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Interview with Lewis L. Millett [n.d.]

Unknown interviewer:

For the editor state your name and where you grew up.

Lewis L. Millett:

Where I grew up?

Unknown interviewer:

Yeah, your name and--

Lewis L. Millett:

Yeah. Lewis - L E W I S -- Millett - M I L L E T T. Born in Maine; enlisted in the Army in Fort Devins [sp?], Massachusetts.

Unknown interviewer:

That's great. What was your childhood like?

Lewis L. Millett:

Well it was during the Depression, but we lived on a farm and-- we had money - just before the Depression - Depression hit, so my stepfather bought a 2-car portable-- home-built garage, and we extended the front end, and we lived in that for-- all my childhood. But the reason we did it-- or he did it - we lived on 10 acres of land and raised all our own food! So-- I, I didn't -- people were starving during the Depression, but not us.

Unknown interviewer:

That's good. Did you have people-- [SOUND CUT]

Lewis L. Millett:

...parades on 4th of July - we went to the beaches of Maine - and family - all the family. And one of the men - my uncle who fought in World War I - wounded - had a badly-injured right wrist and had a leather thing that covered it and so forth, and I always thought of him as my hero! Fought in the Yankee Division, you know, 26th, in World War I. And-- that's probably one reason I joined the Army.

Unknown interviewer:

Tell me about your enlistment; why did you enlist and what year was it in.

Lewis L. Millett:

I enlisted September 1940 in the U.S. Army Air Corps, and all m-- because-- I took typing in high school, and the reason I took typing --all the good-looking women were in the typing class [LAUGHS]--

Unknown interviewer:

Things [...?...] changed.

Lewis L. Millett:

-- and at that time not many men typed, so immediately I was in the National Guard - they made me a clerk in the Guard; when I went on active duty they found out I'd been a clerk in the Guard and t-- so that's the jobs I got -and didn't want 'em! You know? I hated it. [LAUGHS] But-- good-looking girls. [LAUGHS]

Unknown interviewer:

Tell me about your basic training - how was your training?

Lewis L. Millett:

I actually didn't get any basic training in the American Army because I'd been in the National Guard - and they considered --trained - which I wasn't, you know, because at that time the Guard -- well I'd been to summer camp 2 or 3 times with them and stuff like that - and-- actually the first training I got was not in basic training - they sent me to Army Air Corps and went to Lowry Field [sp?] which is near Denver to learn machine gun --50 caliber machine gun. And-- shortly thereafter I deserted the Army, went to Canada -- but for a different reason -- people went to Canada during Vietnam to get out of the war! I went to Canada to get in the war before - we were at peace at the time and the Canadians were fighting the Nazis, so I went to Canada and joined the Canadian Army - went overseas with them. And then we get in the war-- well that's kind of rough - I went down to the American Embassy in Ashville [sp?] - [...?...] said just wait -they're going to announce that all Americans in the British and Canadian forces can transfer into the American Army. So-- [AHEMS] excuse me - I waited and, and then transferred and-- [LAUGHS] - I, I talked to this sergeant - female sergeant - [AHEMS] excuse me-- and asked what would happen to me when I transferred back, you know, into the American Army. She said nothing - well that was a lie but-- [AHEMS] I went to North Africa with-- [OFF-MIKE COMMENTS]

Unknown interviewer:

Let's just back up a little bit - so you went up to Canada - you joined the Canadian--

Lewis L. Millett:

Canadian Army - went over - went overseas with the Canadians.

Unknown interviewer:

Did you see action with them?

Lewis L. Millett:

No. Well-- the bombing raids in England all the time at that time.

Unknown interviewer:

Were you flying with them?

Lewis L. Millett:

No, no - I was a-- RCA - Royal Canadian Artillery - 25 pounders. But- [AHEMS] at the base we were in was southeastern England and the German bombers - mostly fighter aircraft with one or two bombs in them - flew over our position all the time, but-- we never fired at 'em and you know - they, they left the anti-aircraft and fighter pilots take care of it. So it wasn't very exciting. [LAUGHS]

Unknown interviewer:

Okay. And then you had the opportunity to switch to the American-- [BOTH SPEAK AT ONCE]

Lewis L. Millett:

Yeah, they made the announcement shortly aft--thereafter that-- all the Americans and the British and Canadian forces could transfer into the American Army, and so went and saw this gal and asked - sergeant - about transferring and-- said what'll happen to me-- [PHONE RINGING] cause I deserted the Army! [OFF-MIKE COMMENTS] [SOUND CUT] [OFF-MIKE COMMENTS]

Unknown interviewer:

So, so you met this Marine Sergeant -- Army Sergeant.

