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Interview with James Lee Baker [7/19/2002]

Larry Ordner:

This tape is made July 19, 2002, with James Lee Baker. Mr. Baker was born May 22, 1926, and resides in Corbin, Kentucky. He is a native of Ohio County, Kentucky, and served in the United States Navy Amphibians as a fireman first class from 1944 to 1945. Went in the Navy at age 17. Saw service, among other locations, at Great Lakes, Norfolk, Fort Bliss, and on LSTs 805 and 853, and also while in Okinawa. Received a commendation from his captain for outstanding duty, and also the awardee of a Bronze Star. This tape is made with Larry Ordner, regional director for Senator Richard Lugar. Well, Mr. Baker, tell me now, you were 17 years old, and then you -- when you went in the Navy. Did you enlist, or were you drafted?

James Lee Baker:

No. I had to -- when I -- my brother was already over in the South Pacific, and I wanted to go. So I kept bringing papers home for my dad to sign. He kept tearing them up.

Larry Ordner:

Really? Did he think you were too young?

James Lee Baker:

Yeah. So -- my brother was already over there, too, see. So the third bunch I brought home, I said, Pap, if you don't sign these, I'm going to sign your name to them. And he said, well, Jim, I'd about as soon see you dead as to sign them. But nothing else for him to do but sign them, so he signed them.

Larry Ordner:

So what was -- the main reaction from home was he didn't want to do it?

James Lee Baker:

He didn't want to do it. Daddy didn't want to sign them.

Larry Ordner:

Yeah.

James Lee Baker:

Oh, I can understand that now, see --

Larry Ordner:

Sure. Sure, yeah.

James Lee Baker:

-- better than I could then.

Larry Ordner:

Where was your brother at?

James Lee Baker:

He was in the South Pacific.

Larry Ordner:

Well, at age 17, though, then where did you go for induction? Do you remember?

James Lee Baker:

Great Lakes to boot camp.

Larry Ordner:

Boot camp? Boot camp at Great Lakes. Did you get there on a train? Did they send you on a train?

James Lee Baker:

Yeah, a train.

Larry Ordner:

And you knew that you were going there, though, didn't you?

James Lee Baker:

Yeah.

Larry Ordner:

Yeah. Well, what was -- what was basic like for you? Was it pretty rigorous physically?

James Lee Baker:

Well, Great Lakes wasn't. But Fort Pierce, Florida, I got in the amphibs, see.

Larry Ordner:

Now, how were you selected for that? Was -- did they evaluate you and decide that you wanted -- that you needed to go into that, or was that --

James Lee Baker:

I don't know exactly how I got in it, but it's -- we had to have a lot of extra training.

Larry Ordner:

Okay.

James Lee Baker:

So we had 16 weeks in Florida. That was rough, because we had to -- see, we had to go in and hit the beach on these LSTs. This training we took down there was for in case we didn't get off from the beach. We were issued a knife and a .45 before we'd go in and hit the beach in case we took -- where we took the Marines in or the infantry or the engineers or whatever we was hauling, they'd issue that to us before we hit the beach in case we didn't get off the beach. ___+. So -- and in case we had to go ashore with whoever we was hauling. That was all we had for protection, you know. Of course, old LST number 30, it got hit about midships, and half of them ended up on the beach, and the rest of them went back out in the water. I don't imagine they survived. ___+.

Larry Ordner:

Yeah. Just for the purposes of this tape, because I know that there might be future listeners who really are unsure of the role of the LSTs, can you describe really what the LSTs were all about and what kinds of duties they were really meant to do?

James Lee Baker:

Well, they was -- they was made for one purpose, to go in and hit that beach. Flat on the bottom and then hot as hell. But they -- they knew that. They were just made to get over there and do a job. They left them in some of these countries and didn't even bring them back.

Larry Ordner:

Really?

James Lee Baker:

So -- I don't know what ever happened to mine, you know.

Larry Ordner:

Well, the LSTs really had quite a history with this area, too, didn't they?

James Lee Baker:

Yeah.

Larry Ordner:

Because they were --

James Lee Baker:

Made over in Evansville.

Larry Ordner:

-- built in Evansville and --

James Lee Baker:

Well, now, how can I find this out? After I got off from that 805 -- it left me in New Orleans in ___+ went to the hospital -- I got on that 853. And where was it made at?

Larry Ordner:

I'm not sure. I don't know.

