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Interview with Thomas H. Begay [4/25/2013]

David Talas:

Hello, my name is David Talas, I am the Native American special emphasis program manager for Native Americans through the EEO program. Today we have Thomas Begay to my right here, and his son Gerald Begay. Mr. Begay here is a World War II Native American Navajo Code Talker, and today we just wanted to bring him here to share some of his stories, and share some of his experiences as a Navajo Code Talker. Mr. Begay, yá'át'ééh.

Thomas H. Begay:

yá'át'ééh, _______. [shakes hands with Talas]

David Talas:

Gerald.

Gerald Begay:

Hello. [shakes hands with Talas]

David Talas:

So Mr. Begay, would you mind sharing with us your experiences as a Navajo Code Talker?

Thomas H. Begay:

Yes, sir. I'm very honored to be here with all of you, and I want to thank the VA, the staff, all the people that are involved with the good health system that they have for us veterans - World War I, World War II, and other conflicts. I was a young man in 1943, I couldn't get a job at the Flagstaff Ordnance Depot - Bellemont, Arizona. I went there many times, a man kept telling me "you're too young, you're too young" - just like a record player. So I told him, I said "I want to show you - I'm going to join the Marines, because I'm old enough!" He wouldn't budge, he wouldn't hire me at all. But I went home to Gallup, New Mexico--I'm from south of Gallup, they call it the Checkerboard area, where it's not the reservation, it's off-reservation. West of us and north of us is the Navajo reservation. My parents they lived there since the return from Bosque Redondo. My grandmother, my grandfather settled there - it's out in a remote area, only by horseback you go out there to find a hogan where I was born. I understand I was born at home in a hogan when the snow was maybe six or eight or twelve inches. And my grandmother delivered me sometime around 1926 or '27. They didn't know how to read or write, so they didn't put down the birth - the month, and the day, and the year. So I was born at home and my age was flexible, so I went and told the Marine recruiter "I want to join the Marines." And I told him I would like to be an aerial gunner, he said "sure, we're looking for--you're just the man that I see in the bubble shooting down the Japanese Zero!" I believed him, he processed me, and I told him "my name is Thomas H. Begay, I'm Navajo." "Sure," he said, "we're looking for you." The Marines are the outfit that are "first to fight" they say, and so I joined the Marines. I went to boot camp, my first time on a train. I guess there were berths on the train, but I didn't sleep in it because I didn't know I had a bed. I sat up all night going to California. Finally, there's a conductor, he said "why didn't you sleep in your bed?" I said "I didn't know I had a bed." I got out, and he said "go eat." There was a whole line--many people--and they came and they checked tickets. I guess I had a special ticket, they pulled me forward and said "eat anything you want on the train." That was the introduction to the new way - the new life, new involvement. I got to San Diego, checked in, the bus was waiting by the train - "United States Marine Corps," all dressed in blues - sharp. I looked at them, and "maybe I'll wear one of those blues" I thought. And we went through boot camp, my first experience--I didn't like butter because of the boarding school I went to, they served butter, I didn't like the taste of it. The Marine mess sergeant was standing by where you throw your garbage, he stopped me and said "why didn't you eat that butter?" "I don't like it" I say. "Did you know there's a war? You're going to like it - you eat it right there!" he says. "Yes, sir!" So I just put it in my mouth and "oom!" [makes swallowing motion] went down the hatch! So I went through boot camp, then they sent me to a line camp after boot camp - Camp Pendleton. All the orders were "report to Building So-and-so" so I did. And here was a whole bunch of Navajos in there - I didn't know none of them, they were from some other location out there on the reservation. And a sergeant says "you are going to be a Code Talker." I said "I didn't sign up to be a Code Talker, I don't want to be a Code Talker! I want to be an aerial gunner." "Too bad!" he said, "you're here. If you run off, we're going to find you, we're going to shoot you for desertion during wartime." I said, "yes, sir!" So I stayed. And here the Navajo Code was easy for me, because I grew up on the reservation with my mom, my dad - they don't speak English, they don't read or write. I already knew the wording, so it was easy for me to go through and memorize. You go by memorizing it, you don't carry a book in your hip pocket for the code, they picked up the code worksheet every day after class. It was restricted, and you don't talk about it, the newsmen were barred from interviewing us. They can take pictures, but they said "no, you don't tell them nothing about the Navajo Code, because it's a secret project." So we memorized 250 to 300 terms, they tested me, in no time I was out and