Lewis L. Millett:

Army Sergeant - a female - and-- asked about transferring to the American Army, and of course I had to tell them I had deserted and asked them what was going to happen to me when I -- oh, nothing. Well that was the lie, but you know [AHEMS] - when I transferred back into the American Army I immediately made the invasion of North Africa with the First Armored Division and in the first battle in--near Tunisia I, I get a Silver Star. I'm a private, and I get a Silver Star and they started promoting me. By the time my records catch up -- cause see I'd deserted, so they didn't have my records - I had to tell them my name, rank and serial number and what, what my day of enlistment. Otherwise they had no records of me. Well by the time they caught up I had fought 6 months in afraid - 6 months in Italy - had a Silver Star and a Bronze Star and was a buck sergeant. And my records catch up and they court-martial me for desertion - found me guilty - fine me 52 dollar fine - but at that time I had been only getting 10 dollars a month because they had no records of me. And so I had accumulated all this money - I got about 6,000 dollars when they finally court-martialed me [LAUGHS] and they fined me 52 dollar fine and made me a second lieutenant. [LAUGHS]

Unknown interviewer:

Unbelievable.

Lewis L. Millett:

Yeah.

Unknown interviewer:

So tell me about your first action - what was that like?

Lewis L. Millett:

That was when I got the Silver Star in North Africa and-- against the Nazis - the Germans -and we were being air raids and-- artillery fire started a haystack on fire and next to the haystack they had camouflaged one of our half-tracks with the ammunition - and the driver of the half-track who was a really big guy - tremendous arms - and the first sergeant who had been there - ran and left it-- and, and the hay stack was burning. I ran down to get the half-treack, but at the time I didn't even know how to drive the damn thing! And I didn't know how to start it -I'm looking for a starter on the floor but--it was a push-button starter on the -eventually found it - eventually got it started -- and started driving across country - but I was blind! All the hay, camouflage on top of the track, I couldn't see -- and all of a sudden this-- the-- I didn't realize but I'm dri-- I got-- fire on, on the hay in the back of the track and it drops in and-- hits the-- the-- ammunition, and then it starts to go off, you know, not - to burn - to powder bags. And I rolled out and-- the track blew up beautiful - beautiful explosion - I mean all this ammo and-- white phospherous and red shells and all that. And, and they gave me a Silver Star for trying. [LAUGHS]

Unknown interviewer:

For trying. [LAUGHS]

Lewis L. Millett:

Yeah. Yeah.

Unknown interviewer:

Pretty funny. Okay, so that was your first action, huh?

Lewis L. Millett:

That was first action against the Nazis, yeah.

Unknown interviewer:

Okay. So talk to me about, about the action that led to your Medal of Honor.

Lewis L. Millett:

Well that was the Korean War.

Unknown interviewer:

Oh, [...?...]. [BOTH SPEAK AT ONCE]

Lewis L. Millett:

See I fought - Af-- to fight the whole war in Europe you had to fight in - start in Africa! And that's where I got the Silver Star - and I ended the war up getting a Bronze Star in Italy as a second lieutenant - a first lieutenant. I'd gone up through the ranks, and I called artillery on my own position when we were surrounded by the Germans. And then the war ended and I came home and went to college, and stayed in the reserve - in the National Guard - and I got recalled just before Korea broke out -- actually they recalled me - and, and they needed first and, and-- first lieutenants and captains [AHEMS] - we were very short at that time. And they immediately sent me to Japan and I got a beautiful job -- director of education in Nara and Wakayama [sp?] prefecture. See military governors still [didn't ?] exist [...?...] then and so I, I worked for the Army-- cause they saw that I had majored in education - I didn't have a degree at the time - but I majored in education. And the Army says well you know - officers can do anything [LAUGHS] --and - very, very interesting. I had-- it was a good job. I loved it.

Unknown interviewer:

And then they-- they--

Lewis L. Millett:

Then the war broke out yeah.

Unknown interviewer:

-- called you into Korea.

Lewis L. Millett:

Yeah.

Unknown interviewer:

Yeah.