James Lee Baker:

How can I find out?

Larry Ordner:

I don't know. I'm sure we can probably find out. I'll make a note for you and see what I can do.

James Lee Baker:

Oh, I'd just like to know. It might have been made here in Evansville, or it might have been made up in Jeffersonville. I don't know.

Larry Ordner:

Well, tell me now, after -- after Great Lakes and your training, then what? What was next for you?

James Lee Baker:

Well, we went to Norfolk, and we were training down there for five or six weeks, and then we went to Fort Pierce, Florida.

Larry Ordner:

Uh-huh. And that was for amphibian training?

James Lee Baker:

Yeah, 16 weeks.

Larry Ordner:

Now, what kind of things in the amphibian training was different than what other men would have gotten had they not been in --

James Lee Baker:

Well, we had --

Larry Ordner:

I guess what I'm asking is, what were you training for differently than, say, other men in the Navy would have been training for?

James Lee Baker:

Well, it's like my brother. He went aboard -- he went to boot camp, and then he went aboard a ship and went on overseas. And then I had to have all this extra training because I was going to get on an LST. I was training for that. And like I said, you know, they go in and hit the beach, and sometimes they don't get off the beach. And that training was for if you have to go ashore with whoever you're hauling, then that's all -- that's all you've got. You've got a .45 and a knife to fight the Japs with.

Larry Ordner:

Wow. So from Norfolk, then, you were really -- that's when you went on the LSTs. Right?

James Lee Baker:

No. I went to Fort Pierce, Florida, and had 16 weeks of amphibious training.

Larry Ordner:

Okay. Okay. Now from that point, where did you go?

James Lee Baker:

Well, let's see. We came back to Jeffersonville, picked up that 805.

Larry Ordner:

And then that was in -- and again for the tape, we'll say that was in Jeffersonville, Indiana, what was now Jeffboat. I think it was the Howard Shipyard at that time. And they were making -- also making LSTs?

James Lee Baker:

Uh-huh.

Larry Ordner:

And you picked it up there?

James Lee Baker:

Yeah.

Larry Ordner:

And where did it go from that?

James Lee Baker:

We come down the Ohio here to New Orleans. No, let's see. Yeah, I got off from it in New Orleans, that 805 there, you know. Then I got on the 853 in New Orleans, then went on out on that. We made the invasion of Okinawa in the 53.

Larry Ordner:

All right. How long of a passage was it? Where did you -- you left from New Orleans, and what was your route to Okinawa?

James Lee Baker:

We went to Hawaii, Pearl -- Pearl Harbor.

Larry Ordner:

You had to go through, I guess, the Panama Canal route. Right?

James Lee Baker:

Oh, yeah. Oh, we went through -- you had to go through the Panama Canal, where we had to -- we went on down to -- we went down the Mississippi, you know, the Gulf of Mexico, through the Panama Canal, the coast of Seattle.

Larry Ordner:

That is a long route, isn't it?

James Lee Baker:

We left -- we left going overseas from Seattle --

Larry Ordner:

Uh-huh.

James Lee Baker:

-- and came back to Seattle. I don't know how that worked out ___+.

Larry Ordner:

So you went to -- you say you went to Hawaii, and that was really like when you'd finally gotten -- Hawaii is like your holding base right before you left for Okinawa?

James Lee Baker:

Yeah. Well, we made -- we made a few more islands. See, my brother got in on some of them, you know, before Okinawa come up. We made some of them, but the fighting was mostly over on them, you know, but -- but, now, Okinawa was a -- that was a dandy, boy. So --

Larry Ordner:

Okay. Can you tell me about that, please? What -- what was your role with that on the LSTs? Can you describe that for me?

James Lee Baker:

Well, I was a gunner. You see, they've got these little landing barges on the sides, two on each side, BPs, I think they were. And when they left -- when that one left the ship, I was a gunner on that, had to go with it. They had a .50 caliber -- two .50 caliber machine guns on the steering ___, you know, and I was gunner on one of them. And when they left the ship for any reason, I had to go with them, you know. We -- one time we was lowering this BP over the side, and there was a lot of bodies in the water, just floating, you know. And this one particular fellow that I've thought about a lot, he come floating by face down in the water, and he was a sailor, because he had on dungarees and a T-shirt, a white T-shirt, you know. I could tell he was a sailor by that. But he was face down in the water, and he had a big red rose on his shoulder that said "Mother" on there. And I had to take this long pole with a hook on it like we used to pull up to a ship or something and ease him over out of the way so we wouldn't set there and chop him up, you know. And then he goes on out to sea, you know. But I thought about while I was doing that, about his mama being home waiting for a letter, but she wasn't going to get one. She didn't know that yet, see. So --

Larry Ordner:

And you thought -- you thought it was just somebody's kid?

