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Interview with James Alvin Jolly [2/17/2005]

Marjorie Green:

We are interviewing veteran James Alvin Jolly in his home in Fair Oaks, California. Today is February 17th, 2005. Mr. Jolly was born in Oceanside, California, in the year 1921. Also president is his wife, Rose. He is being interviewed by Marjorie Green and videotaped by Joan Cortez. All three ladies are members of the Sacramento Chapter of the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution. Mr. Jolly is a member of the Sons of the American Revolution. Mr. Jolly, in what war did you serve?

James Alvin Jolly:

World War II.

Marjorie Green:

What was your highest rank, and where did you serve?

James Alvin Jolly:

I was an ensign U.S. Maritime Service, and I was in the Atlantic and in the Pacific and the Andalusians.

Marjorie Green:

What events in your life led up to you -- your joining this branch of service?

James Alvin Jolly:

Well, when I was in high school, I got an amateur -- a radio license. So I was in my junior year. And so the radio operating was of great interest to me. And during the summer -- well, I went off to college for a year and then came back home during the summer. And when -- during the early part of the summer, I received a -- I was taking a magazine called the QST, which was published by the American Radio Relay League, which was -- represented the amateur radio operators in the United States. And they published an article about a training service that was operated by the Coast Guard for the U.S. Maritime Service at Gallops Island in Boston Radio Harbor, and they were looking for recruits who had amateur radio licenses. And this attracted me because I was an amateur and interested in that. And I wrote to them and came back a request that -- they requested that I go to San Francisco for an interview and for a physical exam, and I did that. And then by the end of the summer I got a letter saying that I had been selected. And then a little later I got a -- a ticket in the mail to take the train across the United States from -- from where we were. And of course the trains in those days went through Chicago. And when I was in -- changed trains in Chicago and the train then went to Boston, I met two friends, two young fellows my age who, of course, were amateur radio operators: Andy McCloud and Herky Knight (ph). And we became real good friends, and we then went on to Gallops Island where I started my training.

Marjorie Green:

And were you living in Oceanside at this time?

James Alvin Jolly:

No. My parents had a dairy farm at Hilmar which was near Turlock, California. And I was going to school, high school at Hilmar.

Marjorie Green:

Do you recall your first days in the service?

James Alvin Jolly:

Well, yes. The first -- well, we had arrived in Boston we -- we came down to the -- to the ship, the Eaton (ph) which was a Coast Guard Cutter and to check in there. And it was in the evening. And they -- the officer there suggested we probably ought to go back and get a hotel because we couldn't go -- be taken off the island til next morning to be sworn in. And we said, "Well, that's a good idea but we spent all our money on food getting out here.” And they said, "Okay. Well, you can sleep onboard." So we got to sleep onboard. Then we went with the -- the Cutter the next morning out to the Coast Guard and operated ___ Gallops Island and we were sworn in then. That was our first day on the island. The island is way out in the middle of Boston Harbor; and, of course, this was still in the fall. It -- it wasn't -- it wasn't too bad, but during the winter, the snow and the winds were rather -- rather severe.

Marjorie Green:

What was the name of that island, do you recall?

James Alvin Jolly:

Gallops Island.

Marjorie Green:

Okay.

James Alvin Jolly:

Still -- it's still there.

Marjorie Green:

Okay.

James Alvin Jolly:

It's operated by the park service --

Marjorie Green:

Uh-huh.

James Alvin Jolly:

-- at the present time.

Marjorie Green:

Okay. Tell me about your training.

James Alvin Jolly:

Well, the training was supposed to go for a year, and because this was where you started -- well, it was -- part of the day was devoted to seamanship. After all, we were all landlubbers. And they -- we had to learn to tie knots and all those kinds of things. And then we would have lifeboat drills, where we'd go out and they had davits located on the -- on the dock which would lower the boats into the water. And we would have to lower the boats and get in and go out and row around and come back. And we had to learn about the emergency equipment that was in the lifeboat. All of those kinds of things. That was -- That went on almost every day for the first three months in the morning. And in the afternoon, we went to technical classes because we had to learn all the electronics. And then part of the day was devoted to learning code because we had to be able to copy and transmit Morse code at 20 words per minute in order to graduate. And so that -- that took a lot of our time also.

Marjorie Green:

Do you remember any of your instructors?