Lewis L. Millett:

Well our unit went to Korea-- and, and I-- got out of the military government - and--reverted back to the-- 8th Field Artillery in Nara, Japan. And almost immediately made --in fact I went down-- to talk to our commanding officer cause-- the word got out that the 27th Infantry is going to go to Korea! To fight! So I went down to volunteer - transfer to the 27th. And-- I remember-- can't think of his name now - the colonel - from Louisiana -yeah! - from, from [New Orleans ?] - he said don't worry about it, we're going to go anyway. [LAUGHS] Which we did of course, and-- I did the same damn thing there in Korea as I had been doing for years in-- World War II - a forward observer, you know, with a--with the infantry. And--

Unknown interviewer:

Tell me about the actions that led to your--

Lewis L. Millett:

Well actually - I'd been working with this--Easy Company - 27th Regiment - as a forward observer - and-- their commander was Reginald Desidario from Pasadena, California who got a posthumous award of the Medal of Honor. And-- the, the unit had withstood a very large [Chinese ?] attack and-- but he got killed during the - just towards dawn - the dawn was breaking, and a grenade landed next to him and killed him. And I volunteered to take over the command - I was an artilleryman but-- I wanted - that was a good outfit - it was a fine outfit - it still is. And so I volunteered and-- and--the battalion commander let me do it-- the regimental commander who was Machalis [sp?] -you ever hear of Machalis - General Mackhalis - he ended up a general -- didn't know about it, see? [LAUGHS] I transferred over to his unit - it was a regiment - but--Gordon Merch [sp?] who was the battalion commander - I knew who you are -- he knew me, because I'd been fighting with them for almost a year. So I transferred over, and I remember marching with the troops and then going by a--checkpoint in the road-- and who's standing there but Michalis! What are you doing here Millett?! And I said I'm commanding Easy--and what?! [LAUGHS] happened? [LAUGHS] See he didn't even know I'd become commander of his unit.

Unknown interviewer:

So you were on your way to your, your action at that point.

Lewis L. Millett:

That's right after the Chinese hit - you know very - very heavily [AHEMS] in lieu of pulling back eventually we withdrew south of Seoul, and we're off on the-- east-- western flank, and-- we got reports of captured enemy--messages and stuff like that, and in one of them the Chinese said Americans are afraid of bayonets! And I said that's a blankety-blank lie! I said my - both my great-grandfathers that fought in the Civil War used bayonets all the time, and we'll teach those son of a bitches a lesson! [LAUGHS] So I went and got bayonets and-- had them sharpened up and trained the troops and said from now on we'll lead off on bayonet assaults! Which I didn't realize was a great deal but-- nobody did that any more so--[...?...] I led three different bayonet assaults.

Unknown interviewer:

Really.

Lewis L. Millett:

And then they ordered me not to do it any more, cause they were afraid I'd get killed -probably would have. But-- I didn't realize it! You - all you need to do - get some metal bars - lead a bayonet assault! [LAUGHS] [LAUGHTER] Make sure you stick a few [in over half ?] when you hit those Chinamen though. Those "slant-eyes" turned around. [LAUGHS]

Unknown interviewer:

Tell me about what it's like to lead a, a bayonet charge.

Lewis L. Millett:

Exciting. And there's some things that are amazing. I remember I hit one man in the forehead, and-- the bayonet went up and out--and it was like hitting a, a pumpkin or something like that - not very hard! I couldn't believe it! But you know -afterwards I got to thinking about why it was so easy -- cause the skull is hard! -- well you're full of all this in-- in fact afterwards I couldn't hardly stand up. I was so drained of all the energy, because the adrenalin has just pushed you more and more--and-- you can do-- unbelievable - well you've heard of people ripping doors off cars to help people out in the story-- The adrenalin gets off and gives you a s--exceptional strength! But-- after it's over you're [LAUGHS] weak as a kitten, and that's why the Army always says re-organize when you take a position. Re-organize and-- go around and make the troops are in the right position - and the reason for that is-- not only to make sure - tactically what you're doing - but-- get the troops used to seeing you in the, in the position -- and to re-gain their strength. Because they've drained themselves, probably, of all the damn energy they have in them making the assault, and, and they don't teach you this but I, I assume this after a few battles - you know - that that's one reason the army does that. Yeah.

Unknown interviewer:

Makes sense. Of course - so-- what's the importance of leadership on the battlefield?

Lewis L. Millett:

Lead the way. And then get out of the way cause they'll go-- the American soldiers are the finest in the-- world! [Huh!] And it's the only army in the world that liberates countries and then turns it over to them! We don't keep 'em. Huh! This is the only army in the world that goes marching down liberated towns and stuff and all the kids come out! [LAUGHS] You know -you're welcome! Huh? Unbelievable! We have a hell of a tradition and-- we should be very proud of it - but most civilians don't understand that. They've never been to war.