James Lee Baker:

Somebody's -- yeah. Just like I say, he had "Mother" -- had "Mother" on his shoulder.

Larry Ordner:

And at the age that you were, that had to be a very difficult thing to see. I mean, I imagine you felt like you had grew up pretty fast out there, didn't you?

James Lee Baker:

Oh, yeah. Well, you just did what you had to. You didn't let that bother you, because you've got to watch the Japs. I mean, you had your mind on the Japs. ___+ along the beach. See, we took the infantry in. Now, the 27th Infantry and the 77th Infantry made that landing there, and I'm not sure -- I've been trying to think which one we had. We took one of the infantries in first. The 77th and the 27th, we had one or the other of them, but I can't think which one. But then we unloaded the infantry, and we went back to Sipan, and they -- do you want me to go on with this?

Larry Ordner:

Sure. Sure, please.

James Lee Baker:

So them old LSTs, they -- they're just a big hull, you know, and they're empty inside, just huge inside when they're empty. You just look down through them, you know. And they stacked that LST full of steel drums of airplane gas, as long as they could get one in there, all the way to the front, and then they put a bulldozer in there -- now this was a team of engineers we picked up in Sipan -- had a bulldozer and some other kind of piece of heavy equipment right in the bow. And we was to take that into Okinawa. They was supposed to had a place to ___+ unload it when we got there. But the Japs had done took it back away from them before we got there, so there we was. We -- of course, we went in to hit the beach before we found that out, I guess. So -- Before you go in, about a hundred yards or so, you drop a steering anchor. It's on a winch on the steering of the ship. And that's a winch to help get you back off of the beach, you know, when you get ready to get back off. You drop that going on in. But all that weight on there, we hit the bottom before we got a hundred feet or so from the beach, because the load was so heavy, you know. The main deck was sticking out of the water about two and a half foot --

Larry Ordner:

Wow.

James Lee Baker:

-- because all that tank, that floating steel, the airplane gas. Just thank the Lord that the Japs didn't get into that. That much airplane gas would have had everything in that harbor blowed up and on fire.

Larry Ordner:

I'm sure.

James Lee Baker:

You can imagine one steel drum of airplane gas, what an explosion it would make, and we -- no telling how many we had stacked on top of each other.

Larry Ordner:

It had to be hundreds and hundreds, didn't it?

James Lee Baker:

Oh, yeah. Yeah.

Larry Ordner:

And that was -- that would have just been a primary target had they known. Thank heavens.

James Lee Baker:

Oh, if they had knowed that, they would have sent a plane especially in there to have got us.

Larry Ordner:

Wow.

James Lee Baker:

And the ___ of it is, it shows you, like when you're 18 and when you've had so much hard training, too, to go along with that, we was fixed for it, you know, because they knowed where we was going, see. And when we hit the beach -- well, when we went in to hit the beach and got hung up -- they hooked another LST with a long cable on our steering anchor back here ___+. And they was pushing us, you know, trying to get us off, get us un-hung up. So in the meantime, the Jap -- the suicide planes was all around, you know. We just didn't get one.

Larry Ordner:

Gosh.

James Lee Baker:

They'd have -- they'd have -- like I said, they would have sent one special after us if they'd knowed we had all that airplane gas on there. And we'd have pulled up there ___+, you know.

Larry Ordner:

Wow.

James Lee Baker:

Wouldn't have been no survivors. All, you know, all would have gone up. But -- it's a wonder we didn't get hit. And ___+. Like I say, it was seven days a week.

Larry Ordner:

Okinawa was really the -- that was really like the last major --

James Lee Baker:

That was it.

Larry Ordner:

I mean that was Japan's last stand, really, wasn't it, before what could have been an invasion?

James Lee Baker:

That's it. Well, it wasn't an invasion.

Larry Ordner:

Yeah. But, I mean, I say an invasion on the -- what would have been a full-scale invasion of the Japanese mainland.

