst Hamilton. Chas. Grubb Hinsdale. Sub. Sch. Cong. Ch., for Theo. Student Aid, Tailadega C La Grange. Y.P.S.C.E Malta. Cong. Ch Marshall. Cong. Ch Morris. Cong. Ch North Aurora. Sab. Sch., Schneider Oak Park. Mrs. E. J. Humphrey Peoria. Plymouth Cong. Ch Polo. Emma R. Parsons Rio. Cong. Ch Saint Charles. Cong. Ch Seward. Second Cong. Ch., 7.60; Sah. Sch., by Rohert H. Wright, Treas., 2.40. Shabhona. A Christian Endeavorer, for Aimeda Gardner Sch., Moor head, Miss .. Sterling. Sah. Sch., Cong. Ch Thawville. Cong. Ch Tolono. Mrs. L. Haskell, io; and for Vaidese M., i Tonica. C. E. Soc. of Cong. Ch Illinois Womans Home Missionary Union, Mrs. L. A. Field, Treas., for Womans Work; Chicago. New England W.M. S 1040 Jacksonville. W. M. 5 21 00 Moline. First. W. M. S i6 00 Ottawa. Jr. C. E ~ Pecatonica. V. P. 5. C. E 5 00 Poplar Grove. W. M. 5 6 65 Rockford. First Cong. Ch., W.M.S 2500 MICHIGAN, $272.21. Ann Arhor. First Cong. Ch .. . .. Cabinet. Cong. Ch Cabinet. Sab. Sch., Cong. Ch. for Thea. Student Aid, Taliadega C Churches Corners. J. F. Douglass, for Student Aid, Gregory Inst Corinth. Detroit. First Cong. Ch Young Ladies Union, i~ V. P. 5. C. E., I2~ for Stu- dent Aid, Santee Indian Sch Dorr. Cong. Ch., i~i, and Sab. Sch. 2.03 Maple City. Cong. Ch Olivet. Cong. Ch., Ladies Benny. Soc., for Student Aid, Taliadega C Olivet. Cong. Ch., Three S. S. Classes, for Lexington, Ky South Haven. Clark Pierce Womans Home Missionary Union of Michigan, hy Mrs. E. F. Grabill, Treas., for Womans Work. Armada. L. A. S 50 Benton Harhor. V. P. 5. C. E., for Student Aid, A. G. Sch., Moorhead, Miss. 6 00 Benzonia. V. P. 5. C. E., for Student Aid, San- tee, Neb., Pieasant Hiii, Tenn., and Moorhead, Miss 2 50 Detroit First. Ch., Wo- man a Assn 25 00 Detroit First Ch., Jun.. Soc. ,for Student A id, A. G. Sch., Moorhead, Miss ~ oo Grand Rapids. Park Ch., W.H.M.S 375 Greenville. V. L. M. S.,for Student Aid, Pleasant Hill, Tenn 5 00 Harrison. W. H. M. S 50 Hopkins Station. Helping Hand M. B.,for Student Aid, A. G. Sch., Moor- head, Miss 50 RECEIPTS. 3 00 500 75 00 3 00 4 50 8 io 500 25 00 8 02 3 75 3 00 4 12 3 45 400 9 39 31 00 37 50 2 42 24 00 i6 34 5 00 3 00 Metamora. W. H. M. 5... io 00 Three Oaks. W. H. M. S., for Student Aid, A. G. Sch., Moorhead, Miss.... 5 00 South Lake Linden. Wo- mans Assn, io,for Stu- dent Aid, Pleasant Hill, Tenn , and iofor Indian StudentAid, Sanice, Neb. 20 00 IOWA, $282.70. Alden. Mrs. L. R. Fitcb,for Work in South Caroiina Burlington. Cong. Ch Clay. Cong. Ch Davenport. Edwards Cong. Ch Des Moines. A Friend, for Stadent Aid, Gregory Inst Fairfield. Cong. V. P. 5. C. E., for Mc- Intosh, Ga Genoa Bluff. Cong. Ch Grandview. Cong. Ch., Ladies M. Soc Bbl. C. for fi/iiiiaansburg Acad, Ky. Granger. Junior C. E. Soc., by Mrs. C. M. Gammon, Carpet for Chapel Plat- form; Prairie Hill Cong. Sab . Sch.,Pkg. Papers,for Beach Inst., Ga. Kelly. Sub. Sch., Infant Class, by Miss L. B. Gossard, s Pkgs. Literature and 4 yds. Toweling,for Beach Inst., Ga. Keokuk. Miss Rebecca H. Wilson Sioux City. Mary and Sadie West, Sub. for Harpers Young People, i8g~, for Beach Lust., Ga. Sloan. Mrs. R. F. Gallaher, for McIn- tosh, Ga Waucoma. Cong. Ch Waterloo. Miss Lucy 0. Leavitt, io, and Box of C.,for Student Aid, Taiiadega C 83 73 57 25 15 52 ~8 25 5 ofi 5 00 500 6 75 Iowa Womans Home Missionary Union, Miss Belle L. Bentley, Tress., for Womans Work. Alden. Jr. C. E 5 00 Anita. V.P.S.C.E 625 Cedar Rapids. W. M. 5... 3 ~ Central City. W. M. 5 6 00 Eldora. W. M. S 10 50 Magnolia. W. M. S 50 Newburg. Mrs. James Newcomer 50 Ottuinwa. Jr. C. E s 00 Red Oak. W. M. S 25 00 Shenandoah. W. M. 5.... i~ 6o Waterloo. W. M. S II 75 Waucoma. W. M. S 10 00 Iowa W. H. M. Union, Un- designated Funds S 77 105 87 WISCONSIN, $222.14. Appleton. Cong. Ch 13 44 Fulton. Cong. Ch., 3.17; Indian Ford Station, 54c 3 71 Lake Geneva. Cong. Ch 25 94 Janesville. Miss S. A. Watson, for Stu- dent Aid, Chandler Sch., Lexington, Ky 400 Kenosha. Thomas Gillespie, M.D 10 00 Menasha. Cong. C. E. Soc., for C. B. Hail, McIntosh, Ga 8 6o Milwaukee. Grand Av., adI io co Milwaukee. Miss Lucy S. Toplin, for Meridian, Miss x co New Richmond. First Cong. Ch 17 6i River Falls. Cong. Ch., to const. Miss EUNICE PRATT L.M 31 00 Springvale. Sab. Seb. Cong. Ch., Box Books, etc.,for Nat, Ala. Sturgeon Bay. V. P. 5. C. E., for Stu- dent Aid, Gregory Inst 300 Tomab. Cong. Ch 20 So RECEIPTS. Union Grove. Cong. Ch., 33.41, C. E. Soc. of Cong. Ch., 4.40 37 8s Viroque. Cong. Ch 4 53 Wisconsin Womans Home Missionary Union, Mrs. C. M. Blackman, Treas., for Womans Work.~ Arena. W. H. M. S i i~ Emerald Grove. W. H. NI. S 1000 Kenoslia. W. H. M. 5 5 00 Madison. W. H. M. S s8 00 Wauwatosa 7 00 41 10 MINNESOTA, $88.23. Fairmont. Cong. Cli 2 21 Hasty. Cong. Sab. Sch., for Student Aid, Tougaioo U 7 90 Litelifield. Mrs.M. Weeks,for Meridian, Miss 3 00 Minneapolis. Lyndale Cong. Cli., 12.50; W. H. Norris, s~ Rodelmer, 5.98 30 48 Minneapolis. Y. P. 5. C. E. of Plym. Cli., for Hos.j3ital, Fort Yates, N. s II 50 St. Paul. Pacific Cong. Cli 6 12 St. Paul. Rev. H. H. H art, for Burreil Sc/i., Se/ma, Ala 2 00 Stiliwater. Grace Cong. Cli 3 32 Zumbrota. First Cong. Cli II 70 KANSAS, $22.25. Kansas City. First Cong. Cli s~ 25 Topeka. Primary S. S. First Cong. Cli., for Meridian, Miss 5 00 Waliaunsee. First Cli. of Clirist 6 00 MISSOURI, $152.71. De Soto. Cong. Cli 4 oo Peirce City. First Cong. Cli i6 00 St. Louis. Relier Place Cong. Cli., 6; Hope Cong. Cli., 5.27 is 27 Webster Groves. First Cong. Cli i 25 Womans Home Missionary Union of Mo., by Mrs. K. L. Mills, Treas., for Wa- mans Work. Sedalia. First Cli., L. H. M.S s~68 Meadville. Cong. Cli., L. H.M.S 1000 St. Louis. Memorial Cli., L.H.M.S 1000 Neoslia. Cong. Cli., L. H. M.S 575 Lelianon. Cong. Cli., L. H. M. S 10 00 Nicliols. Cong. Cli., L. H. M.S 300 Springfield. First Cong. Cli.,Y.P.S.C.E 500 St. Louis. Pilgrim Cli , Y. P.S.C.E 2250 Kansas City. So. West Tab.,Y.P.S.C.E 500 St. Louis. Olive Brancli CII.,L.H.M.S 426 Hannibal. Hannilial Cli., L.H.M.S 300 St. Louis. Pilgrim, L. H. M.S 100 Boone. Terre Cong. Cli., L.H.M.S 1000 St. Louis. Union Cong. Cli.,L.H.M.S 2500 - 120 19 ARKANSAS, $i.oo. Helena. Miss E. M. Tliomason NEBRASKA. $265.96 Arborville. Cong. Cli., i.~s; Y. P. 5. C. E., ~.so; Kings Daugliters, 1.25, liy. F. N. Recknor, Cli. Treas 5 00 183 Asliland. Cong. Cli 13 on Blair. Cong. Cli 4 50 Cook. F. E. Craig 5 00 Fremont. Cong. Cli 26 35 Hastings. Cong. Cli 5 6s Nebraska City. Womans Miss. Soc., liy Mrs. E. W. Clark, Treas. for Ton- galoo U 5 00 Santee Agency. Pilgrim Cong. Cli 200 00 Wallace. Cong. Cli 4 46 NORTH DAKOTA, $8.26. Fort Yates. Standing Rock Cliapel, Coil. 2.60; Cannon Ball Cliapel, 3.60, by Rev. Geo. W. Reed 6 20 Jamestown. ~Cong Cli 2 o6 SOUTH DAKOTA, $32.38. Aurora. Cong. Cli Holabird. Mrs. J. S. Harris Pierre. First Cong. Cli., 18.58; Sab. Seli., 5.63, and C. E., ~ COLORADO, $53.70. Boulder. Cong. Cli Fruita. L. U.S.,IorA.N.andf Sc/i., Thoniasnille, Ga Grand Junction. Cong. Cli Greeley. Park Cong. Cli Lafayette. Cong. Cli Womans Home Missionary Union of Cob, by Mrs. Horace Sanderson, Treas., for Womans Work. W. H. M. U CALIFORNIA, $20.25. Campbell. Primary Class Cong. S. S., for Student Aid, Talladega (~ Redlands. Mrs. M. W. Gaylord, for Standing Rock Indian M Sutter Co. E. Woodland. Cong. Cli OREGON, $16.90. Portland. Cong. Cli. Y. P. 5. C. E., for Barrell Sc/i., Selma, Ala Salem. Sali. Seli. First Cong. Cli Willsburg. Cong. Cli. Jun. C. E. Soc.... WASHINGTON, $8.oi. Fidalgo City. Rev. Horace J. Taylor... Skokomisli. Cong. Cli DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, $28.76. Wasliington. A Friend, for Central C/i., New Orleans, La., 2 ; Plymoutli Cong. Cli., 6.76; A Friend,for Alaska KENTUCKY, ~ Combs. Cong. Cli Red Asli. Cong. Cli Williamsburg. Rev. H. B. Fry Williamsburg. Rev. Geo. Ames, 2 Cliairs, for Big Creek GajS, Tenn. TENNESSEE, $69.00. Big Creek Gap. Cong. Cli., ~ A Friend, Mempliis. Friends Nasliville. Union Cli., 25; Rev. H. S. Bennett, in; Rev. C. W. Dunn, 5 NORTH CAROLINA, $~.ss. Raleigli. Cong. Cli Scrieby. Cong. Cli Valle Cruces. Rev. M. Jones, for Stu- dent Aid, Skyland Inst., N. C 5 12 I 50 25.76 2 50 5 05 i6 is 500 15 00 3 00 5 00 10 25 800 7 90 3 01 5 00 28 76 3 55 500 14 00 15 00 40 00 2 55 4 00 300 184 GEORGIA, $25.56. Atlanta. First Cong. Ch Byron. Cong. Ch. and Sab. Sch Cypress Slash. Cong. Ch., iSo; Rev. J. A. Jones, 1.20 McIntosh. Cong. Ch McIntosh. Miss Nellie I. Reed,for St a- dent A Id, Dorchester Acad Rutland. Cong. Ch. and Sab. Seb Thomasville. B ethany Cong. Ch Woodville. Rev. J. H. H. Sengstacke, 75C.; Rev. J. Loyd, 45c.; Pilgrim Ch., 45C ALABAMA, $66.45. Marion. Cong. Ch., 16.09; Miss. Prayer Meeting, 9.91; Infant Class, Cong. Ch. Sab. Sch.,for Rosebud Indian M., 2.35. Mobile. First Cong. Ch., 6.~o, and Sab. Sch., 2 Sylacauga. First Cong. Ch Tuskegee. Rev. E. J. Penney, for Stu- dent Aid, Talladega C Alabama Womans Missionary Union, by Mrs. E. C. Slisby, Treas. for Womans Work. State Fees 6 50 Marion. W. M. U 3 50 Montgomery. W. M. U... ~ 00 LOUISIANA, $19.21. New Orleans. Mrs. Anna Harris, 5; Rev. Geo. W. Henderson, ~ Y. P. 5. C. E., of Straight U., 3.63 New Orleans. Morris Brown Junior S. C. E., s.o8,for C. E. Hall, McIntosh, Ga., and ifor Straight U Schriever. Louisiana State Assn MISSISSIPPI, $39.00. Moorhead. Miss E. L. Parsons,for A. C. Sch., Moorhead Tougaloo. Miss C. E. Parkhurst, 6; Frank H. Ball, 3, for Student Aid, Tougaloo U TEXAS, $s.oo. Austin. Tradesmen of Austin, for Blacksmith Shol, Tillotson Last NEW MEXICO, $4.40. White Oaks. Plym. Cong. Ch Womans Home Missionary Union of New Mexico, Miss Helen Whedon Bul- lock, Tress., for Womans Work: Albuquerque. W. H. M. U ~ Ellen B. Stanley, for Teachers Library, Straight U A Friend for Knoxville, Tenn. Friends, for Student A id, Talladega C Communion Set, for Ch., Big Creek Gal, Tenn. RECEIPTS. 4 50 I 50 3 00 500 2 40 2 50 5 0I 27 35 8 50 i 6o 14 00 15 00 is 63 2 o8 5 50 30 00 9 00 5 00 300 I 40 10 00 3 00 ENGLAND, $200.00. London. Mrs. A. Allen for Woodwork- ing Delt., Le Moyne Inst 200 00 CHiNA, $~.oo. Taiko-Shansi. Miss M. L. Partridge.... 00 Donations $12,407 40 Estates . 7,094 00 $19,501 40 INCOME, $1,635.00: Avery Fund,for Mendi M 135 CO Income, for Talladega C 1,500 00 1,635 00 TUITION, $4,264.25. Cappahosic, Va. Tuition 6 25 Evarts, Ky. Tuition 23 40 Lexington, Ky. Tuition 87 90 Williamsburg Acad., Ky. Tui- tion 76 20 Big Creek Gap, Tenn. Tuition 21 00 Grand View, Tenn. Tuition 24 00 Jonesboro, Tenn. Public Fund i5~ 00 Jonesboro, Tenn. Tuition 10 70 Knoxville, Tenn. Tuition 26 50 Memphis, Tenn. Tuition 488 75 Nashville, Tenn. Tuition 456 35 Pleasant Hill, Tenn. Tuition... Co 6~ Beaufort, N. C. Tuition 63 00 Blowing Rock, N. C. Tuition... i5 25 Carters Mills, N. C. Tuition.... in 00 Hilisboro, N. C. Tuition 30 30 Kings Mountain, N. C. Tuition 32 co McLeansville, N. C. Tuition i 00 McLeansville, N. C. Public Fund 29 00 Nails, N. C. Tuition s 00 Saluda, N. C. Tuition ~8 00 Troy, N. C. Tuition 6 40 Whittier, N. C. Tuition i~ 03 Wilmington, N. C. Tuition 82 25 Charleston, S. C. Tuition 303 45 Greenwood, S. C. Tuition 8o 50 Albany, Ga. Tuition 129 50 Andersonville, Ga. Tuition 17 48 Atlanta, Ga. Storrs Sch., Tui- tion 139 07 McIntosh, Ga. Tuition 69 96 Macon, Ga. Tuition 208 91 Marietta, Ga. Tuition 5 05 Savannah, Ga. Tuition 194 25 Thomasville, Ga. Tuition 59 55 Woodville, Ga. Tuition 4 io Athens, Ala. Tuition 42 95 Florence, Ala. Tuition 7 50 Marion, Ala. Tuition 37 40 Nat, Ala. Tuition 48 50 Selma, Ala. Tuition 94 20 Talladega, Ala. Tuition Iss 20 Orange Park, Fla. Tuition 78 oo Meridian, Miss. Tuition 75 6s Moorhead, Miss. Tuition . ... ~6 75 Tougaloo, Miss. Tuition 93 75 ~New Orleans, La. Tuition 451 00 Austin, Tex. Tuition 96 6o 4,264 25 Total for March $25,400 6~ SUMMARY. Donations $87,197 o Estates 43,225 Si $130,422 82 Income 6,005 00 Tuition 22,594 95 Total from Oct. to March ~i. $159,022 77 FOR THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY. Subscriptions for March $6o 74 Previously acknowledged ~ 95 Total $~i~ 69 H. W. HUBBARD, Treas., Bible House, N. Y.

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The American missionary. / Volume 49, Issue 6 Congregational work Pilgrim missionary Congregationalist and herald of gospel liberty American Missionary Association. New York June 1895 0049 006
The American missionary. / Volume 49, Issue 6, miscellaneous front pages 184A-184B

JUNE, 1895 // I~ _____ y ,.. 4 Z~ILI~ CONTENTS VOL. XLIX No.6 EDITORIAL. FINANCIAL,..,. AMERICAN NEGRO AND AFRICA, Bisiio~ WHIPPLE, THE INDIANS. AMONG TIlE INDIANS (Illustrated), THE SOUTH. Two ASSOCIATiON MEETINGS, - RAG CARPETS, 185 186 187 189 197 199 ALMEDA GARDNER INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL, MOORHEAD, MISS. (Illustrated), 200 THE CHINESE. TESTIMONIES TO THE GRACE OF GOD, . 202 IN MEMORIAM. COL. FRANKLIN FAIRBANKSREV. J. G. CRAIGIIEAD, D.D., . REV. GEORGE T. HOLYOKEME. ISAAC J. Sr. JOHNMISS ISABELLA D. FEEM- STERREV. L. C. WhITE, RECEIPTS, . 205 206 207 NEW YORK: PUBLISHED BY THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION, Bible House, Ninth St. and Fourth Ave., New York. Price, 50 Cents a Year in advance. Entered at the Post Office at New York, N. Y., as second-class matter. ~trnerican (BMs~ionar~ ~tssociation. PRESIDENT, MERRILL E. GATES, LL.D., MASS. Vice-Presidents. Rev. F. A. NOBLE, D.D., Ill. Rev. hENRY HOPKINS, D.D., Mo. Rev. ALEX. MCKENZIE, D.D., Mass. Rev. HENRY A. STIMSON, D.D., N. Y. Rev. WASHINGTON GLADDEN, D.D., Ohio. Corresponding Secretaries. Rev~ M. E. STRIEBY, D.D., Bible House, N. Y. Rev. A. F. BEARD, D.D., Bible house, N. Y. Rev. F. P. WOODBURY, D.D., Bible house, N. Y. Assistant Corresponding Secretary. Rev. C. J. RYDER, D.D., Bible house, N. Y. Recording Secretary. Rev. M. B. STRIEBY, D.D., Bible House, N. Y. Treasurer. HENRY W. HUBBARD, Esq., Bible House, N. Y. A uditors. PETER MCCARTEE. JAMES MITCHELL. Executive Committee. CHARLES L. MEAD, Chairman. ChARLES A. HULL, Secretary. For Three Years. For Two Years. For One Year. WILLIAM HAYES WARD, CHARLES A. HULL, SAMUEL HOLMES, JAMES W. COOPER, ADDISON P. FOSTER, SAMUEL S. MARPLFS LUCIEN C. WARNER, ALBERT J. LYMAN, CHARLES L. MEAD, JOSEPH H. T~VICHELL, NEHEMIAH BOYNTON, WILLIAM II. STRONG CHARLES P. PEIRCE, A. J. F. BEHRENDS, ELIJAH HORR. District Secretaries. Rev. GEo. H. GUTTERSON, 21 Congl House, Boston, Moss. Rev. Jos. E. ROY, D.D., i~3 La Salle Street, Chicago, ill. Rev. W. E. C. WRIGHT, D.D., Conglkooms, Y. ill. C. A. Building, Cleveland~ Ohio. Secretary of Womans Bureau. Miss D. B. EMERSON, Bibte House, N. Y. COMMUNICATIONS Relating to the work of the Association may be addressed to the Corresponding Secretaries letters for TuE AMERICAN MIssIONAI~Y, to the Editor, at the New York Office; letters relating to the finances, to the Treasurer; letters relating to woman s work, to the Secretary of the Womans Bureau. DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS In drafts, checks, registered letters, or post-office orders, may be sent to H. N. Hubbard, Treasurer, Bible House, New York, or, when more convenient, to either of the Branch Offices, 21 Congregational House, Boston, Mass., 151 Washington Street, Chicago, Ill., or Congregational Rooms, Y. M. C. A. Building, Cleveland, Ohio. A payment of thirty dollars constitutes a Life Member. NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERSThe date on the address label~~ indicates the time to which the subscription is paid. Changes are made in date on label to the ioth of each month. If payment of subscription be made afterward the change on the label will appear a month later. Please send early notice of change in post-office address, giving the former address and the new address, in order that our periodi- cals and occasional papers may be correctly mailed. FORM OF A BEQUEST. I GIVE AND BEQUEATH the sum of dollars to the American Missionary Association, incorporated by act of the Legislature of the State of New York. The will should be attested by three witnesses.

Financial Editorial 185-186

THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY VOL. XLIX. JUNE, 1895. No. 6. FINANCIAL. In the last number of THE MISSIONARY we reported our debt at the close of the first six months of the fiscal year as $79,696.61. Now, at the close of the seventh month, April, there is a slight reduction, the debt being $76,010.87, a little less than at the end of February, when it was $76,431.49. These variations as to the debt have significance mainly as showing that it has not increased during late months. They leave un- touched the graver question of the removal of the debt. Only two ways of accomplishing this result are possible-the increase of receipts or the cutting down of expenses. The first of these must be the work of our constituentsthe sad alternative falls on the officers of the Associa- tion. It may seem an easy task to make a reduction mathematically on a given percentage, but we wish our friends could realize the dis- may and the tears that its practical working would occasion. We can see that procession of Indian pupils turning from the door of the Christian school to go back to the blanket and the tepee; we can see the group of mountain youth, just awakening to the inspiration of a new life, confronted by the closed school and church; we can see the htmdreds of colored children, the future factors in the national prob- lem, civil and religious, relegated to that ignorant mass that constitutes the element of danger in that problem. Then, too, we can realize the blight put upon the hopes of teachers and pastors dismissed from the service who have devoted the vigor of their days and to whom no other opening appears. We know that stringent times bring hardships to people in many walks of life, but it would, indeed, be a peculiar emergency that would i86 AMERICAN NEGRO AND AFRICA, even suggest the closing of schools and churches in the cities or States of the North. How much less should abridgment come to the en- lightenment and evangelization of the most needy, most dangerous, and yet, if properly cared for, the most hopeful races of our land. AMERICAN NEGRO AND AFRICA. The American negro is a citizen of the United States, entitled to all its privileges, political and religious. As this country is the most favored on earth in climate, soil and political freedom, it is natural that the negro should prefer to remain here. To remove him forcibly is as great a crime as to remove the descendant of the American Puritan or of the Virginia cavalier. Nor is it for the benefit of the nation that he should be removed. It needs his brain and hand and heart to increase its aggregate of wealth, military strength, and especially its spiritual power, for he is most richly endowed in the treasures of the heart. But Africa! her deplorable history, her present degradation and her future possibilities give her a claim upon the sympathy and help of Christendoma claim most shamefully neglected. Grasping hations calling themselves Christian are struggling to possess her soil and gather her treasures. But even from these selfish efforts good will come to Africalaw will prevail, commerce will arise and the slave trade will be banished. But a deeper work is needed to redeem Africa the gospel of Christ only can reach the heart and reform the life. Something has been done in this respect, but vastly more is needed, and while this duty rests upon all Christians of every nationality, it rests with peculiar force on the American negro. The ties of kindred and fatherlandcall him; his color and common descent will give him both a welcome and an influence. He must go first as an ambassador of Christ to establish the church and the school, carrying intelligence and the industries of life. We have little faith in the colonies for Africa hastily gathered of ignorant and penniless people. Their end often is disaster. One of the most pitiable sights the writer ever saw was a little handful of colored people on the ferryboat crossing from New York to Jersey City. They were part of a colony that had gone to Africa, and after disappointment and disaster were now returning home in utter destitution. Their pitiable condition as they crouched on the boat moved the compassion of the passengers and an impromptu col- lection was made in their behalf. The recent return of a colony from Mexico in destitution adds another to the list of these melancholy expeditions. Some colonies have fared better, but the era of successful coloniza- tion is in the future, when limited and not frequent companies of Chris-

American Negro and Africa Editorial 186-187

i86 AMERICAN NEGRO AND AFRICA, even suggest the closing of schools and churches in the cities or States of the North. How much less should abridgment come to the en- lightenment and evangelization of the most needy, most dangerous, and yet, if properly cared for, the most hopeful races of our land. AMERICAN NEGRO AND AFRICA. The American negro is a citizen of the United States, entitled to all its privileges, political and religious. As this country is the most favored on earth in climate, soil and political freedom, it is natural that the negro should prefer to remain here. To remove him forcibly is as great a crime as to remove the descendant of the American Puritan or of the Virginia cavalier. Nor is it for the benefit of the nation that he should be removed. It needs his brain and hand and heart to increase its aggregate of wealth, military strength, and especially its spiritual power, for he is most richly endowed in the treasures of the heart. But Africa! her deplorable history, her present degradation and her future possibilities give her a claim upon the sympathy and help of Christendoma claim most shamefully neglected. Grasping hations calling themselves Christian are struggling to possess her soil and gather her treasures. But even from these selfish efforts good will come to Africalaw will prevail, commerce will arise and the slave trade will be banished. But a deeper work is needed to redeem Africa the gospel of Christ only can reach the heart and reform the life. Something has been done in this respect, but vastly more is needed, and while this duty rests upon all Christians of every nationality, it rests with peculiar force on the American negro. The ties of kindred and fatherlandcall him; his color and common descent will give him both a welcome and an influence. He must go first as an ambassador of Christ to establish the church and the school, carrying intelligence and the industries of life. We have little faith in the colonies for Africa hastily gathered of ignorant and penniless people. Their end often is disaster. One of the most pitiable sights the writer ever saw was a little handful of colored people on the ferryboat crossing from New York to Jersey City. They were part of a colony that had gone to Africa, and after disappointment and disaster were now returning home in utter destitution. Their pitiable condition as they crouched on the boat moved the compassion of the passengers and an impromptu col- lection was made in their behalf. The recent return of a colony from Mexico in destitution adds another to the list of these melancholy expeditions. Some colonies have fared better, but the era of successful coloniza- tion is in the future, when limited and not frequent companies of Chris- BISHOP WHIPPLE. 187 tian men and women, well educated and well provided by experience in life and with money, will do a grand work in Africa, carrying with them the church, the school, the plow, the shop, and all the elements of civilization. In the meantime, and none too soon, should the church arouse itself to the duty of preparing well educated and thoroughly Christian men and women of African descent to go forth on this great mission of evangelization and civilization to Africa. ONE of our colored pastors in the South, who has spent a number of years in Africa, particularly in the districts toward which immigration is being directed, expresses himself very sensibly along this line. He says that the hap-hazard immigration now going on will end in disaster and degradation. He feels that his people must make much greater advances in education and wealth and moral steadiness before under- taking to colonize in Africa. He has seen too much of the sad results of present colonization, as usually undertaken, to have any faith in it. BISHOP WHIPPLE. We take pleasure in giving below a brief note of Bishop Whipple, mentioning the recent visit of himself and of Miss Rose Cleveland and others to our school in Thomasville, Ga. This testimonial illustrates the broad sympathy of the Bishop in every form of good work for the needy. His onerous duties as a bishop in the Protestant Episcopal Church have not prevented him from devoting time and influence for the benefit of the poor Indian. His services in this behalf have been widespread, sometimes in the humble wigwam of the Indians, some- times in the House of Bishops, and sometimes in Washington, D. C., where his influence for many years has been remarkably great. He is very highly esteemed in the office of this Association, not only for his great work, but also as the loved nephew of our honored secretary, Rev. George XVhipple, D. D. THOMASvILLE, GA., April 24, 1895. Mj Dear Dr. Strieby: You know how I loved my dear uncle, your associate, and my interest in these dark-skinned children of Our Father. I visited your Allen School here yesterday with Miss Rose Cleveland and a party of ladies. We found a Christian home, loving teachers and bright, intelligent scholars. The youngest of the pupils, as well as the older ones, gave ready answers to questions. They sang for us and I gave them a few words of counsel. The good people of Thomasville feel a warm interest in this work. Yours faithfully, H. B. WWPPLE.