Unknown interviewer:

Of course.

Lewis L. Millett:

Yep.

Unknown interviewer:

[...?...] be very different. Tell me about what the medal means to you.

Lewis L. Millett:

Oh, a lot of things - well it's [an ?] honor -but it's [LAUGHS] - not only honor for me, but you know - what stupid son of a bitch is going to say fix bayonets and charge? You know? And if they don't charge -- you're dead! [LAUGHS] You know? You can go t-- running up the hill all by your lonesome and get shot! [LAUGHS] But that's what I say - this is not just mine. It's a hundred men that I had too - and usually companies are about 220! I only had a hundred. And if they all hadn't gone, I'd be dead - just as simple as that. So this as much belongs to the men of my unit as it does to me.

Unknown interviewer:

Any of your men in your unit just say you're a crazy SOB-- [...?...] [BOTH SPEAK AT ONCE]

Lewis L. Millett:

[LAUGHS] Well one, one of them's still alive - he's a lieutenant -- Dell Evans [sp?] - lives in-- Alabama -- in fact I just got some pictures - I didn't know he had these pictures from Korea - I should have brought 'em - didn't think about it. There are some enlisted men around - but-- you don't see 'em much. I only had a hundred men anyway, and-- eventually probably of those hundred, probably only 50 ever walked out of Korea. You know. Cause we had high rate of casualities because we were undermanned and the Chinese were at heavy strength. But Dell Evans's still alive and--

Unknown interviewer:

What-- what do you think the medal should mean to the country?

Lewis L. Millett:

Oh, it's the highest honor you can get, and it says -- over and above the call of duty -- in other words if you didn't do it, you wouldn't be court-martialed -- and-- it's-- and-- at the existence of your life! [You know?] So-- to me-- [LAUGHS] - I didn't think that anyone - I'm arrogant - I didn't believe any son of a bitch could kill me - you know what I mean? So - and then I went that way! You know? [LAUGHS] I've walked through artillery fire! [Naked!] Every time I got hit I was wondering what the hell happened?! [LAUGHS] [LAUGHTER] But--

Unknown interviewer:

In looking back at it now-- okay - from a perspective - you know - maybe 50 years later - was it worth it?

Lewis L. Millett:

To me it was! Oh, yeah! Not, not only that, but morale-- and-- you can't understand the--feeling -- I wish I knew who they were and where they were because I left right after that -- and-- I never got-- an association with most of the men who were in the company. But I owe them my life! Huh? You didn't go charging up a hill by your lonesome - or you're gonna die! And-- I presume they thought I was a good leader, cause I went. You know? [LAUGHS] Right now in looking back and say -fix bayonets and follow me-- that stupid son of a bitch, [LAUGHS] you know? [LAUGHTER] But-- they did! Otherwise I wouldn't be here! So this is as much tribute to them as it is to me. But that's-- almost typical of the American soldier. If he believes in his leader, he'll follow - period! And-- no matter it might be - but [LAUGHS] you know - yeah, it is kind of crazy to go charging up with bayonets! You know? Against people with machine guns and all that crazy -you know? But like I say I'm an arrogant son of a bitch and I didn't believe anybody could kill me! [LAUGHTER]

Unknown interviewer:

Tell me what you tell your kids about - and your grandchildren - what are you going to tell them about the Medal of Honor?

Lewis L. Millett:

That it's a great honor - and you have to live up to it. You don't disgrace it. And-- I have a-- deep belief that most of the people I know who received it live up to it. Huh. In fact-- I don't know of any offhand who's disgraded themselves or the Medal of Honor. I, I think they try to live up to the - the meaning of it. And it is a great honor! You know? Old President Truman who was a soldier who had fought in World War I - in the artillery -when it around - he said "I'd rather have this than be president of the United States!"

Unknown interviewer:

He told you that?

Lewis L. Millett:

Huh? Yep! He told every sing-- the 4 of us -one-- none of 'em is here - Ainar England [sp?] - got shot in the eye - you might see him around. We were decorated same time. The other two are dead. One was Ray Harvey from Pasadena -- he and I and, and Ainar England and-- what's the other guy's name? The four of us were decorated by Truman. And Truman said this to all 4 of us! "I'd rather have this medal than be president of the United States." And I d-- I'm not a Republican but I liked Harry Truman. [LAUGHS] [LAUGHTER] And I think he was a good president.