James Lee Baker:

Well, that's why they fought so hard there, see. They knowed when they lost that Okinawa, that was it.

Larry Ordner:

Yeah.

James Lee Baker:

The next thing was their homeland. And sure enough, after we finally got there, we went to the Philippines, and we was ready, and we was setting and waiting for orders to invade Japan when they dropped the bomb.

Larry Ordner:

Did you think you were going to go?

James Lee Baker:

Well, yeah. We was waiting to go.

Larry Ordner:

Fully -- fully expected to go?

James Lee Baker:

Yeah. We was waiting to go, waiting for orders.

Larry Ordner:

Then you got the word, then, that the bombing had occurred?

James Lee Baker:

Well, see, Roosevelt died about that time. He wouldn't give the order to drop the bomb. But they had claimed they had two of them is all they had. Now I don't know how many they had. Nobody else don't know, really, I don't think. But when they dropped the first one -- Well, first of all, Roosevelt wouldn't give the order to drop the bomb, then he died, then Truman took over. So Truman said sock it to 'em, you know, and he dropped that first one. And, you know, oh, it killed thousands, you know. But the Japs wouldn't hardly quit, you know. But when they dropped their second one, they just hauled up and quit.

Larry Ordner:

Did people know -- did you guys know, really, what the atomic bomb was capable of?

James Lee Baker:

Well, no, not really. I don't think -- I don't think the people who even made it did.

Larry Ordner:

Yeah.

James Lee Baker:

You know, ___+.

Larry Ordner:

Yeah.

James Lee Baker:

Really, they didn't know what it was going to do.

Larry Ordner:

Yeah. Did you think after the first one, that the war was just -- that they were going to surrender?

James Lee Baker:

Well, ___+. No. We just had to wait and see.

Larry Ordner:

Yeah. So where were you when you got the word that -- you were still in the Philippines when you got word that they had surrendered?

James Lee Baker:

Yeah. We was, like I said, we was waiting for orders to invade Japan.

Larry Ordner:

Well, what was -- what was the reaction to news that the Japanese had surrendered?

James Lee Baker:

Oh, of course, we was thrilled to death, because we would have been the first ones in there, and we would have just been slaughtered. I mean they was just there waiting. We wouldn't be here today, there wouldn't be no doubt about that; there ain't no telling how many thousands of Americans, you know. But that's just -- that's just part of it.

Larry Ordner:

Well, after being in the Philippines then, were you able to come home after that?

James Lee Baker:

Let's see. No. We went to -- we went to Yokohama, Yokosuto, and Tokyo. Now first of all I went to the hospital in the Philippines, and that ship run off and left me. So I got -- they said they called -- like I said, they called it a hospital, but it was an old ___+ with swinging bars ___+ old folding cots. I was there 17 days, and it rained every day, and I got wet every day. I was laying right next against that Seymour. And I kept telling them, I said let me go back aboard ship. I said I'd be better -- I'll be dry at least, you know. ___+. But they finally said they radioed down there to the receiving station. Now they said there was 8,000 men down there, misplaced men, didn't have nothing, didn't have no place to go, didn't have no ship, didn't have no companies, and there was one mess hall for 8,000 men. Well, when they sent me down there, my ship pulled out before we got down there, and I got stuck in a folding -- in a tent with a folding cot, legs stuck down in the mud about so far, still raining, water running under my bunk, in there by myself. And I thought that was it. I didn't think I was going to make it out of there. Finally I went aboard a -- it was an old ___ destroyer before the war, and then the Navy took it over there; the amphibs took it over. And they called it an APV or something. And they changed my orders, and I went aboard that. Then -- anyway, I got off of it. Went to Yokohama, Yokosuto, and Tokyo, and then I got off of it in Tokyo.

Larry Ordner:

What kind of duties did you do when you were at Yokosuto and Yokohama? What kind of duties did you have at that time? Did you go in as part of an occupational force?

James Lee Baker:

Yeah. Let's see. I don't remember just -- I don't remember all of that. See, we was -- we was just like kind of in transit. We didn't have no (CPO).

Larry Ordner:

Oh, I see. I see.

James Lee Baker:

We was just going from one to another, just --

Larry Ordner:

I see.

James Lee Baker:

And then we came back to the States -- I did -- on a little old -- it was a civilian ship before the war. Geodetic survey people had it. It was a nice little ship, had brass rails on it. It was almost like a big yacht.