James Alvin Jolly:

Well, the instructors were fine and they -- no big problem with the instructors. They -- you know, if you were a bad boy for some reason, well you'd get KP duty. That was never nice. And another thing that everybody had to participate in once in a while was fire watch. That was a two-hour watch at night, like, from 12:00 to 2:00 and 2:00 and 4:00 and 4:00 to 6:00 and so on. And in the winter when there was snow, it wasn't very pleasant because down on the far end of the island was where the recreation building was. And you had this little box and it had a key in it, and you had to go to all these places and turn the -- turn the key into the identified place it showed you were there. So we had to make our way down through the blizzard to where the -- where the building was in the far end of the island and then make our way back. And I can remember that as not a very pleasant experience.

Marjorie Green:

Where did you go after this training?

James Alvin Jolly:

Well, I think there's one more thing I might mention was when we came around to -- well, first off, because the three of us that I mentioned earlier -- Andy and Herky (ph) and I -- were pretty bright kids. And they -- the war had come along because we came there in September of 1940. And, of course, Pearl Harbor was in the middle of this. And then we -- we continued through that. And they wanted to speed up the program, and so they moved us. We were originally in class R-8, which would be the eighth class they had there. And they moved us to R-7, which was a class that started three months before we had started, and so we would graduate three months earlier. And that was -- I think that was important because we're going to get out of that school three months earlier. And then the last day, after we had taken all our exams and we were ready to be assigned ships and so on, I became very ill. And I checked in and they said I had scarlet fever, which goes into isolation. And so I was very sick, and they actually made a request from Chicago and got some special serum to sort of moderate the illness. I was in the hospital for three weeks. And then when I came out, I had a week that I stayed in my friend that I had met in Boston and then came back to the island. And by that time, Andy McCloud had already lost his life on a ship. He had been assigned a ship that was on the Murmansk run in a convoy. And his ship had been destroyed. And so it was, you know, little disconcerting, shall we say, to have my buddy lost so early on. But then --

Marjorie Green:

Did his ship catch a torpedo? Was that it?

James Alvin Jolly:

Pardon?

Marjorie Green:

Did his ship catch a torpedo? Was that it?

James Alvin Jolly:

Yes. It was torpedoed.

Rose Jolly:

A submarine.

James Alvin Jolly:

And it was sunk.

Marjorie Green:

Uh-huh.

James Alvin Jolly:

Of course, in those days, those early convoys were -- might lose out of the convoy of 30, they might lose ten ships in the process of getting over to Murmansk. Or some of them were even worse than that. And it was, like, 17 ships out of 30. Lot of ships were lost there. But, anyway, you want to know my first assignment? Well, they told me to go down to New York and gave me the ticket. Told me a place to check in there, and I went down to the maritime service in New York. And when I got to New York, they said, "Well. We have a ship waiting for you. We can't tell you where it is or what it is, but what we want you to do is fly to Jacksonville.” Now, you remember at that period of time, to fly in an airplane was rather urgent because there weren't too many flights and civilians, particularly, or even military were not sent on airplanes. You went on trains. So -- so I went down there and they said that I should check in at the hotel, which I did, and I got another envelope which said that I was supposed to go on to Miami the next day. Again, flying. When I got to Miami, I checked in at the hotel, and at the hotel I got a message there. And it said I was supposed to meet a man in the lobby at a certain time the next morning, which I did. And so this man came up and asked me who I was and had me identify myself and so on and so forth. So he said, "Well, I'm taking you -- I'm the driver. I'm taking you to where you have to go," and he still wouldn't tell me where I was going. And so then we were headed out on the -- well, after I had just gotten in the car and we had gotten a little ways, he said, "Well, we're headed for Key West, Florida.” And Key West, you go through a road that goes to Key West and goes from island to island, and it's got a lot of bridges. And it's a very interesting drive. And I finally got to -- to Key West and my ship there was the Edmond J. Moran, the seagoing tug. 125 feet long, 2,000 horse power. A very robust seagoing vessel. And I checked with the captain who was Hugo Kroll, and he said, "Sonny, we've been waiting seven days for you. And we'll be sailing." And we left within an hour to go to sea.

Marjorie Green:

And what was your job assignment on the Moran?

