Full caption: Ester Hernández. Libertad. Etching, copyright © 1976. Fine Prints Collection (unprocessed). Prints and Photographs Division. LC-USZ62-127167. Courtesy of the artist. Full caption: Ester Hernández. Libertad. Etching, copyright © 1976. Fine Prints Collection (unprocessed). Prints and Photographs Division. LC-USZ62-127167. Courtesy of the artist.

Chicana artist Ester Hernández, a member of the women's artist collective Las Mujeres Muralistas (Women Muralists), uses icons in almost all her work. Inspired by the nation's American Revolution Bicentennial celebrations in 1976, Hernández laid claim to the Statue of Liberty—emblem of European immigration, citizenship, plurality, freedom and also a conventional symbol of American identity—and here reworks it into a powerful symbol of resistance to assimilation. The inscription “Aztlán” (White Land) refers to the Aztec land of origin, located in the area of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and California. (For fine prints, see page 209.)

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