Unknown interviewer:

That's [...?...].

Lewis L. Millett:

Well he stood up for some people I didn't think he should have stood up for, but that's because he's friends - you know? and not--that's understandable.

Unknown interviewer:

When did you first hewar you were going to receive - where were you when you heard you were going to receive the Medal of Honor?

Lewis L. Millett:

Oh, they pulled me out of the line-- and I didn't realize it at the time, and it wasn't--oh, about 2 weeks later - because-- S.L.A. Marshall [sp?] - you ever hear of him -author? He's a Detroit News corr-- war correspondent - he'd evidently wrote up the story-- and it went to Ridgeway-- and--immediately they - that's when they pulled me out of the line - and-- because previously people had been recommended and they stay in the line for a month or two months and they get killed! You know? They're still fighting and-- and--still full of piss and vinegar and - you know? And they-- they get killed, so-- as soon as it gets to-- the theater - they pull you off--and--send you home.

Unknown interviewer:

And then you were able to meet with Truman. Was your family there to watch it?

Lewis L. Millett:

My grandmother. My mother had died-- I had been married there-- to a gal who was in my home town - went to school together and so forth. And-- I'm fighting a war in Korea and she gets a divorce - which is illegal! You know? You can't divorce a guy who - you're in combat - but-- [LAUGHS] - I, I got to Washington to get the medal and who comes to Washington - is my - my ex-wife! [LAUGHS] Who wants me - cause I could have gone to court and had the divorce annulled because it's illegal! And-- she tried to get me to do that and I said no - once burned - twice shy. [LAUGHTER] And I met this beautiful gal at the White House -- and immediate said that's-- you know - so we got married. In less than a week. And all my family said oh, you don't know this gal - oh, she's a beauty - from Pasadena - and-- we were married 44 years - 4 children - and she went all over ['Nam ??] with me; she was part Cherokee, and she fell in love with the Montanyards - God bless them - they're being wiped - annihilated now by the Communists. And we don't do a damn thing about it but-- she visited all those Montanyard villages over there and-- hell of a woman - hell of an Army wife -- which is difficult - to be an Army wife. Yeah, your husband's off playing soldier and, and you have to sit home and take care of the kids and all that by yourself. Yeah.

Unknown interviewer:

Tell me how you would - in, in all the milestones in your life - how would you rank receiving the Medal of Honor.

Lewis L. Millett:

Oh, one of the highest honors I've ever had, you know. The only hon-- the only other one -- I was a sergeant of arms - this society -and they sent me out to bring in the next visitor - when I went out - and-- couldn't find him! There's nobody around - so when I went back in what they'd done - they got me off from - on a wild goose chase so they could vote -- and this is 139 members of the Medal of Honor Society - voted to make me - in honor-- lifetime-- Sergeant of Arms of the Society. That's the only position they could offer. but all 139 had to vote - yes - you know - no, no dissenter. And-- [LAUGHS] you know you, you look down and see these-- guys out of here - what they've done and so on -- that's a hell of an honor! Huh? That's a hell of an honor! Just as much as the Medal of Honor. Yeah. Because they're all-- soldiers and, and heroes! Huh? You know.

Unknown interviewer:

Absolutely.

Lewis L. Millett:

Yeah. [BLOWING NOSE?]

Unknown interviewer:

If you were to speak to our next generation -the kids that are growing up now - what would you tell them about the Medal and about the country and what are the basics - what are the things they should know that maybe they're not being told?

Lewis L. Millett:

Well this is the greatest country in the world - there's some-- I won't say it but-- some people who are-- derogatory about the United States of America -- it's the only real free country in the world! Huh? And-- freedom isn't free! My youngest son, God bless him, was killed on active duty coming home from the Sinai! On a peacekeeping mission. Freedom isn't free! It takes - and, and we live free in this country, because men have died - men and women have died - shed their blood - all over the world -not only to protect our freedom but others' -and I've fought in 9 different countries --none of 'em are a colony of the United States. We had one colony and the reason it was a colony - we didn't want Spain to take [a sole piece ??] back - huh? And then at the end of World War II we give 'em their freedom. Huh? We have no colonies. Huh? But we go - I've fought in 9 different countries! All of 'em which are free now! Huh? And that shows you who we are and what we stand for!

Unknown interviewer:

Absolutely. We're exactly one year from 9/11 - September 11th - can you tell me what your thoughts on that are?