James Alvin Jolly:

Well, the -- the assignment -- the Moran was to go to ships that had been torpedoed on the East Coast. There was no blackouts yet and many ships were getting sunk by -- by the submarines, and we had very little military protection at that time because this was still, you know, 1940 -- late '41, early '42. And so our job was, if the ship didn't sink immediately, was to put a towline on it and beach it if we possibly could so that they could save the cargo. Because a lot of ships would sink right away, and it was a sort of "if they could do it,” why, the Germans would shoot three torpedoes to make the ship sink right away, but sometimes they didn't do that or they missed and they would only hit, say, one torpedo and it would maybe float for 12 hours or 14 hours before they sunk. And if we could get there, we could save the ship.

Marjorie Green:

Tell me about a couple of your most memorable experiences on that ship.

James Alvin Jolly:

Well, one of them -- we were sent down to Saint Lucy (ph) to -- to bring a ship back to the United States. And it had been torpedoed in the harbor and it had sunk in the harbor into the mud, and they had been torpedoed in the engine room. It was a British ship called the Antata (ph). And they -- they put a concrete side in where the hole was in the engine room and pumped the water out and got the ship to float again. And it had iron ore in it, and the U.S. wanted the iron ore. And -- so it was our job to tow it back to the United States. And it had a full crew on it. And the crew stayed on the ship and we were tying it. And when we got on our way, we were along the coast of Florida, and we were off of Miami, and it was at night but the lights on the shore were all on. They hadn't blacked out the lights yet. And the submarines could be on the outside, and you would make a silhouette. And we had one escort with us, one Navy ship with us. But it was on the inside at the time that they torpedoed the Antata (ph) the second time. And the Antata (ph) went down pretty fast. And it turned up and started sliding down. But all but one got off it. And, of course, as soon as it got torpedoed, they had to cut the towline line and -- and we circled around and tried to keep moving and picked up a lot of -- the Navy ship picked up a lot of them too. And we took them all into -- into Miami. The question has come up as to why -- when we were all out there where all the torpedoes were, you know, the -- the German submarines, how come they didn’t torpedo us? And this was a diesel electric and a twin screw. And the screws turn on screws at 170 RPM, and the Navy ships, the smaller Navy ships, turn at the same speed there. And -- and a cargo ship only turns at about 70 RPM. So the submarines have listening devices and they could listen, and they'd hear that kind of a speed and they would assume it was a Navy ship. And so they stayed away from us rather than attack us. So that's probably what saved our -- but we were getting many -- you see, when -- when a ship was torpedoed, before they were torpedoed, but if they saw a submarine in the area, they would break silence and say where they were, because it was pretty much chance that they had already been discovered. So I would get those kinds of reports all the time where the ships said, “Well, we break silence because there's a torpedo -- a sub in our area.” And then when they would get torpedoed is when they would went out an SOS. And then we would try to find out where that was, whether it was close enough to us to go help them or not. Another occasion that you'd be interested in -- and it's referred to in that book that’s --

Marjorie Green:

Uh-huh?

James Alvin Jolly:

-- on one of the pages there. Anyway, the Navy was taking two troop ships through the Panama Canal. These were large troop ships through the Panama Canal to the other side -- to the West Coast. And in order to -- for maximum protection, they had the first troop ship and then they had a tug. An oceangoing tug of our size in between. And then the next troop ship and then another tug. And we were the last tug. And we were headed for a place between Haiti and Cuba. And it's called Windward Channel, and it's a very narrow channel. And it's rather shallow, and it's sandy bottom. And the Germans would lay on the bottom with their -- with their submarine and wait until a ship came, and they would surface and destroy the ship. And, of course, this was a pretty dangerous area to go through. And as we approached that, the -- they -- the command ship -- the flag ship ran up their flags because the communications, you know, within a convoy was by flags or flashing lights. You didn't use your radios for that kind of communication. And they indicated that there was evidence of a submarine in the area, and then shortly after that, to the right of our tug -- and we were the last tug, following the last troop ship -- a submarine surfaced. A conning tower came up. And immediately the submarine realized what they saw -- because they could see what was going on and also there were Navy ship escorts -- and so immediately tried to -- to submerge and, at their angle, went right underneath our tug. And it struck the tug. Probably damaged or broke off the conning tower as it was trying to go down, but there wasn't much distance for it to go down. And by -- by going this direction, it was avoiding the depth charges that would be dropped as soon as the Navy could get at them. But the depth charges are not going to be dropped when you're right adjacent to a troop ship. And so, as it went further on over and as they went far enough out -- they were following, of course, by sonar -- why, they put depth charges on it and eventually the oil slick came up and they destroyed the submarine. But it was interesting to -- to have that experience.