Bishop Whipple Editorial 187-189

BISHOP WHIPPLE. 187 tian men and women, well educated and well provided by experience in life and with money, will do a grand work in Africa, carrying with them the church, the school, the plow, the shop, and all the elements of civilization. In the meantime, and none too soon, should the church arouse itself to the duty of preparing well educated and thoroughly Christian men and women of African descent to go forth on this great mission of evangelization and civilization to Africa. ONE of our colored pastors in the South, who has spent a number of years in Africa, particularly in the districts toward which immigration is being directed, expresses himself very sensibly along this line. He says that the hap-hazard immigration now going on will end in disaster and degradation. He feels that his people must make much greater advances in education and wealth and moral steadiness before under- taking to colonize in Africa. He has seen too much of the sad results of present colonization, as usually undertaken, to have any faith in it. BISHOP WHIPPLE. We take pleasure in giving below a brief note of Bishop Whipple, mentioning the recent visit of himself and of Miss Rose Cleveland and others to our school in Thomasville, Ga. This testimonial illustrates the broad sympathy of the Bishop in every form of good work for the needy. His onerous duties as a bishop in the Protestant Episcopal Church have not prevented him from devoting time and influence for the benefit of the poor Indian. His services in this behalf have been widespread, sometimes in the humble wigwam of the Indians, some- times in the House of Bishops, and sometimes in Washington, D. C., where his influence for many years has been remarkably great. He is very highly esteemed in the office of this Association, not only for his great work, but also as the loved nephew of our honored secretary, Rev. George XVhipple, D. D. THOMASvILLE, GA., April 24, 1895. Mj Dear Dr. Strieby: You know how I loved my dear uncle, your associate, and my interest in these dark-skinned children of Our Father. I visited your Allen School here yesterday with Miss Rose Cleveland and a party of ladies. We found a Christian home, loving teachers and bright, intelligent scholars. The youngest of the pupils, as well as the older ones, gave ready answers to questions. They sang for us and I gave them a few words of counsel. The good people of Thomasville feel a warm interest in this work. Yours faithfully, H. B. WWPPLE. AMONG THE INDIANS. 1 b~ SECRETARY C. J. RYDER. Dr. Horace Bushnell in his famous sermon Concerning the demoral- izing influence of immigration propounded the deepest principles of race progress, or deterioration, as truly as of the individual. A wander- ing life tends to become a wanton life. Local habitation is essential to a permanent civilization. The nomadic race, having no interest in home or fireside, lacks the essential condition for healthful develop- ment. Land hunger, as political economists call it, has been an essential factor in making New England what she is. The love of the farm, or AN INDIAN TEPEE. Among the Indians. THE TEPEE, THE HOME, THE SCHOOL, THE CHURCH. AMONG THE INDIANS. 189 of the village dwelling, or the city residence, is the basis of patriotism, the love of the broad land. In considering the Indian problem we find these fundamental prin- ciples abundantly illustrated. The Indian has no land hunger as an individual. His right to hold land in severalty which he now possesses is to him the limitation of his freedom and not the enlargement of it. The whole boundless prairie has been his and when the pale face offers him only i6o or 320 acres of land the proposition is repulsive to him and his rights are curtailed. This fact is often forgotten in the treatment of the Indian problem. The excellent legislation known as the Dawes Bill, in order to be effective or of any real value, must be met with a desire on the part of the Indians to possess property in severalty. Right here comes one large service of the missionary. He must create this desire on the part of the red men. He finds the Indian in his tepee or wigwam. If the notion comes to him he may strike that tent at any hour and go to a remote part of the prairie. The faithful missionary, through the appointments of a fixed home and the object lessons of his own life, almost more than through his instruction, little by little wins the Indian to the desire to have a fixed home of his own. In the work of the American Missionary Association the faithful women who have entered upon this self-sacrificing service are some of them in the midst of Indian tribes quite remote from central schools or stations. The gentle, loving, yet persistent and positive influence of these women, in creating in the minds of Indian women better ideals, is inestimable. Little by little the tepee or tent gives place to the log cabin. But the de- sire of the red man for free- dom from any restraints leads him to build beside his cabin a bower of branches and leaves. Under this he and his INDIAN CABIN AND BOWER. family sit dur- ing the heat of the day and sleep during the summer nights. This cabin with its bower is a place of comfort in the heat. But it is more. It is a sort of link between the high Christian civilization toward which the

C. J. Ryder, Secretary Ryder, C. J., Secretary Among the Indians: The Tepee, the Home, the School, the Church The Indian 189-197

AMONG THE INDIANS. 189 of the village dwelling, or the city residence, is the basis of patriotism, the love of the broad land. In considering the Indian problem we find these fundamental prin- ciples abundantly illustrated. The Indian has no land hunger as an individual. His right to hold land in severalty which he now possesses is to him the limitation of his freedom and not the enlargement of it. The whole boundless prairie has been his and when the pale face offers him only i6o or 320 acres of land the proposition is repulsive to him and his rights are curtailed. This fact is often forgotten in the treatment of the Indian problem. The excellent legislation known as the Dawes Bill, in order to be effective or of any real value, must be met with a desire on the part of the Indians to possess property in severalty. Right here comes one large service of the missionary. He must create this desire on the part of the red men. He finds the Indian in his tepee or wigwam. If the notion comes to him he may strike that tent at any hour and go to a remote part of the prairie. The faithful missionary, through the appointments of a fixed home and the object lessons of his own life, almost more than through his instruction, little by little wins the Indian to the desire to have a fixed home of his own. In the work of the American Missionary Association the faithful women who have entered upon this self-sacrificing service are some of them in the midst of Indian tribes quite remote from central schools or stations. The gentle, loving, yet persistent and positive influence of these women, in creating in the minds of Indian women better ideals, is inestimable. Little by little the tepee or tent gives place to the log cabin. But the de- sire of the red man for free- dom from any restraints leads him to build beside his cabin a bower of branches and leaves. Under this he and his INDIAN CABIN AND BOWER. family sit dur- ing the heat of the day and sleep during the summer nights. This cabin with its bower is a place of comfort in the heat. But it is more. It is a sort of link between the high Christian civilization toward which the AMONG THE INDIANS. 190 Indians are steadily marching and the old nomadic and pagan life from which they are emerging. The fact that this cabin is anchored on the personal property of the indian makes strongly for Christian civilization. About the cabin homes of a missionary like Miss Dodge, or Miss Collins, or Miss Lord, little by little the Indian cabins take on more and more evidences of civilized life and Christian thought. About the large schools like that at Santee they erect tidy frame houses. Here is the witness of another step in their progress. The enormous value of having these missions planted among the Indi~ans will be at once ap- preciated when the facts are con- sidered. In my own observation of Indian life on the prairie, covering only ten years, I can bear witness to wonderful changes that have taken place. Perhaps no single field illus- trates this progress more inter- estingly than Fort Berthold in North Dakota. Here three tribes, the Rees, Gros Ventres, and Man- dan, had built a triple village on a projecting promontory around which the Missouri River ran. They wandered in the early days up and down the prairie and MISS M. C COLLINS, GRAND RIVER. this village was their fortress and storehouse They were joined in offensive and defensive alliance against the strong and warlike Sioux. Ten years ago the ground was honeycombed where the old village stood with subterranean cisterns, or storerooms, in which they deposited their food. They covered up the open- ing neatly with prairie grass so that if driven from their stronghold the Sioux could not find their storehouses. By the very conditions of savage warfare these people had become villagers But their ideals were those of freedom and the wildest range of the prairie. The old block house was the first taste of the white mans civilization the red AMONG THE INDIANS. 9 man had. It was war, cruel and bitter, by which he was initiated into civilized customs. Little by little this old Indian village has crumbled to ruin. The torture pole which stood in the midst has been pulled down by the Indian boys in our C h r is~ t ian school. The Indians o f these tribes are largely on their own farms and cattle ranges in the vicinity. The last old Indian, Porcupine Hash, recently left the ruined village in a summers twilight. He had not yielded to the Christian influences. On the crumbling ruins of the old medicine house he spread a piece of red flannel cloth. From the prairie he brought the bleached horns and the skull of a buffalo, which is an animal sacred to the In- dians. On the horns he hung his bracelet and other trinkets of per- sonal adornment, h i s off ering to his pagan gods. Just as the sun went down he walked out from the ruins of this place so sacred to him through his pagan superstitions. On the next Sabbath morning in the little chapel that BLOCKHOUSE AT FT. BERTHOLD. stands almost under the shadow of the old torture pole we celebrated the Communion and wel- comed to the table of our dear Lord and the fellowship of the AN OUTSTATION CABIN. 192 AMONG THE INDIANS. Christian church more than twenty Indians. The seed-sowing of the past, through the self-sacrificing devotion of many missionaries, had sprung up, and there was this glorious ingathering of full, ripe spiritual harvest. Here had been the slow process of de- velopment f r o m pagan tepee to Christian home, and the forces producing this transformation were the Christian school and church. SCHOOL AT FT. BERTHOLD. When the collec- tion was taken to meet the debt that so heavily weighs down the A. M. A. treasury this Indian church at Fort Berthold responded generously. It was during intense cold, when deep snow lay on the prairie. A part of the con- gregation was unable to meet on the Sabbath when the collec- tion was to be taken. Deacon Bull-Boy gathered the contri- butions of the absent members and rode through the deep snow many miles that he might pre- sent it with the other gifts upon the appointed Sahbath. At Gahe a similar process of development has gone forward. F he Christian home, the school and the chapel are the potent factors in the uplifting of the Indians in this field. I visited the comfortable cottage of Pas- tor Yellow Hawk, in which there were many appointments of a Christian home, which was pre- sided over by Pastor Yellow Hawks modest and refined wife, DEACON BULL-BOY, FT BERTHOLD. and realized more than ever be- fore how this process of race elevation was gradually going forward through the influence of the life and home of the missionary. The influence of their delightful Christian home at Rosebud Agency has its AMONG THE iNDIANS. 193 effect upon hundreds of Indians who gather at this station each year. But if it is true that the local habitation is a necessary factor in per- manent race elevation or Christian civilization, these Indian boys must be taught to con struct their houses. Here the in- dustrial de- partment of a great school like tha.t at Santee be- comes especi- a 11 y import- ant. The shops giving the Indian ROSEBUD MISSION HOUSE. boys knowl- edge of black smithing, carpentry, shoemaking, together with thorough instruction in agriculture and horticulture, are essential factors in working out the great prob- lern which is upon us. But she who presides within a cot- tage that the young Indian learns to build in the Asso- cia t ions school must be taught the domestic in- dustries o r t h e cottage will be little better than t h e tepee. The instruc- tion of Indian of their rooms, girls in cooking, sewing, knitting, darning, the care and all the minutlie of neat housewifery, receive careful MISSION SCHOOL AT OAHE. 94 AMONG THE INDIANS. attention. A. cooking class where they are taught to make bread that can really be eaten is a curiosity. This one may see in Santee Normal Training School. Classes in other domestic industries are as regular and sys- tematic a part of the school work as any de- partment. We must not for- get, how- ever, that the pur- pose of the in i 5 s i o n school isto Christian- ize and not simply to citizenize. The problem the missionaries of the American Missionary Association are working out is vastly different from that possible to government or public school teachers. The use of the Bible in public schools, even among white people of the East, is contested, and at the best most inadequate and unsatis INDUSTRIAL TRAINING SHOPS AT SANTEE. SANTEE SCHOOL, GENERAL VIEW. AMONG THE INDIANS. factory. The mission school is planted for the very purpose of spreading Christian truth. House building is not necessarily home planting. The shops and industrial training receive careful attention in our Christian schools, but they are a means and not an end. The class of students fitting themselves through thorough study and careful Biblical instruction present the highest type of work in. this splendid Christian school at Santee. The Indians need well trained and con- secrated Christian leaders of their own tribes more than they need blacksmiths or carpenters. It is a radical mistake to suppose that the government can ever take the place of the Christian institution in pre- paring these Christian leaders. The Christian academies and colleges of New England and the interior, receiving, as they do, constantly increasing endowment funds, given by far-seeing and consecrated men and women , are the incontrovertible e v i - dence that the white man believes in the Christian school for his children. But a race just emerging from paganism needs a for/ion these Chris- tian institutions. And the Indian will need them right along just as the white man does, and for similar rea- sons. ELIZABETH CHAPEL, CHEYENNE RIVER. Santee N o r m a 1 Training Institute perhaps more than any other one school meets this need. The chapel is the center of these various buildings. Christian worship is the highest evidence possible that the Indians are coming into Christian civilization. Loyalty to Jesus Christ is the supreme test of safe citizenship as truly as of spiritual power. Old Glory floats over Santee and lessons of patriotism both by object lesson, text book and example are constantly taught. At Fort Yates, N. D., a large octagonal booth is erected each year. Indians gather at this cool, embowered meeting place. For what? Why, simply that the missionaries may teach them patriotism. By public addresses, by songs, by prayers, by flags festooned above their heads, these red people are taught the value of our national institutions, the meaning of our great holidays, loyalty to our common country. 196 AMONG THE INDIANS. And they learn these lessons and are faithful to them. When Sitting Bull fell mortally wounded on the prairie it was not the white soldiers of the United States Army that overpowere(l him and his band. It was a company of Indian policemen who, knowing what they risked, went out in behalf of our common country, and some of them gave their lives in heroic defense of its flag. One of these, Deacon Little Eagle, of our Congregational church at Grand River, had learned the lessons of patriotism in our mission schools, and he fell mortally wounded, a martyr to his patriotic zeal and Christian devotion. Ah, no, the Ameri- can Missionary Association does not fail to teach these red people the great lessons of patriotism. The influence of the work at these central schools and missions is felt far over the prairie. The outstations now conducted in our mission field number twenty-six. In these, Christian young Indian men and women are doing heroic and self-sacrificing work. The serious and irreparable loss occasioned in the Indian field by the lack of funds to carry on the work properly has fallen most seriously upon the central and larger stations. The Indians, with courage and an earnest faith, have taken up the work in the outstation missions with increased enthusiasm. In many places they have erected buildings with their own labor and money. A Christian home conducted by the native pastor and his wife in connection with each of these missions furnishes the object lesson needed. These Indian churches feel also the pressure of necessity in the gen- eral work of the Association. Pilgrim Church, at Santee, took its col- lection on Lincoln Memorial Sabbath to meet the heavy debt upon the A. M. A. treasury. They sent to this treasury $247 to lift this burden. This contribution included the generous gifts of the teachers of the school, but many of the Indians themselves gave large amounts. One of the most interesting outstations is that on the Cheyenne River, where Elizabeth Chapel was dedicated May 20, 1894. A regular Congregational Council was called for the dedication of the building and the ordination of two young men, both Indians. The services were of peculiar interest, as the memory of the sainted Elizabeth Winyan was honored in the naming of the chapel. The young men ordained to the ministry were both her descendants. This chapel with the work it represents is the full harvest gathered from the seed sown by white and native missionaries through these years of patient and self-sacrificing toil. Prayer and faith and struggle and tears have entered into the work. It is now the time of ingathering all over this great field. The urgent appeal comes from central missions and schools, from the hones of the faithful missionaries, from scattered outstations, for larger and more generous support for the gathering of this harvest. TWO ASSOCIATION MEETINGS. 97 The South. TWO ASSOCIATION MEETINGS. BY FIELD SUPT. G. S. DICKERMAN. To understand the scope of our work in the South, one must be at the meetings of the State Associations. There will be seen the teach- ers of our schools and colleges, the pastors of churches, superintend- ents of Sunday-schools, Christian Endeavor officers, leaders of mission- ary societies, and a goodly company of the rank and file of faithful men and women who codperate with themveterans whose service began before the close of the war and gathered about them in reverence and affection their younger co-laborers, many of whom were taught by them and delight still to be guided by their wisdom. The annual meeting of the Alabama Association was held this year with the First Church of Shelby. First came the meeting of the Sun- day-school Association, which was opened on Friday evening with an address by Rev. F. G. Ragland and continued through the following day. Following this on Saturday evening, came the opening of the Association proper with a sermon by Rev. J. S. Jackson. On Sunday there were not only services appropriate to the occasion in the church where the Association was held, but the visiting ministers supplied the pulpits of other churches in the place. Sermons before the Association were preached by Revs. J. J. Scott, W. J. Larkin and Thomas Bell. On Monday and Tuesday there were animated discus- sions on various topics of practical interest, such as How Best to Raise Money for Current Expenses and Benevolence, How to Conduct a Prayer Meeting and to Secure Greater Interest in It, How and When Church Members Should Study the Bible, Hours and Methods of Study for a Pastor, To What Extent Discipline Should be Administered, How to Have a Successful Monthly Concert, and Our Six Societies. There was also a very earnest discussion on the question of Uniting the Association with the Other Congregational Bodies of the State in a General Convention. It appeared that a sufficient number of the churches had not voted in favor of the proposed union to carry it into effect, and in consequence it was voted to return to a position formerly held of Inviting the Churches of the Convention to Form a State Body on the Basis of Representation by Pastor and Delegate from each Individual Church. Attention was called to the new paper, the Congregational Herald, published at Montgomery, and the Association voted to recommend it to the churches. The Womans Missionary Union met on Monday afternoon, with a

Field Supt. G. S. Dickerman Dickerman, G. S., Field Supt. Two Association Meetings The South 197-199

TWO ASSOCIATION MEETINGS. 97 The South. TWO ASSOCIATION MEETINGS. BY FIELD SUPT. G. S. DICKERMAN. To understand the scope of our work in the South, one must be at the meetings of the State Associations. There will be seen the teach- ers of our schools and colleges, the pastors of churches, superintend- ents of Sunday-schools, Christian Endeavor officers, leaders of mission- ary societies, and a goodly company of the rank and file of faithful men and women who codperate with themveterans whose service began before the close of the war and gathered about them in reverence and affection their younger co-laborers, many of whom were taught by them and delight still to be guided by their wisdom. The annual meeting of the Alabama Association was held this year with the First Church of Shelby. First came the meeting of the Sun- day-school Association, which was opened on Friday evening with an address by Rev. F. G. Ragland and continued through the following day. Following this on Saturday evening, came the opening of the Association proper with a sermon by Rev. J. S. Jackson. On Sunday there were not only services appropriate to the occasion in the church where the Association was held, but the visiting ministers supplied the pulpits of other churches in the place. Sermons before the Association were preached by Revs. J. J. Scott, W. J. Larkin and Thomas Bell. On Monday and Tuesday there were animated discus- sions on various topics of practical interest, such as How Best to Raise Money for Current Expenses and Benevolence, How to Conduct a Prayer Meeting and to Secure Greater Interest in It, How and When Church Members Should Study the Bible, Hours and Methods of Study for a Pastor, To What Extent Discipline Should be Administered, How to Have a Successful Monthly Concert, and Our Six Societies. There was also a very earnest discussion on the question of Uniting the Association with the Other Congregational Bodies of the State in a General Convention. It appeared that a sufficient number of the churches had not voted in favor of the proposed union to carry it into effect, and in consequence it was voted to return to a position formerly held of Inviting the Churches of the Convention to Form a State Body on the Basis of Representation by Pastor and Delegate from each Individual Church. Attention was called to the new paper, the Congregational Herald, published at Montgomery, and the Association voted to recommend it to the churches. The Womans Missionary Union met on Monday afternoon, with a 198 TWO ASSOCIATION MEETINGS. large attendance and very interesting exercises. Letters were read from Miss Emerson, Mrs. Kincaid and other friends, and reports were made of Work Among Children, with discussions on How to Conduct Chil- drens Meetings, What do we read in our Homes, and Attention to Missionary Literature. Those in attendance on the meetings were glad to hear the familiar voices and the words of wisdom of many who have given their best thought and watchful interest to these churches from their very originlike President and Mrs. DeForest, Prof. and Mrs. Andrews, Prof. and Mrs. Silsby, Rev. Messrs. Ragland, Jackson, Snell, Sims, and Mrs. Dillard. With these were many who have more recently entered the field, and not a few zealous students of Talladega who have already proven their efficiency by missionary work in the newer fields. But the especial feature of the occasion was the visit of Dr. J. E. Roy, who was Field Superintendent for seven years, and who now for the first time in a whole decade returned to receive the glad greetings of the many with whom he was formerly associated. The welcome given was the best proof of how deeply his influence entered into all this noble work. There were many things in the meetings which were full of promise. Several churches have new pastors: Rev. J. L. Cole at Birmingham, Rev. Thomas Bell at Selma, and Rev. J. J. Scott, who was ordained at Shelby on Tuesday, at Alco. Several new openings for church and school work were reported. A large number of students at Talladega are asking for places in which to do mission- ary work. Hopefulness and the conviction that our missions are to grow and multiply were in the air. Many of us wished that our North- ern friends and the generous supporters of the American Missionary Association could have been present. It would have impressed them with the wisdom of their investments for this object. The day after the Alabama Association closed its session at Shelby, the Tennessee Association began its annual meeting at Athens, Ala. A number of churches in Alabama near the border of the State belong to this body, which explains the place of meeting. Here is found another company of Christian workers, showing in every word and movement that they are simply a different division of the same army. The central institution of this Association is Fisk University at Nash- ville. Much regret was expressed that neither President Cravath, nor Professor Bennett, its honored fathers, could be present. Worthy representatives were in attendance, however, in Prof. C. W. Dunn, and Miss M. A. Bye. The veterans of the meeting were Revs. J. E. Smith of Chattanooga, and B. A. lines of Knoxville. Other pastors p~resent were Rev. Messrs. Clark, Harris, Moorland, Scott, Johnson, Paris, and Jennings. Revs. W. W. Dorman and Mrs. M. J. Smith RAG CARPETS. 99 were from the mountains and gave interesting accounts of their fields, to which both have only recently come. Mrs Moore, the gifted wife of our Field Missionary, thrilled the meeting on more than one occa- sion with the earnestness and eloquence of her words. And finally Dr. Roy came in as at Shelby to revive old friendships and form new ones, and then to give a feast of good things in his addresses. Here too, as at Shelby, there was an examination, followed by an ordination, the candidate being Mr. Sandy A. Paris of Jonesboro. Discussions were held on Christian Endeavor Societies, Congrega- tionalism for Our People, Personal Influence in Conversion, What Con- stitutes Home-making? and How Can a Deeper Interest in Missionary Effort be Aroused? The Womans Missionary Union met on Thursday and the tenor of its exercises was Greater zeal and enterprise to enlighten and save the neglected in our own and other lands. Indeed the meetings generally showed much of this spirit. There seemed to be a feeling that new and inspiring opportunities were opening for Christian service, and that there must be an enlargement of plans to enter in. This sentiment came to expression in a resolution presented by Rev. Jos. E. Smith, of Chattanooga, proposing a general conference of all our workers for counsel and mutual encouragement, at such time and place as the American Missionary Association might designate. The last day, which was Sunday, witnessed a spirit of deep religious tenderness in the congregations, and in response to invitations a con- siderable number of persons arose to take the first steps in a life of Christian discipleship. When at night the Lords table was spread and the communion celebrated, it was the universal testimony that the meetings had brought great blessings to all who had participated in them. To the people of Athens and their visitors alike it had been a season of delightful Christian fellowship and of spiritual refreshing. RAG carpets are likely to become a genuine means of grace in the field of the American Missionary Association. One of our mountain schools has been greatly in need of carpets. The floors are bare and the teachers find decent carpets very helpful in creating a home feeling in the girls whom they instruct and in giving them worthy ideals. Some good women have taken it upon themselves to make rag carpet for this mountain school. It is an excellent plan, and we are grateful to them for it. Are there not other womens societies, or individual women, who could find time to make rag carpets for our needy boarding schools? There are many of them in the lowlands and mountains of the South that are destitute in this respect. In each of them a carpet means an attractive YQQiII. It requires more careful cleanliness and cultivates

Rag Carpets The South 199-200

RAG CARPETS. 99 were from the mountains and gave interesting accounts of their fields, to which both have only recently come. Mrs Moore, the gifted wife of our Field Missionary, thrilled the meeting on more than one occa- sion with the earnestness and eloquence of her words. And finally Dr. Roy came in as at Shelby to revive old friendships and form new ones, and then to give a feast of good things in his addresses. Here too, as at Shelby, there was an examination, followed by an ordination, the candidate being Mr. Sandy A. Paris of Jonesboro. Discussions were held on Christian Endeavor Societies, Congrega- tionalism for Our People, Personal Influence in Conversion, What Con- stitutes Home-making? and How Can a Deeper Interest in Missionary Effort be Aroused? The Womans Missionary Union met on Thursday and the tenor of its exercises was Greater zeal and enterprise to enlighten and save the neglected in our own and other lands. Indeed the meetings generally showed much of this spirit. There seemed to be a feeling that new and inspiring opportunities were opening for Christian service, and that there must be an enlargement of plans to enter in. This sentiment came to expression in a resolution presented by Rev. Jos. E. Smith, of Chattanooga, proposing a general conference of all our workers for counsel and mutual encouragement, at such time and place as the American Missionary Association might designate. The last day, which was Sunday, witnessed a spirit of deep religious tenderness in the congregations, and in response to invitations a con- siderable number of persons arose to take the first steps in a life of Christian discipleship. When at night the Lords table was spread and the communion celebrated, it was the universal testimony that the meetings had brought great blessings to all who had participated in them. To the people of Athens and their visitors alike it had been a season of delightful Christian fellowship and of spiritual refreshing. RAG carpets are likely to become a genuine means of grace in the field of the American Missionary Association. One of our mountain schools has been greatly in need of carpets. The floors are bare and the teachers find decent carpets very helpful in creating a home feeling in the girls whom they instruct and in giving them worthy ideals. Some good women have taken it upon themselves to make rag carpet for this mountain school. It is an excellent plan, and we are grateful to them for it. Are there not other womens societies, or individual women, who could find time to make rag carpets for our needy boarding schools? There are many of them in the lowlands and mountains of the South that are destitute in this respect. In each of them a carpet means an attractive YQQiII. It requires more careful cleanliness and cultivates 200 ALMIL)A GARDNER INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. taste and home love. In this way a rag carpet becomes the m ;ans of grace. ALMEDA GARDNER INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL, MOORHEAD, MISSISSIPPI. BY REV. c. N. POND. One pleasing feature of The College, as Moorhead people call Almeda Gardner School, is the favor it wins in this Mississippi commu- nity. The little community is itself a busy hive, sometimes by outsiders nicknamed Grub/own, because nearly everybody works. Such a people would the more naturally accept the ideals of an industrial school. The seminary ladies, though teaching colored girls, are received into white socials, literary gatherings and church services, one of them being regu- larly elected organist of the last. Though sustained in part by the American Missionary Association, the school sprang from the faith and skill of its principal, Miss S. L. Emerson, formerly of Tougaloo. Her present assistants are Miss E. L. Parsons and Miss S. J. Lime, the three conducting a well ordered course of academic, musical, gymnastic and industrial training. Though benevolent, the course is not free, as parents and pupils alike prize more highly the teaching which costs something. Hence, as far as practi- cable, they pay. They are thus more likely to spare some foolish expendi- ture, as, for instance, liquor at Christmas or tobacco the .year round. Though not a large institution, the building seems large, as it pro- vides dormitory, working and living apartments, recitation, assembly and reception rooms, all under one roof. The ladies prefer quite young pupils as being more surely and permanently molded, and twenty-two boarders with thirty day scholars fill the house with an animating stir of young girlhood mostly between eight years and early teens. They study, recite, march, exercise, mend, cook, make beds, sweep, play, have fun, and keep busy and happy in a hundred ways. Friday evening is set apart for mending. To call then is not unlucky, for a peep into the workroom will discover a picture worth seeing. Around tables, in chairs, on the floor, there are articles of head and foot- gear with every grade between; sewing needles, darning needles, pieces of various colors, all alive with busy fingers, bright eyes, sable faces, and curly heads. It seems a kindergarten of mending, whose results will save many a street parade of woful rags in coming days. If one visits the school in Christmas Sabbath services he is likely to shed some tears, or, again, when the pathos is over, to feel a strong temptation toward clapping of hands in enthusiastic forgetfulness of the day. Miss Emerson is in the chair, Miss Parsons at the piauo, Miss

Rev. C. N. Pond Pond, C. N., Rev. Almeda Gardner Industrial School, Moorhead, Mississippi The South 200-202

200 ALMIL)A GARDNER INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. taste and home love. In this way a rag carpet becomes the m ;ans of grace. ALMEDA GARDNER INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL, MOORHEAD, MISSISSIPPI. BY REV. c. N. POND. One pleasing feature of The College, as Moorhead people call Almeda Gardner School, is the favor it wins in this Mississippi commu- nity. The little community is itself a busy hive, sometimes by outsiders nicknamed Grub/own, because nearly everybody works. Such a people would the more naturally accept the ideals of an industrial school. The seminary ladies, though teaching colored girls, are received into white socials, literary gatherings and church services, one of them being regu- larly elected organist of the last. Though sustained in part by the American Missionary Association, the school sprang from the faith and skill of its principal, Miss S. L. Emerson, formerly of Tougaloo. Her present assistants are Miss E. L. Parsons and Miss S. J. Lime, the three conducting a well ordered course of academic, musical, gymnastic and industrial training. Though benevolent, the course is not free, as parents and pupils alike prize more highly the teaching which costs something. Hence, as far as practi- cable, they pay. They are thus more likely to spare some foolish expendi- ture, as, for instance, liquor at Christmas or tobacco the .year round. Though not a large institution, the building seems large, as it pro- vides dormitory, working and living apartments, recitation, assembly and reception rooms, all under one roof. The ladies prefer quite young pupils as being more surely and permanently molded, and twenty-two boarders with thirty day scholars fill the house with an animating stir of young girlhood mostly between eight years and early teens. They study, recite, march, exercise, mend, cook, make beds, sweep, play, have fun, and keep busy and happy in a hundred ways. Friday evening is set apart for mending. To call then is not unlucky, for a peep into the workroom will discover a picture worth seeing. Around tables, in chairs, on the floor, there are articles of head and foot- gear with every grade between; sewing needles, darning needles, pieces of various colors, all alive with busy fingers, bright eyes, sable faces, and curly heads. It seems a kindergarten of mending, whose results will save many a street parade of woful rags in coming days. If one visits the school in Christmas Sabbath services he is likely to shed some tears, or, again, when the pathos is over, to feel a strong temptation toward clapping of hands in enthusiastic forgetfulness of the day. Miss Emerson is in the chair, Miss Parsons at the piauo, Miss MOOR/lEAD, MISS. 20! Lime on the floor, visitors, both white and colored, in the seats, and every pupil alert. There must necessarily be something commonplace, for humanitys average will appear. But strongly-marked talent and patient drill win admiration and touch sensitive hearts. The girls recite, MOORHEAD INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. sing, read; they listen, respond, and listen again, all athrill with the mood of the hour and the glory of Christs natal day. Or perhaps the visitor falls upon the humdrum of every-day school work, as a class wrestles with an English sentence, and those eight giants the parts of speech. Miss Lime is Socratic, and draws out these varying minds with comforting success. Then the visitor moves on and hears Miss Parsons in another class with a more advanced language drill. Will you say something to the girls? asks the teacber. Say some- thing! Most assuredly.~ If the visitor has words he is prepared to speak them now, for he is deeply interested in these free-born daughters 202 THE CHINESE. of Ethiopia who have come from centuries of slavery and ages of heathenism, but now face a future of promise. Go on, girls, go on in this very way. Study, work, follow your teachers and your Lord. The red, white and blue is your flag, America is your country, and all time to come is yours for success and happiness. The Chinese. TESTIMONIES TO THE GRACE OF GOD. BE REV. w. c. POND, D.D. I am writing this in San Diego, having just completed my annual round of visits to our missions in Southern California. It has been, on the whole, the most restful and delightful tour of this sort that I have ever taken: the blessed sunshine which has cheered all nature fitly symbolizing the comfort I have found in the condition and progress of our work. At each point I hold what we call an anniversary, using for the pur- pose both Sunday and week-day evenings, since I could not otherwise complete the round during the annual vacation granted by my church. By means of these anniversaries not only is interest in the work made more general and deep, but offerings in aid of it are secured without which we would be compelled to suspend our operations. The most interesting features of these meetings are the original addresses, generally more or less autobiographical, made by Chinese brethren, and I have felt moved to give to the readers of THE MIssIoN- ARE extracts from several of these. I am sure that if the space at my command admitted of it many of them might be given, and given in full, without causing the readers interest in them to flag. There is in the mission at Los Angeles a brother whose littleness of stature made me think always of Zacchleus, while his zeal and conse- cration, though not the measure of his possessions, helped to complete the parallel. Here is his addresssomewhat spoiled by the corrections of a too careful teacher, for it would have been, for our purpose, better if left in the quaintness and rudeness of its original Anglicized Chinese. But here it is just as it came into my hands It was fifteen years ago that I came to this country which the Chinese called the Golden Hills, and where we thought that gold and silver were as plenty as the sands on our sea-shore. It was the wish to get some of this money that led me to leave my home in China and to come and live among strangers in a strange land. For several years I worked for this, but I never found it. Then I began to gamble, think-

Rev. W. C. Pond, D.D. Pond, W. C., Rev., D.D. Testimonies to the Grace of God The Chinese 202-205