Larry Ordner:

I'll be darned.

James Lee Baker:

Come back to the States on it.

Larry Ordner:

What kind of -- how did it do in the ocean? Was it --

James Lee Baker:

Pretty good.

Larry Ordner:

Pretty good?

James Lee Baker:

Yeah. Of course, we didn't hit -- we didn't hit no bad storms.

Larry Ordner:

Yeah.

James Lee Baker:

But, Lord, them old LSTs wasn't fit to ride a storm in. We was in Okinawa setting there ___+. After the invasion was about over, we was setting -- just setting there, and one of these typhoons was coming up late one evening just before dark. And they made us -- we was setting there empty. Them old LSTs is flat on the bottom, you know, so they can go in and hit the beach. Just like a tub setting in the water when they're empty. And just before dark, they made us -- the ships -- the winds got so strong, the ships got to dragging anchor on the bottom, and they, of course, started bumping together. So they made us head out to sea into that storm in that old LST. Man, I'm telling you, ___+ made it. Some of them didn't. They guesstimated them swells to be 75 foot high. That's a pretty good-sized wave, ain't it? And them old LSTs, they ain't made like a ship on the bow. They're round, you know, like this. Them doors open. And when they hit one of them big swells, they just -- you'll stand on your head if you don't grab something, you know, if you happen to be standing up. And then they'll stop for a few seconds and then raise up, and then that swell would run out from under it, and then it falls and hits the bottom. Man, I'm telling you, jar your teeth just like ___+ everything busts and flying apart. That's a heck of a --

Larry Ordner:

I'm sure you feel like you're going to break apart.

James Lee Baker:

Oh, yeah. Well, I think some of them did.

Larry Ordner:

Yeah.

James Lee Baker:

And it's just getting dark, winds; you just head into it. I mean, you know, you're just -- just hoping. That's all you're doing. Just -- now, some of those big old ships can handle that stuff, but them LSTs, they're just made to go over there and hit the beach and --

Larry Ordner:

Yeah. Well, how did you get word you were going to finally get to come home?

James Lee Baker:

Let's see. Well, I was in -- I was in Japan then. The war was over at that point. And -- well, I went aboard that little ship I was just telling you about.

Larry Ordner:

Yeah.

James Lee Baker:

U.S. Lassen (ph) was the name of it.

Larry Ordner:

And then where did you -- where did you arrive at? Back in Seattle?

James Lee Baker:

No. Over to Pearl Harbor again.

Larry Ordner:

Oh, Pearl Harbor. Okay.

James Lee Baker:

Refueled and then come home myself.

Larry Ordner:

Okay. And then how did you get from -- did you take a train back to this area?

James Lee Baker:

Well, that's the only way there was to travel then, I guess.

Larry Ordner:

Yeah. Yeah.

James Lee Baker:

Let's see. I got discharged and -- let's see. Where did I get discharged at? I don't even know where I got discharged. I can't tell you.

Larry Ordner:

That was about -- that was 1945 you were discharged.

James Lee Baker:

1945.

Larry Ordner:

And then -- but you got to come home shortly after that. Correct?

James Lee Baker:

Yeah.

Larry Ordner:

When you got back, did you -- after a period of time, did you use your GI Bill benefits in any way?

James Lee Baker:

Uh-huh.

Larry Ordner:

Tell me about that.

James Lee Baker:

Well --

Larry Ordner:

Did you get any training of any kind?

James Lee Baker:

Got sheet metal, sheet metal, on the GI Bill. Worked in Morgan Sheet Metal, Lawrenceburg. ___+. And It helped me, you know. I wasn't expecting it. So --

Larry Ordner:

Well, tell me, looking back after all these years, I know there's -- every time I talk to someone who's served in the Navy, there's always, there seems like, an extreme pride at having been in the Navy. There's like a -- every man that I've ever met that's served in the Navy has always talked with such loyalty to their ship, any vessel they served on. And I'm sure you probably feel the same way, don't you?

James Lee Baker:

Yeah.

Larry Ordner:

What is it about the Navy that makes the Navy a little bit more special, you think, to some -- to those who served in the Navy?

James Lee Baker:

I don't really know. Of course, I wanted to get in the Navy. That why I joined. I wanted to -- I wanted to get in the Navy because my brother was in the Navy, see.