Marjorie Green:

I guess. You also spent some time in the Pacific. Can you tell us about little bit about the Pacific?

James Alvin Jolly:

Yes. The Pacific. Well, it's a big ocean. And the -- the -- the Samuel W. Williston was the ship that I was on from there. But that was -- first was, we were sent on the tug -- the Edmond J. Moran. We had to go up to Baltimore, and we got two very large barges. These were flat barges. They were 100 feet wide, 350 feet long. And two of them. And we had one weight behind and one weight behind that, and we had to tow them through the Panama Canal and up along the cost of -- of Mexico and all those countries along there and clear on up and to -- And when we got to Seattle, why, they fitted all the crew with -- with weather gear. Alaskan gear. And they issued us all -- all guns. We had already gotten machine guns. We had machine guns and we had depth charges. But they issued all the crew with rifles. And we had a couple of military Navy guys come onboard with us. And then we continued on up through the Inland Passage and then on out and -- every day we had -- had gun practice and so on and so on. They didn't tell us yet where we were going. We went on up to Kodiak and on out through the islands, and then we finally learned that we were going to the Invasion of Kiska too. And when we finally got out there, there were big gun ships that were shelling the shore. And the -- the procedure was, you put one of these barges on one side and one on the other of the tug. And you'd go alongside a troop ship, and they would load the troops. And they would load the mechanized guns and so on onboard the barge. And then you'd turn around, and they’d load the other one. So now you had two loaded barges. And you'd go for shore as fast as you could with the tug. And the trouble was that there wasn't really very good landing there. There’s a lot of steep places. And they found some that weren't too bad. And you'd go in and you'd just churn water and put those barges against the shore. And then the tractors, the bulldozers would come off first and make -- make a path for the heavy machinery and so on. The -- the mobilized guns and so on come off. And, of course the -- the big ships were still -- still shooting big projectiles at the shore. And the guys were flying around up there, dropping bombs and so on.

Rose Jolly:

Including your brother.

James Alvin Jolly:

We -- that's where I got the combat bar. We had a bomb was dropped about 500 feet, but it didn't destroy us, fortunately, and we were machine gunned from the shore because they didn't like us there. But, you know, it was quite an experience.

Marjorie Green:

Tell us about your other medals that you received.

James Alvin Jolly:

Well the -- we were out there then after that for a whole period there on -- it was through the winter.

Marjorie Green:

Uh-huh?

James Alvin Jolly:

And then we were -- they wanted to replace the full crew and be taken back to the States, and my next ship was the Samuel W. Williston. And we left out of San Francisco and we were loaded with --

Rose Jolly:

Alaskan gear. ___.

James Alvin Jolly:

We were loaded with 50-gallon drums of aviation gasoline in the holes. And that's not the best thing to have as a cargo. There was no smoking, nothing like that on the deck, because if you have a 50-gallon drum of gasoline, a bunch of them down in the hole, there's going to be some vapor escape, and it could explode very easily. And we left San Francisco, heading out, and we weren't going to pick up an escort until we got out 20 days, because they didn't have enough escorts for everybody. So an escort would come from the -- from the Australian area up and meet us about 20 days out. But it's a 42-day trip. So we had quite a ways that we'd go unescorted. And you'd make about 200 miles a day with ten-notch ships. Maybe 250 with these ships. They were very slow loaded. And on the seventh day out, the radio officer runs the same watch as the -- as the first mate which is midnight to -- I mean, 8:00 o'clock to midnight and noon to 4:00 in the afternoon. You have two four-hour shifts. And this particular night, at midnight I got off and went off to my bunk and so on. And along about 2:00 o'clock or something like that the ship struck something. At least we thought it did. And it shook the ship, whatever happened. And the captain stopped the ship, put it into reverse. You know, a ship re-vibrates when you put it in reverse and you’ve been going forward. And he stopped the ship, and they looked all around to try to find out what we had run into. And after a while, the captain gave up. He gave up and said, "Oh, it must've been a floating something out here." We went on down to Noumea -- New Caledonia where we were down there, and when we pulled into port -- the first thing you do after you anchor is you drop one of the mechanized lifeboats which you use as a boat to go ashore. And certain of the officers get in the boat to go in to report. And so the captain, the first mate, and chief engineer and myself went into this boat. And we had a -- we had gone out a little ways, and we looked back -- Now, as you go all the way down to 42 days, you’re burning a lot of oil. And so the ship floats higher because it doesn't weighted down as much. So the Plimsoll line will show as maybe you've gone -- raised 10 feet in the water over this period of time. And we looked back and in the engine room was this round indentation which had been the head of a torpedo that had hit the engine room. And it hadn't exploded. Now, if it had, with all our gasoline, it would've just "fwip" like that. There would have been nothing left. And the other thing that is important is that the Japanese or either Germans would normally shoot three torpedoes, because they want to be sure. And it's only one, so it had to be their last torpedo, and it had to be a dud. And it's quite an experience.