202 THE CHINESE. of Ethiopia who have come from centuries of slavery and ages of heathenism, but now face a future of promise. Go on, girls, go on in this very way. Study, work, follow your teachers and your Lord. The red, white and blue is your flag, America is your country, and all time to come is yours for success and happiness. The Chinese. TESTIMONIES TO THE GRACE OF GOD. BE REV. w. c. POND, D.D. I am writing this in San Diego, having just completed my annual round of visits to our missions in Southern California. It has been, on the whole, the most restful and delightful tour of this sort that I have ever taken: the blessed sunshine which has cheered all nature fitly symbolizing the comfort I have found in the condition and progress of our work. At each point I hold what we call an anniversary, using for the pur- pose both Sunday and week-day evenings, since I could not otherwise complete the round during the annual vacation granted by my church. By means of these anniversaries not only is interest in the work made more general and deep, but offerings in aid of it are secured without which we would be compelled to suspend our operations. The most interesting features of these meetings are the original addresses, generally more or less autobiographical, made by Chinese brethren, and I have felt moved to give to the readers of THE MIssIoN- ARE extracts from several of these. I am sure that if the space at my command admitted of it many of them might be given, and given in full, without causing the readers interest in them to flag. There is in the mission at Los Angeles a brother whose littleness of stature made me think always of Zacchleus, while his zeal and conse- cration, though not the measure of his possessions, helped to complete the parallel. Here is his addresssomewhat spoiled by the corrections of a too careful teacher, for it would have been, for our purpose, better if left in the quaintness and rudeness of its original Anglicized Chinese. But here it is just as it came into my hands It was fifteen years ago that I came to this country which the Chinese called the Golden Hills, and where we thought that gold and silver were as plenty as the sands on our sea-shore. It was the wish to get some of this money that led me to leave my home in China and to come and live among strangers in a strange land. For several years I worked for this, but I never found it. Then I began to gamble, think- TESTIMONIES TO TUE CPA CE OF GOD. 203 ing it might be easier to get rich in that way. But instead of getting rich I lost all that I had. About three years ago I began to go to the Mission School. Before that I had no desire to learn the English language or to hear the preach- ing of the gospel. But the grace of God was sufficient for even me. Soon after going to the Mission I was convinced of the sinfulness of my past life and was converted and began to live a new life. I have not found the money that I came here for, but I have found greater riches in Jesus,riches that no one can take away from me. If I should go back to China without any money, but with Jesus in my heart, I should think myself the richest man in the world. Thanks be unto God for his unspeakable gift ! Here is one by Lee Mow, of Fresno: DEAR FRIEND5.I am very pleased to meet you here this evening. I am going to try to tell you how I found this Mission and Jesus. I am very, very glad in my heart that I am a Christian now. When I came over to this country from China I went to St. Helena. The lady and her family were very kind to me. They taught me how to cook, and also taught me to speak English. I think they must be Christian people. After I stayed there for about three years, I came to Fresno, which was about two years ago. While I was here I was led by bad friends to walk in evil ways and do things which did not please God and all the good people. Although I know where the Mission School is, I did not like to go to it, but keep on about a year doing bad things. Then brother Leang Din met me and got me to attend school. After I learned that Jesus was the Son of God and he had died for me, and if I love him he will love me and will forgive all my sins,so I joined with the Association of Christian Chinese in our Mission. And I was baptized by Rev. Mr. Collins who is my pastor of this church and I am very glad to tell you to-night I am a member of this church and I mean f shall try to be a true Christian. I am praying to Jesus to help me to do good every day so long as I live on earth and I thank my teachers who had been so kind to me. It was [due to] their efforts that to-day I am among you, a Christian. They taught me about Jesus who did love every sinner like myself. I will preach and tell my people here and in China. Ah, how great is God and how loving is Jesus ! May every one love him in this room to-night. God bless you forever and ever Here is one from our little mission at Vernondale, a suburb of Los Angeles, where a great many Chinese lease ground and cultivate vege- tables for the Los Angeles market. Wong Bue was born in this State, and when his parents went back to China, was left, at the age of four, in the care of an uncle, who is said to be very fond of him, and to regard him ~s a son, The address has evidently beer~ correeted too THE CHJATESE. 204 much in its English, but its ideas are original: It is with pleasure I come before you to-night that I may thank my friends for what they have done to keep up our Mission School. It is now about three years since I entered the Vernondale Mission, and I very much enjoy study- ing the English language and customs. For, although I am a native Californian, I had never before had chances to attend any school. And now I can even read the Bible,the book which my American friends say is the best book in the world. And my teacher hopes I soon will be able to say from my heart, The Lord is my refuge and strength, a very present help in time of trouble. [Probably this is a verse com- mitted to memory by him in the school, upon his reciting which his faithful and earnest teacher had expressed the hope to which he refers. W. C. P.] Our readers have seen that Wong Bue does not yet pro- fess to be a Christian. It would be in him, if once regenerated, to be of great service to his countrymen. I conclude with a brief address given at Ventura by Lem Tim Kee, the Chinese merchant of that village, and a very thrifty, substantial man and Christian: DEAR FRIENDs.I would like to tell you about myself, and how I became a Christian. Twenty years ago when I was at home, I had seen and heard of Christianity, there were some preachers who preached the gosple at the City of Canton. Yet I did not know what it was or what good for human beings. Because I had not learnd of it. And then shortly I came to California in 1875. So I began to go in some of the mission schools. After awhile I had searched and examined this religious and the Bible. Now I have found out the love of God that He gave His only begotten Son to break down the parti- tion of the nations and be a propitiation for our sins. At first I thought Christ only for the foreigners not for our people. Finally I found the Bible said: Jesus has died for all nations My favorite verse is St. John 3rd, i6, For God so love the world that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believe in Him should not perish but have everlasting life. I was converted in this city in 1891. Our kind teacher who was active in the Masters work, showed her kindness and Christian charity. It seems to me the children of God make plain His love to all those who obey Him. These are not selected as the best, but rather as the briefest and possibly most characteristic of these testimonies. Other addresses (some of them of great interest and ability) were on such subjects as The Present War as seen by a Christian Chinese, and Education in China, and The True Light Enlightening China. But my space is more than occupied, and I must desist. iN MEMORIAM. In Memoriam. It is seldom that we are called upon to render in a single number of TIlE MISSIONARY our tribute to the memory of so many faithful friends, who in a greater or less degree have been connected with the American Missionary Association. We mourn their loss, yet rejoice that their lives were so full of Christian charity and good works as to leave only hallowed memories behind them. COL. FRANKLIN FAIRBANKS. This honored man, who died April 24, combined in an unusual degree the best traits of a successful business man with a broad, intel- ligent and active Christian life. He was the head of one of the largest manufacturing establishments in America, he was the president or di- rector of several banks, railroads and other corporations, and was also engaged in positions of responsibility in military and civil service; and yet he still had the heart and ability to engage most effectively in various forms of benevolent and Christian activity. He was a faithful member and officer of the church, and in the erection of the Fairbanks Museum of Natural Science, in his native town, he manifested both his cultured taste in science and his interest in education. He was a corporate member of the American Board and a member of the Com- mittee on the International Sunday School Lessons. He was for a time a member of the Executive Committee of the American Missionary Association, and none who were present at its last meeting, in Lowell, Mass., will forget his valuable service in the examination of the finan- cial condition of the Association and in the clear and business-like manner in which he presented the subject. REV. J. G. CRAIGHEAD, D.D. Dr. Craighead was born in Carlisle, Pa., 1823, and died in New York, 1895. He was educated in the schools of his native State and in Union Theological Seminary of this city. After a short pastorate he was associated with Rev. Dr. Field in the editing and managing of the New York Evangelist. After spending fourteen years in this position, and after extensive travel in Europe and the East, he devoted some time in Philadelphia, to work for the Presbyterian Historical Society. But in the later years of his life he was Dean of the Theological Depart- ment of Howard University, Washington, D. C. This brought hini into close relations with the officers of this Association, and ~ve dan bear testimony not only to his faithfulness as a teacher, but to his deep personal interest in the welfare of the students. By his own exertions,

Col. Franklin Fairbanks In Memoriam 205

iN MEMORIAM. In Memoriam. It is seldom that we are called upon to render in a single number of TIlE MISSIONARY our tribute to the memory of so many faithful friends, who in a greater or less degree have been connected with the American Missionary Association. We mourn their loss, yet rejoice that their lives were so full of Christian charity and good works as to leave only hallowed memories behind them. COL. FRANKLIN FAIRBANKS. This honored man, who died April 24, combined in an unusual degree the best traits of a successful business man with a broad, intel- ligent and active Christian life. He was the head of one of the largest manufacturing establishments in America, he was the president or di- rector of several banks, railroads and other corporations, and was also engaged in positions of responsibility in military and civil service; and yet he still had the heart and ability to engage most effectively in various forms of benevolent and Christian activity. He was a faithful member and officer of the church, and in the erection of the Fairbanks Museum of Natural Science, in his native town, he manifested both his cultured taste in science and his interest in education. He was a corporate member of the American Board and a member of the Com- mittee on the International Sunday School Lessons. He was for a time a member of the Executive Committee of the American Missionary Association, and none who were present at its last meeting, in Lowell, Mass., will forget his valuable service in the examination of the finan- cial condition of the Association and in the clear and business-like manner in which he presented the subject. REV. J. G. CRAIGHEAD, D.D. Dr. Craighead was born in Carlisle, Pa., 1823, and died in New York, 1895. He was educated in the schools of his native State and in Union Theological Seminary of this city. After a short pastorate he was associated with Rev. Dr. Field in the editing and managing of the New York Evangelist. After spending fourteen years in this position, and after extensive travel in Europe and the East, he devoted some time in Philadelphia, to work for the Presbyterian Historical Society. But in the later years of his life he was Dean of the Theological Depart- ment of Howard University, Washington, D. C. This brought hini into close relations with the officers of this Association, and ~ve dan bear testimony not only to his faithfulness as a teacher, but to his deep personal interest in the welfare of the students. By his own exertions,

Rev. J. G. Craighead, D.D. In Memoriam 205-206

iN MEMORIAM. In Memoriam. It is seldom that we are called upon to render in a single number of TIlE MISSIONARY our tribute to the memory of so many faithful friends, who in a greater or less degree have been connected with the American Missionary Association. We mourn their loss, yet rejoice that their lives were so full of Christian charity and good works as to leave only hallowed memories behind them. COL. FRANKLIN FAIRBANKS. This honored man, who died April 24, combined in an unusual degree the best traits of a successful business man with a broad, intel- ligent and active Christian life. He was the head of one of the largest manufacturing establishments in America, he was the president or di- rector of several banks, railroads and other corporations, and was also engaged in positions of responsibility in military and civil service; and yet he still had the heart and ability to engage most effectively in various forms of benevolent and Christian activity. He was a faithful member and officer of the church, and in the erection of the Fairbanks Museum of Natural Science, in his native town, he manifested both his cultured taste in science and his interest in education. He was a corporate member of the American Board and a member of the Com- mittee on the International Sunday School Lessons. He was for a time a member of the Executive Committee of the American Missionary Association, and none who were present at its last meeting, in Lowell, Mass., will forget his valuable service in the examination of the finan- cial condition of the Association and in the clear and business-like manner in which he presented the subject. REV. J. G. CRAIGHEAD, D.D. Dr. Craighead was born in Carlisle, Pa., 1823, and died in New York, 1895. He was educated in the schools of his native State and in Union Theological Seminary of this city. After a short pastorate he was associated with Rev. Dr. Field in the editing and managing of the New York Evangelist. After spending fourteen years in this position, and after extensive travel in Europe and the East, he devoted some time in Philadelphia, to work for the Presbyterian Historical Society. But in the later years of his life he was Dean of the Theological Depart- ment of Howard University, Washington, D. C. This brought hini into close relations with the officers of this Association, and ~ve dan bear testimony not only to his faithfulness as a teacher, but to his deep personal interest in the welfare of the students. By his own exertions, 206 IN MEMORJAM. and from his own purse, many of them were tided over difficult spots in their endeavors to secure an education. REV. GEORGE T. HOLYOKE. This faithful minister of the Gospel entered into his rest January 22, t89~. He was always a friend of the colored people, often befriending or helping them, and although a great sufferer through exposure during his army life, he was comforted by the fact that he had a hand in help- ing to free the slaves. His last work on earth was as pastor of the Lincoln street Congregational church in Topeka, Kan., a church that had some time before been organized by this Association. The last service he conducted was at the home of one of the humble members of the church, less than a week before his own departure. MR. ISAAC J. ST. JOHN Was born in Walton, N. Y., in 1834, died in Oswego ~fl 1895, and was buried in Walton. Mr. St. John was an intelligent and efficient business man, of great integrity and consecrated Christian character. In x88r, when some difficulties had arisen in the mission of this Association in West Africa, Mr. St. John was appointed as superintendent of the mis- sion, with a view of rectifying these difficulties, especially in their busi- ness and financial aspects. He spent about a year at the mission and performed the duties assigned to him with wisdom and efficiency. The officers of the Association retain a pleasant remembrance of his charac- ter and of his useful work in our service. MISS ISABELLA DAVIS FEEMSTER. Miss Isabella D. Feemster died in New Ruhama, Miss., on Sabbath morning, March 31, 1895, aged 69 years. For many years she had been a missionary among the colored people in the neighborhood of her home, where her father, Rev. S. A. Feemster, was an A. M. A. missionary for a long time, and had a special interest in all reforms of the day. She was greatly attached to the Sunday-school work and loved to teach the word of God to the poor and ignorant. Her faith never wavered in the prosecution of this work. Before she passed away she said: I am not afraid to die. I am happy. in the Lord. I am ready and waiting whenever He sees fit to call me. REV. L. C. WHITE, The aged pastor of the churches at Henrietta, McClurds, Moorhead and Prims Grove, N. C., recently passed away. His last illness was largely occasioned by exposure in his labors among these scattered congregations. He was a faithful laborer in the vineyard of the Lord.

Rev. George T. Holyoke In Memoriam 206

206 IN MEMORJAM. and from his own purse, many of them were tided over difficult spots in their endeavors to secure an education. REV. GEORGE T. HOLYOKE. This faithful minister of the Gospel entered into his rest January 22, t89~. He was always a friend of the colored people, often befriending or helping them, and although a great sufferer through exposure during his army life, he was comforted by the fact that he had a hand in help- ing to free the slaves. His last work on earth was as pastor of the Lincoln street Congregational church in Topeka, Kan., a church that had some time before been organized by this Association. The last service he conducted was at the home of one of the humble members of the church, less than a week before his own departure. MR. ISAAC J. ST. JOHN Was born in Walton, N. Y., in 1834, died in Oswego ~fl 1895, and was buried in Walton. Mr. St. John was an intelligent and efficient business man, of great integrity and consecrated Christian character. In x88r, when some difficulties had arisen in the mission of this Association in West Africa, Mr. St. John was appointed as superintendent of the mis- sion, with a view of rectifying these difficulties, especially in their busi- ness and financial aspects. He spent about a year at the mission and performed the duties assigned to him with wisdom and efficiency. The officers of the Association retain a pleasant remembrance of his charac- ter and of his useful work in our service. MISS ISABELLA DAVIS FEEMSTER. Miss Isabella D. Feemster died in New Ruhama, Miss., on Sabbath morning, March 31, 1895, aged 69 years. For many years she had been a missionary among the colored people in the neighborhood of her home, where her father, Rev. S. A. Feemster, was an A. M. A. missionary for a long time, and had a special interest in all reforms of the day. She was greatly attached to the Sunday-school work and loved to teach the word of God to the poor and ignorant. Her faith never wavered in the prosecution of this work. Before she passed away she said: I am not afraid to die. I am happy. in the Lord. I am ready and waiting whenever He sees fit to call me. REV. L. C. WHITE, The aged pastor of the churches at Henrietta, McClurds, Moorhead and Prims Grove, N. C., recently passed away. His last illness was largely occasioned by exposure in his labors among these scattered congregations. He was a faithful laborer in the vineyard of the Lord.

Mr. Isaac J. St. John In Memoriam 206

206 IN MEMORJAM. and from his own purse, many of them were tided over difficult spots in their endeavors to secure an education. REV. GEORGE T. HOLYOKE. This faithful minister of the Gospel entered into his rest January 22, t89~. He was always a friend of the colored people, often befriending or helping them, and although a great sufferer through exposure during his army life, he was comforted by the fact that he had a hand in help- ing to free the slaves. His last work on earth was as pastor of the Lincoln street Congregational church in Topeka, Kan., a church that had some time before been organized by this Association. The last service he conducted was at the home of one of the humble members of the church, less than a week before his own departure. MR. ISAAC J. ST. JOHN Was born in Walton, N. Y., in 1834, died in Oswego ~fl 1895, and was buried in Walton. Mr. St. John was an intelligent and efficient business man, of great integrity and consecrated Christian character. In x88r, when some difficulties had arisen in the mission of this Association in West Africa, Mr. St. John was appointed as superintendent of the mis- sion, with a view of rectifying these difficulties, especially in their busi- ness and financial aspects. He spent about a year at the mission and performed the duties assigned to him with wisdom and efficiency. The officers of the Association retain a pleasant remembrance of his charac- ter and of his useful work in our service. MISS ISABELLA DAVIS FEEMSTER. Miss Isabella D. Feemster died in New Ruhama, Miss., on Sabbath morning, March 31, 1895, aged 69 years. For many years she had been a missionary among the colored people in the neighborhood of her home, where her father, Rev. S. A. Feemster, was an A. M. A. missionary for a long time, and had a special interest in all reforms of the day. She was greatly attached to the Sunday-school work and loved to teach the word of God to the poor and ignorant. Her faith never wavered in the prosecution of this work. Before she passed away she said: I am not afraid to die. I am happy. in the Lord. I am ready and waiting whenever He sees fit to call me. REV. L. C. WHITE, The aged pastor of the churches at Henrietta, McClurds, Moorhead and Prims Grove, N. C., recently passed away. His last illness was largely occasioned by exposure in his labors among these scattered congregations. He was a faithful laborer in the vineyard of the Lord.

Miss Isabella D. Feemster In Memoriam 206

206 IN MEMORJAM. and from his own purse, many of them were tided over difficult spots in their endeavors to secure an education. REV. GEORGE T. HOLYOKE. This faithful minister of the Gospel entered into his rest January 22, t89~. He was always a friend of the colored people, often befriending or helping them, and although a great sufferer through exposure during his army life, he was comforted by the fact that he had a hand in help- ing to free the slaves. His last work on earth was as pastor of the Lincoln street Congregational church in Topeka, Kan., a church that had some time before been organized by this Association. The last service he conducted was at the home of one of the humble members of the church, less than a week before his own departure. MR. ISAAC J. ST. JOHN Was born in Walton, N. Y., in 1834, died in Oswego ~fl 1895, and was buried in Walton. Mr. St. John was an intelligent and efficient business man, of great integrity and consecrated Christian character. In x88r, when some difficulties had arisen in the mission of this Association in West Africa, Mr. St. John was appointed as superintendent of the mis- sion, with a view of rectifying these difficulties, especially in their busi- ness and financial aspects. He spent about a year at the mission and performed the duties assigned to him with wisdom and efficiency. The officers of the Association retain a pleasant remembrance of his charac- ter and of his useful work in our service. MISS ISABELLA DAVIS FEEMSTER. Miss Isabella D. Feemster died in New Ruhama, Miss., on Sabbath morning, March 31, 1895, aged 69 years. For many years she had been a missionary among the colored people in the neighborhood of her home, where her father, Rev. S. A. Feemster, was an A. M. A. missionary for a long time, and had a special interest in all reforms of the day. She was greatly attached to the Sunday-school work and loved to teach the word of God to the poor and ignorant. Her faith never wavered in the prosecution of this work. Before she passed away she said: I am not afraid to die. I am happy. in the Lord. I am ready and waiting whenever He sees fit to call me. REV. L. C. WHITE, The aged pastor of the churches at Henrietta, McClurds, Moorhead and Prims Grove, N. C., recently passed away. His last illness was largely occasioned by exposure in his labors among these scattered congregations. He was a faithful laborer in the vineyard of the Lord.

Rev. L. C. White In Memoriam 206-207

206 IN MEMORJAM. and from his own purse, many of them were tided over difficult spots in their endeavors to secure an education. REV. GEORGE T. HOLYOKE. This faithful minister of the Gospel entered into his rest January 22, t89~. He was always a friend of the colored people, often befriending or helping them, and although a great sufferer through exposure during his army life, he was comforted by the fact that he had a hand in help- ing to free the slaves. His last work on earth was as pastor of the Lincoln street Congregational church in Topeka, Kan., a church that had some time before been organized by this Association. The last service he conducted was at the home of one of the humble members of the church, less than a week before his own departure. MR. ISAAC J. ST. JOHN Was born in Walton, N. Y., in 1834, died in Oswego ~fl 1895, and was buried in Walton. Mr. St. John was an intelligent and efficient business man, of great integrity and consecrated Christian character. In x88r, when some difficulties had arisen in the mission of this Association in West Africa, Mr. St. John was appointed as superintendent of the mis- sion, with a view of rectifying these difficulties, especially in their busi- ness and financial aspects. He spent about a year at the mission and performed the duties assigned to him with wisdom and efficiency. The officers of the Association retain a pleasant remembrance of his charac- ter and of his useful work in our service. MISS ISABELLA DAVIS FEEMSTER. Miss Isabella D. Feemster died in New Ruhama, Miss., on Sabbath morning, March 31, 1895, aged 69 years. For many years she had been a missionary among the colored people in the neighborhood of her home, where her father, Rev. S. A. Feemster, was an A. M. A. missionary for a long time, and had a special interest in all reforms of the day. She was greatly attached to the Sunday-school work and loved to teach the word of God to the poor and ignorant. Her faith never wavered in the prosecution of this work. Before she passed away she said: I am not afraid to die. I am happy. in the Lord. I am ready and waiting whenever He sees fit to call me. REV. L. C. WHITE, The aged pastor of the churches at Henrietta, McClurds, Moorhead and Prims Grove, N. C., recently passed away. His last illness was largely occasioned by exposure in his labors among these scattered congregations. He was a faithful laborer in the vineyard of the Lord. RECEIPTS. RECEIPTS FOR APRIL, 1895. THE DANIEL HAND FUND For the Education of Colored People. Income for April Previously acknowledged CURRENT RECEIPTS. MAINE, $498.~g. Alfred. Missionary Circle, for Student Aid, Pleasant Hill, Tenn in on Alfred. E. L. Merrill, Eli. C. for Blow- ing Rock, N. C. Bangor. Womans National Indian Asso., 5~ Mrs. E. L. Crosby, in mem- ory of Anna Leland Crosby, 5 for Hos tital, Fort Yates, N. D 58 00 Bangor. Mrs. Dr. Field, 23; Sab. Sch. First Parish Cli., 20.56; Mrs. E. L. Crosby, s, for Indian Sch., Qahe, S. P 4456 Bangor. Central Cli., for Student A id, Pleasant Hill, Tena 15 on Belfast. Cong. Ch 29 25 Brewer. First Cong. Ch II 75 East Otisfield. Edward C. Loring . s on Ellsworth. Friends 8 nn Farmington. Miss C. N. Bixhy, for Stu dent Aid, Pleasant Hill Acad., Tenn 2 01 Fort Fairfield. V. P. 5. C. E., for Stu- dent Aid, Skyland Inst., Blowing Rock, N.C Son Lewiston. Junior J3and by Miss Wey- mouth, Bbl. Goods for Gregory Inst., Wilmington, N. C. Limerick. Cong. Cli North Bridgton. W. M. Soc., Bbl. Bed- ding, etc., and freight, 2.so,for Talla- dega, Ala 2 20 Parsonsfield. Daniel Smith 23 on Portland. West Cong. Ch., 22; St. Law- rence St. Ch., 14.34 36 34 Robbinston. W. M. Soc. of Cong. Ch., Bhl. Bedding, etc., and freight, 2,for T llodega,Ala 2 00 Sidney. A. Sawtelle 9 50 Waterville. Cong. Ch. V. P. 5. C. E., for C. F. Hall, McIntosh, Ga in 00 Waterville. Friend, for Student A id, Pleasant Hill Acad Tenn 00 Woodfords. Mrs. Woiidburys Sab. 5db. Class, for Student Aid, Talladega C.. 2 00 Woodfords. W. M. Soc. of Cong. Cli., for frezeht to Talladega, Ala., 2.78; Mrs. C. A. Woodhury, 2.50 for freight to Blowing Rock, N. C.: freight to Kings Mountain, N. C 4 30 Maine Womans Aid to A. M. A., by Mrs. ida Vose Woodhury, Treas., for Womans Work: Albany. Mrs. H. G. Love- joy,3; I 400 Brunswick. Ladies of Cong. Ch 75on Calais 25 00 Machiss 30 on Portland. Second Parish Aids 20 00 254 00 $442 39 ESTATE. Corinth. Estate of Sarah E. Perham, by John L. Crosby, Treas. Maine Missy Socy... 57 on $498 39 NEW HAMPSHIRE, $2,458.42. Atkinson. Cong. Ch 20 73 Concord. First Cong. Ch. and Soc., to coost. MRS. SYLVESTER DANA, MRS. THOMAs M. LANG, HENRY K. MoRRisoN and V. C. HAsTINGS L. Ms 222 24 Concord. V. L. M. S., for mdl Dej3t., Straight U 25 on Greenland. Cong. Ch 22 40 Hampton. Cong. Ch 4 50 Hinsdale. Cong. Ch 4 02 Kensington. Friends,for Indian M 2 6n Nashua. Pilgrim Cli ,adl 22 29 Nashua. Pilgrim Cli., A Friend, for freight to Moorhead, Miss 3 50 Nashua. Miss A. Spaulding, Bhl. C. for Blowing Rock, V. C. Stratham. Sab. Sch. Cong. Cli in on New Hampshire Female 4Jent. Inst. and Home Missionary Union, Miss Annie A. McFarland, Treas., for Womans Work: West Concord, Young Ladies M. Soc 20 CO $225 28 ESTATE. Kecne. Estate of Emily Robinson, by Gen. H. Griffin, Executor . $2,233 23 $2,458 41 VERMONT, $2,634.55. Barre. C. C. B. Berlin. Cong. Cli Brandon. Mrs. L. G. Case Brattleboro. Center Cong. Cli., A Friend Burlington. Sal. Seli. College St. Cli., for Central Ch., New Orleans, La.... Burlington. Ladies of College St. Cli., B. of C. for McIntosh, Ga. Chelsea. Cong. Cli., for Macon, Ga Jeffersonville. Mrs. H. W. Varnums S. S. Class,for Student A id, Straight U. Lunenburg. Cong. Cli Manchester. Miss E. J. Kellogg Middlebury. Cong. Cli Newport. First Cong. Cli. Newport. Mrs. Emma L. Richmond, for Student Aid, Mcintosh, Ga Newport. Mrs. E. L. Richmond, for freight to Mcintosh, Ga. North ( raftsbury. Cong. Cli Pawlet. A Friend Peru. Dea. Edmund Batchelder on 25 Ii ~on 200 00 8 00 5on 24 i8 12 38 4 i6 84 6on 5 on no 207 $1,460 no 22,558 64 $24,018 64