ready for combat. I was assigned to the 5th Marine Division - it was activated in November 1943 at Camp Pendleton, Oceanside, California. So that's where I was, I got ready for the combat training, and we had a special training for Code Talkers in that unit. They got us a rubber boat, I guess, and they just dumped us way out in the ocean and said, "you make it back - inflate your rubber boat, and then come to the shore. Because you're going to be going in submarines and other ways to get into combat, so you're going to have to learn all these techniques, learn how to get to the shore. And then fight with your buddies when he comes to the shore - throw him around, throw you around," all that stuff. So this is how we were trained, and besides being Navajo Code Talkers we had to learn semaphores, flat hoist, panels, switch board, telephones - the EE-8, the blinker, and Morse code - "da da dat da daa dat da da dat dat dat", you know, all that stuff. So that's the way they trained us, then we qualified, and we were sent over to a combat unit. I would say out of 100 Navajos, there was about 30 or 25 failed - I don't know why. They cannot catch on to the Code that they developed. Besides that, we had to develop additional code during the training. So with my unit--the 5th Marine Division--we used 508--I have a codebook that shows 508 with the division. Then I learned that the 1st Division, 2nd Division - they only have two hundred and some code words. But those code words that are made--the new ones--they didn't reach the Code Talkers already overseas. Because the Code would remain in the United States, because they were afraid that it might get in the hands of the enemy of the United States, the Japanese. So they kept everything in the United States, at Camp Pendleton - they locked that Code every time that you used it, and you put it back, but you memorized it. So this is how we used the Navajo Code. And during the landing on February 19th, 1945, 0900, prior to that--H-Hour they called it--we had to set up our radios, get the frequency going, everything working, testing, up to before landing. Then we get on a boat, 9 o'clock start going in circles, and hit the beach. Our beach assigned to us was Green Beach - Suribachi [motions with hand to the left], Red 1 and 2 were next to it, and we started landing at 0900. I was scared, I got numb from head to toe. Numb - I don't feel nothing, so if I got hit maybe I won't feel it. On the first day we lost two Code Talkers shot, three wounded. Some of you may have seen the Windtalkers bodyguards - we had no bodyguard. So I told the other Code Talkers, I said "maybe you guys were back there with the Red Cross drinking coffee and cookies." When we landed on Iwo Jima, we were in combat and we had no bodyguard. The sniper got you, they got you; if the mortar got you, artillery, whatever weapon they had, he got us. There's all kinds of Marines at the beach, covered up - it makes you scared. I was scared, afraid, but I kept up with my radio - checking in with the ship. I went on the USS Cecil going to Iwo Jima, and stayed there on the island 38 days - February 19th, 1945 to 27 March 1945. The history says that the battle was over on Iwo on March 16th or so - it's not so, I was there - 38 days. So that's the--I learned a lot, I was scared, I had no bodyguard, I had to guard other Marines like anybody else. They guard me, I guard them - I went out there with the infantry. So that's how we used the Navajo Code. We sent close to 800 messages without a mistake. Our commanding officer--Captain Howard M. Connor was my commanding officer of the Signal Company--he made a statement "if it wasn't for the Navajo Code Talkers Iwo wouldn't have been taken. For the first 48 hours they sent close to 800 messages during the battle--initial battery--without a mistake." So that's the comment we got from our commanding officer for 5th Marine Division. He got promoted to Major, he got a Bronze Star; I didn't get anything - only combat experience. [laughs] So that's the story on the Navajo Code Talkers. The training was hard, not anybody can go through, only certain ones made it, so that's the group of famous Navajo Code Talkers.

David Talas:

So Mr. Begay--

Thomas H. Begay:

Yes, sir.

David Talas:

Could you share with us maybe some of your Code Talker encryption - could you speak it in Navajo for us?

Thomas H. Begay:

Yeah, it's like--for example--Iwo Jima was a new island, so we had to spell "Iwo Jima" in Navajo. We have an alphabet - A down to Z. So to spell "Iwo," it'd be "I" - "a-chi" which means intestine; "gloe-ih" for "W," which means weasel; "O" is "ne-ahs-jah" - owl. Letter "J" - "tkele-cho-g," a... donkey. [laughter] "Jackass." And then "itch" for letter "I," "M" a mouse - "na-as-tso-si"; "a-chi" is "I"; then "A" is "na-as-tso-si" - "mouse." So we had those words already, we knew--we didn't have books on us--we just have to spell it out. So that's how you spell one of them. Like requesting artillery fire or something like that on hill so-and-so we have already. Some of them you spell it out, and some you--the new words, you have to spell it out. It's easy!