Marjorie Green:

I guess. Did you feel a lot of pressure or stress during this time?

James Alvin Jolly:

Well, I was too young to know the difference.

Marjorie Green:

To know the difference? Do you recall the day your service ended?

James Alvin Jolly:

Well, you see, it's sort of was a gradual thing. The -- we did get reports onboard ship and so we knew when -- when the war was over with Germany. And we knew the day the war was over in Japan. But I continued to sail then and after the war was over. In fact, my last ship was the Young America which was a troop ship which was bringing home troops from South Korea. And so we went. We'd go to South Korea, and then we moved over to Japan and came back to the United States. So that was my -- my last ship that I was on. And so it was sort of a gradual thing. I left the -- left the Merchant Marine then, signed off, and didn't go back anymore. And came home to my young bride.

Marjorie Green:

Yes. Tell us how you met your wife.

James Alvin Jolly:

Oh. Well, it's the same Hilmar where I went to high school. And where I -- you know, was an amateur radio operator and so on. But in my senior year there, they hired a teacher. A young attractive teacher. And she had her sister that had come to live with her while she was teaching. And her sister happened to be Rose. And her sister -- I took some of her sister's classes, and her sister sort of liked me, I guess. And she introduced me to Rose, and that's where our friendship started. And all during the war, we communicated by letter, and a couple times I got to come home and have a couple weeks off. And then on one of these trips, we got married in 1945.

Marjorie Green:

So you were married after the war?

James Alvin Jolly:

1945. In January 14th, yeah.

Marjorie Green:

Okay. After your service ended, what did you do in the week -- days and weeks after your service ended?

James Alvin Jolly:

Well, I was uncertain what I wanted to do. And one thing that was a little difficult for all of the people in the Merchant Marine is, the GI Bill did not apply to them. And it wasn't until 1988 that the Congress decided to give full recognition to the Merchant Marine, and we are regular discharges and all of the rest of that. That happened in 1988. So my first thought -- well, I had all these licenses and I had been studying broadcast licensing, too, while I was at sea. And when I had the chance I took the exams from the Federal Communication Commission. So I thought that would be an opportunity for me, and there was a school in San Francisco that was a trade school that taught people to -- to be operators and so on in radio stations. So I went there and took that, but I already had my license, and so, you know, they let me be an announcer and run the disks and do these kinds of things there. And --

Marjorie Green:

And what station was this?

James Alvin Jolly:

Pardon?

Marjorie Green:

What station was this?

James Alvin Jolly:

Well, it was -- it was a school station.

Marjorie Green:

I see.

James Alvin Jolly:

See, the school owned it and it was for training purposes. And it was a nonprofit public kind of -- kind of thing. And, well --

Rose Jolly:

Well, no. It was Samuel Gompers.

James Alvin Jolly:

Samuel Gompers was the name of the trade school, yeah And then, well, I wasn't too sure about that, and I thought, well, you know, when you're at sea there’s got to be -- there's a code station that takes messages in those times. A messages went back and forth between the ships. And so I thought, well, maybe I'd like to be an operator on one of the coast stations. So I went down and interviewed with the -- the man at the -- in charge of -- of the KPH. The station that was out at Bolinas and he said, "Okay. Fine. Go on out there." He made arrangements for me, and I went out to Bolinas on a day that was appointed and spent a day out there. And then he said, "Well, after you've been out there, why don't you come back and see me?" So I went back to see him then maybe a week later. And he looked at me and said. "Son, you need to go back to college. You don't want to do that." So I took his advice. I had already put in a year at -- well, the university. It was the College of the Pacific at that time and Stockton College, which was the junior college -- it was on the same campus. So that was the logical place for me to go back. Furthermore, my brother lived in Stockton and he worked at the state hospital; and so I could live with him. So I went back there and went back to school and started working on my degree for -- for -- I wanted to get a scientific degree, and one thing that helped out is because of my radio experience, they were building a new radio station, public radio station at College of the Pacific. And so I got hired as a technician working at the radio station, and because I was the technician -- was part of the -- hired by the university or the college there, then I got free tuition, and free tuition would have been something I couldn't afford. So that worked out -- worked out fine for me. And I graduated with a -- with a degree in physics.