Receipts for April, 1895 207-216

RECEIPTS. RECEIPTS FOR APRIL, 1895. THE DANIEL HAND FUND For the Education of Colored People. Income for April Previously acknowledged CURRENT RECEIPTS. MAINE, $498.~g. Alfred. Missionary Circle, for Student Aid, Pleasant Hill, Tenn in on Alfred. E. L. Merrill, Eli. C. for Blow- ing Rock, N. C. Bangor. Womans National Indian Asso., 5~ Mrs. E. L. Crosby, in mem- ory of Anna Leland Crosby, 5 for Hos tital, Fort Yates, N. D 58 00 Bangor. Mrs. Dr. Field, 23; Sab. Sch. First Parish Cli., 20.56; Mrs. E. L. Crosby, s, for Indian Sch., Qahe, S. P 4456 Bangor. Central Cli., for Student A id, Pleasant Hill, Tena 15 on Belfast. Cong. Ch 29 25 Brewer. First Cong. Ch II 75 East Otisfield. Edward C. Loring . s on Ellsworth. Friends 8 nn Farmington. Miss C. N. Bixhy, for Stu dent Aid, Pleasant Hill Acad., Tenn 2 01 Fort Fairfield. V. P. 5. C. E., for Stu- dent Aid, Skyland Inst., Blowing Rock, N.C Son Lewiston. Junior J3and by Miss Wey- mouth, Bbl. Goods for Gregory Inst., Wilmington, N. C. Limerick. Cong. Cli North Bridgton. W. M. Soc., Bbl. Bed- ding, etc., and freight, 2.so,for Talla- dega, Ala 2 20 Parsonsfield. Daniel Smith 23 on Portland. West Cong. Ch., 22; St. Law- rence St. Ch., 14.34 36 34 Robbinston. W. M. Soc. of Cong. Ch., Bhl. Bedding, etc., and freight, 2,for T llodega,Ala 2 00 Sidney. A. Sawtelle 9 50 Waterville. Cong. Ch. V. P. 5. C. E., for C. F. Hall, McIntosh, Ga in 00 Waterville. Friend, for Student A id, Pleasant Hill Acad Tenn 00 Woodfords. Mrs. Woiidburys Sab. 5db. Class, for Student Aid, Talladega C.. 2 00 Woodfords. W. M. Soc. of Cong. Cli., for frezeht to Talladega, Ala., 2.78; Mrs. C. A. Woodhury, 2.50 for freight to Blowing Rock, N. C.: freight to Kings Mountain, N. C 4 30 Maine Womans Aid to A. M. A., by Mrs. ida Vose Woodhury, Treas., for Womans Work: Albany. Mrs. H. G. Love- joy,3; I 400 Brunswick. Ladies of Cong. Ch 75on Calais 25 00 Machiss 30 on Portland. Second Parish Aids 20 00 254 00 $442 39 ESTATE. Corinth. Estate of Sarah E. Perham, by John L. Crosby, Treas. Maine Missy Socy... 57 on $498 39 NEW HAMPSHIRE, $2,458.42. Atkinson. Cong. Ch 20 73 Concord. First Cong. Ch. and Soc., to coost. MRS. SYLVESTER DANA, MRS. THOMAs M. LANG, HENRY K. MoRRisoN and V. C. HAsTINGS L. Ms 222 24 Concord. V. L. M. S., for mdl Dej3t., Straight U 25 on Greenland. Cong. Ch 22 40 Hampton. Cong. Ch 4 50 Hinsdale. Cong. Ch 4 02 Kensington. Friends,for Indian M 2 6n Nashua. Pilgrim Cli ,adl 22 29 Nashua. Pilgrim Cli., A Friend, for freight to Moorhead, Miss 3 50 Nashua. Miss A. Spaulding, Bhl. C. for Blowing Rock, V. C. Stratham. Sab. Sch. Cong. Cli in on New Hampshire Female 4Jent. Inst. and Home Missionary Union, Miss Annie A. McFarland, Treas., for Womans Work: West Concord, Young Ladies M. Soc 20 CO $225 28 ESTATE. Kecne. Estate of Emily Robinson, by Gen. H. Griffin, Executor . $2,233 23 $2,458 41 VERMONT, $2,634.55. Barre. C. C. B. Berlin. Cong. Cli Brandon. Mrs. L. G. Case Brattleboro. Center Cong. Cli., A Friend Burlington. Sal. Seli. College St. Cli., for Central Ch., New Orleans, La.... Burlington. Ladies of College St. Cli., B. of C. for McIntosh, Ga. Chelsea. Cong. Cli., for Macon, Ga Jeffersonville. Mrs. H. W. Varnums S. S. Class,for Student A id, Straight U. Lunenburg. Cong. Cli Manchester. Miss E. J. Kellogg Middlebury. Cong. Cli Newport. First Cong. Cli. Newport. Mrs. Emma L. Richmond, for Student Aid, Mcintosh, Ga Newport. Mrs. E. L. Richmond, for freight to Mcintosh, Ga. North ( raftsbury. Cong. Cli Pawlet. A Friend Peru. Dea. Edmund Batchelder on 25 Ii ~on 200 00 8 00 5on 24 i8 12 38 4 i6 84 6on 5 on no 207 $1,460 no 22,558 64 $24,018 64 208 RECEIPTS. Putney. Cong. Ch., 16.30, and Sab. Sch., 6.50 22 8o Randolph. First Cong. Ch ... 8 50 Rutland. Mrs. Fred. Chaffee, by New- man K. Chaffee, for mdi Dejst., Sire ight U i,ooo 00 St. Johnsbury. Uk ..~. for Leaf lets 25 Soutb Royalton. Mrs. Susan H. Jones 200 oo Underhill. Cong. Ch 5 44 West Brattleboro. Cong. Ch 25 53 West Randolph. A Friend 00 West Rutland. Cong. Ch 22 o8 Friends in Vermont 20 oo Womans Home Missionary Union of Vermont, by Mrs. William P. Fair- banks, Treas., for Womans Work: Barton. W. H. M. S 8 50 Barton. Childrens Missionary Soc.,for Indian Sclljl 6 70 Barre. L.M.S iooo Bennington, North. W. H. M.S Brattleboro, West. W. H. M. S 4000 Charlotte. W. H. M. S 20 00 Coventry. Mrs. Niles S. S. Class,for Indian S.hzS.... 6 00 Cbarleston, West. Junior C. E.,for Indian SchA 2 50 Glover, West. W. H. M. 5.. ~ 00 Middlehury. L. D. M. 5.... 20 00 Montpelier. L. M. S 50 00 Pittsford. . Kings Daughters 00 St. Johnshury. So. Ch., W. H.M.S 8000 Sheldon. S. S. Class, for Indian Schj3 I 00 Underhill. Homeland Circle 6 00 MASSACHUSETTS, $4,328.61. Ameshury. Ladies H. M. Soc., Bbl. Bed- ding, etc.,for Talladega, Ala. Amherst. Sab. Sch. First Cong. Ch Amherst. ~Friends, for Indian AL, Santee, Neb Amherst. Colored S. S., by Mrs. Tucker- man, Bbl. Goods for Gregory Inst., Wilmington, N. C. Andover. A Friend, for Mountain Work Ashfield. Cong. Ch., Bhl. C. for Evarts, Ky. Athol. Miss Chandler forBuggy, Mcin- tosh, Ga Attlehoro. Second Cong Ch. V. P.S. C. E. Becket. North Cong. Ch Bernardston. Cong. Ch Beverly. Washington St. V. P. 5. C. E., for Central Ck., Aew Orleans, La Boston: Central Ch 509 93 OldSouthCh.,adl 20300 Old South Ch., adi. from Nelson Curtis 22 oo Sab. Sch. Old South Ch.,for Fisk U 25 00 Mrs. J. H. Wolcott,forHos- lital, Fort Yates, N. D.. 25 00 Miss E. B. Thatcher, for Student Aid, Pleasant Hill, Teon TO 00 V. P. 5. C. E. of Berkeley Temple/or Student A id, Pleasant Hill A cad., Teon... 800 Edwards Ch., Annie C. Bridgman, for Thea. Stndent Aid, Straight U. 762 V. W. C. A., hy Miss M. L. Thompson,for Marshall vile, Ga 5 00 Whatsoever Circle, for 4 6~ I 50 5 00 700 800 5 00 Gregory Inst., Wilozing ton, N.C 200 Dorchester. Second Cong. Ch. (s of which Jor Chinese Women) 76 75 Second Cong. Ch., for Stu- dent Aid, Pleasant Hill, Tenn 5 00 Mrs. Jacob Fullerton, for Ilosj3ital, Fort Yates, N. D 2500 Jamaica Plain. Boylston Cong. Ch. (2 of whichfor Indian M., Qahe, S. D.) 6i 42 Roxbury. Walnut Ave. Cong. Ch 23435 Mrs. C. E. Aldrich, Walnut Av. Ch., 25; Mar- guerite, ~o cents, for Indian Schi., Qahe, S.D 25 50 Eliot Ch ~6 32 Sab. Sch. Cong. Ch., for Indian M., SanteeNeb.. 3522 Mrs. P. N. Livermore. Im- manuel Ch., for Indian M., Qahe, S. D. 5 00 West Roxhury. South Evan. Ch 57 so Mrs. Myra P. French, Bhl. C.for Mcintosh, Ga. s,x86 20 Bridgton. First Cong. Ch 23 50 Brookline. Harvard Cong. Ch 141 84 Buckland. Cong. Ch is 59 Camhridgeport. Pilgrim Cong. Ch 33 38 Cambridgeport. Pilgrim Ch., Easter Offering 15 00 Charlestown. Winthrop Cong. Ch 35 36 Chelsea. Central Cong. Ch., ~ First Cong. Ch., S 39 33 Chesterfield. Cong. Ch 3 00 Clinton. W. H. M. Soc. of Cong. Ch., for Wilmington, N. C 8 00 Dalton. V. P. S.C. E.,for C. E. Hall, Mcintosh, Ga 20 00 Dalton. Ladies Soc., Bhl. Household Goodsfor Boarding Hall, Cumberland Gaz3, Tenn. Dedham. Sah. Sch. Cong. Ch , adi ~ 00 Dunstable. Cong. Ch., to const. MRS. 3. C. KENOALLL M ... 3200 East Douglas. Second Cong. Ch. and Soc 20 33 Fall River. Central Cong. Ch 25 00 Fitchburg. Mrs. F. F. Battles, for Chi- nqse M 50 Florence. Florence Cong. Ch 42 29 Great Barrington. Thursday Morning Cluh, for HosisitaA Fort Yates, N. D 8 ~s Greenfield. Second Cong. Ch 26 is Greenfield. S. B. Pierce, Pkg. Papers for Cumberland Ga13, Tenn. Hanover. Second Cong. Ch 7 6~ Haverhill. Riverside Union Ch 6 50 Haverhill. Mrs. C. M. Clark, Bhl. C. for Blowing Rock, N. C. Holyoke. First Cong. Ch. H. M. Soc., Bbl. C. for A odersonville, Ga. Huntington. First Ch 2 00 Hyde Park. First Cong. Ch 42 72 Hyde Park. Friends, for Student Aid, Yalladega C 2000 Lexington. Hancock Cong. Ch 6 ~5 Lowell. Eliot Ch. to const. JAMEs SyKEs L.M 3695 Lowell. Eliot Cong. Ch., Bhl. C. for Evarts, Ky. Lynn. Junior Endeavor of Central Ch., for Indian Schj3., Oahe Sek., N. D 50 00 Lynn. Central Cong. Ch., for Qahe Indian M 22 00 Lynn. First Cong. Ch., by J. J. McKen- zie, Bhl. Goods for Gregory Inst., Wilmington, N. C. Marihoro. Girls Miss Club of Union Ch., for Share, India M., Fort Berthold, N. D 25 00 RECEIPTS. Medford. Womans Miss. Soc. of Union Cong. Ch Meirose. Orthodox Cong. Ch., for Indian M Meirose Highlands. Cong. Ch Middlehoro. Thomas P. Carleton Millhury. Primary S. S. Class., hy Caro- lyn Waters, for Gregory Inst., Wil- mington, N C Newhury. First Cong. Ch Newhuryport. Belleville Cong. Ch. , for Mountain Work Newhuryport. Mrs. Grace M. Scott/or Student Aid, Normal Sch., Albany, Ga Newton. Eliot Ch Newton. Miss Cora Clark Flood, for Student Aid, Talladega C Newton Centre. First Cong. Ch Newton Highlands. Cong. Ch North Amherst. Jr. Y. P. S. C. E.,for Student Aid, Lincoln Acad., N. C.... Northampton. Friends, for Indian M., Sautee, Neb North Beverly. Cong. Ch., ~ Bhls C. for Evarts, Ky. North Brookfield. First Cong~ Ch., to const. MARY A. McD. SNELL L. M North Rochester. Cong. Ch., adl Norwich. Mrs. E. H. Coit, for freight to Blowing Rock, N. C Palmer. Prim. Dept. Sah. Sch. Cong. Ch.,forAcad., Nat Ala Pittsfield. First Cong. Ch., ~ Mrs. Harriet S. Strong, s~ South Cong. Y. P. 5. C. E., 13.49 Pittsfield. Mrs. Senator Dawesfor Hos- ~bital, Fort Yates, A. D Plainfield. Cong. Ch. Soc. and Sah. Sch. Quincy. Evan. Cong. Ch Roslindale. Miss F. H. Wiswall, hox of hooks, cx. charges paid, for Thomas- vilie, Ga. Royalaton.. First. Cong. Ch Salem. Tahernacle Ch., to const. JONAS JONES L. M Sharon. Cong. Ch., ~o; Cong. 5. 5., 10, to coost. MRS. MARY L. STONE L. M.... Salem. Miss C. Philhrick, South Ch Somerville. Prospect Hill Ch., ~ Winter Hill Cong. Ch., ~ Southhoro. Pilgrim Evan. Ch South Framingham. G. M. Amsden, 5; Mrs. A. M. Amsden, South Hadley. First Cong. Ch South Hadley Falls. Elizaheth Gaylord, for Straight U., New Orlcans, La South Weymouth. Mrs. Win. Dyer, for Student Aid, A. N. and I. Sch., Thomasnille, Ga. South Weymouth. Mr. and Mrs. Win. Dyer, Piano RentforA. N. and!. Sch.. Thomasnille, Ga. Springfield. Miss A. L. Saunders, for Gloucester Sch., Caj5johosic, Va Stockhridge. Miss Alice Byington, xoo; Miss Brewer, 3, for Indian Schj5s., Santee, Neb Stockhridge. A Friend Taunton. Trin. Cong. Ch. V. P. Union, for Mountai Work Townsend. Cong. Ch. . . Upton. First Cong. Ch Waltham. Trio. Cong. Ch.. Ware. V. P. 5. C. E., hy Mrs. Geo. E. Hale, for Gregory Inst., Wilnoington, N C Warren. L. M. S. for Teachers Library, Straight U., New Orleans, La Warren. V. P. S.C. E., hy Mrs. J.C. Strick- land, for Student A id, Mcintosh, Ga.. Wayland. Cong. Ch. V. P. 5. C. E., for Indian M., Flying Bys Village, N. D. Wellesley, Mrs. C. A. Ransom Westfield. Second Cong. Ch. Primary S. S. Class, for Gregory I st., Wil I 04 a6 83 600 17 96 3 89 3 00 95 00 5 00 103 94 109 30 800 6 00 32 00 I 24 76 22 5 00 24 26 600 3 o6 33 00 30 00 ~6 98 5 50 25 50 50 103 03 25 25 00 6 52 40 66 14 95 7 00 25 00 400 5 00 25 00 209 mington, N. C I 00 Westfield. Second Cong. Ch. Primary S. S. Class, Bhl. Goods for Gregory Inst., Wilmington, N C. West Medway. Second Cong. Ch., for Acad, Nat Ala 1000 West Medway. Second Cong. Ch 3 20 Westport. Pacific Union Cong. Ch West Stockhridge. Village Cong. Ch ... 25 6. Weymouth Heighis. Mrs. F. E. L., of First Ch., for Student Aid, Tougaloo U 500 Winchester. Sah. Sch. First Cong. Ch., for Girls Indl. Dejlt., Fisk U 20 00 Wohurn. Sah. Sch. Cong. Ch.,for Acad., Ntt,Ala 800 Woods Holl. Junior C. E. Soc., hy Mrs. Geo. S. Dodge, for Gregory Inst., Wil- mington, N. C I 00 Worcester. Union Ch., 93 04; Piedmont Ch., Quar., 30; , to coost. MRS. HARRIET A. ANDREWS L. M., 30 153 04 Worcester. Mrs. S. R. Rice,for Gregory Inst., Wilmington, N. C 4 Os Worcester. Miss J. F., Bhl. Books for Blowing Rock, N. C. Yarmouthport. E. D. Paynefor freight to Raleigh, N. C i co Hampden. Benevolent Association, hy Geo. R. Bond, Treas.: Chicopee. First Ch 4 8o Holyoke. Second Sah. Sch.. 50 00. Westfield. First Ch 76 co West Springfield. First Ch., 24; Mittineague, 26.71 50 72 18151 Womans Home Missionary Association of Mass, and R. I., Miss Annie C. Bridgman, Treas., for Womans Work. W.H.M.A 30773 Brighton. Cong. Ch.,25 Sah. Sch., i~ and Young Ladies, io, for Indian Schj5., Oahe, S.D 5000 Brimfield. Mrs. J. W. Brown- ing,for Chinese Women... 00 Meirose. Altruista, for Zn- dianM.,ND 200 Roxhury. Aux. Immanuel Ch. 30 74 39 47 $3,718 6i ESTATES. Milton. Estate of Miss Mary E. Vose, hy James W. Vose. Executor. 200 00 Ware. Estate of Mrs. Nancy B. Hitch. cock, hy Mrs. Eleanor L. Brainerd, Ex ecutrix 400 00 $4,318 6i CLOTHING, BooEs, ETC., RECEIVED AT BOSTON OFFICE: Newhury, Mass. First Cong Ch., Bhl. of C.for Grand View, Teon. Oxford, Mass. Mrs. B. F. White, Box of B00ksfor Meridi n, Miss. Varmouthport, Mass. Bhl. of C., hy F. D. Payne, for Raleigh, N. C. RHODE ISLAND, $83.10. Newport. United Cong. Ch Pawtucket. Mrs. Sarah Davis, for Indian M., 2; Prim. Dept. Sah. Sch. Cong. Ch., 2.03 .. Providence. Beneficent Cong. Ch Providence. Beneficent Ch. V. P. 5. C. E. ,for Student Aid, Blowing Rock, N. C Providence. V. P. 5. C. E. of North Cong. Ch Providence. Pkg. Humane Literature, from Humane Education Committee for Savannah, Ga. 23 38 3 03 57 69 800 216 PFCEIPTS. CONNECTICUT, $5,820.92. Andover. Cong. Ch 9 00 Bantam. Mrs. Ella M. Grannis 6 00 Barkhamsted. First Cong. Ch 3 ~ Berlin. Second Cong. Ch. Sab. Sch., ~ F. L. Wilcox, 25; Miss C. Hovey, io, for Student Aid, Tougaloo U . 70 00 Bloomfield. Cong. Ch., ~ Bbls. C for Evarts, Ky. Bolton. Mrs. Thomas L. Brown 00 Branford. Cong.Ch 52 67 Bridgeport. Olivet Cong. Ch i8 52 Bridgeport. C. M. Miner, Bbl Papers for Albany, Ga. Bridgewater. Cong. Ch. (3.50 of which Sab. 5db. Easter Offering) ~i 00 Bristol. Cong. Cli., 21.89; Miss C L. Bowman, z .. .. 22 89 Centrebrook. Ladies of Cong. Ch., for Allen N. and T. Sck., Thomasville, Ga . 22 00 Chester. Cong. Ch s 95 Coichester. Mrs. C. B. McCall/or Indian Sckj~., Santee, Neb 8 00 Danielsonville. Dea. James H Bailey and Wife, Golden Wedding Thank Offering 00 Darien. Cong. Ch 3 00 East Hampton. Cong. Ch., to const DRA. HORATIO D. CHAPMAN L. M 30 00 East Haven. Cong Ch.,for Central Ch., New Orleans, La 23 00 East Woodatock. Miss Alice C Chandler, Bbl. C. for Talladega, A/a Fairfield. Mrs. Eliza A. Lyon, for Fisk U 500 Farmington. C. E. Soc., by Mary J. Hart, Treas., for Central Ck., New Orleans, La 25 00 Franklin. Cong. Ch 3 00 4I~reenwich. John H. Brush 5 00 Groton. First Cong. Ch 9 30 Hartford. First Cong. Ch., 208.78; Rev. C. S. Beardslee, 25 233 78 Hartford. D. E. Howe, ~o; Judge and Mrs. Shipman, so; Henry Roberts, 25; John C. Parsons, 25; Mr. and Mrs. John Cooke, io, for Student A id, Tougaloo U 260 00 Hartford. Windsor Av. Cong. Cli., Bbl. and Box C. for Evarts, Ky. Hebron. Ladies of First Cong. Ch., for A. N. and I. Sck., Thomasnille, Ga 24 50 Hebron. Cong. Ch. S. S. Class, by S. A. Jaggerfor Student Aid, A. N. and I. ScA., Thomasville, Ga i 00 Lisbon. Cong. Ch 5 75 Mansfield Center. Mrs. Adaline Rouse, for Freedmen 2 00 Meriden. John S. Lane, for Student Aid, Tougaloo, Miss 5 00 Middlebury. Cong. Ch 22 00 Middle Haddam. Second Cong. Ch 5 00 Middletown. V. P. 5. C. E. of North Cong. Ch.,for Blowing Rock. N C.. io 00 Milford. Sab. Sch. Plymouth Ch 8 8r Morris. Sab. Sch. Cong. Ch 7 29 Naugatuck. Cong. Ch 200 00 New Lebanon. Milo Mead 4 50 New London. First Ch. of Christ 44 23 Norfolk. Plumb Brown 20 00 North Woodstock. Cong. Cli 25 54 New Haven. Davenport Ch.,92.74 Prof. Win. E. Chandler, 25 207 74 New Haven. Progressive Circle, Kings Daughters, by Stella E. Monson, Tress., for Sckj5., Blowing Rock, N. C 20 00 New Haven. Dixwell Av. Cong. Ch., for CentralCk, New Orleans La 2000 New Haven. Kings Daughters. for St dent Aid, Williamsburg A cad., Ky 900 New Haven. W. H. M. S. of College St. Ch., Box C. for Tougaloo. Miss. New Preston. Village Cli. and Soc...... 25 00 Poquonock. Cong. Cli 4 28 Putnam. Second Cong. Ch 27 8o Seymour. Cong. Ch 22 66 Sherman. Cong. (h 24 00 Somers. C. B. P. 6o 00 Southport. John G. Gorham 20 00 South Killingly. Cong. Ch 3 00 Stamford. First Cong. Ch. V. P. 5. C. E.,for Mountain Work in Tenn. hal. to coost. Miss MARY J. MILLs L. M 88 Stamford. Jr.Y. P. 5 C. E., for Sky- land Inst., Blowing Rock, N. C co Thomaston. Solomon Curtis, deceased, for Indian M 500 00 Thomaston. First Cong. Ch 22 6o Torrington. Cong. Ch. S. S. Class, by Miss C. A. Comstock,for Student Aid, A. N. and I. Sck., Tkomasville, Ga 2 oo Wallingford. Cong. Ch. Ladies Benev. Soc., Bhl. C. for Greenwood, S. C. Waterbury. Mrs. H. M. Peck, for Stn- dent Aid, Tougalon U To oo Wauregan. Cong. Ch. and Soc., i7.95; Y.P.S. CE., i.os 2900 West Hartford. First Ch. of Christ 25 52 West Hartford. Rev. T. M. Hodgdon, for Student A id, Tougalon U 00 West Winsted. Miss Isabel M. Holmes, for Student Aid, Tougalno U 25 00 Whitneyville. Cong. Ch 20 00 Willimantic. Mrs. Mary A. Williams 20 00 Wilton. Cong. Cli. V. P. 5. C. E., for Reading Room, Central Cli., New Orleans, La 25 00 Windsor. First Cong. Ch 6i 50 Womans Cong. Home Missionary Union, by Mrs. Ward W. Jacobs, Tress., for Womans Work. Naugatuck. La6ics Aid Soc 40 00 Newington. Ladies H. M. Union 9 00 New Milford. Ladies H. M. Soc 35 00 Norwich. Park Cli., 258.90; Second Cli., 50.00; Green- ville Cli., 20.00; Taftville Cli., 8.so; Geni. Collection, 26.64 254 0~ Whitneyville. Young Ladies M. Soc 4 00 342 04 $2,301 76 ESTATES. Chaplin. Estate of Mrs. Mary H. Dorrance, by E. H. Davison, Executor. 2 o 00 Cornwall. Estate of Silas C. Beers, John E. Calhoun and George C. Harrison, Executors 2,587 25 Groton. Estate of Mrs. B. N. Hurlbutt.. 30 oa New Haven. Estate of Nelson Hall, by A. M. Blakesley, Executor 2~O00 00 Norfolk. Estate of Mrs. Mary Langdon Porter 702 00 $5,820 92 NEW YORK, $2,928.72. Binghamton. First Cong. Cli. Bible School,for Fisk U 50 00 Binghamton. Mrs. Edward Taylor 20 00 Brooklyn. Central Cong. Cli., ~ Plymouth Cli., 203.83; Tompkins Av. Cong. Cli., coil, at Miss, meeting, 46. 985 iS Brooklyn. Sab. 5db., Central Cong. Cli., for Indiirn M., Santee, Neb 37 50 Brooklyn. Lewis Av. Cong. Cli. V. P. 5. C. l5.,for Indian M.. Oake, S.D 2500 Brooklyn. Park Cli. V. P. 5. C. E., by Mrs. Sami Osliorn, Blil Goods for Gregory Inst., Wilmington, N. C. RECEiPTS. brooklyn. Miss M. D. Halliday, Bbl. C. for Greenwood, S. C. Flushing. Sab. Sch. of Cong. Ch., for Indian M Honeoye. Cong. Cli. V. P. 5. C. E. for C. E. Hell, McIntosh, G Huntington. Rev. W. J. Jennings Jamesport. Cong. Ch Livonia Center. Mrs. Win. Calvert and Sister Lockport. First Cong. Ch Maine. First Cong. Cli Middle Island. Hannah M. Overtonfor ludian M New York. Miss Ellen Collins, for Gloucester Sch., Cq4/~ahosic, Va New York. Mrs. A. B. Woodford, for Fisk U New York. Miss D. E. Emerson, for Moorhead, Miss NewYork. M.C.H. New York. W. C. Conant,2 Dictionaries. Olean Cong. Cli. W. M. S., for freight to Hillsboro, N. C Owego. Cong. Lb., Box Books, etc.,for Big Creek Get, Tenn. Prohibition Park, S. I. Union Cong. Cli, Pulaski. Cong. Cli Riverhead. Cong. Cli., Young Mens S. S. Class, 3 Young Ladies S. S. Class, 2,for Williamsburg Aced., Ky Roseview. Anna Woodruff, for Macon, Ga Salamanca. Cong. Cli., 4.80; Y. P. 5. C.E. of Cong. Cli., 2.85 Sherburne. First Cong. Cli., to const. Rsv. WM. A. TROW and MRS. IDA 0. BRIEN L. M.s Sherburne. Miss Carrie E. Pratt, for horse for Telledege, Ale Slierburne. H. G. Newton, M.D.,for the Debt Sherburne. Cong. Sab. Sch.,for Student Aid., TelledegeC Smyrna. Sab. Sch.M iss. Soc. of Cong. Cli. (of which 8.52for Everts, Ky., and s5 for Big Creek Get, Tenn.) Spencerport. Prof. S. W. Clark Syracuse. Good Will Cong. Cli Syracuse. C. M. Hamlin, Papers for Blowing Rock, N. C. Syracuse. Mrs. C. A. Hamlin, 2 pkges. Humane Literature for Sevennek, Ge. Tarrytown. Mrs. Elbert B. Monroe, for Gloucester A. end I. Sch., (ettehosic, Ve Watertown. Emmanuel Cong. Cli. White Plains. Presbyterian Cli., Bhl. C. for Tougaloo, Miss. AFriend 14 90 3 7 4 25 3 00 28 52 20 00 50 00 30 00 25 00 I 40 2 50 5 00 500 3 00 ~ 121 89 76 43 35 00 35 03 3 00 25 00 5 00 Womans Home Missionary Union of N. V., by Mrs. J. J. Pearsall, Treas., for Womens Work: W.H.M.U.ofN.Y 10300 Albany. First Cli. L. H. M. S., and Whatsoever Circle ~ 00 Brooklyn. Puritan Cli. Jun. C.E 3000 Brooklyn. Central Cli. L. B. S 7800 Brooklyn. Central Cli., Class iii 5750 Brooklyn. Lewis Av. Earnest Workers, 40; Jun. Evangel. Circle,~ 45 00 Brooklyn. Lewis Av. Evan. Circle 29 31 Brooklyn. Park Cli. L. M. C., for Student Aid, Lin- coln Aced 6 00 Bridgewater. Aux . 5 00 Candor. Y. L. M. Guild xo 00 Crown Point. Aux si 50 Gloversville. Blue Bells 5 00 Honeoye. Aux ii 00 28 ~ Honeoye. Cheerful Givers io 00 Honeoye. Y. L. M. S 6 25 Ithaca. W. M. S 42 6o Ithaca. S. S., for Student Aid, Gregory Inst 24 00 Maine. W.H.M.S i6 on New York. Broadway Tab. Soc. for Womans Work 54 50 New York. Mrs. H. S. Cas- well, Dime Bank ~ 00 New Haven. Aux 9 77 Plininix. W. M. S., for Stu- dent Aid, Pleasant Hill, Tenn 32 00 Pouglikeepsie. Opportunity Circle 20 00 Riverhead. W. H~M. U 31 69 Syracuse. Geddes Cli. W. M.S 700 Wadhams Mills in on Walton. W.H.M.S 2000 Woodhaven. First Cong. Cli. Woodhaven. r Jr. E. 25 00 West Winfield. Mrs. Nettle SpenQer 25 25 68250 $2,428 71 ESTATE. Gloversville. Estate of Isaac V. Place, Wayland D. West and Cyrus Stewart, Executors 500 00 $2,928 71 NEW JERSEY, $634.02. East Orange. A Friend 37 50 Montclair. First Cong. Cli. (30 of which from D. 0. Eslibaugh, to coost. MAR- GARET ESHSAUGH L. M.) 316 Montclair. Womans H. M. Soc. of Cong. Cli., 2 Blils. C., val. $50, for A ndersonville, Ga. Womans Home Missionary Union of the N. J. Association, by Mrs. J. H. Deni- son, Treas. for Womens Work: Montclair, N. J. First Cong. Cli. W. H. M. Soc iSo 00 Washington, D. C. First Cong. Cli. W. H. M. Soc... 30 00 210 00 PENNSYLVANIA, $52.00. Allegheny. Miss Laura Whittaker, for Scht., Hillsboro Sch., N. C I 00 Arnot. Puritan Cong. Cli on Canton. H. Sheldon 25 00 Erie. Mrs. Emma Thompson, for Fisk U 500 Germantown. First Cong. Cli., Nee- sima Guild 20 00. Ogontz. Miss M. J. Gates, Dinner setfor Blowing Rock, N. C. Ridgway. Cong. Cli. Y. P. Bible Class No. 6,for McIntosh, Ge s 00 OHIO, $3,~98.89. Akron. Cong. S. S., for Theo. Student Aid, Telladega C 25 oo Bellevue. First Cong. Cli. and Soc 7 00. Cleveland. A Friend ~ 00. Cleveland. Dr. Julius King, s; H. C. Loomis, s, for Student A id, Talla- dega, C 20 00~ Cleveland. Mrs. A. J. Smith, two Boxes C.for Cumberland Get, Tenn. Cleveland. Y. L. M. Soc. of Euclid Av. Cong. Ch.,Clothing,val. $22,for Indian. Student Aid. Coitsville. Geography Hall Missionfor Student Aid, Talladega C 2 50 Delaware. William Bevan ~ on 212 PECEIPTS. Rent. Cong. ch. Mantua, Miss C. M. Davis Marion. Mrs. M. B. Vose, for Gregory I I., Wilmington, N. C Marietta. First Cong. Ch Medina. Friends, by Miss Sarah F. Clark, Bbl. C., Freight 8oc. for Helena, Ark Mount Vernon. Cong. Ch., Chas. Cooper Newark. Miss Margaret Evans New London. Miss Curtiss, 1.50; Gertie Graham (earned by making paper flowers), i,for Memihis, Tenn North Benton. Simon Hartzell North Bloomfield. Friends, so; Cong. Ch., ~ North Monroeville. Cong. Ch. V. P. 5. C. E Oberlin. First Cong. Ch. .. Oxford. Lucy E. Keith Twinsburg. Cong. Ch. Y. P. 5. C. E., ~ Miss Liley Walton, for Macon, Ga., 1.50 Temple. Cong. Ch., Bbl. C. and freight, 2.16, for Macon, Ga Wauseon. Cong. Ch Ohio Womans Home Missionary Union, by Mrs. G. B. Brown, Treas., for Womans Work. Akron. First W. M. S 10 00 Alexis. Willing Workers.... 3 no Berea. W. H. M. S 2 So Ceredo, West Va. W. M. C.. oo Cincinnati. Walnut Hills W. H. M. 5., ~ V. P. 5. C. 1400 Claridon. W. M. S 7 00 Cleveland. Euclid Av. W. M. 5., 20; First Y. P. 5. C. E., s; First W. M. 5., 25; Pilgrim W. M. S., so; Plymouth H. M. 5., s 6~ no Cleveland. Hough Av. W. H. M.S 500 Collinwood. V. P. 5. C. E.. io 00 Columbus. Eastwood W. H. M.S.,40;Y.P.S.C.E.,5. 4500 Coyahoga Falls. V. L. M. 5. 12 00 Elyria. W. M. S., so; Y. P.S. 1500 Lexington. W. M. S 6 00 Lodi. W.M.S 300 Madison. Central W. H. M. S 1003 Mansfield. First W. M. 5 s~ no Marietta. First Ch. W. M. 5 14 00 Marietta. Oak Grove M. B 7 no North Monroeville. W. H. M.S 250 North Olmstead. W. H. M. 5 500 North Ridgeville. Miss Wiockles S. S. Class 2 50 Oberlin. Second L. A. 5., 4.9; Second 5. 5., 11.87 ~i Paddys Run. Shandon W. M.S 500 Toledo. Washington St. W. M. U 22 00 Toledo. Central W. M. U... S no Wakeman. W. M. S 8 no Wauseon. C. W. A 4 00 West Andover. W. M. 5 2 00 York. Mallet Creek V. P. 5. CE sco 8 o8 50 34 07 8o 5 00 2 50 5 00 17 00 7 co 57 6x I 50 6 50 15 20 360 47 $598 89 ESTATE. Cincinnati. Estate of Win. F. Church, by E. W. Parsons ~,noo 00 $3,598 8g INDIANA, 50C. Porter. A Friend ILLINOIS, $755.66. Abingdon. Emma Harris Albion. Mrs. P. W. Wallace Alton. Mrs. I. D. Gilman, for Gregory Inst., Wilmington, N. C Chicago. New England Ch., Geo. D. Holmes Chillicothe. R. W. Gilliam Creston. Sab. Sch. Cong. Ch Dundee. Cong. Ch., 17.49; Sab. Seb. of Cong. Ch.,2 Evanston. First Cong. Ch Evanston. Major E. D. Redington, Large Flag, for Chaj5cl, Savannah, Ga. Farmington. Cong. Ch., to const. CHARLES N. ROSE L. M Forrest. Cong. Ch Griggsville. Cong. Ch Hamilton. Chas. Dorman Hinsdale. Cong. Sab. Sch.,for Fisk U.. Jacksonville. Young Ladies Miss. Soc... for Stadent A id, fougaloo U Kewanee. First Cong. Ch. ,for C. E. Hall, McIntosh, Ga La Salle. Cong. Ch., 2 Bbls. C. for Toagaloo, Miss. Marseilles. Dr. R. Newton Baughman, to coost. ESTHER HUNTINOTON LITTLE L. M Oak Park. Win. Spooners Bible Class, for Stadent A id, Talladega C Ottawa. First Cong. Ch Plainfield. Cong. Ch Princeton. Mrs. E. J. Smith, to coost. CHARLES H. COLTON L. M Ridgeland. Sab. Sch. Cong. Ch Roscoe. Cong. Ch. V. P. 5. C. E., for C. F. Hall, F/cm/ash, Ga Sannemin. Mrs. M. E. Knowlton Seward. First Cong. Ch Shabbona. V. P. 5. C. E. of Cong. Ch., for Dorchester Acad., McIntosh, Ga... Shabbona. Cong. Sab. Sch.,for Fisk U. South Dansville. Cong. Sab. Seb., for Fisk U Streator. Bridge St. Cong. S. S., for Fisk U Toulon. Junior C. E. Soc., 8; Miss A. M. Smiths Sab. Sch. Class, s, for Student Aid, Talladega C Waverly. V. P. 5. C. E 5 So 7 no 3 09 9 49 83 13 46 75 14 21 21 15 5 03 15 00 ~no 5 00 9 ~6 33 70 30 00 5 50 2 50 40 no 8 00 5 00 3 50 9 no 3 53 Illinois Womans Home Missionary Union, Mrs. L. A. Field, Treas., for Womans Work. Chicago. Union Park Ch., W. M. 5., 170; Ch. of the Redeemer Jr. C. F., ; Lincoln Park Ch. W. M. S., 3.50; Leavitt St. Ch. W. M. S., aSo; New England Ch. W. M. 5., s.s~ s8~ 6~ Champaign. W. M. S i~ Highland. W. M. S 3 no Mendon. W. M. S 13 no Morgan Park. W. M. S 8 s Oak Park. W. M. S... s5 00 Payson. W. M. S .. ~ no Rockford. Second W. M. S no Summerdale. W. M. S 9 00 ____ 246 95 MICHIGAN, $1,840.02. Bangor 2 no Bensonia. V. P. 5. C. F., for Student Aid, Pleasont Hill, Tenn 83 Chelsea. Cong. Cit. .. z~86 RECEIPTS. Churchs Corners. Mr. J. F. Douglass and S. S.,for Gregory Inst., Wilming ton, N.C 8oo Churchs Corners. A. W. Douglass 5 no Clayton. Y. P. S. C. E., Box Literature for Savannah, Ga. Detroit. Woodward Av. Cong. Ch 73 95 Detroit. Ladies of First Cong. Ch., Blil. C. for Greenwood, S. C. Detroit. Mrs. Anna E. McIntyre, Hu- mane Literature. Dexter Cong Cli 3 50 Dimondale. Ladies Aid Soc. of Presby- terian Cli., for Student A id, Talla- dega C 5 00 Grenville. Y. L. M. S., for Student Aid Pleasant Hill, Tenn no Hudson. Anon., to const. MRS. NETTLE CHILOS, MRS. JENNIE A. GASTON, Miss ANNA M. LANE, Miss TILLIE K. MUTCHELL, DEA. AZARIAL SMITH, DNA. HENRY D. MANN, RUFUS F. SEELVE, Miss MARIE RoEERTS, Miss LIZZIE L. GALUSHA, MISS FLORA E. DOTY, WILL- IAM BIVIN, FRANCIS M. CHILDs, WINS- LOW H. DAY, MRS. JENNIE TALLMAN and REV. J. P. RIEoINOEE, L. Ms. (250 of whiclifor Fisk U.) 480 00 Irving. Cong. Cli 2 00 Laingsburg. Womans Assn., by Mrs. C. E. Hollister, for Mountain Work 2 00 MiddleYule. Cong. Cli 00 Midland. Helper, 6.58; Helper, ~ is Midland. Frederick W. Higligate on Nortliport. Cong. Cli 35 00 Saginaw. Cong. Ch.,for Student A id. Tougaloo U 70 00 So. Lake, Linden. Womans Association, for Student Aid, Pleasant Hill, Tenn. 50 00 Womans Home Missionary Union of Mich., by Mrs. E. F. Grabull, Treas,, for Womans Work: Bangor. Aux 50 Detroit. Womans Assn of First Cli 35 00 Chelsea. W. M. S 2 50 Chelsea. Jr. C. E. Soc., for Reindeer, Alaska H 2 00 Comma. W. M. S 25 Greenville. W. H M. S s on Jackson. W. H. M. S 8 00 Lamont. W. H. M. S 25 Litchfield. L. M. S 10 00 Muskegon. Y. P. 5. C. E. of First Cli 15 no Muskegon. W. H. M. S ~ 00 Owosso. W.H.M.U . 500 Portland. W. H. M. 5. 30 South I5mmett. Mrs. Eliza Allen.. 5 00 Stanton. W~. H. M. S~.. .... 5 00 Union City: W. H. M. 5.... 6 00 Whitaker. W. H. M. S 50 Wyandotte. W. M. S 2 50 Ypsilanti. W. H. M. S 2 50 ____ 502 30 $840 02 ESTATE. Ann Arbor. Estate of Dr. C. L. Ford, by Bryant Walker, Administrator 2,000 00 $1,840 02 IOWA, $333.88. Bellevue. Cong. Cli. Y. P. 5. C. Efor Acad., Nat. Ala Belmond. Cong. Cli Cedar Rapids. Willing Workers, Pkg. Literature and s.5o for Student A id, Beach Institute Central City. Mrs. S. H. Blodgett and Ladies, Blil. Goods for Gregory Inst., Wilmington, N. C. 3 20 4 50 I 50 213 Corning. Cong. Cli i~ 6~ Council Bluffs. N. P. Dodge, for Talla- dega, Ala so on Cresco. Mrs. C. A. Harlan, for Gregory Inst., Wilmington, N. C 8 no Des Moines. A Friend, to coost ANNA HOWARD WARD L. M 30 00 Dubuque. First Cong Cli 28 73 Emmetsburg. V. P. 5. C. E. of Cong. Cli., for Student A id, Beach Institute 8 00 Forest City. Jr. C. E. Soc., for Student Aid Beach I stituic s 50 Grionell. Friends, is; Miss Emily Magoun, 3, for Student A Id, Tou- galon U 24 00 Hampton. First Cong. Cli 28 75 Osage. Cong (li 26 50 Osceola. Miss Jennie M. Baird, 2 for Alaska and ifor Indian H 300 Oskaloosa. Pkg. Sewing Material from S. S. Class, by Mrs. K. L. Turner for Savannah, Ga. Manson. V. P. 5. C. E i 54 Marshalitown. Cong Cli i8 84 McGregor. J. H. Ellsworth is 00 Muscatine. Mrs. C. L. McDermid 2 00 Muscatine. Miss Ella Mulford,for Stu- dent Aid, Tougalno U s no Reinbeck. Jr. C. E. Soc. of First Cong. Cli., by Mrs. W. L. Brandt, Box Liter- ature, fo- .Yavannah, Ga. Webster City. Cong. Cli 25 on Iowa Womans Home Missionary Union, Miss Belle L. Bentley, Treas., for 14 omans Work: Almoral. L. M. S 2 on Alpha. L.H.M.S ~on Belle Plain. V. P. 5. C. E 2 o8 Charles City. V. P. 5. C. E 2 20 Correctionville. Jr. V. P. S. C.E 550 Decorab. V. P. 5. C. E 6 ~5 Eldon. L. M. S 2 40 Genoa Bluffs. L. M. S 2 00 Grinnell. W. H. M. U s6 02 Iowa Falls. Primary Class s 45 Miles. L. M. S 55 00 Montour. L. M. S 6 00 Mortinser. Jr. C. E s 05 Owens Grove. L. M. 5., ~ Y.P.S.C.E.,4.75 975 Pilgrim. Jr.V.P.S.C.E 200 Sabula. Mrs. H. H. Wood 3 00 Tabor. L. M. S 2 00 Webster City. L. M. S 5 47 8567 WISCONSIN, $90.31. Brandon. J. F. Skinner and S. S., br Gregory Inst., Wilmington, N. C s no Burlington. Womans Miss. Soc., Pkg. of C/or Tilloison Inst., Austin, Texas. Cooksville. Womans Miss. Soc., Pkg. Aprons, for Tilloison Inst., A ustin, Texas. Fond do Lac. Cong. Cli 54 68 Fox Lake. Cong. Cli. and Soc 7 13 Green Bay. Junior C. E. Soc., 59 Album Scrap Books, for Tilloison Inst., A us- tin, Texas. Hartland. Win. Le Roy, 2 valuable horsesfor Tougalon, Miss. Ithaca. Cong. Cli 5 00 Milwaukee. Grand Av. Cli., V. L. M. Soc., Christmas Box, for TilITot son Inst., Austin, Texas. Oneida. Mrs. C. F. Peirce and A Teacher 3 00 Peslitigo. Mrs. A. N. Andrews and Ladies, Blil. Goods for Gregory Inst., Wilsningtoe, N C. Ripon. V. M. C. A. of Ripon College, for Selma, Ala 6 50 South Milwaukee. First Cong. Cli 7 i0 ~I4 Sun Prarie. W. M. S., by Miss Black- man, for Gregory Inst., Wilmington, N. C Whitewater. Cong. Ch Wisconsin Womans Home Missionary Union, by Mrs. C. M. Blackman, Treas., for Womans Work: Beloit. Second Ch. W. H. M.U 500 Janesville. H. M. U 5 00 Pewaukee. W. H. M. U 5 90 Whitewater. H. M. U ii no MINNESOTA, $211.56. Fergus Falls. First Cong. Ch., for Alaska M Fergus Falls. Rev. W. C. A. Walker,ftr Alaska M Freeborn. Cong. Cb Freedom. Cong. Cb Grand Meadow. Box C. for Jonesboro, Tenn. Mankato. Bbl. C. for Jonesboro, Tenn. Minneapolis. V. P.S. C. E., of Plymoutis Cb., adl. for Hoslital, Fort Yates, N. D Morris. Cong. Cb Princeton. Box C.for Jonesboro, Teno. St. Paul. Bbl. C. for Jonesboro, Tenn. Springfield. Mrs. Cbarles Lent, for Gregory Inst., Wilmington, N. C Wortbington. Union Cong. Cb Minnesota Womans Home Missionary Union, by Mrs. M. W. Skinner, Treas., for Woma ns Work. Austin 25 17 Elk River in 75 Excelsior 7 00 Fairmont. W. H. M. 5., 3.60; S.S,203 563 Faribault. Mrs. Mott 90 Freedom 5 00 Graceville s 00 Little Falls. S. S 2 50 Minneapolis. Plymotb, 38.37; Park Av., x6.8o; First, 11.43; First Jr. C. E Soc., 2.25; Pilgrim, 5oc 69 35 Owatonna 20 00 Princeton 5 00 Rocbester 22 Saint Paul. Park, ~ Pacific 5. 5., 2.70 6 70 Winona. First, i6; First S. 5.. 3.51 9 5 Waseca 2 00 KANSAS, $413.60. Parsons. Mrs. S. C. Boardman, ~ Miss F. A. Locke, Womans Home Missionary Union of Kansas, Mrs. E. K. DeLong, Treas., for Womans Work: Arkansas City ii 00 Gosben s 00 Hiawatba 2 00 Kansas City. First Cb 10 on Maple Hill 23 00 Newton 2 50 Osawatomie 3 75 Panla 4 00 Seneca 9 00 Sunny Side. C. E s 75 Topeka. First Cb., is; Cen- tral Cb., o 25 00 Wellsville 5 00 RECEIPTS. 500 14 00 20 90 4 20 5 75 4 02 25 500 50 3 87 187 07 96 00 $g8 00 ESTATE. Waterville. Estate of H. H. Griffin 315 6o $413 6o MISSOURI, $431.57. Cameron. Cong. Cb. for Student Aid, Tougaloo U St. Louis. First Cong. Cb. V. P. 5. C. E., bal. to conat. MRS. S. FREEMAN HEESRY L. M Springfield. Cong. Cb. Junior C. E., for Sck., Meridian, Miss Womans Home Missionary Union of Mo., by Mrs. K. L. Mills, Treas., for Womans Work: Brookfield. Cong. Cb. L. H. M. 5., is; S.S., io; Jr. V.P. S.C.E.,175 2675 Cartbage. Cong. Cb. L. H. M.S 2365 Hannibal. Cong. Cb. L H. M.S 530 Kansas City. Olivet Cb L. H.M.S 250 Kansas City. S. W Taber- nacleL.H.M.S 326 Kansas City. First Cb. V P. S.C.E 1000 Lamar. L. H. M. S 3 25 Meadville. Cb. L. H. 58. 5 3 00 Mine La Motte. V. L. H. M. Circle 8 28 Old Orcbard. L. H. M. 5 25 00 Pierce City. L. H. M. S 24 8~ St. Josepb. Tabernacle Cb. L.H.M.S 1260 St. Louis. Pilgrim L. H. M. 5 6~~o St. Louis. Pilgrim, Mr. and Mrs. A. N. Benedicts Bible Class. .. . 37 22 St. Louis. Central L. H. M. S 4880 St. Louis. Hyde Park L. H. MS... . 2000 St. Louis. Compton Hill L. H.M.S 1700 St. Louis. Plymoutb L. H. M.S Ion St. Louis. First L. H. M 5. 8 00 St. Louis. Hope Cb. L H. M.S . 750 St. Louis. Olive Brancb Cb. V.P.S.C.E. 500 Sedalia. Cong. Cb. V. P. 5. C. E 20 00 Springfield. Central Cb. L. H.M.S 1035 Sp~n~field First Cb. L. H. 955 Webster Groves. L. H. M. 5. 24 21 NEBRASKA, $44.07. Santee. Pilgrim Cb., by Rev. A. L. Riggs NORTH DAKOTA, $s.no. Fargo. W. M. S., by Mrs. M. M. Fos- ter, for Gregory Inst., Wilmington, N. C SOUTH DAKOTA, $5.62. Bad River. Cong. Cb Cbeyenne River. Cong. Cb Moreau River. Cong. Cb Oabe. Cong. Cb Vankton. W.H. M. Soc.,for Fisk U.,. 800 5 00 500 423 57 44 07 5 00 2 47 75 2 83 I 57 RECEIPTS. 215 COLORADO, $20.05. Denver Mills. Walter Wynkoop, Sub. for Golden Rule, one year, for Thomas- due, Ga. Highland Lake. Church of Christ Miss. Soc., by Ed. G. Seaman, for Le Moyne Normal Inst Telluride. Cong. Ch., Easter Gift...... CALIFORNIA, $695.50. Pomona. J. D. Dewey Redlands. Rebecca H. Smiley San Francisco. Receipts of the Cali- fornia Chinese Mission. (See items below) San Francisco. Miss A. M. Hobbs, for Gloucester Sc/i., CaA5akosic, Va Santa Barbara. Miss E. Beckwith Soquel. Cong. Ch Stockton. Rev. J. C. Holbrook Tulare. Mrs. Harriet 3. Harding Womans Home Missionary Union of Southern Cal., by Mrs Mary M. Smith, Treas. for Womans Work. Ontario. Cong. Ch. W. H. MS 565 Riverside. Cong. Ch. W. H. M. S 10 00 DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, $52.oo. Washington. Howard University Eas- ter Offering, by President 3. E. Rankin, D.D . Washington. Ransom C. Edmondson, for Fisk U Washington. Friends, Bbl. and Box. C. for Evans, Ky. VIRGINIA, $6.36. Cappahosic. Teachers and Pupils ol Gloucester Ag. and Indi. Sch Norfolk. Miss A. E. Tucker, for Gloucester Sc/i., Ca~j3akosic, Va KENTUCKY, $31.oo. Halsey. Friends Newport. York St. Cong. Ch., for Camj3ton, Ky . Red Ash. Cong. Ch TENNESSEE, $52.05. Grand View. Normal Inst., 7.50; Y. P. S. C. E., 4.30 Memphis. Friends, by E. S. Webb, for Mem~,3/iis, Teen Memphis. W. M. Union of Cong. Ch.,. by Mrs. M. A. Clark, Pres 20 05 500 635 50 15 00 2 35 5 00 5 00 25 6~ 50 00 2 00 5 36 25 00 ii 8o 15 00 500 Womans Home Missionary Union of Tenn., by Mrs. J. E. Moorland, Treas., for Womans Work. Nashville 20 25 NORTH CAROLINA, $21.96. High Point. Cong. Ch .... 96 Nails. B. H. Saunders 2 00 Saluda. A Friend, hal. to const. MINNIE A. HOLLIES L. M 10 00 Valley Crusis. Rev. M. Jones, for Stu- dent Atd, Sky/and Inst., B/owing Rock, N. C s 00 GEORGIA, $7.15. McIntosh. Cong. Ch 4 00 McIntosh. Miss S. 3. Scott, iso; Prof. Fred W. Foster, s, for Student Aid, McIntosh, Ga 2 20 Woodville. Pilgrim Ch., 84c.; Rev. J. Loyd, 6~c.; Rev. J. H. H. Sengstacke, 30c 2 75 ALABAMA, ~ Childershurg. Cong. Ch 2 00 Childersburg. Cong. Ch., for Ta/la dego A/a 200 Shelby. Cong. Ch., Easter Gift LOUISIANA, ~ Abbeville. Cong. Ch., Easter Offering.. Hammond. Cong. Ch 4 00 10 47 FLORIDA, $10.00. Sanford. Mrs. Moses Lyman 10 00 MISSISSIPPI, $63.48. Meridian. First Cong. Ch. and Sab. Sch , Easter Gift Moorhead. Colored Ch Tougaloo. Frank H. Ball,35 22; Mrs. H. E. Sawyer, is, for Student A id, Tou- ga/eu U Tougaloo. A. H. Bennett, 4; Miss M. E. Hodge, set Encyclopedia, Am. Lit- erature, for Touga/on U TEXAS, $iI.5o. Austin. Tradesmen of Austin, for B/ocksmitk Skoj5, A usttn, Texas Dallas. Mrs. Mary A. McClure, for Mountain Work Dallas. Plymouth Cong. Ch., Easter gift 25C. Miss M. C. Phelps, for Sa/uda, N. C A Friend, Prinjing Press for Miss Huines work, Central Ch., New Orleans, La. Bhl. Books, etc., Bbl. Papers, etc., for Big Creek Gal, Tenn. Friends. Bbl. C. for Evarts, Ky. CANADA, $5.00. Montreal. Chas. Alexander 66 ~ 6o 50 22 40 500 3 50 25 5 00 CH1NA, $5.00. Tai-ku Shansi. Rowena Bird ~ 00 Donations $25,952 70 Estates 25,224 88 $27,177 ~8 INCOME, $1,136.66. Avery Fund,for Mendi M 451 73 Mrs. S. N. Brewer Endowment Fund 20 93 De Forest Fund,for Presidents Chair, Tal/adega C 32 92 C. F. Dike Fund,for Straight U ~ 00 Ellen Battell Eldridge Endow- ment Fund 225 00 Fisk Univeisity, Theo. End. Fund 450 General Endowment Fund 50 00 Hammond Fund,for Straight U. 209 72 E. A. Hand, Endowment Fund ii 25 Howard University Then. En- dowment Fund 209 72 Le Moyne Fund, for Memikis, Teen .. 4390 S. M. Strong Endowment Fund, forSaluda,N.C 2700 2,136.66 TUITION, $4,643.14. Cappahosic, Va. Tuition 8 00 Evarts, Ky. Public Seb. Fund 79 6i Lexington, Ky. Tu~tio~ 92 50 216 Williamsburg, Ky. Tuition Big Creek Gap, Tenn. Tuition.. Jonesboro, Tenn. Tuition Knoxville, Tenn. Tuition. Memphis, Tenn. Tuition Nashville, Tenn. Tuition Pleasant Hill, Tenn. Tuition... Beaufort, N. C. Tuition Blowing Rock, N. C. Tuition... Hillsboro, N. C. Tuition Kings Mountain, N. C. Tuition. Pekin, N. C. Tuition Saluda, N. C. Tuition Troy, N. C. Tuition Whittier, N. C. Public Fund.... Whittier, N. C. Tuition Wilmington, N. C. Tuition..... Charleston, S. C. Tuition Greenwood, S. C. Tuition Albany, Ga. Tuition Andersonville, Ga. Tuition Atlanta, Ga. Storrs Sch., Tui- tion Macon, Ga. Tuition Marietta, Ga. Tuition Marshallville, Ga. Tuition McIntosh, Ga. Tuition New Orleans, La. Tuition Savannah, Ga. Tuition Thomasville, Ga. Tuition Woodville, Ga. Tuition Athens, Ala. Tuition Marion, Ala. Tuition Nat, Ala. Tuition Selma, Ala. Tuition Talladega, Ala. Tuition. Orange Park, Fla. Tuition Martin. Fla. Tuition Meridian, Miss. Tuition Moorhead, Miss. Tuition Tougaloo, Miss. Tuition Helena, Ark. Tuition Austin, Text Tuition RECEIPTS. 149 30 i8 oo 4 70 38 75 517 70 504 26 5 35 15 25 23 50 27 00 5 00 48 04 5 75 73 92 10 55 i84 50 330 50 100 90 131 00 i6 67 i6a 10 211 62 10 55 4 33 71 66 439 53 i6i 67 57 00 3 55 33 30 43 25 67 75 96 8o 252 IS 69 ~8 15 00 129 40 23 30 177 25 110 90 ill 70 4,643 54 Total for April $32,957 38 SUMMARY. Donations $103,149 71 Estates 54,450 69 $157,600 40 Income 7,245 66 Tuition 27,238 09 Total from Oct. to April 30.. $191,980 i~ FOR THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY. Subscriptions for April $66 40 Previously acknowledged 4i9 69 Total $486 09 RECEIPTS OF THE CALIFORNIA CHINESE MissioN from Feb. ~i to April 12~ s195. Witliam John- stone, Treas. FROM LOCAL MISSIONS: Fresno. Chinese Mon. Off s., 7.25; N. Y. Gifts to Jesus, I. 5o; Mrs. Janet B. Thomson, 7.20 15 95 Los Angeles. Chinese Mon. Offs.. ~ 45; Anniversary Offs., 8.5o; Annual Memberships, ~ B. F. Sanbern, ~ Mrs. Mary GarVe.y, s 9 95 Maryaville. Chinese Mon. Offs. 25 Oroville. Chinese Mon. Offs ~ 35 Petaluma. Chinese Mon. Offs 4 50 Riverside. Chinese Mon. Offs., 5.~5; Annual Memberships, 6; A. M Wheelock, ~ Others, 75 cents 13 50 Sacramento. Chinese Mon. Offs 14 75 San Bernardino. Chinese Mon. Offs., 3.90; Anniversary Offs., 33 90 San Diego. Chinese Mon. Offs., ~ Anniversary Offs. (of which J os. Winchester, s; N. Burnell, i; Annual Mem- bers, s), 31.60; N. V. Gift, 50 cents 39 55 San Francisco. Bethany Ch. Annual members, ~ N. G. Cook, i: Mrs. A. T. Silshy, ~ N. C. P.,,, 2.25; Mrs. H. N. Lamont, s; Friend, 14 25 San Francisco Central Mission. Chinese Mon Offs 5 95 San Francisco. Branch Asso. N. Y. Gifts to Jesus 29 75 Santa Barbara. Chinese Mon. Offs., ~ Annual Offs., 21.65; Annual Members, etc., 6.75 35 40 Santa Cruz. Chinese Mon. Offs 3 50 Stockton. Chinese Mon. Offs.. 4 30 Ventura. Chinese Mon. Offs., 2.75; N. Y. Gifts, ~ Anniver- sary Offs. (of which Annual Members, 7; Miss Emma Cook, i; Mrs. Harriet Web- ster, i; Mr. and Mrs. West, 12.20 19 95 Vernondale. N. Y. Gifts, ~ Annual Members, ~ Mrs. G. A. Rawson, i; Mrs. G. N. Townsend, s; Others, 7 00 Watsonville. Chinese Mon. Offs. 5 90 276 70 Womans Home Missionary Union of Southern Cal., Mrs. M. M. Smith,Treas.: North Pasadena. Cong. Cli ~6 lo INDIvIDUAL GIVERs: Messrs. Balfour, Gutlirie & Co 250 00 Prof. R. R. Lloyd ~o 00 EASTERN FRIENDS: Danvers, Mass. Sab. Seb. Maple St. Cong. Ch NewHaven, Coon. Mrs. Henry Far~ num FOR CHINESE WOMEN AND CHILDREN: Bucksport, Me. Mrs. Geo. Blodgett 3 0~ Marihoro, Mass. Miss H. J. Alexander 2 00 New Haven, Conhi. Miss Skin- ner 100 Albany, N. Y. Friends of Chinese, by Miss Janet Mc- Naughton 17 00 Wheaton, Ill. Mrs. Carrie Kennedy 00 Des Moines, Iowa. Mrs. J. F. Rollins 2 00 6 00 5c 00 Total $635 50 H. W. HUBBARD, Treas., Bible House, N. Y.