Lewis L. Millett:

Well I, I'm a warrior; and I'd like to bomb the crap out of whoever did that. [LAUGHS] I'm sorry. You know.

Unknown interviewer:

No, don't be sorry.

Lewis L. Millett:

Yeah. They d-- they-- well I'd be m-- I'd give 'em torture. [LAUGHS] Before I killed 'em. [LAUGHS] I'm sorry but-- that's the way I feel about it. I know you're not supposed to feel that way, but-- that's-- and, and they say v-- vengeances aren't mine - but - we'll put 'em there just to the Lord can-- d-- re--extract his vengeance when they get to hell. [LAUGHS]

Unknown interviewer:

That's true. Okay. Is there anything I didn't ask you about that I should have - is there anything else you'd want to say about the Medal of Honor or winning it or anything else?

Lewis L. Millett:

Well you're very lucky - and I, I'm extremely lucky - [LAUGHS] stupid son of a bitch says fix bayonets and charge - you know, that's crazy! [LAUGHS] and, and-- but you see - I, I consider that I must have been a pretty good leader. Otherwise none would have gone - but they all did! Huh? And-- and-- this is typical of the American soldier - I think.

Unknown interviewer:

You think we have the finest army in the world?

Lewis L. Millett:

I'm afraid we're not getting enough - we don't have enough bullets to train people now - this is - in fact I gotta talk to Mary Bono about this - we're not training people adequately to perform their jobs! Not enough ammunition! And that's stupid! I-- when I had the opportunity, like-- when I was an advisor to the Vietnamese, I used to take my rifle - go down on the beach with a couple of boxes of ammun-- big boxes of ammo -fight it and shoot all day long! You know? Because that weapon - if I get in combat I want to be able to use it offhand - without even sighting, because I know it so well [TAPS NEAR MICROPHONE?] that it's just like sticking your finger out, you know? And-- I always-- believed that the front line soldiers should every week go to the-- END SIDE A START SIDE B [SOME MATERIAL REPEATS]

Lewis L. Millett:

And-- I always-- believed that the front line soldiers should every week go to the range --every week. And fire 50 or a hundred rounds. Huh? So when he goes in combat it'll be next to pointing your finger out there when he points that weapon. That's - that's an idiosyncracy of mine.

Unknown interviewer:

Now I believe that's absolutely [...?...] right. Let me just-- [OFF-MIKE COMMENTS] Talk a little bit about the bond between soldiers.

Lewis L. Millett:

Well!-- [LAUGHS] When you're lying [LAUGHS] shot on the ground, they don't come up and say hey are you Jew or a Christian? Are you black, white or yellow? Huh? That's the meaning of-- of - whether you've [...?...]. I've never met a bad soldier in combat. [PAUSE] I'm alive today because I had damn, damn good men! Huh? Ahhh. I get emotional about it.

Unknown interviewer:

Understandable.

Lewis L. Millett:

We're in a free country, and we - why are we? Because a lot of people - black - white -yellow - went and gave their lives so that you and I can live free! Huh? Simple as that! Greatest country in the world! Show me another one that's better! [LAUGHS] I'll send you there. [LAUGHS] Yeah. [BLOWING NOSE]

Unknown interviewer:

Thank you very much.

Lewis L. Millett:

God bless America. And Gloucester --Massachusetts. Yep. And fought in the revolution - so we got land grants - [LAUGHS] I gotta tell you this - we got land grant because they'd fought in the revolution - and moved from Gloucester to Maine where they had the land grant. I went and looked at the damn land they got --they had a big rock with our name on it Millett -- nothing but rock and pine [LAUGHS] trees. [LAUGHTER] It's-- there was a house on it, and they would have knocked down the house to see if the -and this black guy came to the door from New York City - it was his summer home. [LAUGHS] [LAUGHTER]

Unknown interviewer:

Oh, that's great.

Lewis L. Millett:

Yeah.

Unknown interviewer:

That's great.

Lewis L. Millett:

But-- but-- they do have a big deal of land; it was terrible land, you know? That's typical veteran benefit. [LAUGHS] [LAUGHTER]

Unknown interviewer:

I've heard that from a few people. [LAUGHS]

Lewis L. Millett:

Yeah. Yeah.

Unknown interviewer:

Well thank you for taking the time.

Lewis L. Millett:

My pleasure.

Unknown interviewer:

It's been a real pleasure. [BOTH SPEAK AT ONCE]

Lewis L. Millett:

Thank you. [End of Interview]

 
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