Larry Ordner:

Yeah.

James Lee Baker:

And I'm still glad I got in the Navy. I'd rather -- I'd rather been on one of those LSTs hauling those troops in than take a chance of getting off the beach, instead of going on on the beach --

Larry Ordner:

Yeah.

James Lee Baker:

-- with them, you know. Because I tell you, it's pitiful. You take them soldiers and infantry, Marines in there, and you just dump them off, you know, and there they go up the beach with their rifle and their knife. And every day they dug in waiting, just slaughter them. On the beach there, you could look up that beach just as far as you could see, bodies just rolling up, rolling by, Jap, soldiers, Marines. I don't know how many thousands. Just ___+, you know, whatever you're doing, you know.

Larry Ordner:

Well, it has been a lot of years, but looking back these years now, how do you feel about your service and what the U.S. was able to accomplish and what you were part of during that time? It was such a tremendous effort.

James Lee Baker:

Well, I don't know hardly how to answer that. I just done what I was told to do.

Larry Ordner:

Yeah.

James Lee Baker:

And I got, like I said, I got a commendation from the captain for the invasion of Okinawa for outstanding duty. And I tell you how I think I got -- how I come -- how I got that. Of course, I didn't get in no trouble. I mean I was -- I was strictly business, I mean, doing what I was supposed to be. When -- like there in Okinawa, it was just 24 hours a day, seven days a week, you know, just about. And my bunk was -- aboard ship -- was a top bunk. And there was a hatch right over my head, a round hatch, and it was -- I done took ___+ the hatch where I could just spin it, get it loose. So this LCM -- I think it's a little barge you haul on top of the LST -- going over there. You'd take them over, and they've got a 12-man crew. Well, one of them in that crew was a Phillips, Drexel Phillips, from Fordsville, Kentucky. And he -- anyway, we got over to Okinawa. See, before we went in, we drained the power stanchion on the ship and tilted the ship and busted the turnbuckles loose and let them off. They just slid off in the water sideways, you know. And I talked to him after it was over and he come back to Fordsville. He made it off. And -- where was I going from there?

Larry Ordner:

Well, you just were kind of wrapping up that statement there on Okinawa.

James Lee Baker:

Oh, boy, it was a dandy. I mean, like I said, that -- the Japs knowed that was their last hour. That's why they fought so hard.

Larry Ordner:

Well, I appreciate your sitting down and doing this tape with me, and I think it will be good that it's going to be preserved, and your stories were -- it was very good of you to recall these for me, and I appreciate you doing it very much.

James Lee Baker:

Glad to do it. Anything I can do to help. Oh, that -- supposed to tell you about that hatch. We had that -- it's the L standard ship, medium, I think they called it, a little landing barge with a 12-man crew. Like I said, we had it on our -- I explained that. And when that siren would go off, well, the Japs was coming. We knew that, see. And I slept with my shoes on and my life jacket, and of course I had my helmet laying right there beside me. And when that siren would go off, I'd just reach up and spin that thing, grab my helmet, put it on, and I'd get on my hands and knees and go from the starboard side of the ship to the port side. My gun was on the far side from where I slept. And I'd -- instead of going all the way around, you know, I'd just go clear across underneath that thing on my hands and knees. And I'd be over there in -- And I was a gunner on a 20 millimeter, and you had a loader to load it for you, supposed to. But I'd get over there and load the gun. You had to open your thing up, get that canister out of there, slap it on there. Then I'd strap myself in that thing and put the poles on and (?call in to?) the bridge, and my loader ain't even got there yet. I think that's why I got that commendation. Because in the daytime, see, they could see you from the ridge, looking right down at you. They could see what you was doing. And, I mean, that's the only reason I know of. Of course, like I said, I never had no trouble ___+. I done more than I was asked to do. So -- so I got that commendation.

Larry Ordner:

Well, thanks so much for doing this tape.

James Lee Baker:

Okay.

Larry Ordner:

Pleasure to meet you.

James Lee Baker:

Same here. You look familiar. Where are you from?

Larry Ordner:

I'm from Corbin, Indiana --

James Lee Baker:

Corbin, Indiana.

Larry Ordner:

-- the other Corbin.

James Lee Baker:

The other Corbin. Well, I hope to see you again sometime.

Larry Ordner:

I'm sure you will. Thanks very much for coming in.

[END OF INTERVIEW]

 
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