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The American missionary. / Volume 49, Issue 7 Congregational work Pilgrim missionary Congregationalist and herald of gospel liberty American Missionary Association. New York July 1895 0049 007
The American missionary. / Volume 49, Issue 7, miscellaneous front pages 216A-216B

EDITORIAL. ANNUAL MEETINGFINANCES, SKETChEs ov ANNIVERSARY ExEI~cIs1S. WITAY BECoMES OF THEM? REV. GED. WITIPILE, D.D RACE PREJUDICEIS IT WANING Mis. MOOoY IN TEXAS, 217 218 218 219 220 221 THE SOUTh. ANNIVERSITY EXERCISES: TOUGALOD, MISS 222 STRAIGhT UNIVERSITY, NEXV OR LEANS, . . . . . 224 GREGORY INSTITUTE, WILMINGTON, N. C., . 226 BEACH INSTITUTE, SAVANNAh, GA.. 228 MCINTOSH, GA 229 LINCOLN SCHOOL, MERIDIAN, MISS., 230 GRAND VIEW, TENN 231 PLEASANT HILL, TENN., 232 NOTES 233 LETTERS FROM GRADUATES. HOE THE FIRST HILL OF CORN, 234 A Gooo HINT BRINGS TIIRIFT, . 235 A PASTORS VISIT AND TESTIMONY, 236 THE CHINESE. THE SACRAMENTO MISSION, . . . 237 WOMANS STATE ORGANIZATIONS 239 RECEIPTS 241 NEW YORK: PUBLISHED BY THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION, Bible House, Ninth St. and Fourth Ave., New York. Price, 50 Cents a Year in advance. Entered at the Post Office at New York, N. Y~, as second.class matter. JULY, 1895 VOL. XLIX No.7 CONTENTS ~tmedcan (DM~ionarx~ ~t~sociatioii PRESIDENT, MERRILL E. GATES, LL.D., MASS. Vice-Presidents. Rev. F. A. NOBLE, D.D., Ill. Rev. hENRY HOPKINS, D.D., Mo. Rev. ALEX. MCKENZIE, D.D., Mass. Rev. HENRY A. STIMSON, D.D., N. Y. Rev. WASHINGTON GLADDEN, D. D., Ohio. Corresj5onding Secretaries. Rev. M. E. STRIEBY, D.D., Bible House, N. Y. Rev. A. F. BEARD, D.D., Bible House, N. Y. Rev. F. P. WOODBURY, D.D., Bible House, N. Y. Assistant Corresponding Secretary. Rev. C. J. RYDER, D.D., Bible House, N. Y. Recording Secretary. Rev. M. E. STRIEBY, D.D., Bible House, N. Y. Treasurer. HENRY W. HUBBARD, Esq., Bible House, N. Y. Auditors. PETER MCCARTEE. JAMES MITCHELL. Executive Committee. CHARLES L. MEAD, Chairman. CHARLES A. HULL, Secretary. For Three Years. For Two Years. For One Year. WILLIAM HAYES WARD, CHARLES A. HULL, SAMUEL HOLMES, JAMES W. COOPER, ADDISON P. FOSTER, SAMUEL S. MARPLES LUCIEN C. WARNER, ALBERT J. LYMAN, CHARLES L. MEAD JOSEPH H. TWICHELL, NEHEMIAH BOYNTON, WILLIAM H. STRONG CHARLES P. PEIRCE, A. J. F. BEHRENDS, ELIJAH HORR. District Secretaries. Rev. GEo. H. GUTTERSON, 21 Congl House, Boston, Mass. Rev. JOS. E. RoY, D.D., 153 La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill. Rev. W. E. C. WRIGHT, D.D., ConglRooms, Y. M. C. A. Building, Cleveland~ Ohio. Secretary of Womans Bureau. Miss D. E. EMERSON, Bible House, N. Y. COMMUNICATIONS Relating to the work of the Association may be addressed to the Corresponding Secretaries; letters for THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY, to the Editor, at the New York Office; letters relating to the finances, to the Treasurer; letters relating to womans work, to the Secretary of the Womans Bureau. DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS In drafts, checks, registered letters, or post-office orders, may be sent to H. W. Hubbard, Treasurer, Bible House, New York, or, when more convenient, to either of the Branch Offices, 21 Congregational House, Boston, Mass., 151 Washington Street, Chicago, Ill., or Congregational Rooms, Y. M. C. A. Building, Cleveland, Ohio. A payment of thirty dollars constitutes a Life Member. NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERSThe date on the address label indicates the time to which the subscription is paid. Changes are made in date on label to the 10th of each month. If payment of subscription be made afterward the change on the label will appear a month later. Please send early notice of change in post-office address, giving the former address and the new address, in order that our periodi- cals and occasional papers may be correctly mailed. FORM OF A BEQUEST. I GIVE AND DEQTJEATII the sum of dollars to the American Missionary Association, incorporated by act of the Legislature of the State of New York. The will should be attested by three witnesses.