Gerald Begay:

What was the letter "A"?

Thomas H. Begay:

"Wol-la-chee" - "ant" - the red ant or black ant, I don't know which one, but it was ant, A-N-T, "wol-la-chee." Or "be-la-sana"-- [break in recording]

Thomas H. Begay:

--to eat, you know, it's good. [laughter] So we had everything all--you learned it by memory. If you don't learn, you ask them to spell it out or something like that. Because I know one individual with 3rd Division, he said he didn't learn one word - "bring - B-R-I-N-G." He kept repeating, he said "I don't know what it meant." We had "ba-nah-ah," (ph) that means "give it to the individual." He didn't know the word "brought." So anyway, those are some of the experiences that I had using the words. We used 508 code words that we memorized during the war. It was in the Marine Corps history about our division taking Mount Suribachi - 28th Marines was assigned to do that. We had Code Talkers with that unit - each regiment they had a unit, a recon company, that had Code Talkers. So everywhere we have Navajo Code Talkers assigned to. I do not know how the 1st Marine Division used Code Talkers, or the 2nd, or the 3rd, or the 4th, but I know our commanding officer - how he distributed Code Talkers evenly with the units that were going to land--to make the first landing, we have a group of Navajo Code Talkers there. Then we have a headquarters - General Keller E. Rockey was my commanding general, he was a very good general. And there was a photograph at his headquarters - on the beach, he's on the telephone. They identified me, I was standing with a group, in one of those big history books - "PFC Begay" it says. [laughs] And the others they have lieutenants, and they have other--on the beach, the photograph, in one of those big Iwo Jima history books. So I was there, and for each unit we have a list with every man in the unit - 28th Marines, 27th, 26th, Headquarters, we're listed - rank, name, all in the history book on Iwo Jima. In fact, Major Connor wrote the book - he made a report, and we have a book, and they sell them in Nashville, Tennessee. I forgot the name of the--Battery Press, they have 5th Marine Division invasion history book--it tells you who was there. So if I see a Code Talker say "I was there!" I say "okay, let me see if you were there." [mimics flipping through a book] No, I'm just kidding! [laughs]

David Talas:

So Mr. Begay, could you tell us about your medal? Could you share that?

Thomas H. Begay:

This one here [touches Congressional Silver Medal hanging from necklace on his chest] is Congressional Medal from Congress of the United States. It's a Silver Medal with our patch - this patch right here [points to Navajo Code Talkers Association patch on his shoulder]. The patch is designed with the Navajo origin - when they came into the world: black world, blue world, yellow, and white. And this here is a telephone - jash-cheen (ph). At that particular time, they already have a cell phone - a cell phone, jash-cheen (ph), which means telephone. And this rainbow traveled by the Twin Warriors that eradicated the killing monsters of the Navajo people on this earth. So that's how it's designed, a lot of people don't know about it, they say "hey, what's that?" Indian artists and all--but it's designed--it's a sand painting, you use it for healing people that become sick, in the Navajo way. We have healing ceremonies--a lot of them--that we have for our own people, we have medicine men. We had many medicine men a long time ago. Today they are very limited out there, they have some, but they--[gestures with hands to indicate uncertainty]--I guess they are, that's what they say - that they are medicine men. But a long time ago, we had a medicine man that cured--for example, we had some healing ceremonies out there approved by the VA, I think there's 13 of them. The Good Way ceremony, which makes you--when you're sad, when you don't feel good, when you have PTSD, you have a Good Way ceremony. They also have--they call it N'daa - Enemy Way ceremony, if you have problems with bad dreams, all kinds of bad effects, they're supposed to eradicate that PTSD - N'daa. Then there's several others - I'm not a medicine man, so I don't know about a lot of those ceremonies. What else do you want to know, sir? [laughs]

David Talas:

Mr. Begay, how do you feel about the experiences with coming back to the United States, and not being able to tell people about what you did?

