Full caption: Studies in Expression: When Women Are Jurors. Drawing. Charles Dana Gibson. [1902?] Published in Life, October 23, 1902. Cabinet of American Illustration (CAI—Gibson, no. 23 [C size]). Prints and Photographs Division. LC-USZ62-46321 Full caption: Studies in Expression: When Women Are Jurors. Drawing. Charles Dana Gibson. [1902?] Published in Life, October 23, 1902. Cabinet of American Illustration (CAI—Gibson, no. 23 [C size]). Prints and Photographs Division. LC-USZ62-46321

Women were virtually nonexistent on juries in 1902 when Charles Dana Gibson, creator of the famous “Gibson Girls,” drew this caricature for Life. On rare occasions, however, women were called to serve in cases that involved female defendants. Despite the fact that juries are selected from voter rolls and the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment qualified women as “electors,” the states did not immediately pass legislation to include them for jury selection. As late as 1942 only twenty-eight state laws allowed women to serve as jurors, but these also gave them the right to claim exemption based on their sex. The Civil Rights Act of 1957 gave women the right to serve on federal juries, but not until 1973 could women serve on juries in all fifty states.

see caption below