Annual Meeting Editorial 217

THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY VOL. XLIX. JULY, 1895. No. 7. ANNUAL MEETING. The annmil meeting of the American Missionary Association will be held in Detroit, Mich., October 2224, 1895. We give this notice thus early that our friends may make their arrangements to attend. Our welcome is cordial, and we anticipate an enthusiastic meeting. FINANCES. REAPERS AND THEIR WAGES. The closing of our school year brings back our teachers and makes the call on our treasury for the payment of their salaries. These sala- ries are very small and are accepted hy the teachers on a self-sacrificing missionary basis. Many of them could have securcd better pay in other employments, and most of them are dependent upon these small salaries for their support. Some have parents or relatives whom they assist, and a few have no homes at the North and are obliged to pay out for boarding during the vacation the savings of their active months. These salaries must be paid. We cannot turn away such toilers empty- handed, and we appeal to those who love this work and know its value to aid in the payment of these salaries during the current and coming months with special and increased gifts. The good work done may be seen in part in the sketches we publish of the closing exercises of some of the schools. Shall the failure to meet these well-earned and meager salaries except by increasing our deht be a warning that for the next year some schools must be shut up and others crippled; and shall a people so eager to fit themselves for useful life be denied the privilege? Prompt help in paying current bills will mean much for the present and the future,

Finances: Reapers and their Wages Editorial 217-218

THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY VOL. XLIX. JULY, 1895. No. 7. ANNUAL MEETING. The annmil meeting of the American Missionary Association will be held in Detroit, Mich., October 2224, 1895. We give this notice thus early that our friends may make their arrangements to attend. Our welcome is cordial, and we anticipate an enthusiastic meeting. FINANCES. REAPERS AND THEIR WAGES. The closing of our school year brings back our teachers and makes the call on our treasury for the payment of their salaries. These sala- ries are very small and are accepted hy the teachers on a self-sacrificing missionary basis. Many of them could have securcd better pay in other employments, and most of them are dependent upon these small salaries for their support. Some have parents or relatives whom they assist, and a few have no homes at the North and are obliged to pay out for boarding during the vacation the savings of their active months. These salaries must be paid. We cannot turn away such toilers empty- handed, and we appeal to those who love this work and know its value to aid in the payment of these salaries during the current and coming months with special and increased gifts. The good work done may be seen in part in the sketches we publish of the closing exercises of some of the schools. Shall the failure to meet these well-earned and meager salaries except by increasing our deht be a warning that for the next year some schools must be shut up and others crippled; and shall a people so eager to fit themselves for useful life be denied the privilege? Prompt help in paying current bills will mean much for the present and the future, 218 SKETCHES WHA T BECOMES OF GRADUATES? SKETCHES OF ANNIVERSARY EXERCISES. We begin in this number of THE MISSIONARY the publication of sketches of the closing exercises in our normal and higher institutions in the South. These are occasions of great joy and enthusiasm to the pupils and teachers, and to the large audiences which they bring together. Perhaps to some of our readers at the North who glance over these pages it may seem as if the repetition of these exercises is useless. But they and we should remember our own school and college commencement days and the enthusiasm they awoke in us and in wide circles of friends, and especially can some of us recall such occasions, a generation or two ago, when they constituted the great event of the year in educational centers in New England and else- where. Let us now note that these Southern institutions are in that earlier and fresher period of their history, and those who wish to watch carefully their progress will be gratified with the enthusiasm dis- played and in the remarkable development in the advancement of this rising race. Those of our readers (arid we hope there are many) who watch with Christian and patriotic sympathy the struggles of this race to meet the demands of their new position will find much satisfac- tion in noting from year to year the indication in these services of a steady advance. A reflex thought from the marks of progress of these pupils will call up with sorrow that great mass of the colored people still in ignorance and poyerty, and who still need the helping hand. It will, however, be a pleasure to think of the great service which these graduates will render as teachers, preachers, mechanics and business men, and as cultured and thrifty wives and mothers of the home. WHAT BECOMES OF THEM? It is a pertinent inquiry: What becomes of the graduates of our schools? Do they h~ad useful lives, and, if they are helpful to their people, in what way do they accomplish it? What difficulties do they meet and how do they succeed in overcoming them? We have sought to secure at first-hand answers to these questions and have obtained sketches of personal experience from some of these graduates. We begin their publication in this number of THE M~S5IONARY. We shall continue them for some months to come. They will be found to be varied both as to the skill in delineating and in the incidents delineated. There will be no startling adventures or heroic achievements, but the real experiences of colored boys and girls as they go from the helpful and sustaining influence of the school and its connected church into the every day and not very favorabe surroundings, where they must push

Sketches of Anniversary Exercises Editorial 218

218 SKETCHES WHA T BECOMES OF GRADUATES? SKETCHES OF ANNIVERSARY EXERCISES. We begin in this number of THE MISSIONARY the publication of sketches of the closing exercises in our normal and higher institutions in the South. These are occasions of great joy and enthusiasm to the pupils and teachers, and to the large audiences which they bring together. Perhaps to some of our readers at the North who glance over these pages it may seem as if the repetition of these exercises is useless. But they and we should remember our own school and college commencement days and the enthusiasm they awoke in us and in wide circles of friends, and especially can some of us recall such occasions, a generation or two ago, when they constituted the great event of the year in educational centers in New England and else- where. Let us now note that these Southern institutions are in that earlier and fresher period of their history, and those who wish to watch carefully their progress will be gratified with the enthusiasm dis- played and in the remarkable development in the advancement of this rising race. Those of our readers (arid we hope there are many) who watch with Christian and patriotic sympathy the struggles of this race to meet the demands of their new position will find much satisfac- tion in noting from year to year the indication in these services of a steady advance. A reflex thought from the marks of progress of these pupils will call up with sorrow that great mass of the colored people still in ignorance and poyerty, and who still need the helping hand. It will, however, be a pleasure to think of the great service which these graduates will render as teachers, preachers, mechanics and business men, and as cultured and thrifty wives and mothers of the home. WHAT BECOMES OF THEM? It is a pertinent inquiry: What becomes of the graduates of our schools? Do they h~ad useful lives, and, if they are helpful to their people, in what way do they accomplish it? What difficulties do they meet and how do they succeed in overcoming them? We have sought to secure at first-hand answers to these questions and have obtained sketches of personal experience from some of these graduates. We begin their publication in this number of THE M~S5IONARY. We shall continue them for some months to come. They will be found to be varied both as to the skill in delineating and in the incidents delineated. There will be no startling adventures or heroic achievements, but the real experiences of colored boys and girls as they go from the helpful and sustaining influence of the school and its connected church into the every day and not very favorabe surroundings, where they must push

What Becomes of them? Editorial 218-219

218 SKETCHES WHA T BECOMES OF GRADUATES? SKETCHES OF ANNIVERSARY EXERCISES. We begin in this number of THE MISSIONARY the publication of sketches of the closing exercises in our normal and higher institutions in the South. These are occasions of great joy and enthusiasm to the pupils and teachers, and to the large audiences which they bring together. Perhaps to some of our readers at the North who glance over these pages it may seem as if the repetition of these exercises is useless. But they and we should remember our own school and college commencement days and the enthusiasm they awoke in us and in wide circles of friends, and especially can some of us recall such occasions, a generation or two ago, when they constituted the great event of the year in educational centers in New England and else- where. Let us now note that these Southern institutions are in that earlier and fresher period of their history, and those who wish to watch carefully their progress will be gratified with the enthusiasm dis- played and in the remarkable development in the advancement of this rising race. Those of our readers (arid we hope there are many) who watch with Christian and patriotic sympathy the struggles of this race to meet the demands of their new position will find much satisfac- tion in noting from year to year the indication in these services of a steady advance. A reflex thought from the marks of progress of these pupils will call up with sorrow that great mass of the colored people still in ignorance and poyerty, and who still need the helping hand. It will, however, be a pleasure to think of the great service which these graduates will render as teachers, preachers, mechanics and business men, and as cultured and thrifty wives and mothers of the home. WHAT BECOMES OF THEM? It is a pertinent inquiry: What becomes of the graduates of our schools? Do they h~ad useful lives, and, if they are helpful to their people, in what way do they accomplish it? What difficulties do they meet and how do they succeed in overcoming them? We have sought to secure at first-hand answers to these questions and have obtained sketches of personal experience from some of these graduates. We begin their publication in this number of THE M~S5IONARY. We shall continue them for some months to come. They will be found to be varied both as to the skill in delineating and in the incidents delineated. There will be no startling adventures or heroic achievements, but the real experiences of colored boys and girls as they go from the helpful and sustaining influence of the school and its connected church into the every day and not very favorabe surroundings, where they must push REV. GEO. WHIPPLE, D.D. 219 their way, find their chance, and do lifes work. These sketches are truthful and instructive as to some important phases of Southern life and will repay perusal. REV. GEORGE WHIPPLE, D.D. Among the many noble men who have aided in organizing and carry- ing forward the work of the American Missionary Association there REV. GEORGE WHIPPLE, D.D.

Rev. George Whipple, D.D. Editorial 219-220

REV. GEO. WHIPPLE, D.D. 219 their way, find their chance, and do lifes work. These sketches are truthful and instructive as to some important phases of Southern life and will repay perusal. REV. GEORGE WHIPPLE, D.D. Among the many noble men who have aided in organizing and carry- ing forward the work of the American Missionary Association there REV. GEORGE WHIPPLE, D.D. 220 RACE PRE7 UDICE. stands in the front rank Rev. George Whipple, D. D., its first Secretary, whose useful labors were continued with unabated zeal and success for over thirty years. iHe accepted his position when the society began its career in feebleness, under ostracism and with a future whose hope was in God only. Probably Dr. Whipple and his associates little dreamed at that time of the swift-coming and eventful results of the next few years. Slavery then seemed stronger and more defiant than ever, and the freedom of the slave appeared more hopeless. But Dr. Whipple lived to see the slave power crushed and the fetters of the slave broken. He lived to take a prominent part in the founding of schools and churches in the South, and to behold the little primary schools, held in abandoned houses and churches and in brush arbors, succeeded by well equipped normal and higher institutions, and it was his privilege to stand on the platforms of some of those institutions and present diplomas to worthy graduates in the presence of large and appreciative audiences, composed in part of persons of the white race who shared in the enthusiasm of the occasion. Such a life and such a record are worthy of grateful commemoration, and constitute an honorable part of the history and work of the American Missionary Association. George Whipple was born in Albany, N. Y., in 1805, was educated at Oneida Institute, Lane Seminary and Oberlin College, was appointed professor of mathematics in the last-named institution and left that position in 1846 to take his place as Secretary of this Association. Dr. Whipple was happy in the intimate friendship of his distinguished rela- tive, Bishop Whipple; was the personal friend of Rev. Chas. G. Finney and of Theodore D. Weld, and in accepting his position as secretary here he became the close associate of the Tappans and other anti- slavery reformers at the East. RACE PREJUDICEIS IT WANING? We are aware that race prejudice in this, as in all other countries, is deeply rooted and hard to be eradicated, and that from time to time there are sad and almost terrific indications of its presence in the South. But we are glad to note, on the Other hand, evidences that it is waning among what may be called the more thoughtful people. Some of these evidences are found in the reports we publish of the anniversary exer- cises in our schools, where the white people attend and manifest their interest in the advancement of the colored pupils. Another very pleasant indication is given on the following page of the quiet and yet decided way in which Mr. Moody removed the barriers at one of his meetings in Texas. We commend this article to our readers attention.

Race Prejudice--Is it Waning? Editorial 220-221

220 RACE PRE7 UDICE. stands in the front rank Rev. George Whipple, D. D., its first Secretary, whose useful labors were continued with unabated zeal and success for over thirty years. iHe accepted his position when the society began its career in feebleness, under ostracism and with a future whose hope was in God only. Probably Dr. Whipple and his associates little dreamed at that time of the swift-coming and eventful results of the next few years. Slavery then seemed stronger and more defiant than ever, and the freedom of the slave appeared more hopeless. But Dr. Whipple lived to see the slave power crushed and the fetters of the slave broken. He lived to take a prominent part in the founding of schools and churches in the South, and to behold the little primary schools, held in abandoned houses and churches and in brush arbors, succeeded by well equipped normal and higher institutions, and it was his privilege to stand on the platforms of some of those institutions and present diplomas to worthy graduates in the presence of large and appreciative audiences, composed in part of persons of the white race who shared in the enthusiasm of the occasion. Such a life and such a record are worthy of grateful commemoration, and constitute an honorable part of the history and work of the American Missionary Association. George Whipple was born in Albany, N. Y., in 1805, was educated at Oneida Institute, Lane Seminary and Oberlin College, was appointed professor of mathematics in the last-named institution and left that position in 1846 to take his place as Secretary of this Association. Dr. Whipple was happy in the intimate friendship of his distinguished rela- tive, Bishop Whipple; was the personal friend of Rev. Chas. G. Finney and of Theodore D. Weld, and in accepting his position as secretary here he became the close associate of the Tappans and other anti- slavery reformers at the East. RACE PREJUDICEIS IT WANING? We are aware that race prejudice in this, as in all other countries, is deeply rooted and hard to be eradicated, and that from time to time there are sad and almost terrific indications of its presence in the South. But we are glad to note, on the Other hand, evidences that it is waning among what may be called the more thoughtful people. Some of these evidences are found in the reports we publish of the anniversary exer- cises in our schools, where the white people attend and manifest their interest in the advancement of the colored pupils. Another very pleasant indication is given on the following page of the quiet and yet decided way in which Mr. Moody removed the barriers at one of his meetings in Texas. We commend this article to our readers attention. MR. MOODY iN TEXAS. 221 WHAT MR. MOODY DID IN TEXAS. One of our pastors in the South sends us the following interesting sketch: The great Moody meetings were heartily enjoyed by us all. Our church people were constant attendants. At the opening of the meet- ing Mr. Moody noticed the colored people Sitting away off from the platform and railed in to cut them off from the whites, lie did not like so unequal accommodationso plain a distinction. When the meeting was over I waited and spoke with him. We walked down to the colored department. He said, I dont like this railing business, and he threw himself against the railing, but it did not fall. He said, Give me till to-morrow to get that down. The next day when the colored people went to the tabernacle they found the railing torn away, the seats moved up near the platform, a stove put up and a curtain stretched in the rear to keep out the wind. From that time on the colored people flocked, to hear the great evangelist. But Mr. Moody did not stop there. He came down and asked the colored people to sing. So unexpected was his invitation, it caught us unprepared. The next day I got my choir together and added a few from some of the other colored churches. The old sexton arranged seats for us and placed an organ there. At the night service Mr. Moody said, We will now ask the colored people to sing. I arose and faced my choir, and the little organ pealed forth as it was touched by the hand of a colored girl, and the choir sang Scatter Sunshine. There were about 7,000 or 8,ooo people present, all save about 300 were white. It was a new feature. The people seemed to be surprised, astonished, excited. They stood on their feet, they peered over each other. When we were through singing, Mr. Moody said, Why, it will never do to let them beat us that way, and the audience responded with a hearty laugh. The next day the daily papers said we made fine mu sic, and the Dallas News was headed: The great Moody meetings. An audience of 9,000 and a colored choir the feature. I have not heard of any objection, censure, or anything concerning Mr. Moodys method. No paper spoke against the colored people singing, and we sang one song at each service after that. White and black say such a thing never was done in Texas befoi-e. Mr. Moody left to preach elsewhere, but a young man, Mr. Jones, remained and held meetings at the white Congregational Church. At these meetings the white man, Henry Vance, who burned and tortured the negro, Henry Smith, was converted and joined the white Con- gregational Church.

What Mr. Moody did in Texas Editorial 221-222

MR. MOODY iN TEXAS. 221 WHAT MR. MOODY DID IN TEXAS. One of our pastors in the South sends us the following interesting sketch: The great Moody meetings were heartily enjoyed by us all. Our church people were constant attendants. At the opening of the meet- ing Mr. Moody noticed the colored people Sitting away off from the platform and railed in to cut them off from the whites, lie did not like so unequal accommodationso plain a distinction. When the meeting was over I waited and spoke with him. We walked down to the colored department. He said, I dont like this railing business, and he threw himself against the railing, but it did not fall. He said, Give me till to-morrow to get that down. The next day when the colored people went to the tabernacle they found the railing torn away, the seats moved up near the platform, a stove put up and a curtain stretched in the rear to keep out the wind. From that time on the colored people flocked, to hear the great evangelist. But Mr. Moody did not stop there. He came down and asked the colored people to sing. So unexpected was his invitation, it caught us unprepared. The next day I got my choir together and added a few from some of the other colored churches. The old sexton arranged seats for us and placed an organ there. At the night service Mr. Moody said, We will now ask the colored people to sing. I arose and faced my choir, and the little organ pealed forth as it was touched by the hand of a colored girl, and the choir sang Scatter Sunshine. There were about 7,000 or 8,ooo people present, all save about 300 were white. It was a new feature. The people seemed to be surprised, astonished, excited. They stood on their feet, they peered over each other. When we were through singing, Mr. Moody said, Why, it will never do to let them beat us that way, and the audience responded with a hearty laugh. The next day the daily papers said we made fine mu sic, and the Dallas News was headed: The great Moody meetings. An audience of 9,000 and a colored choir the feature. I have not heard of any objection, censure, or anything concerning Mr. Moodys method. No paper spoke against the colored people singing, and we sang one song at each service after that. White and black say such a thing never was done in Texas befoi-e. Mr. Moody left to preach elsewhere, but a young man, Mr. Jones, remained and held meetings at the white Congregational Church. At these meetings the white man, Henry Vance, who burned and tortured the negro, Henry Smith, was converted and joined the white Con- gregational Church. 222 TO UGAL 00 UNIVERSITY. The South. ANNIVERSARY EXERCISES. TOUGALOO UNIVERSITY, TOUGALOO, MISS. The commencement exercises, May 1922, closed a year of quiet and successful work. The enrollment, 379, was slightly in excess of that of the previous year, and the average attendance was encouragingly larger than in past years. Each year emphasizes the need of more dormitory room at Tougaloo. Fully one hundred and fifty boys have been refused admission for lack of room. 0, the pity of it that where so many are longing to rise the want of room shuts them out from the opportunity! The last fortnight of the year was shadowed by the death by drowning of one of the most popular young men of the school. Prominent in many ways, a worker in the Young Mens Christian Association, his sud- den death was a great shock. In the deep thoughtfulness that it occa- sioned several who had been hesitant regarding the Christian life came to decision for the right. The baccalaureate sermon by the president from the text Greater is He that is in you than he that is in the world concluded a series on the First Epistle of John. All of the exerciscs of the week passed off smoothly and with great success. Those who have attended the commencements for many years speak of the marked progress that each year shows. The alumni meeting on Tuesday afternoon was quite well attended. As the prepared programme could not be carried out, an experience meeting was held and many of the difficulties and encourage- ments that meet the young colored people were brought to view. It was instructive and saddening to learn how difficult it is for intellige~nt and Christian young men and women, who strive to maintain an honor- able character in all ways in their endeavors to secure positions as teachers, to have to contend with the wire pulling, corruption, sectarian- ism and meanness that often enter into the obtaining of places to teach. It was very evident that in many ways and along various lines Tougaloo students are doing an important missionary work in Louisiana, Arkansas and Mississippi. The proposition of emigration to Africa found lttle favor. Nearly all those who spoke touched upon the relations of the white and colored races, and the generally expressed opinion was that by patience, wise forbearance and courtesy recognition of character and merit would surely be won. One said that in a town where formerly

Anniversary Exercises: Tougaloo University, Tougaloo, Miss. The South 222-224

222 TO UGAL 00 UNIVERSITY. The South. ANNIVERSARY EXERCISES. TOUGALOO UNIVERSITY, TOUGALOO, MISS. The commencement exercises, May 1922, closed a year of quiet and successful work. The enrollment, 379, was slightly in excess of that of the previous year, and the average attendance was encouragingly larger than in past years. Each year emphasizes the need of more dormitory room at Tougaloo. Fully one hundred and fifty boys have been refused admission for lack of room. 0, the pity of it that where so many are longing to rise the want of room shuts them out from the opportunity! The last fortnight of the year was shadowed by the death by drowning of one of the most popular young men of the school. Prominent in many ways, a worker in the Young Mens Christian Association, his sud- den death was a great shock. In the deep thoughtfulness that it occa- sioned several who had been hesitant regarding the Christian life came to decision for the right. The baccalaureate sermon by the president from the text Greater is He that is in you than he that is in the world concluded a series on the First Epistle of John. All of the exerciscs of the week passed off smoothly and with great success. Those who have attended the commencements for many years speak of the marked progress that each year shows. The alumni meeting on Tuesday afternoon was quite well attended. As the prepared programme could not be carried out, an experience meeting was held and many of the difficulties and encourage- ments that meet the young colored people were brought to view. It was instructive and saddening to learn how difficult it is for intellige~nt and Christian young men and women, who strive to maintain an honor- able character in all ways in their endeavors to secure positions as teachers, to have to contend with the wire pulling, corruption, sectarian- ism and meanness that often enter into the obtaining of places to teach. It was very evident that in many ways and along various lines Tougaloo students are doing an important missionary work in Louisiana, Arkansas and Mississippi. The proposition of emigration to Africa found lttle favor. Nearly all those who spoke touched upon the relations of the white and colored races, and the generally expressed opinion was that by patience, wise forbearance and courtesy recognition of character and merit would surely be won. One said that in a town where formerly TO(JGAL 00, M/SS. 223 he was only tolerated by the whites now they welcome his return and greet him cordially as Professor. Another who at his first going to teach suffered some indignities from young white boys said that now those boys would be the first to defend him. Others spoke in similar strain. President Woodworth said that from what he had heard them say it seemed to him that they were taking the wisest course to win confidence and respect, and were realizing and going still more to real- ize the meaning of the beatitude Blessed are the meek, for they shall inherit the earth. Rev. ID. M. Fisk, of T& edo, who was present, spoke afterward in admiring wonder of the poise and self-restraint of the speakers, regarding it as a most hopeful sign showing what Chris- tian education can accomplish. The graduating class of this year numbered but four, three from the normal and one from the musical department. Their work would have been highly creditable anywhere. One of the class expects after a little to study medicine (Tougaloo numbers several quite success- ful physicians among its alumni), another to teach and enter mercantile life, and two will become teachers at Tougaloo. The annual address by Rev. D. M. Fisk, of Toledo, Ohio, on The Newest Education was a brilliant forthsetting of the different phases through which education has passed from that which concerned itself with words to that which, basing itself on all the facts that science has gained, asks, as this is so, what are you going to do about it? giving to the moral and religious their due place. It was helpful, stimu- lating, and in the highest degree suggestive and valuable. As usual a number of prominent and representative white people were interested participants in the exercises. After Mr. Fisks address there were brief addresses from several. The widely spread interest in the work is to some extent indicated in the fact that those who spoke represented the Baptist, Methodist, Christian and Presbyterian denominations. The industrial exhibits attracted large attention, and special com- mendation was given to the specimens of mechanical and architectural drawing and cabinet work. During the year these lines, and practical dressmaking have been specially developed, while the other industries have been carefully and excellently carried on. Those in charge of the work at Tougaloo, and at other places in the South, look forward with dismay to the probability of severe impair- ment of usefulness through the curtailment of work that seems inevitable owing to the state of the Associations treasury. Where the cuts will come may not yet be known. They can come in hardly any direction without a serious hampering of work for years to come. Will our friends allow it 224 STRAIGHT UNIVERSITY, STRAIGHT UNIVERSITY, NEW ORLEANS, LA. BY REV. GEG. W. HENDERSON. Straight University has added another year to the sum of her useful life. Each year of her long beneficent edu~ational ministry has on the whole been a stepping stone to a better service and larger usefulness, and now, upon this twenty-sixth anniversary, she stands upon an emi- nence gained by faithful striving, and rejoices in the great op~rortunity which has been hers, and in the wise use which under divine Providence she has been able to make of it. Commencement week proper opened Sunday, May i ~. The morning service consisted of an earnest and fitting address to the Young Mens and Young Womens Christian Associations by Rev. A. M. Green of the African Methodist Church, and the evening service of the fine Baccalaureate of Pres. Atwood with its impressive exposition of the idea and duty of Christian service. The large and attentive audience showed how great was the interest in the occasion. On the three succeeding days came the exhibition of the industrial department, showing the good work of the boys in carpentry, of the girls in sewing, and of both in printing; the interesting exercises of the Daniel Hand school; the eloquent address of Rev. J. E. Terry before the Sumner and Alpha literary societies; the class day exercises, sparkling with life and replete with good sense; the exhibition of the grammar department, with its usual high excellence, and the pleasant meeting of the alumni, who listened with so much pleasure to the address by A. J. Lopez, M.D., of the class of 86 (college course), whose effort in its noble thought and choice diction was much above the average of such productions. All of these occasions were attended 13y large and appreciative audiences. The graduating exercises, Thursday, May 23, were the culmination of the interest which had been steadily growing in inten- sity. The weather threatened and kept its promise, but nothing could dampen the enthusiasm of the public. The skies lowered, the rain came, but the people also came; so keen their interest in the occasion and so great their appreciation of this nursery of Christian learning and of the Christian benevolence of our Northern friends which makes it possible. No description of the evening could do it justice. The spacious auditorium of Central Church could not hold the people who came. But those who gained entrance were held, not only by the church, but by the fine, earnest speaking of the graduates, which at times, unlike the speaking sometimes heard on such occasions, was actually eloquent. The opening prayer was by Rev. W. E. Peirce, a scholarly divine of the city. On the platform sat several of the tins-

Rev. Geo. W. Henderson Henderson, Geo. W., Rev. Anniversary Exercises: Straight University, New Orleans, La. The South 224-226

224 STRAIGHT UNIVERSITY, STRAIGHT UNIVERSITY, NEW ORLEANS, LA. BY REV. GEG. W. HENDERSON. Straight University has added another year to the sum of her useful life. Each year of her long beneficent edu~ational ministry has on the whole been a stepping stone to a better service and larger usefulness, and now, upon this twenty-sixth anniversary, she stands upon an emi- nence gained by faithful striving, and rejoices in the great op~rortunity which has been hers, and in the wise use which under divine Providence she has been able to make of it. Commencement week proper opened Sunday, May i ~. The morning service consisted of an earnest and fitting address to the Young Mens and Young Womens Christian Associations by Rev. A. M. Green of the African Methodist Church, and the evening service of the fine Baccalaureate of Pres. Atwood with its impressive exposition of the idea and duty of Christian service. The large and attentive audience showed how great was the interest in the occasion. On the three succeeding days came the exhibition of the industrial department, showing the good work of the boys in carpentry, of the girls in sewing, and of both in printing; the interesting exercises of the Daniel Hand school; the eloquent address of Rev. J. E. Terry before the Sumner and Alpha literary societies; the class day exercises, sparkling with life and replete with good sense; the exhibition of the grammar department, with its usual high excellence, and the pleasant meeting of the alumni, who listened with so much pleasure to the address by A. J. Lopez, M.D., of the class of 86 (college course), whose effort in its noble thought and choice diction was much above the average of such productions. All of these occasions were attended 13y large and appreciative audiences. The graduating exercises, Thursday, May 23, were the culmination of the interest which had been steadily growing in inten- sity. The weather threatened and kept its promise, but nothing could dampen the enthusiasm of the public. The skies lowered, the rain came, but the people also came; so keen their interest in the occasion and so great their appreciation of this nursery of Christian learning and of the Christian benevolence of our Northern friends which makes it possible. No description of the evening could do it justice. The spacious auditorium of Central Church could not hold the people who came. But those who gained entrance were held, not only by the church, but by the fine, earnest speaking of the graduates, which at times, unlike the speaking sometimes heard on such occasions, was actually eloquent. The opening prayer was by Rev. W. E. Peirce, a scholarly divine of the city. On the platform sat several of the tins- NEW ORLEANS, LA. 225 tees, two of whom are among the leading business men of the Crescent City. The thirteen graduates represent the four departmentsof music, normal, college preparatory and college. One received the degree of Bachelor of Arts, four will enter the freshman class next fall, one received a diploma in music, in addition to a normal diploma. A class of thirty received certificates from the grammar department and will enter upon the normal and college preparatory courses another year. The great constituency of the American Missionary Association, by whose prayers and pecuniary gifts the school is supported, naturally raise the interrogatory What is the evidence that its work is actually advancing to meet the growing demand, what is the character of its contribution to Southern civilization, and what will be the indirect effect upon the country as a whole ? In other words, whether the result, present and prospective, ji~istifies the outlay. A study of the various exercises of Commencement week will partially answer this question. The new event of the year was the graduation, after a course of seven years, of Miss Beatrice Rochon in instrumental music. She is the first fruits of this department. tier Piano Recital, May i6, was a rare treat to lovers of good music, who were present in large numbers, and who were delighted to see to what perfection her fine native gifts had been developed by skillful teaching. The genius of the race for vocal music is also receiving due attention. The singing of the University Glee Club, recently organized, added a positive charm to Commencement. The eight young men and five young women of the graduating class have been with us from four to seven years. How much of patient courage, faith and self-denial these years represent no one not acquainted with the facts can realize. It is Aristotle, I think, or some other master, who says that the capacity for self-denial and patient striving for the far-away prize is the supreme test of virtue. A race capable of such a test is worthy to live, and is sure to gain the worlds highest respect in due time. Every member of the class (with perhaps one exceptipn) is an earnest Christian. Six of them have the ministry in view, four are already enrolled in our theological department. Straight, as the child of missionary faith and enterprise, points with pride to this class as a proof of her fidelity to her mission. Christian duty and service was the dom- inant note in every oration and essay; it was the idea of their motto, Non minis/ran sal minis/rare; it appeaicd not only in such subjects as Frederick Douglass, Responsibility of the Educated Negro, and Christian Education for the AfroAmerican, but in such different themes as Silent Forces, The Benefit of Occupation. lnd Liberty 226 GREGORY NORMAL INSTiTUTE, under Law. This spirit permeates the whole body of students. It appeared in the junior exhibition, May 3, in the exercises of the gram- mar grade and in the class day exercise, showing how earnestly our boys and girls are studying the question of race destiny and the rela- tionship of the races in the South, as well as their profound sense of personal duty thereto. A growing sentiment of patriotism enters into their broad and noble conception of duty. Straight University feels it as her mission, so far as she has the power, to plant in the South the civilization, the concep- tions of Christianity and of liberty which is the glory of the North and the secret of its progress; for this, as she understands it, is the key to the so-called Southern question. Some facts in the history of the year just closed afford her especial encouragement. The times were never so hard, yet the attendance in the higher grades was never so great. This is not only a compliment tothe school, but also to the people, who are realizing more and more how essential these missionary institutions are to the preservation of their liberty, and to whom new difficulties are simply new occasions for fresh sacrifices. An event deserving especial record w~s the vote of the alumni to erect some kind of memorial to Mr. Thomy Lefon in recognition of his bequest of nearly $6,ooo to Straight University, the first considerable gift, so far as known, ever made by a colored man in the Southern States for such a purpose. GREGORY NORMAL INSTITUTE, WILMINGTON, N. C. BY PROF. FRANCI5 T. WATERS. Gregory Institute has grown from a small beginning, year by year, adding to its work better advantages and a higher course of study as the requirements of those completing their work demanded. It had become apparent for some years that the advanced normal course was a neces- sity to this school, for it furnishes most of the colored teachers of East- ern North Carolina. Hence the two years advanced normal was added this year and the course of study arranged to fit the changes, so that there was no class to graduate this year. Commencement week occurred May 1317, inclusive. Monday and Tuesday were devoted exclusively to written examinations as tests of work done for the year. I think in my many years of school work I have never been so agreeably surprised with results as on this occasion. There were remarkably few failures, and the students showed thorough training in all departments and in all branches. On Wednesday occurred public examination, and I had the pleasure of hearing several recitations made that would have done credit to students in any school of any section of our land. I was very much

Prof. Francis T. Waters Waters, Francis T., Prof. Anniversary Exercises: Gregory Normal Institute, Wilmington, N.C. The South 226-228