Thomas H. Begay:

It was confidential until 20 years later, until they released the information about the Navajo Code - I don't know why. But when we left they told us "you don't reveal nothing, even though you're family." I had the family, and I had my kids here - Ron, I forgot to introduce my sonny boy here, Gerald, Captain Gerald Begay, US Army, Lieutenant Colonel Ron Begay, my granddaughter Sandra J. Begay, and my granddaughter there. I didn't forget them, I was supposed to this at the beginning. [laughter] I didn't know what to say--no, I'm okay! [laughs] So that's--as far as I know--it was kind of rough coming back from winning the war, with all of us involved--everybody in the United States, no matter what nationality, no matter what tribe. I think there's one flag, one nation, one of us - all. But, there was no employment - you stand in lines a mile long with everybody. Ours was the worst as Native people - we don't have anybody out there, I mean we don't have any industry or nothing. So a lot of the former servicemen, they went to the city - Los Angeles or elsewhere, to find employment. So after that, I couldn't find a job, I went back to school at Sherman in Riverside, California - Indian school. I was going to high school, and they closed the school. [laughs] So I found my way, working here and there, and finally I said "to heck with this stuff!" I went and joined the paratroopers in the US Army. I went to a recruiter and I said "I understand there's 50 bucks a month?" He said "yeah, you jump out of airplanes for 50 dollars a month." So I said "okay, I'm going to make a little extra money." So I joined the Army in California, and they sent me to Fort Benning, Georgia after a refresher course. I didn't do anything, they just.... It was a rough training - August to October, running, running, exercise. I felt sorry for our elderly, there were some officers - they were lieutenant colonels, captains, they barely--[makes panting noise]. [laughter] And then one of my instructors says--he looks out there, we were all at present arms, I was like this [makes hand salute]--he came up to me and he says--he looks out there and he looks at me, and he says "there's no damn Indians out there! Are you looking for the Indians!?" "No sir!" He says "you give me ten push-ups!" Even if you do or you do not, you still give him ten push-ups. [laughter from audience] I guess it's comical, I didn't get offended. [laughter] No such thing then. I went through, August until October - I packed my own chute, jumped with it, they said "if you don't pack it right, it's your fault!" [laughs] So we had to pack it right. Then we had glider training, so I had both of them - parachute wings and glider. Here [gestures at pins on his chest].

David Talas:

Now Mr. Begay, is there any kind of funny story you would like to share with us about your experiences?

Thomas H. Begay:

Well, there was one on Iwo. This boy said--I think he was from the state of Washington--they called us "Chief" - so we Indians, we were all chiefs. [laughter] The Navy didn't like it when we were on the boat - he would say "I'm the Chief, you're a ____." [laughs] So he said, "well, Chief, what do you think he should have done with all this?" I said, "if I was your chief, we would have stayed home!" [laughter] "We wouldn't have to be here!" That's one of them. [laughter]

David Talas:

Do you want to share another one?

Thomas H. Begay:

There's too many of them, I forgot them. [laughter] Sorry, sir.

Unidentified speaker:

Did the Japanese know you existed?

Thomas H. Begay:

What was that?

David Talas:

He was asking if the Japanese knew you existed?

Thomas H. Begay:

Well, we had books--very short course, Japanese--we had handbooks given to us when training in--we were stationed at the Big Island of Hawaii on top of the island. By the way, it's not like what you see in the movies or advertising - nice, all palm trees and beach. Up there on top of the island it's a desert up there, and that's where we had training - they have cactus and things like that up there, in Hawaii. So that's one of the things that you see about Hawaii, but I was stationed there, so we had combat training. The only time that we went to the beach was when we had training to hit the beach - in Maui, we'd go to Maui. [laughter] So we had a handbook - a yellow one, about this size [makes about a four-inch square with his hands], about four by four. We had the basic Japanese, like how to arrest someone, how to say "attention," "come here." I remember one word, attention - "ki o tsuke!" You know, like that. Attention, stand at attention, things like that. _____+ means "come here," you know, and all that stuff.

David Talas:

So your son Ron said that you know how to speak Japanese?

Thomas H. Begay:

Oh, yeah! Wakarimasu--watashi wa Nihongo wakarimasu. I took Japanese, and the Army tested me, and I passed on reading and writing, and understanding. So we kind of interpreted for the troops over there. [laughs]

David Talas:

Your son is saying--Ron is saying--that you could sing a song for us, maybe, if that's okay? In Japanese.