Marjorie Green:

In physics. Okay. How did you get into the business administration part of the California State University of Sacramento?

James Alvin Jolly:

Well -- when I left there, I went to work for a company in San Bruno which was called Imac (ph). And I was a research scientist in their engineer -- in their research lab for quite a bit of time. And then I became interested in management kind of things and they sent me to a special school at Michigan, University of Michigan, for a while. And I worked myself up to be a manager, and I was director of the -- of the microwave activity there for a while during this 19 years. But I went back to college, and I was going to night school and so on at the University of Santa Clara. And I got all my credits and so on. I got a master's degree, and then I continued on for my PhD. And then I finished everything then and took a leave of absence from -- from the company which was acquired by Verion (ph), which is a large company that exists today. And when you have all of your academic work done but not your thesis, well, you can get a job in the academic world, assuming that you're going to finish your thesis within a year or so. And I went to the Naval Postgraduate School as an assistant to a professor down there. And during the first year I got -- finished any dissertation, became a full PhD. I stayed there for seven years. And then the opportunity came to come up here to Sacramento, and because of my engineering background and my industrial experience, they were very interested to have me come here in the School of Business, and it's now the College of Business here now. And I taught analytical kind of courses. I was teaching statistics. I taught research methodology kinds of things that fit in with me and yet it was part of the School of Business. I stayed there for 14 years before I retired.

Marjorie Green:

Did your military experience influence your thinking about war or about the military in general?

James Alvin Jolly:

Well, I'm a great supporter of the idea that freedom isn’t for free. You've got to fight for it and I’ve never had any reservations about what we did in the war to save ourselves from the Nazis and the Germans and the Japanese. In fact, for many, many years I've been very, very opposed to anything from the Japanese. I know that that was a different culture and I know we've got a new generation and all of this, but the idea of buying anything that was Japanese made -- really bothered me for many, many years. And -- but I know, you know, like, Toyota. They’ve got factories here and they hire a couple thousand Americans in there. But I wouldn't buy a Toyota car. And that's a carryover, because the Japanese were very, very -- well, I want to say that the Germans had a different attitude when they sunk a ship. If you succeeded in getting off the ship and getting into a life raft and if it was quite a ways from shore, they might even come by with their submarine and give you some water and some food, hoping that you might -- they wouldn’t pick you up but they would help you out a little bit. The Japanese would machine gun you and destroy anybody that didn't make it, unless you could hide in the water or whatever. So that -- that really turned me off with respect to any relationship with -- with the Japanese at that time. And, of course, you know all the war stories about the -- about the prisoners and all of that so --

Rose Jolly:

Ted --

James Alvin Jolly:

I don't think I have anything more to say about that.

Rose Jolly:

Ted Fujimoto, your friend in high school.

James Alvin Jolly:

Yeah. I had a very good friend in high school, and we were buddies. And he -- he was taken into prison camp, because when they took all the Japanese. And so he wrote me a letter and said, you know, "I can't write to you anymore because I'm in this camp and they would consider it bad for you to try to be communicating with a Japanese." It wasn't from his point of view, but he didn't want to hurt my reputation. And later on, though, he was successful and volunteered and was in that all-volunteer Japanese group that were in Italy that made a good name for themselves. And many, many years, I didn't find him, but then eventually I did, and I know where he is now and he's --

Marjorie Green:

Oh, good. Is there anything you'd like to add that we've not covered in this interview?

James Alvin Jolly:

Well, the Japanese in the South Pacific was a very, very difficult war, and we were there when one of the major troop ships was -- was destroyed. Picked up some of the -- we lost, I guess, several thousand people there. No. I don't think there's much more I can say. That's all history. And we were just really, really lucky.

Marjorie Green:

Well, Mr. Jolly, I want to thank you very much for sharing your story with us. It's been quite enlightening and will add a lot to future generations.

James Alvin Jolly:

Well, you’re certainly welcome.

Marjorie Green:

Thank you.

 
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