226 GREGORY NORMAL INSTiTUTE, under Law. This spirit permeates the whole body of students. It appeared in the junior exhibition, May 3, in the exercises of the gram- mar grade and in the class day exercise, showing how earnestly our boys and girls are studying the question of race destiny and the rela- tionship of the races in the South, as well as their profound sense of personal duty thereto. A growing sentiment of patriotism enters into their broad and noble conception of duty. Straight University feels it as her mission, so far as she has the power, to plant in the South the civilization, the concep- tions of Christianity and of liberty which is the glory of the North and the secret of its progress; for this, as she understands it, is the key to the so-called Southern question. Some facts in the history of the year just closed afford her especial encouragement. The times were never so hard, yet the attendance in the higher grades was never so great. This is not only a compliment tothe school, but also to the people, who are realizing more and more how essential these missionary institutions are to the preservation of their liberty, and to whom new difficulties are simply new occasions for fresh sacrifices. An event deserving especial record w~s the vote of the alumni to erect some kind of memorial to Mr. Thomy Lefon in recognition of his bequest of nearly $6,ooo to Straight University, the first considerable gift, so far as known, ever made by a colored man in the Southern States for such a purpose. GREGORY NORMAL INSTITUTE, WILMINGTON, N. C. BY PROF. FRANCI5 T. WATERS. Gregory Institute has grown from a small beginning, year by year, adding to its work better advantages and a higher course of study as the requirements of those completing their work demanded. It had become apparent for some years that the advanced normal course was a neces- sity to this school, for it furnishes most of the colored teachers of East- ern North Carolina. Hence the two years advanced normal was added this year and the course of study arranged to fit the changes, so that there was no class to graduate this year. Commencement week occurred May 1317, inclusive. Monday and Tuesday were devoted exclusively to written examinations as tests of work done for the year. I think in my many years of school work I have never been so agreeably surprised with results as on this occasion. There were remarkably few failures, and the students showed thorough training in all departments and in all branches. On Wednesday occurred public examination, and I had the pleasure of hearing several recitations made that would have done credit to students in any school of any section of our land. I was very much WILMING TON, N. C 227 pleased with the class in algebra, taught by Miss Marsh, of the normal course. The expansion of difficult binomial quantities by inspection were written out in remarkably short time. Equations to find the value of x were worked in less than one minute; and they were all quite difficult, and the class had not previously seen these particular exam- ples. United States history, grammar and rhetoric each in turn showed the proficiency of those reciting and the carefulness of instruction. In all the rooms the work of oral recitation was supplemented with music, declamations, essays, etc. Many visitors went from one room to another and all expressed themselves as abundantly satisfied with the exercises. The center of attraction seemed to be the industrial rooms, where Miss Brice, the teacher, had tastefully arranged the years work for exhibition. There were garments of all sorts, and materialchil- drens dresses, ladies wrappers, hem-stitched handkerchiefs, work bags, bedquilts, sheets, pillow slips, samples of patching and darning, buttonholes; in fact, every variety of sewing mentionable, and all with such careful neatness as to bring forth expressions of praise in behalf of those who had completed the work. Many articles were purchased by those who examined and our sales on that day exceeded those of the entire year. The one thing to mar was the lack of shops from which the proofs of labor of the boys could be shown. I be- lieve industrial shops, where the boys can be instructed in woodwork, will increase the efficiency of all classes of work fifty per cent., and leave the boys able to go out in life with hands skilled as well as the intellect. The three-fold development, I believe, is demanded to place them on an equality with the whites with whom they must compete. Threefold development, moral, intellectual and manual, in the order named, I regard important, and I most sincerely hope in a few years we may have the work at Wilmington carried on in all these departments, and thus produce men and women fitted for life. Tuesday evening occurred the entertainment of undergraduates, two representatives chosen from each class, on the basis of scholarship sim- ply, taking part. All showed themselves well prepared and enthusias- tic. Thursday, the regular day for the graduating class, was occupied by the tenth grade, the class which under the old regime would have graduated, but which will graduate in m897 under the new arrangement. Every member ot the tenth grade will continue the remaining two years, and to these will be added several who have graduated in former years and who feel the need of an extended instruction. Friday morning all grades met at the church to receive certificates of promotion and to hear the announcements for the incoming year. On the whole those who were present and heard the exercises pro- nounced them equal to any ever carried on in the school. The weather 228 SAVANNAH, GA. was fine and everything went off without a break. We, look forward to the coming year with enlarged hopes and a determination to meet the requirements laid upon us. While we have added two years to the course of study, our teaching force will not be increased, at least for the coming year. This will necessitate increased work for all the normal teaching force, but all have the true missionary spirit and are willing to do anything necessary for the good of the work. The Lord has abundantly blessed us this year, whereof we are glad. We ask for new blessings and for faithful friends for the year to come. BEACH INSTITUTE, SAVANNAH, GA. By M155 ADA L. wILcox. Could our Northern friends have heard the closing exercises at Beach they would not wonder that our hearts are glad and that we are proud of our pupils. May 17, at I P.M., the children filed into the chapel for the exhibition of the under grades. The parents manifested their interest by filling every available seat, and by frequent bursts of applause over the recitations of the little ones. The finest selection on the programme was the History of the Flag, rendered by students from all grades. So clear was the enunciation, and so good the expres- sion, that one had only to close ones eyes to fancy the speakers were Northern children. Mr. Sengstacke, pastor of the church at Woodville, in a few words contrasted the present opportunities of the colored pupils with the past, and spoke of the time when, in the same spot where Beach now stands, he used to play, and to slip in by stealth to learn to read. On the following Sunday, Mr. Maxwell, pastor of the Congregational Church in Savannah, preached the sermon to the graduates. The earnest, practical words met sympathetic listeners, and the class could not but feel a great spiritual uplift. The next interesting feature was the Wednesday exhibition of the Industrial Work. Of course the display was not a large one, as this branch is still new, but the neatly made garments, the buttonholes, the darning and patching, the quilts and dainty bits of trimming, testi- fied to the interest the children take, and showed how much can be accomplished in five months. The end did, indeed, crown all. It was with some fear lest we should not have a large audience that we gave the commencement at 4 P.M. instead of in the evening as formerly. But by 3 oclock the chapel began to fill, and long before the hour a splendid, happy-faced crowd was packed before the prettily decorated stage, above which, on

Miss Ada L. Wilcox Wilcox, Ada L., Miss Anniversary Exercises: Beach Institute, Savannah, Ga. The South 228-229

228 SAVANNAH, GA. was fine and everything went off without a break. We, look forward to the coming year with enlarged hopes and a determination to meet the requirements laid upon us. While we have added two years to the course of study, our teaching force will not be increased, at least for the coming year. This will necessitate increased work for all the normal teaching force, but all have the true missionary spirit and are willing to do anything necessary for the good of the work. The Lord has abundantly blessed us this year, whereof we are glad. We ask for new blessings and for faithful friends for the year to come. BEACH INSTITUTE, SAVANNAH, GA. By M155 ADA L. wILcox. Could our Northern friends have heard the closing exercises at Beach they would not wonder that our hearts are glad and that we are proud of our pupils. May 17, at I P.M., the children filed into the chapel for the exhibition of the under grades. The parents manifested their interest by filling every available seat, and by frequent bursts of applause over the recitations of the little ones. The finest selection on the programme was the History of the Flag, rendered by students from all grades. So clear was the enunciation, and so good the expres- sion, that one had only to close ones eyes to fancy the speakers were Northern children. Mr. Sengstacke, pastor of the church at Woodville, in a few words contrasted the present opportunities of the colored pupils with the past, and spoke of the time when, in the same spot where Beach now stands, he used to play, and to slip in by stealth to learn to read. On the following Sunday, Mr. Maxwell, pastor of the Congregational Church in Savannah, preached the sermon to the graduates. The earnest, practical words met sympathetic listeners, and the class could not but feel a great spiritual uplift. The next interesting feature was the Wednesday exhibition of the Industrial Work. Of course the display was not a large one, as this branch is still new, but the neatly made garments, the buttonholes, the darning and patching, the quilts and dainty bits of trimming, testi- fied to the interest the children take, and showed how much can be accomplished in five months. The end did, indeed, crown all. It was with some fear lest we should not have a large audience that we gave the commencement at 4 P.M. instead of in the evening as formerly. But by 3 oclock the chapel began to fill, and long before the hour a splendid, happy-faced crowd was packed before the prettily decorated stage, above which, on McINTOSH, GA. 229 a blue ground, hung the silver-lettered class motto, Fortuna For- tibus Fazet. With 4 oclock came the sound of singing in the hall, and, to the music of a slow, stately processional, there entered our fourteen graduates. It was a beautiful, effective opening. The honor of the salutatory fell to one of the young ladies. We cannot speak of the exercises in detail, but the elocutionary work was exceptionally good, and the orations of our boys showed thinking minds and ready expression. The valedj~torian, a young man of more than ordinary ability, gave, in a bright, witty style, the class history, and introduced one of their number as Fortune at the Wheel. The wheel, trimmed with the class colors, was turned by a pretty, slender girl, who gave, in a most winning way, a prophesy in verse to each member. A strong address on the subject of Act Well Your Part was delivered by Vice- President Suggs, of the Industrial College. With such a sermon to begin and such a speech to close, the class of 95 were indeed fortunate. With due modesty we quote the general sentiment expressed to us that the commencement of 1895 was the best ever held in Beach Institute. McINTOSH, GA. By PROF. FRED. w. FOSTER. Our anniversary exercises began Sunday morning, May 19, with a stirring, practical sermon, full of common sense, especially for the benefit of our young people. This was followed in the evening by another dis- course by the same speaker in which he pictured to the young folks what their future homes and home life ought to be, and left words of advice which cannot fail to produce good. Thursday, examination day, opened with rain, but our children were not t~ be balked of the examination for which they had been working so many months. Seven miles and rain could not keep them away. Wide-awake pupils, clear and intelligent recitations, and keen, exact classwork testified to thoroughness of labors of teachers and scholars. Despite the weather a good number of patrons were present and seemed highly appreciative of all that was done, most remaining the entire day. To prove their appreciativeness let this incident bear witness. The principal found an elderly woman weeping just outside the primary room door. On inquiry she said It was such a beautiful exercise I was so full that I had to come out and walk a little. From chart class to eleventh grade everybody was prompt and ready to do his best. Thursday, anniversary day, opened bright and cool. At ten oclock a goodly audience had gathered in our beautiful church, to listen to the

Prof. Fred. W. Foster Foster, Fred. W., Prof. Anniversary Exercises: McIntosh, Ga. The South 229-230

McINTOSH, GA. 229 a blue ground, hung the silver-lettered class motto, Fortuna For- tibus Fazet. With 4 oclock came the sound of singing in the hall, and, to the music of a slow, stately processional, there entered our fourteen graduates. It was a beautiful, effective opening. The honor of the salutatory fell to one of the young ladies. We cannot speak of the exercises in detail, but the elocutionary work was exceptionally good, and the orations of our boys showed thinking minds and ready expression. The valedj~torian, a young man of more than ordinary ability, gave, in a bright, witty style, the class history, and introduced one of their number as Fortune at the Wheel. The wheel, trimmed with the class colors, was turned by a pretty, slender girl, who gave, in a most winning way, a prophesy in verse to each member. A strong address on the subject of Act Well Your Part was delivered by Vice- President Suggs, of the Industrial College. With such a sermon to begin and such a speech to close, the class of 95 were indeed fortunate. With due modesty we quote the general sentiment expressed to us that the commencement of 1895 was the best ever held in Beach Institute. McINTOSH, GA. By PROF. FRED. w. FOSTER. Our anniversary exercises began Sunday morning, May 19, with a stirring, practical sermon, full of common sense, especially for the benefit of our young people. This was followed in the evening by another dis- course by the same speaker in which he pictured to the young folks what their future homes and home life ought to be, and left words of advice which cannot fail to produce good. Thursday, examination day, opened with rain, but our children were not t~ be balked of the examination for which they had been working so many months. Seven miles and rain could not keep them away. Wide-awake pupils, clear and intelligent recitations, and keen, exact classwork testified to thoroughness of labors of teachers and scholars. Despite the weather a good number of patrons were present and seemed highly appreciative of all that was done, most remaining the entire day. To prove their appreciativeness let this incident bear witness. The principal found an elderly woman weeping just outside the primary room door. On inquiry she said It was such a beautiful exercise I was so full that I had to come out and walk a little. From chart class to eleventh grade everybody was prompt and ready to do his best. Thursday, anniversary day, opened bright and cool. At ten oclock a goodly audience had gathered in our beautiful church, to listen to the 230 MERIDIAN, MISS. closing exercises of the year. Sixteen young people competed for the yearly prizes in oratorytwo whole and two half-year scholarships. We wish that some of our friends in the North, who have sent us tangible evidence of their interest, could have seen and heard. Ease of manner, clearness of speech, appropriate gestures, and good emphasis and expression, bringing out the thought of the selections, were notice- able throughout the exercise. Perhaps the best mark of thoroughness was the fact that not once was there an instance of hesitancy or the repetition of a word. The intense interest of the audience was mani- fested by frequent half-suppressed ripples of applause and partly stifled exclamations of approval. Songs by the school or by classes were no unimportant part of the programme, the primary childrens Farmers Song, in which appropriate acting accompanied the words, fairly car- ried away the house. Then followed the awarding of the promotion cards for which so many had worked so long and so hard; the decision of the judges, and words of encouragement from friends, and then the benediction closed the school year of 189495, the best, most prosperous and most suc- cessful year that we have seen. Four hundred and twenty-five is the enrollment for the year; eleven counties have been reached by representatives in our school, and still others will be reached by tl~e earnest Christian young men and young women now going out to scatter the benefits of what they have been gathering; forty-two have been under the home influence of the boarding department; and there has been a marked development and growth in intellectual, -moral and religious character. LINCOLN SCHOOL, MERIDIAN, MISS. BY MRS. H. I. MILLER. Our anniversary exercises were to have been on the 28th of May, but there were grave rumors afloat in the adjoining countiesthe homes of many of the studentsand great apprehensions less the small- pox should compel us to close. Therefore, after due consideration, we anticipated the graduating exercises, and had the annual sermon on the morning of the 23d. It was a noble effort on the part of Mr. Harris, pastor of the Congregational Church,~and we were uplifted by the many words of cheer given us. In the evening the house was well filled by an orderly, attentive and appreciative audience. It was pro- nounced by all the best entertainment Lincoln has ever given. 1 certainly think the essays were original and the orations and music equal to any I have ever heard in our Northern high schools.

Mrs. H. I. Miller Miller, H. I., Mrs. Anniversary Exercises: Lincoln School, Meridian, Miss. The South 230-231

230 MERIDIAN, MISS. closing exercises of the year. Sixteen young people competed for the yearly prizes in oratorytwo whole and two half-year scholarships. We wish that some of our friends in the North, who have sent us tangible evidence of their interest, could have seen and heard. Ease of manner, clearness of speech, appropriate gestures, and good emphasis and expression, bringing out the thought of the selections, were notice- able throughout the exercise. Perhaps the best mark of thoroughness was the fact that not once was there an instance of hesitancy or the repetition of a word. The intense interest of the audience was mani- fested by frequent half-suppressed ripples of applause and partly stifled exclamations of approval. Songs by the school or by classes were no unimportant part of the programme, the primary childrens Farmers Song, in which appropriate acting accompanied the words, fairly car- ried away the house. Then followed the awarding of the promotion cards for which so many had worked so long and so hard; the decision of the judges, and words of encouragement from friends, and then the benediction closed the school year of 189495, the best, most prosperous and most suc- cessful year that we have seen. Four hundred and twenty-five is the enrollment for the year; eleven counties have been reached by representatives in our school, and still others will be reached by tl~e earnest Christian young men and young women now going out to scatter the benefits of what they have been gathering; forty-two have been under the home influence of the boarding department; and there has been a marked development and growth in intellectual, -moral and religious character. LINCOLN SCHOOL, MERIDIAN, MISS. BY MRS. H. I. MILLER. Our anniversary exercises were to have been on the 28th of May, but there were grave rumors afloat in the adjoining countiesthe homes of many of the studentsand great apprehensions less the small- pox should compel us to close. Therefore, after due consideration, we anticipated the graduating exercises, and had the annual sermon on the morning of the 23d. It was a noble effort on the part of Mr. Harris, pastor of the Congregational Church,~and we were uplifted by the many words of cheer given us. In the evening the house was well filled by an orderly, attentive and appreciative audience. It was pro- nounced by all the best entertainment Lincoln has ever given. 1 certainly think the essays were original and the orations and music equal to any I have ever heard in our Northern high schools. GRAN!) VIEW TENN. 23! Everything was perfectly preparednot a jar in any part from begin- ning to end. If no other evidence of growth could be found in our xvork, it could be seen in our audience. For a year or two these enter- tainments were a source of intense anxiety to me, for the spectators were rude, noisy and inattentive, but now no better audience could be found North or South. Just before the presentation of diplomas, Dr. Coleman, pastor of the African Methodist Church, requested us to allow him a word from the platform. He then read a paper signed by the best colored people in the citynot members of the Congregational Churchthanking the American Missionary Association and its workers here in a beautiful and touching manner. The idea was to convey to us the thought that we were appreciated outside of our own church people. It was a very pleasing tribute to our efforts. There were ten students in the class of 95, and seven of the former graduates who took our advanced coursetenth yearin connection with the class of this year. Seven of these graduates will enter Tougaloo next fall; one will go to Fisk, and one of the young men of the class of 94 enters Straight Medical School, or the medical school at New Orleans. It has been a year full of labor and blessing, and all the discomforts arising from hard times have some way disappeared, and every one recognizes the great charity of the American Missionary Association. It is daily said to me: We know how much has been done, and we pray we may show that we appreciate the bounty by doing for others. One thing in closing I cannot for.bear mentioning. Our native Afri- can girl, Moloto, was in a place of great peril and God opened a way whereby she could go to Massachusetts, and in the fall she will enter the school at Northfield to prepare for her chosen work among her people in Africa. We are preparing a little exhibit for the Atlanta Exposition, just to let the people know that Lincoln lives in Meridian, Miss. GRAND VIEW, TENN. BY MISS GRACE PUTNAM. The commencement exercises of Grand View Normal Institute were held Thursday, May 9. The stage and walls were prettily decorated with the class colors, cherry and cream, fastened here and there with bunches of great snowball blossoms. In a conspicuous place appeared the school colors, a knot of blue and gray, significant of the union and harmony of the North and South. Potted plants and cut flowers added to the decorations. Although Grand View is on the mountain top,

Miss Grace Putnam Putnam, Grace, Miss Anniversary Exercises: Grand View, Tenn. The South 231-232

GRAN!) VIEW TENN. 23! Everything was perfectly preparednot a jar in any part from begin- ning to end. If no other evidence of growth could be found in our xvork, it could be seen in our audience. For a year or two these enter- tainments were a source of intense anxiety to me, for the spectators were rude, noisy and inattentive, but now no better audience could be found North or South. Just before the presentation of diplomas, Dr. Coleman, pastor of the African Methodist Church, requested us to allow him a word from the platform. He then read a paper signed by the best colored people in the citynot members of the Congregational Churchthanking the American Missionary Association and its workers here in a beautiful and touching manner. The idea was to convey to us the thought that we were appreciated outside of our own church people. It was a very pleasing tribute to our efforts. There were ten students in the class of 95, and seven of the former graduates who took our advanced coursetenth yearin connection with the class of this year. Seven of these graduates will enter Tougaloo next fall; one will go to Fisk, and one of the young men of the class of 94 enters Straight Medical School, or the medical school at New Orleans. It has been a year full of labor and blessing, and all the discomforts arising from hard times have some way disappeared, and every one recognizes the great charity of the American Missionary Association. It is daily said to me: We know how much has been done, and we pray we may show that we appreciate the bounty by doing for others. One thing in closing I cannot for.bear mentioning. Our native Afri- can girl, Moloto, was in a place of great peril and God opened a way whereby she could go to Massachusetts, and in the fall she will enter the school at Northfield to prepare for her chosen work among her people in Africa. We are preparing a little exhibit for the Atlanta Exposition, just to let the people know that Lincoln lives in Meridian, Miss. GRAND VIEW, TENN. BY MISS GRACE PUTNAM. The commencement exercises of Grand View Normal Institute were held Thursday, May 9. The stage and walls were prettily decorated with the class colors, cherry and cream, fastened here and there with bunches of great snowball blossoms. In a conspicuous place appeared the school colors, a knot of blue and gray, significant of the union and harmony of the North and South. Potted plants and cut flowers added to the decorations. Although Grand View is on the mountain top, 232 PLEASANT HILL, TENN. five miles from the nearest railroad station, there were fully six hundred appreciative people in attendance. The exercises were of the highest order, the essays and orations revealing the deep study and original thought which characterize the true scholar. Diplomas were awarded this year to seven honest, earnest young men and women, most of whom intend to teach in schools of their own. One has already left for New Mexico to take up that work, and another has engaged a school on a Georgia mountain top. The success of this Institute has been very marked. Last year it had an enrollment of 152; this year it had 198, an increase of about 30 per cent. This speaks well for the efficiency of the teaching force. All we lack now is room. How we do need an addition to our school building more school room and more dormitory room! The school is improving yearly and the future is indeed bright. PLEASANT HILL ACADEMY, TENN. BE REV. W. W. DORMAN. It would undoubtedly cheer the heart of every contributor to our mountain work were it possible for him to visit Pleasant Hill Academy and witness the fine grounds, the convenient buildings, the noble young men and women who are taking advantage of the opportunities wl~ich are offered them, and the gratifying display of intellectual power witnessed at the closing scenes of the school year. Situated on the plateau of the CDmberland range, surrounded with its beautiful forests, one is very apt to forget that he is two thousand feet above the level of the sea. As he looks upon the scene the words of the Psalmist come to his mind, Beautiful for situation, the joy of the whole earth, is Mount Zion. Already a fine quarry has been opened, and the hammer and chisel ring merrily in the hands of the students as they prepare the foundation stones for a new building. Under the able leadership of Rev. W. E. Wheeler the work for which the institution was founded is in a very marked degree being brought to a successful issue. Here may be seen the strong character- istics of the American Highlanders, the earnestness with which they labor, the readiness to do whatever is requested of them, and the deep feeling of thankfulness which fills their hearts for the many gifts from the North which has made this place a possibility. On Thursday, May 23, public exercises were engaged in by the grammar, intermediate and primary grades. The work done in these departments was shown to be of a high order. The exercises, which lasted for two hours, told of unwearied efforts by both teachers and scholars. On the following day, early in the morning, might haye been

Rev. W. W. Dorman Dorman, W. W., Rev. Anniversary Exercises: Pleasant Hill Academy, Tenn. The South 232-233

232 PLEASANT HILL, TENN. five miles from the nearest railroad station, there were fully six hundred appreciative people in attendance. The exercises were of the highest order, the essays and orations revealing the deep study and original thought which characterize the true scholar. Diplomas were awarded this year to seven honest, earnest young men and women, most of whom intend to teach in schools of their own. One has already left for New Mexico to take up that work, and another has engaged a school on a Georgia mountain top. The success of this Institute has been very marked. Last year it had an enrollment of 152; this year it had 198, an increase of about 30 per cent. This speaks well for the efficiency of the teaching force. All we lack now is room. How we do need an addition to our school building more school room and more dormitory room! The school is improving yearly and the future is indeed bright. PLEASANT HILL ACADEMY, TENN. BE REV. W. W. DORMAN. It would undoubtedly cheer the heart of every contributor to our mountain work were it possible for him to visit Pleasant Hill Academy and witness the fine grounds, the convenient buildings, the noble young men and women who are taking advantage of the opportunities wl~ich are offered them, and the gratifying display of intellectual power witnessed at the closing scenes of the school year. Situated on the plateau of the CDmberland range, surrounded with its beautiful forests, one is very apt to forget that he is two thousand feet above the level of the sea. As he looks upon the scene the words of the Psalmist come to his mind, Beautiful for situation, the joy of the whole earth, is Mount Zion. Already a fine quarry has been opened, and the hammer and chisel ring merrily in the hands of the students as they prepare the foundation stones for a new building. Under the able leadership of Rev. W. E. Wheeler the work for which the institution was founded is in a very marked degree being brought to a successful issue. Here may be seen the strong character- istics of the American Highlanders, the earnestness with which they labor, the readiness to do whatever is requested of them, and the deep feeling of thankfulness which fills their hearts for the many gifts from the North which has made this place a possibility. On Thursday, May 23, public exercises were engaged in by the grammar, intermediate and primary grades. The work done in these departments was shown to be of a high order. The exercises, which lasted for two hours, told of unwearied efforts by both teachers and scholars. On the following day, early in the morning, might haye been NOTES. 233 seen team after team, horse after horse, mule after mule entering the grounds of the institution and depositing their burdens, until every available space of the large campus was filled. It is graduating day, and fathers and mothers, brothers, sisters and friends, gather to witness the closing scenes. Never was there deeper interest in intellectual life manifested in our New England centers of culture and refinement than is seen among our American High- landers. The building was filled to overflowing, while at the tones of the piano the class, comprising five young men and three young women, marched upon the platform and took their seats. The speeches delivered by the young men and the papers read by the young women showed that the work of the past years had not been in vain. The productions from a literary standpoint and the oratorical effect would have done credit to any high school in our land. After a few appropriate remarks by the principal, diplomas were presented and we realized as never before what a great work was being done by the American Missionary Association. The half of this moun- tain work has never been told and for many reasons cannot be told but it is far-reaching and beneficial in its results. Such a work ought not to be allowed to suffer, neither should it be depressed by debt, for not only are men and women saved intellectually, but by the uowr of the cross are lifted up to heavenly places in Christ. NOTES. ANDERSONvILLE, Ga.Our school closed pleasantly. We had no exercises. It is too hard times for even a little expense. All regret that the children could not be more r& gular this month, but some of the best friends of the school had to put their children in the field a part of the time to get bread. XVe hope for better days next year, and then we will see what Andersonville will do. MERIDIAN, Miss.We greatly feared we should have had to close our school with a panic. The smallpox was mostly outside city limits. Several of the small outlying towns quarantined against Meridian, but it excited our pupils no more than the white citizens were excited, although it was the understanding that a colorcd person smitten with the dread disease was invariably removed to the city pest-house, while the white victim could be cared for by private ourses at his home. COTTON VALLEY, Ala.So sincere was the appreciation of the people for the new school building at Cotton Valley, Ala., that on the day on

Anniversary Exercises: Notes The South 233-234

NOTES. 233 seen team after team, horse after horse, mule after mule entering the grounds of the institution and depositing their burdens, until every available space of the large campus was filled. It is graduating day, and fathers and mothers, brothers, sisters and friends, gather to witness the closing scenes. Never was there deeper interest in intellectual life manifested in our New England centers of culture and refinement than is seen among our American High- landers. The building was filled to overflowing, while at the tones of the piano the class, comprising five young men and three young women, marched upon the platform and took their seats. The speeches delivered by the young men and the papers read by the young women showed that the work of the past years had not been in vain. The productions from a literary standpoint and the oratorical effect would have done credit to any high school in our land. After a few appropriate remarks by the principal, diplomas were presented and we realized as never before what a great work was being done by the American Missionary Association. The half of this moun- tain work has never been told and for many reasons cannot be told but it is far-reaching and beneficial in its results. Such a work ought not to be allowed to suffer, neither should it be depressed by debt, for not only are men and women saved intellectually, but by the uowr of the cross are lifted up to heavenly places in Christ. NOTES. ANDERSONvILLE, Ga.Our school closed pleasantly. We had no exercises. It is too hard times for even a little expense. All regret that the children could not be more r& gular this month, but some of the best friends of the school had to put their children in the field a part of the time to get bread. XVe hope for better days next year, and then we will see what Andersonville will do. MERIDIAN, Miss.We greatly feared we should have had to close our school with a panic. The smallpox was mostly outside city limits. Several of the small outlying towns quarantined against Meridian, but it excited our pupils no more than the white citizens were excited, although it was the understanding that a colorcd person smitten with the dread disease was invariably removed to the city pest-house, while the white victim could be cared for by private ourses at his home. COTTON VALLEY, Ala.So sincere was the appreciation of the people for the new school building at Cotton Valley, Ala., that on the day on 234 HOE THE FIRST HILL. which the exercises were held they asked to be allowed to contribute a few pennies from their almost empty pockets. Several of the school- girls passed through the crowd with small baskets, and as the meeting closed the small number of pennies that were found in the baskets and the many beaming faces plainly told how happy they had been made. Letters from Graduates. President~ De Forest sends the following sketch of the work of a recent normal graduate of Talladega College, now teaching in North Carolina. It was written to a friend of the lady teacher: HOE THE FIRST HILL OF CORN. I took the county examination, and, after securing a first grade cer- tificate, was sent to , where there had been no school for over eight years. There was no school-house, and I had to teach in an old church, with not even a blackboard, until the children, with my assist- ance, got one. The children had had ample time to go wild, and wild, indeed, had they grown. They only delighted in dipping, chewing and smoking the filthy weed. You can imagine how I felt to see nice look- ing boys and girls, from six to sixteen years of age, dipping or chewing in the school-room, for they didnt think it mattered where they took a dip or where they sent the saliva when it overflowed their mouths. It was, indeed, a dismal and discouiaging work, and every one said Id never do anything with those children, because I didnt look strong enough to whip them as they ought to be whipped. In our last moral philosophy class recitation the president gave us a little talk which I shall never forget, and among his many helpful suggestions he remarked: Hoe the first hill of corn you come to, and hoe it well. A very homely statement, isnt it? Yet there is enough logic in it, as the country preacher says, to furnish subject matter for a divine. As that was my first hill I determined to hoe it well. By kind treatment I succeeded in getting the scholars to love me, and the parents, of course, followed suit. At the end of the first session I was so pleased with the improve- ment made that I promised to return. I did so. The children, as a whole, were respectful toward me; but they were, disagreeable to each other. Every day iv~yd have a big fight or quarrel. I couldnt imagine what to do, after punishing in every way I could possibly think of. At last I thought if I could get them to become Christians it would help them. It so happened that the preacher soon after began a revival, and I invited him to come over every afternoon to hold meet- ings with the children. The parents, of course, disapproved, saying

Letters from Graduates: "Hoe the First Hill of Corn" The South 234-235

234 HOE THE FIRST HILL. which the exercises were held they asked to be allowed to contribute a few pennies from their almost empty pockets. Several of the school- girls passed through the crowd with small baskets, and as the meeting closed the small number of pennies that were found in the baskets and the many beaming faces plainly told how happy they had been made. Letters from Graduates. President~ De Forest sends the following sketch of the work of a recent normal graduate of Talladega College, now teaching in North Carolina. It was written to a friend of the lady teacher: HOE THE FIRST HILL OF CORN. I took the county examination, and, after securing a first grade cer- tificate, was sent to , where there had been no school for over eight years. There was no school-house, and I had to teach in an old church, with not even a blackboard, until the children, with my assist- ance, got one. The children had had ample time to go wild, and wild, indeed, had they grown. They only delighted in dipping, chewing and smoking the filthy weed. You can imagine how I felt to see nice look- ing boys and girls, from six to sixteen years of age, dipping or chewing in the school-room, for they didnt think it mattered where they took a dip or where they sent the saliva when it overflowed their mouths. It was, indeed, a dismal and discouiaging work, and every one said Id never do anything with those children, because I didnt look strong enough to whip them as they ought to be whipped. In our last moral philosophy class recitation the president gave us a little talk which I shall never forget, and among his many helpful suggestions he remarked: Hoe the first hill of corn you come to, and hoe it well. A very homely statement, isnt it? Yet there is enough logic in it, as the country preacher says, to furnish subject matter for a divine. As that was my first hill I determined to hoe it well. By kind treatment I succeeded in getting the scholars to love me, and the parents, of course, followed suit. At the end of the first session I was so pleased with the improve- ment made that I promised to return. I did so. The children, as a whole, were respectful toward me; but they were, disagreeable to each other. Every day iv~yd have a big fight or quarrel. I couldnt imagine what to do, after punishing in every way I could possibly think of. At last I thought if I could get them to become Christians it would help them. It so happened that the preacher soon after began a revival, and I invited him to come over every afternoon to hold meet- ings with the children. The parents, of course, disapproved, saying A GOOD HINT. 235 they were not old enough, and as soon as I left their religion would leave too. But I am glad to say that it did not so happen. Very nearly all of those who were large enough to know of their sins became converted and were baptized. After that they grew very loving, and instead of fighting at recess, theyd borrow my Bible to learn verses for Sunday-school, or my hymn book to sing. I became so interested in these children t4iat I felt I must, by all means, serve them again, and more especially when I saw the pretty new school-house erected as a result of hard labor on my part. This past session everything was con- venient and pleasant. I now feel that Ive hoed that hill well, and I presume I shall leave that nicely painted little school-house for some other school maam and find another hill to hoe. A GOOD HINT BRINGS THRIFT. BY PROF. E. c. 5IL5BY. One day about eight years ago the pastor of an American Mis- sionary Association church in an Alabama city rode out into the adjacent country on a mission of benevolence. Here and there he found little cabin homes among the dense growth of piny woods, and stopping at one of the houses, some twelve miles distant from the city, he entered into a conversation with the head of the family. During the interview he learned that this man was the owner of a smell tract of land which he had secured at a dollar an acre, and was sup- porting his family by the few jobs of work he could get and by the sale of charcoal made from the trees on his place. By delivering the coal in the city he could realize about ten or fifteen cents per sack for the same. There was no garden about the house and no domestic animals in sight. The family were living from hand to mouth. Our preacher, who was a graduate from the theological department of Talladega College, advised the man to clear up a part of his land and plant it in vegetables for the comfort and support of his household. He further suggested other measures for improving their condition. The conversation was continued for some time, and then the men parted. Last summer the preacher was accosted on the streets of his city by a man who had a load of watermelons in charge. The discovery was soon made that the owner of the melons was the owner of the little farm and cabin that had been visited by the city pastor several years before. The effort to bring ~kout a reform had been successful. The man told the preacher of the changes that had taken place in his condi- tion; how he had cleared up his land as suggested; that he was raising potatoes and corn and other vegetables, and that the load of melons