Thomas H. Begay:

Which one? Japanese? [sings in Japanese for 10 seconds] That's all I know [audience claps]. But I made it on the History Channel - I was singing a song about Iwo Jima in Navajo. I'm one of the head singers for a group of Code Talkers in Navajo, so we have--I sang about Iwo Jima about--in Navajo, we made songs. My wife and I made "Remember Pearl Harbor" in the Navajo language, because a lot of Navajo veterans, they request that - they wanted the "song and dance" they call it, for a gathering in recognition of veterans at halftime. So we developed songs like an airplane song, Vietnam song, aviation song, Airborne song, Marines Hymn - we made those songs into Navajo. My wife even made a national anthem in the Navajo language - she was invited to the Cardinals and Chicago Bears - she sang before the game with the color guard. Yeah, we did all that kind of thing in the Navajo way - Navajo, you know, the doing. Which one do you want to hear? [laughter]

David Talas:

Well, if you're offering to sing one, I think I would love to hear it.

Thomas H. Begay:

Okay, I'll sing "Iwo." [stands up] I'll stand by myself, I know he got--it went like this - [sings in Navajo for 50 seconds] - it's something like that [applause from the audience]. What we said is "remember Iwo Jima - we raised the United States flag there. And the Navajo Code Talkers were part of the capturing of Iwo Jima" - that's how the song goes. Then "Remember Pearl Harbor" is that you say [sings in Navajo for ten seconds]. "Remember Pearl Harbor," that's how the song goes, it says "over seas, across the ocean" - that's how the wording is, the tó éí ííná. Tó is "water" in Navajo, "over there" is the other side. So that's how the wording is. So we did that, and then we--the Department of the Defense, the Department of the Army sent us to Korea to put on a program. We were entertainers after we retired - my wife and I. In Japan, and then we dedicated the Saipan memorial in 1994--I think, yeah, that's when OJ was driving down the I-5. We were on television being interviewed when that came out - on Saipan. That's how I know that he was driving a white vehicle on there. He said "interruption for the United States"--we were on Saipan, we were dedicating the memorial for all servicemen. So they sent us over there - the governor invited us over there. They were Chamorro - they're like native people--there's other nationalities, like Filipino, Japanese, and others--but Chamorro are the people that lived on the--you know, like Indians, they're native people. So they had us go over there to dedicate--they wanted the Code Talkers included, so we went over there. Then in 1995, we went back to Iwo Jima. They had this special vehicle take us up to the top of Suribachi. My wife sang the national anthem up there, and then the Marine Corps Commandant was promoted there--I forgot which one. There were a lot of servicemen, there were a lot of four-stars out there boy, there was a whole bunch of general officers there. So it was something.

Unidentified speaker:

Were all the Code Talkers Navajo?

Thomas H. Begay:

They had to be! They had to be, because they were the only ones that knew the Navajo language. And we were told not to talk about it, talk to nobody. So we actually had a code, we didn't have the other--I guess--Code Talkers you'd call them, there were other tribes that came out of the woods one day when we put on our Navajo Code Talkers recognition. There was some people from Washington, some people from South Dakota, all over - they came to Quantico, Virginia, we dedicated a Code Talker building over there. There was a bunch of them who I had never heard of - Code Talkers, you know? I don't know - I don't know them, but I understand the historians call them "language talkers" or some kind of--you know. There is a difference - there's a code, an actual code, and then there's non-code - they just made up--a couple guys came up with something. So I don't really know the story on those, I never met one. I did meet a group of Indians in Oklahoma, they were from the First World War - we met with them one time. They took us over there to meet the other Code Talkers from World War I, and there was--but I never saw their code, so I don't know.

Unidentified speaker:

Ira Hayes was not Navajo, he was Pima, wasn't he?

Gerald Begay:

Ira Hayes - was he a Navajo?

Thomas H. Begay:

No, he was a Pima - he's from over here--the reservation. He was a wireman, but he was with the Code Talkers. We have--in the 28th Marines--we have Cohoe, Teddy Draper, some other guy--but yeah. He was a wireman, he would string the wire, put up telephones, he wasn't a Code Talker.

Unidentified speaker:

He raised that flag on Suribachi.

Gerald Begay:

Was he the flag-raiser on the second raising? Did you see him, or was it the other guys?

Thomas H. Begay:

Yeah. The other guy - Joe ____ was over him when he was stringing wire up there, when they called him up to [makes raising gesture]. He said "they pulled him out," he said "we were pulling the wire up there." They had the EE-8 telephone, he said "we were pulling wire, then they called Ira." There he was on the flag-raising.

Unidentified speaker:

I have a question: do you have your Congressional Gold Medal on? Are you wearing it?

Gerald Begay:

This is the Congressional Gold Medal, correct?

Thomas H. Begay:

This is the Silver Medal.

Unidentified speaker:

How did you--I'm in my--well anyway, what does it say on it?

Thomas H. Begay:

[holds Congressional Silver Medal up that he is wearing around neck] It says "USMC World War II. Diné Bizaad Yee Atah Naayéé' Yik'eh Deesdíí." It means "they used the Navajo language in the war." That's what it says.

Gerald Begay:

What's on the other side? Nothing?

Thomas H. Begay:

I covered it. [laughter] This is a ___ coin - my wife's relative--they handed it to me, my wife says "give it to my relative, they'll fix something, they'll make something out of it." [laughter] So they made me a bolo tie, yeah.

Gerald Begay:

Dad, can you tell them about the uniform that Navajo Code Talkers wear?

Thomas H. Begay:

They say the yellow is corn pollen [stands and gestures to yellow shirt]. From corn, there's a pollen--the yellow, they use it to pray, they take one like this and it's like [raises hand in air] "father, son, the Earth"--Mother Earth, that's what they use for this uniform. This is ground [gestures to pants] - ?eezh, Earth, Mother Earth. So that's how they designed it. This I told you about [gestures to patch on right shoulder] - what it meant, it's a sand painting, it's a healing ceremony. But a lot of people, even Code Talkers don't know that--some of them--but they ask me a lot of times, "what does it mean?" "Okay" - I have to sit down and tell the story to let them know how it's made. Navajos always have a silver belt - any ceremony, like Ye'ii bicheii, which is a nine-night ceremony, and also the Good Way ceremony. They put on the--I guess it's back in the history, many years ago--this story that they were the gifts from the Holy People - all the turquoise and things like that. They use the turquoise--when they break it up--to give it to Mother Earth to cross the river--or something like that--if they don't know how to swim. But they're safe, they go across. Anything that happens, they use it to try to alleviate what's going to happen. That's what it means.

Gerald Begay:

Dad, how about your hat?

Thomas H. Begay:

The cap is for the Marine Corps - the United States Marine Corps, it represents the USMC. They wear this red at the Marine Corps Leagues and things like that. This is the eagle [points to Marine Corps emblem on cap] on top of the Earth, anchor - we're under the Department of the Navy. One thing I didn't tell you is that a long time ago the Marine Corps--you cannot get into the Marine Corps if you're an Indian, or a half-Indian, or a Black. We were barred from joining the Marines until President Roosevelt revised an Executive Order - so that's how we came about. That was the law, but Hispanics they can join, because I saw a lot of them - they were DIs when I went to San Diego for boot camp. So that's how we came about, finally got the--I guess they wanted to use Code Talkers, that's why they changed the law! [laughter] Yeah, the Indians were barred from the Marine Corps [pats Talas on the shoulder], did you know that?

David Talas:

No, I did not.

Thomas H. Begay:

Yeah, now you know - because President Roosevelt made an Executive Order, and then--

David Talas:

So Mr. Begay, I appreciate your dedication, your service to our country using the Native American language - the Navajo language. And thank you for sharing that with our audience, and I want to say "thank you" to your sons - Gerald--Captain Gerald Begay--your son Lieutenant Colonel Ron Begay, and your daughter, I can't remember--

Thomas H. Begay:

Yeah, my granddaughter - Shannon.

David Talas:

Shannon--

Thomas H. Begay:

--Begay, yeah.

David Talas:

--Begay. And I just want to thank you again for coming and visiting us at the Tucson VA.

Thomas H. Begay:

Thank you, sir. [applause] Thank you very much for the invitation [shakes hands with Talas]--and thank you for having this.

Unidentified speaker:

Semper Fi. [shakes hands with Thomas Begay]

Thomas H. Begay:

Semper Fi, young man.

 
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