Prof. E. C. Silsby Silsby, E. C., Prof. Letters from Graduates: A Good Hint Brings Thrift The South 235-236

A GOOD HINT. 235 they were not old enough, and as soon as I left their religion would leave too. But I am glad to say that it did not so happen. Very nearly all of those who were large enough to know of their sins became converted and were baptized. After that they grew very loving, and instead of fighting at recess, theyd borrow my Bible to learn verses for Sunday-school, or my hymn book to sing. I became so interested in these children t4iat I felt I must, by all means, serve them again, and more especially when I saw the pretty new school-house erected as a result of hard labor on my part. This past session everything was con- venient and pleasant. I now feel that Ive hoed that hill well, and I presume I shall leave that nicely painted little school-house for some other school maam and find another hill to hoe. A GOOD HINT BRINGS THRIFT. BY PROF. E. c. 5IL5BY. One day about eight years ago the pastor of an American Mis- sionary Association church in an Alabama city rode out into the adjacent country on a mission of benevolence. Here and there he found little cabin homes among the dense growth of piny woods, and stopping at one of the houses, some twelve miles distant from the city, he entered into a conversation with the head of the family. During the interview he learned that this man was the owner of a smell tract of land which he had secured at a dollar an acre, and was sup- porting his family by the few jobs of work he could get and by the sale of charcoal made from the trees on his place. By delivering the coal in the city he could realize about ten or fifteen cents per sack for the same. There was no garden about the house and no domestic animals in sight. The family were living from hand to mouth. Our preacher, who was a graduate from the theological department of Talladega College, advised the man to clear up a part of his land and plant it in vegetables for the comfort and support of his household. He further suggested other measures for improving their condition. The conversation was continued for some time, and then the men parted. Last summer the preacher was accosted on the streets of his city by a man who had a load of watermelons in charge. The discovery was soon made that the owner of the melons was the owner of the little farm and cabin that had been visited by the city pastor several years before. The effort to bring ~kout a reform had been successful. The man told the preacher of the changes that had taken place in his condi- tion; how he had cleared up his land as suggested; that he was raising potatoes and corn and other vegetables, and that the load of melons 236 A PASTORS TESTiMONY. was a part of his crop. The display was a fine one, the elder was urged to accept one as a gift from the grateful owner, and he was told that the fruit was selling at only five cents apiece, but there was money in it at that price. The man emphatically declared that he had been shown the folly of living as he had been doing; that he knew no better until he had heard the preachers advice, and that in common with hundreds of others he needed only such instruction and stimulus to be turned aside to a better course. We are persuaded that in this manner the leaven of influence exerted by the American Missionary Association, through the product of its institutions of learning, is reaching and affecting the masses, even beyond our power to compute. A PASTORS VISIT AND TESTIMONY. We are permitted to take a glance into the Weekly Calendar of the First Congregational Church of Toledo, Ohio, and to extract the following decided testimony to the excellency of our school in Touga- loo, Miss. Our junior pastor, Mr. Fisk, has enjoyed a short vacation in his southern trip to Tougaloo, Miss., where he gave, on Wednesday noon, the annual commencement address before Tougaloo University. lie enjoyed it in spite of some physical personal drawbacks. The welcome was most appreciative; the audience represented both the best white sentiment of that section and the colored intelligence (graduate and undergraduate) cultivated by Tougaloo. Mr. Fisk was deeply impressed by the dignity and solidity of the work being done by the college on its 400 students. It needed only a brief inspection to show that negro character had taken a marked bent from contact with the faculty (wholly white) and the courses of study. We hope to make our scant observations and reflections profitable to others at some early day, and will only add that we willingly sacrifice ease in the service of such a grand cause as this educational work among our colored brothers is. Mississippi has a larger school enrollment of negroes in proportion to its colored population than any other State, though it is all too low a little over twenty-four per cent. Only one generation has elapsed since the slaves were freed. To raise a people from slavery to civiliza- tion is a matter not of years, but of many generations. The progress in industry, morality and education thus far is a source of the highest gratification to all friends of the race, and encouragement to increased gifts toward this great work in the future.

Letters from Graduates: A Pastor's Visit and Testimony The South 236-237

236 A PASTORS TESTiMONY. was a part of his crop. The display was a fine one, the elder was urged to accept one as a gift from the grateful owner, and he was told that the fruit was selling at only five cents apiece, but there was money in it at that price. The man emphatically declared that he had been shown the folly of living as he had been doing; that he knew no better until he had heard the preachers advice, and that in common with hundreds of others he needed only such instruction and stimulus to be turned aside to a better course. We are persuaded that in this manner the leaven of influence exerted by the American Missionary Association, through the product of its institutions of learning, is reaching and affecting the masses, even beyond our power to compute. A PASTORS VISIT AND TESTIMONY. We are permitted to take a glance into the Weekly Calendar of the First Congregational Church of Toledo, Ohio, and to extract the following decided testimony to the excellency of our school in Touga- loo, Miss. Our junior pastor, Mr. Fisk, has enjoyed a short vacation in his southern trip to Tougaloo, Miss., where he gave, on Wednesday noon, the annual commencement address before Tougaloo University. lie enjoyed it in spite of some physical personal drawbacks. The welcome was most appreciative; the audience represented both the best white sentiment of that section and the colored intelligence (graduate and undergraduate) cultivated by Tougaloo. Mr. Fisk was deeply impressed by the dignity and solidity of the work being done by the college on its 400 students. It needed only a brief inspection to show that negro character had taken a marked bent from contact with the faculty (wholly white) and the courses of study. We hope to make our scant observations and reflections profitable to others at some early day, and will only add that we willingly sacrifice ease in the service of such a grand cause as this educational work among our colored brothers is. Mississippi has a larger school enrollment of negroes in proportion to its colored population than any other State, though it is all too low a little over twenty-four per cent. Only one generation has elapsed since the slaves were freed. To raise a people from slavery to civiliza- tion is a matter not of years, but of many generations. The progress in industry, morality and education thus far is a source of the highest gratification to all friends of the race, and encouragement to increased gifts toward this great work in the future. THE SACRAMENTO MISSION. 237 The Chinese. THE SACRAMENTO MISSION. BY REV. W. C. POND, D. D. We celebrated what I suppose to be its twenty-fifth anniversary on Sunday evening, May 12. It was in existence when I became Super- intendent of this work more than twenty-one years ago, and had been in operation for several years before. XVhen it was established there was no other missionary work doing for the Chinese in that city. Other missions have been established by its side, but with no serious inroad upon its efficiency or success. And the several missionsCon- gregational, Methodist and Presbyterianco6perate instead of compet- ing. Nevertheless, we make it our rule to plant our missions where Christ is not named so far as the Chinese are concerned, and it is probable that if either of these other missions had been established in Sacramento twenty-five years ago ours would never have existed. It originally consisted simply of a school which held its evening ses- sions in one of the smaller rooms in the basement of the Congregational Church. But it was apparent to me, not long after I became Sup- erintendent, that no substantial results could be secured without a mis- sion house, which would contai not only a school-room and chapel entirely under our control, and open for use at any time, but also a home for our otherwise homeless brethren, where they could abide, clear from the defiling associations and abounding temptations of the stores of Chinatown. For there are few, if any, of these stores with- out their annexes for gambling, for opium smoking, for idol-worship, and even for what is worse than all these. Accordingly, a mission house was rented, the Chinese agreeing to provide a certain portion of the rent, and this has been occupied now, without change, for nearly seventeen years. In the earlier years the frequent changes of teachers hindered the efficiency of the mission, but in i88o-a little more than fifteen years agoMrs. S. E. Carrington listened to our invitation and heard in it the Masters call. She has been the responsible teacher ever since, relieved by others, in two instances, that she might visit the home of her childhood, but even in such vacations carrying the mission on her heart. She has put life-blood into the work. She has been the friend, counselor, helper of her pupils in all matters. Her home has been open to them almost as if they were her children, and her time and strength have been spent in service to Christ for them without the slightest consideration of the work called for by her promise to me. More than a thousand Chinese have thus been brought under her genial but intense and unflinching discipline; her gospel instructions

Rev. W. C. Pond, D.D. Pond, W. C., Rev., D.D. The Sacramento Mission The Chinese 237-239

THE SACRAMENTO MISSION. 237 The Chinese. THE SACRAMENTO MISSION. BY REV. W. C. POND, D. D. We celebrated what I suppose to be its twenty-fifth anniversary on Sunday evening, May 12. It was in existence when I became Super- intendent of this work more than twenty-one years ago, and had been in operation for several years before. XVhen it was established there was no other missionary work doing for the Chinese in that city. Other missions have been established by its side, but with no serious inroad upon its efficiency or success. And the several missionsCon- gregational, Methodist and Presbyterianco6perate instead of compet- ing. Nevertheless, we make it our rule to plant our missions where Christ is not named so far as the Chinese are concerned, and it is probable that if either of these other missions had been established in Sacramento twenty-five years ago ours would never have existed. It originally consisted simply of a school which held its evening ses- sions in one of the smaller rooms in the basement of the Congregational Church. But it was apparent to me, not long after I became Sup- erintendent, that no substantial results could be secured without a mis- sion house, which would contai not only a school-room and chapel entirely under our control, and open for use at any time, but also a home for our otherwise homeless brethren, where they could abide, clear from the defiling associations and abounding temptations of the stores of Chinatown. For there are few, if any, of these stores with- out their annexes for gambling, for opium smoking, for idol-worship, and even for what is worse than all these. Accordingly, a mission house was rented, the Chinese agreeing to provide a certain portion of the rent, and this has been occupied now, without change, for nearly seventeen years. In the earlier years the frequent changes of teachers hindered the efficiency of the mission, but in i88o-a little more than fifteen years agoMrs. S. E. Carrington listened to our invitation and heard in it the Masters call. She has been the responsible teacher ever since, relieved by others, in two instances, that she might visit the home of her childhood, but even in such vacations carrying the mission on her heart. She has put life-blood into the work. She has been the friend, counselor, helper of her pupils in all matters. Her home has been open to them almost as if they were her children, and her time and strength have been spent in service to Christ for them without the slightest consideration of the work called for by her promise to me. More than a thousand Chinese have thus been brought under her genial but intense and unflinching discipline; her gospel instructions 238 THE SACRAMENTO MISSION. the power of her Christian character. More than a hundred have given evidence of having passed from death unto life. Of course the larger proportion of her pupils were not with her for a great while. Coming and going, having no home anchorages, most of our Chinese can be held under instruction only but for brief periods, but several have been con- nected with the school with no intermission, except occasional and necessary absences, for more than ten years. Two Christian marriages have been solemnized in our little chapel. In each case the chief objection of the bride to the proposed husband was that he was a Christian, but in both cases the Christian husband has so sanctified the wife (I. Cor. 7:14) that one has been for several years a member with him of the Congregational Church, and the other, though married only a few months since, has applied for baptism. At least twelve have gone from this mission to China or elsewhere doing Christian work. Jung Poy, our noble brother, fell a victim to exposure while laboring for the sick in a pestilence hospital. It was said by those who knew him best that his whole life seemed per- fect, and we cannot doubt that he is now at home with Christ. Fong Get Loy had the joy on one of his visits to China of seeing his wife come out into clear light as a follower of Christ, and she became forth- witn a witness for him in the villages round about his home. And now both he and she are engaged in missionary labors. Fong Won was accepted by us as a helper and stationed at Oakland. His year of service there had a fruitage of at least twelve souls, and he is now preaching in China in connection with the work of our American Board. Fong Sec I was just about to invite into our work as a missionary helper when the Salvation Army captured him. He has been for two or three years a lieutenant, and is now, I believe; a captain. His pro- ficiency in English has led to his being employed in the editorial work on the War Cry, and within the last month I have seen it stated that General Booth had announced his purpose to place a force of the Army at work in China under the leadership of this brother converted in our Sacramento Mission. These brethren have borne a noble pert in the missionary work undertaken by our Chinese in China. They have on removing from Sacramento taken their religion along with them, and in several of our missions they are among the pillars. Our last anniversary was in all respects a good one except that, for reasons not connected with our work, we missed the great throng which has usually crowded the large auditorium. But it was an audience to be weighed rather than counted, as was shown not only by the close atten- tion, but by the generous offerings, which fully provided for the mission during the three closing months of the present fiscal year. The amount was nearly $x~o. Ought such a work to cease? WOMANS STATE ORGANIZATIONS. WOMANS STATE ORGANIZATIONS. MAINE. WOMANS Aio TO A. M. A. Stale CommitteeMrs. Ida Vose Woodhury, Woodfords; Mrs. A. T Burbank, Yarmouth; Mrs. Helen Quimby. Bangor. NEW HAMPSHIRE. FEMALE CENT INSTITUTION AND HOME Miss. UNION. PresidentMrs. Cyrus Sargeant, Plymouth. SecretaryMrs. John T. Perry, Exeter. TreasurerMiss Annie A. McFarland, Concord. VERMONT. WOMANS HOME MIssioNAsY UNION. PresidentMrs. 3. H. Babbitt, W. Brattleboro. SecretaryMrs. M. K. Paine, Windsor. TreasurerMrs. Win. P. Fairbanks, St. Johns- bury. MASS ANO R. I. * WoMANs Hosis MIsSIoNASY AssocIATIoN. PresidentMrs. C. L. Goodell, Boston Highlands, Mass. SecretaryMrs. Louise A. Kellogg, 32 Congre- gational House, Boston. TreasurerMiss Annie C. Bridgman, 32 Congre. gational House, Boston. CONNECTICUT. WOMANS HOME MIssIoNAEY UNION. PresidentMiss Ellen R. Camp, 9 Camp St., New Britain. SecretaryMrs. C. T. Millard, 36 Lewis St., Hartford. TreasurerMrs. W. W. Jacobs, 19 Spring St. Hartford. NEW YORK. WOMANS HOME MISSIONANY UNION. PresidentMrs. Win. Kincaid, 413 Green Ave., Brooklyn. SecretaryMrs. Win. Spalding, 5i1 Orange St., Syracuse. TreasurerMrs. J. 3. Pearsall, 230 Macon St., Brooklyn. NEW JERSEY. WoMANs HOME MISsioNANY UNION OF THE N. 3. ASSOCIATION. PresidentMrs. A. H. Bradford, Montclair. SecretaryMrs R. J. Hegeman, 32 Forest Street, Montclair TreasurerMrs. 3. H. Dennison, 150 Belleville Ave., Newark. PENNSYLVANIA. WOMANS MIssIoNANY UNION. PresidentMrs. A. H. Claim, 274 Manhattan St., Allegheny. SecretaryMrs. C. F. Jennee, Ridgway. TreasurerMrs. T. W. Jones, 511 Woodland Terrace, Philadelphia. OHIO. WOMANS HOME MIssIoNAisY UNION. PresidentMrs. Sydney Strong, Lane Seminary Grounds, Cincinnati. SecretaryMrs. 3. W. Moore, 836 Hough Ave., Cleveland. TreasurerMrs. G. B. Brown, 2116 Warren St., Toledo. INDIANA. WOMANS HOME MIssIoNAsx UNION. Presi~lentMrs. W. A. Bell, 223 Broadway, Indianapolis. SecretaryMrs. E. S. Smith, Indianapolis. TreasurerMrs. A. H. Ball, Anderson. ILLINOIS. WOaiANS HorsE MissioNAsv UNION. PresidentMrs. Isaac Claflin, Lombard. SecretaryMrs. C. H. Taintor, i~s Washington St , Chicago. TreasurerMrs. L. A. Field, Wilmette. IOWA. WOMANS HOME MIssIONAisY UNION. PresidentMrs. T. 0. Douglass, Grinnell. SecretaryMrs. H. H. Robbins, Grinnell. TreasurerMiss Belle L. Bentley, 300 Court Ave. Des Moines. MICHIGAN. WOMANS HOME MISSIONASY UNION. PresidentMrs. George M. Lane, r~ West Alex- andrine Aye, Detroit. SecretaryMrs. J. H. Hatfield, 301 Elm Street, Kalamazoo. TreasurerMrs. E. F. Grabill, Greenville. WISCONSIN. WOMANS HOME MIsSIoNAEY UNION. PresidentMrs. E. G. Updike, Madison. SecretaryMrs. A. 0. Wright, Madison. TreasurerMrs. C. M. Blackman, Whitewater. MINNESOTA. WOMANS HorsE MIsSIONAIsY UNION. PresidentMiss Katherine W. Nichols, 230 East Ninth Street, St, Paul. SecretaryMrs. A P. Lyon, i~ Florence Court, S. E., Minneapolis. TreasurerMrs. M. W. Skinner, Northield. NORTH DAKOTA. WOMANS HOME MIssIoNASY UNION. PresidentMrs. XV. P. Cleveland, Caledonia. SecretaryMrs. Silas Daggett, Harwood. TreasurerMrs. 3. M. Fisher, Fargo. SOUTH DAKOTA. WoMANs HOME MIssIoNAisy UNION. PresidentMrs. A. H. Robbins, Bowdle. SecretaryMrs. W. H. Thrall, Huron. TreasurerMrs. F. H. Wilcox, Huron. BLACK HILLS, SOUTH DAKOTA. WOMANS MIssIoNAisy UNION. PresidentMrs. 3. B. Gossage, Rapid City. SecretaryMrs. H. H. Gilebrist, Hot Springs. TreasurerMiss Grace Lyman, Hot Springs. NEBRASKA. WoMANs HOME MIssioNAisy UNION. PresidentMrs. J. T. Duryea, 2402 Cars Street, Omaha. SecretaryMrs. S. C. Dean, 636 3ist Street, Omaha. TreasurerMrs. G. 3. Powell, 3oth and Ohio Streets, Omaha. 239

Woman's State Organizations 239-241

WOMANS STATE ORGANIZATIONS. WOMANS STATE ORGANIZATIONS. MAINE. WOMANS Aio TO A. M. A. Stale CommitteeMrs. Ida Vose Woodhury, Woodfords; Mrs. A. T Burbank, Yarmouth; Mrs. Helen Quimby. Bangor. NEW HAMPSHIRE. FEMALE CENT INSTITUTION AND HOME Miss. UNION. PresidentMrs. Cyrus Sargeant, Plymouth. SecretaryMrs. John T. Perry, Exeter. TreasurerMiss Annie A. McFarland, Concord. VERMONT. WOMANS HOME MIssioNAsY UNION. PresidentMrs. 3. H. Babbitt, W. Brattleboro. SecretaryMrs. M. K. Paine, Windsor. TreasurerMrs. Win. P. Fairbanks, St. Johns- bury. MASS ANO R. I. * WoMANs Hosis MIsSIoNASY AssocIATIoN. PresidentMrs. C. L. Goodell, Boston Highlands, Mass. SecretaryMrs. Louise A. Kellogg, 32 Congre- gational House, Boston. TreasurerMiss Annie C. Bridgman, 32 Congre. gational House, Boston. CONNECTICUT. WOMANS HOME MIssIoNAEY UNION. PresidentMiss Ellen R. Camp, 9 Camp St., New Britain. SecretaryMrs. C. T. Millard, 36 Lewis St., Hartford. TreasurerMrs. W. W. Jacobs, 19 Spring St. Hartford. NEW YORK. WOMANS HOME MISSIONANY UNION. PresidentMrs. Win. Kincaid, 413 Green Ave., Brooklyn. SecretaryMrs. Win. Spalding, 5i1 Orange St., Syracuse. TreasurerMrs. J. 3. Pearsall, 230 Macon St., Brooklyn. NEW JERSEY. WoMANs HOME MISsioNANY UNION OF THE N. 3. ASSOCIATION. PresidentMrs. A. H. Bradford, Montclair. SecretaryMrs R. J. Hegeman, 32 Forest Street, Montclair TreasurerMrs. 3. H. Dennison, 150 Belleville Ave., Newark. PENNSYLVANIA. WOMANS MIssIoNANY UNION. PresidentMrs. A. H. Claim, 274 Manhattan St., Allegheny. SecretaryMrs. C. F. Jennee, Ridgway. TreasurerMrs. T. W. Jones, 511 Woodland Terrace, Philadelphia. OHIO. WOMANS HOME MIssIoNAisY UNION. PresidentMrs. Sydney Strong, Lane Seminary Grounds, Cincinnati. SecretaryMrs. 3. W. Moore, 836 Hough Ave., Cleveland. TreasurerMrs. G. B. Brown, 2116 Warren St., Toledo. INDIANA. WOMANS HOME MIssIoNAsx UNION. Presi~lentMrs. W. A. Bell, 223 Broadway, Indianapolis. SecretaryMrs. E. S. Smith, Indianapolis. TreasurerMrs. A. H. Ball, Anderson. ILLINOIS. WOaiANS HorsE MissioNAsv UNION. PresidentMrs. Isaac Claflin, Lombard. SecretaryMrs. C. H. Taintor, i~s Washington St , Chicago. TreasurerMrs. L. A. Field, Wilmette. IOWA. WOMANS HOME MIssIONAisY UNION. PresidentMrs. T. 0. Douglass, Grinnell. SecretaryMrs. H. H. Robbins, Grinnell. TreasurerMiss Belle L. Bentley, 300 Court Ave. Des Moines. MICHIGAN. WOMANS HOME MISSIONASY UNION. PresidentMrs. George M. Lane, r~ West Alex- andrine Aye, Detroit. SecretaryMrs. J. H. Hatfield, 301 Elm Street, Kalamazoo. TreasurerMrs. E. F. Grabill, Greenville. WISCONSIN. WOMANS HOME MIsSIoNAEY UNION. PresidentMrs. E. G. Updike, Madison. SecretaryMrs. A. 0. Wright, Madison. TreasurerMrs. C. M. Blackman, Whitewater. MINNESOTA. WOMANS HorsE MIsSIONAIsY UNION. PresidentMiss Katherine W. Nichols, 230 East Ninth Street, St, Paul. SecretaryMrs. A P. Lyon, i~ Florence Court, S. E., Minneapolis. TreasurerMrs. M. W. Skinner, Northield. NORTH DAKOTA. WOMANS HOME MIssIoNASY UNION. PresidentMrs. XV. P. Cleveland, Caledonia. SecretaryMrs. Silas Daggett, Harwood. TreasurerMrs. 3. M. Fisher, Fargo. SOUTH DAKOTA. WoMANs HOME MIssIoNAisy UNION. PresidentMrs. A. H. Robbins, Bowdle. SecretaryMrs. W. H. Thrall, Huron. TreasurerMrs. F. H. Wilcox, Huron. BLACK HILLS, SOUTH DAKOTA. WOMANS MIssIoNAisy UNION. PresidentMrs. 3. B. Gossage, Rapid City. SecretaryMrs. H. H. Gilebrist, Hot Springs. TreasurerMiss Grace Lyman, Hot Springs. NEBRASKA. WoMANs HOME MIssioNAisy UNION. PresidentMrs. J. T. Duryea, 2402 Cars Street, Omaha. SecretaryMrs. S. C. Dean, 636 3ist Street, Omaha. TreasurerMrs. G. 3. Powell, 3oth and Ohio Streets, Omaha. 239 WOMANS STATE ORGANIZATIONS. MONTANA. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. 0. C. Clark, Missoula. SecretaryMrs. W. S. Bell, 410 Dearborn Ave., Helena. TreasurerMrs. Herbert E. Jones, LivingSton. MISSOURI. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. Henry Hopkins, 916 Holmes Street, Kansas Clty. SecretaryMrs. E. C. Ellis, 2456 Tracy Ave., Kansas City. TreasurerMrs. K. L. Mills, 1526 Wabasb Ave., Kansas City. KANSAS. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. F. E. Storrs, Topeka. SecretaryMrs. George L. Epps, Topeka. TreasurerMrs. D. D. DeLong, Arkansas City. OREGON. WOMANs HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. Jobn Summerville soS Second Street, Portland. SecretaryMrs. George Brownell, Oregon City. TreasurerMrs. W. D. Palmer, 546 Tbird Street, Pdrtland. WASHINGTON. WOMANS MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION. PresidentMrs. A. J.. Bailey, 323 Blanebard Street, Seattle. SecretaryMrs. W. C. Wbeeler, 424 Soutb K Street, Tacoma. TreasurerMrs. J. XV. George, 620 Fourtb Street, Seattle. CALIFORNIA. WoMANs HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. PresidentMrs. E. S. Williams, 572 s2tb Street, Oakland. SecretaryMrs. L. M. Howard, 95 Grove Street, Oakland. TreasurerMrs. J. M. Havens, 1329 Harrison Street, Oakland. SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. W. J. Wasbburn, 510 Downey Ave., Los Angeles. SecretaryMrs. P. J. Colcord, Claremont. TreasurerMrs. Mary M. Smitb, Public Library, Riverside. NEVADA. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. L. J. Flint, Reno. SecretaryMiss Margaret N. Magill, Reno. TreasurerMiss Mary Clow, Reno. INDIAN TERRITORY. WOSIANS MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. Jobn McCartby, Vinita. SecretaryMrs. Fayette Hurd, Vinita. TreasurerMrs. R. M. Swain, Vinita. NEW MEXICO. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. C. E. Winslow, Albuquerque. SecretaryMrs. E. W. Lewis, 301 So. Editb Street, Albuquerque. TreasurerMrs. H. XV. Bullock, Albuquerque. MISSISSIPPI. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. C. L. Harris, 1421 3iSt Avenue, Meridian. SecretdryMrs. Editb M. Hall, Tougaloo Univ., Tougaloo. Treasurer-Mrs. L. H. Turner, 3012 I2tb Street, Meridian. LOUISIANA. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMiss Bella W. Hume, corner Gasquet and Liberty Streets, New Orleans. SecretaryMrs. Matilda Cabr~re, New Orleans. TreasurerMrs. C. H. Crawford, Hammond. ALABAMA. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. G. W. Andrews, Talladega. SecretaryMrs. 3. 5. Jackson, Montgomery. TreasurerMrs. E. C. Silsby, Talladega. FLORIDA. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. S. F. Gale, Jacksonville. SecretaryMrs. Natban Harrows, Winter Park. TreasurerMrs. W. D. Brown, Interiseben. TENNESSEE, KENTUCKY ANO ARKANSAS. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION OF THE TENNESSEE ASSOCIATION. PresidentMrs. G. W. Moore, Box I, Fisk Univ., Nasbville. SecretaryMrs. Jos. E. Smitb, 304 Gilmer Street, Cbattanooga. TreasurerMrs. J. E. Moreland, 216 N. McNairy Street, Nasbville. COLORADO. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. B. C. Valentine, Higblands. SecretaryMrs. Cbas. Westley, Box ~oI, Denver. TreasurerMrs. Horace Sanderson, 1710 s6tb Ave., Denver. WYOMING. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. G. S. Ricker, Cbeyenne. SecretaryMrs. W. C. Wbipple, Cbeyenne. TreasurerMrs. H. N. Smitb, Rock Springs. OKLAHOMA. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. J. H. Parker, Kingfisber. SecretaryMrs. L. E. Kimball, Gutbrie. TreasurerMrs. L. S. Cbilds, Cboctaw City. UTAH (Including Soutbern I dabo). WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. Clarence T. Brown, Salt Lake City, Utab. SecretaryMrs. W. S. Hawkes, 535 Sixtb Street, E., Salt Lake City, Utab. TreasurerMrs. Dana XV. Bartlett, Salt Lake City, Utab. Secretary for IdaboMrs. Oscar Sonnenkaib, Pocatello, Idabo. NORTH CAROLINA. WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. J. W. Freeman, Dudley. Secretary and TreasurerMiss A. E. Farrington, Higb Point. TEXAS. WoMANs HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. J. M. Wendelkin, Dallas. SecretaryMrs. H. Burt, Lock Box 563, Dallas. TreasurerMrs. C. I. Scofield, Dallas. GEORGIA. WOMANS HOME MISSIONARY UNION. PresidentMrs. H. B. Wey, 253 Forest Avenue, Atlanta. SecretaryMrs. H. A. Kellam, Atlanta. TreasurerMiss Virginia Holmes, Barnesville. S tbe purpose of exact information we note tbat, wbile tbe XV. H. M. A. appears in tbls list as a State body for Mass. and R. I., it baa certain auxiliaries el sewbere. 240 RECEIPTS. 241 RECEIPTS FOR MAY, 1895. THE DANIEL HAND FUND For the Education of Colored People. Income for May $15,000 00 Previously acknowledged .. 24018 64 $39,018 64 CURRENT RECEIPTS. MAINE, $360.72. Auburn. W. A. Robinson, for C. F. Hall, McIntosh, Ga ~ 00 Brewer. Jr. En. Soc., for C. E. Hall, McIntosh, Ga 8 50 Camden. Cong. Ch ~ Castine. V. P. 5. C. E., Bhl. C., Freight, s.rs7,for McIntosh, Ga 2 27 Dexter. Cong. Ch 3 00 Eastport. Harold and Leon Reynolds, for Student Aid, Dorchester A cad., Ga 2 00 Gardiner. Cong. Cb 8 9~ Hallowell. Ladies Benev. Soc., Bhl. C. for Moorhead, Miss. Holden. Jr. V. P. 5. C. E. for I.incoln Acad.,N.C..... 500 Kennehunk. Union Ch. and Soc ~ 83 Litchfield Corners. V. P. 5. C. E., Miss Alice E. Libby, Treas 2 50 Lyman. Cong. Ch., adl Portland. Ladies Circle, for Student Aid, Talladega C 35 00 Portland. Williston Cong. Ch. V. P. 5. C. E.,for St dent A id, Lexington Sck., Ky 500 South Berwick. Miss Katharine B. Lewis S. S. Class,for Student Aid, Fisk U.. 12 co South Berwick. Niss E. Ricker, for Indian M., Fort Berthold. N. D s 00 Maine Womans Aid to A. M. A., by Mrs. Ida Vose Woodhury, Treas., for Womans Work: Alma 500 BassHarbor. Y.P.S.C.E 100 Bath. Winter St. Ch ~5 co Bluehill 4 50 Brooksville 2 00 Bucksport 20 25 Castine 7 40 Ellsworth 26 25 Ellsworth Falls 4 00 Lyman. Aux., $22.39. V. P. S C. E., $s.9 7 ~8 North Ellsworth 2 20 Orland . SO 00 Portland. Bethel Ch 22 25 Topsham 20 00 Rockland 10 00 Union 00 Woodfords. Home Workers, so; L. M. 5., 6.75 s6 75 $199 o8 NEW HAMI2SHIRE, $362.25. Concord. Friend 00 Francestown. Cong. Ch 25 00 Gilsum. Cong. Ch 6 00 Henniker. Cong. Ch 46 50 Hinsdale. Sab. Sch. Cong. Ch., hal. to const. GEORGE A. ROBERTSON L. M 6 00 Manchester. Franklin St. Cong. Ch 40 53 Merrimac. Geo. S. Parkhurst, f